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To: Non-Sequitur
Do you have a link to support that double jep. stuff you're selling? Never heard of that one.

The truth is that Andrew Johnson pardoned Davis, just before a 3 judge panel could be assembled to vote on whether or not to indict him. Many wanted him tried, but those who looked into the Union's case started having second thoughts. After the pardon, they quickly lost interest. It was a convenient excuse not to try him, since he would have proven secession to be constitutional.

A voluntary Union is a more Perfect Union.

187 posted on 06/26/2002 5:31:16 PM PDT by H.Akston
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To: H.Akston
There are several excellent biographies of Davis which go into the details of his post-war legal issues to one extent or another, like "Jefferson Davis, American" by William Cooper. Here is a website which also gives a fairly detailed overview of the situation. Johnson never pardoned Davis, either. He just delayed acting on the issue, the trial of Davis remained on the court docket until 1869. As for Davis himself, he was never pardoned having never been convicted of a crime. But he did have his citizenship restored by Jimmy Carter, for all the good that did.

As for a trial, if there is anyone who thinks that Davis would not have been convicted if placed on trial then they are unbelievably naieve. And such a trial would have done nothing to prove or disprove the legality of secession. Than was decided by the Supreme Court in 1869. It's illegal.

190 posted on 06/26/2002 7:15:50 PM PDT by Non-Sequitur
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