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To: slowry
Which came into existence first, the states, or the federal government?

With the adoption by the 2nd Continental Congress of the Declaration of Independence, 13 independent British colonies became states under the US Congress.

What came first? I’d say Congress came first.

8 posted on 06/20/2002 2:51:43 PM PDT by Ditto
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To: Ditto
Yeah, that's why they had to vote the constitution into existence.
9 posted on 06/20/2002 2:54:37 PM PDT by slowry
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To: Ditto
With the adoption by the 2nd Continental Congress of the Declaration of Independence, 13 independent British colonies became states under the US Congress.

What came first? I’d say Congress came first.

So you point to the Declaration. The one that calls the states FREE and INDEPENDENT. (Wasn't it Lincoln that pretty much led the way in not referring to the United States, and instead called it Union?)

I've never heard anybody call the "Continental Congress" the "U.S. Congress" before. Did you just do that?

I believe our form of government started in 1788, that's when our Congress was put in place. Not 1776.

I'm sure you know several of the states have their own separate constitutions going back to 1776.

16 posted on 06/20/2002 9:21:46 PM PDT by slowry
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To: Ditto
The Continental Congress was not a federal government. The states existed before the US Constitution was ratified and it was ratified by the states. The federal union was created in the articles of the Constitution. Lincoln couldn't admit this or his entire claim of supremacy for the federal government had no basis.
41 posted on 06/22/2002 7:03:06 AM PDT by Twodees
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