Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

What killed the mammoths and other behemoths?
FR Post 6-6-2 | Interview with Ross MacPhee

Posted on 06/05/2002 3:34:28 PM PDT by vannrox

click here to read article


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-6061-8081-96 next last
I really doubt this. I am siding with the "Punctuated equilibrium" variant of catastrophism. Check out "Voice of the Rocks" by Robert Schoch.
1 posted on 06/05/2002 3:34:29 PM PDT by vannrox
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: vannrox; blam
FYI bump
2 posted on 06/05/2002 3:41:26 PM PDT by afraidfortherepublic
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: vannrox
*******
3 posted on 06/05/2002 3:42:21 PM PDT by remaininlight
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: afraidfortherepublic
Bump for read later tonight.
4 posted on 06/05/2002 3:44:42 PM PDT by blam
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: vannrox
The climate has changed radically at times when there was no extinction, and extinctions have occurred when the climate, at least roughly speaking, should have been benign. There is no question that there were catastrophic changes in temperature and probably in precipitation on many occasions in the past 100,000 years. We know that, for entirely natural reasons, temperature excursions of seven to 12 degrees Celsius occurred within that time period in the space of a century or less, which is basically 12 times the maximum rate of change in the last century of "global warming."

Global Warming is a Fraud Biggiddy Bumpiddy to the Tippiddy Toppiddy.

5 posted on 06/05/2002 3:52:23 PM PDT by KayEyeDoubleDee
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: vannrox
btw, do you have a link?
6 posted on 06/05/2002 3:55:45 PM PDT by KayEyeDoubleDee
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: vannrox
I think it was their body odor that did it...
7 posted on 06/05/2002 3:57:29 PM PDT by chilepepper
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: vannrox
I really doubt this.

Me too. The problem as I see it is that humans were not present in large enough numbers to pass these diseases on over such a large area -- it breaks down for the same reason that he gives for the over-hunting hypothesis.

Not that it's completely out of line, however: the American Indians were practically wiped out within a few decades by various "pox" diseases.

8 posted on 06/05/2002 3:59:42 PM PDT by r9etb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #9 Removed by Moderator

To: vannrox
extremely lethal disease, brought over by humans

Of course...of course...it had to be humans. I can't for the life of me understand why I didn't see it before.

10 posted on 06/05/2002 4:05:14 PM PDT by scouse
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: r9etb
I'm sceptical, but not entirely disbelieving of this. The humans wouldn't necessarily have had contact with all the animals. Just infect a few, who roam within their habitats, and infect others. Just like the Spaniards didn't travel all the way into the Continental US, but smallpox certainly did via trade routes. Good book on this subject btw...

Armies of Pestilence
11 posted on 06/05/2002 4:05:31 PM PDT by Black Agnes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Black Agnes
Over 100 specie of flora and fauna go extinct everyday.
12 posted on 06/05/2002 4:06:10 PM PDT by Barbie Doll
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: vannrox
What killed the mammoths and other behemoths?

we all know drilling for oil in alaska killed them
13 posted on 06/05/2002 4:07:48 PM PDT by TheRedSoxWinThePennant
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: scouse
Yes, it was humans. However, this might put the lie to the whole myth of the benevolent natives who did nature no harm until the white man appeared...On the downside, it would appear to assist the 'humans are evil no matter what' VHEMT goobers.
14 posted on 06/05/2002 4:08:44 PM PDT by Black Agnes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Barbie Doll; sauropod
Cite please. Facts. Name those flora and fauna!
15 posted on 06/05/2002 4:09:30 PM PDT by Black Agnes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: vannrox
Well, it wasn't me. My mammoth gun was in the shop.
16 posted on 06/05/2002 4:12:03 PM PDT by Billthedrill
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Black Agnes
My university professor who taught Environmental Ethics said so, therefore, I cannot cite URL references. Sorry.
17 posted on 06/05/2002 4:12:38 PM PDT by Barbie Doll
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: Barbie Doll
So you're not an eco-wacko? Next time please put in a sarcasm so we know you're not a troll...:)
18 posted on 06/05/2002 4:14:30 PM PDT by Black Agnes
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: scouse
Of course...of course...it had to be humans. I can't for the life of me understand why I didn't see it before.

It's simple.

Humans brought internal combustion engines, the exhaust of which warmed things so much that the ice age wooly mammoths sweat to death.

Or possibly mammoth flatulence (barf!) caused a greenhouse effect which heated things up so much the mammoths sweat to death.

Or.........whatever.

19 posted on 06/05/2002 4:22:50 PM PDT by Ole Okie
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: vannrox
"SA: So, in your opinion, even if the first Americans were highly skilled hunters, could their population sizes and the population sizes of these animals have been such that overkill would even be plausible?

RM: The answer is no, by any scenario. I don't care how early you want people to get into the New World, thereís absolutely no evidence of a positive sort that they were there in huge numbers. In fact, it has to be the opposite, whereas the animals, in some cases, had distributions that were continent wide. Some of the ground sloths, for example, are known from as far south as Mexico and from as far north as the Yukon. The notion that people in whatever numbers and with whatever intent could have come in and slaughtered enough sloths in every possible habitat where they lived in numbers sufficient to cause their extinction--this is unbelievable to me.

Hell - He doesn't WANT to admit the possibility/probability that early man killed them off. (See, if that were so, then early man WASN'T the perfect little innocent twho loved nature and lived co-equally with until Columbus came along and polluted the whole continent with those evil, nasty, European capitalistic christian ideas of free enterprise.

I've seen the other figures that show easily that a small band, moving at less than 300-500 miles PER YEAR could kill every large animal population in only few thousand years (between the 12,000 BC arrival to the 9000 BC death. In doing so, they'ed only need kill a reasonable fraction of each population each year ... no more than done now in Africa by the early tribes there.

20 posted on 06/05/2002 4:23:38 PM PDT by Robert A. Cook, PE
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-2021-4041-6061-8081-96 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson