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Dollar going down fast....under 107... chart link
INO Charts ^

Posted on 06/25/2002 8:10:33 PM PDT by BlackJack

With Worldcom news out, futures down and US Dollar going down hard tonight. Click INO Charts


TOPICS: Business/Economy
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1 posted on 06/25/2002 8:10:33 PM PDT by BlackJack
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To: BlackJack
What is worse is if you look at a longer term chart. Really shows the sharp sell off and the bottom drops out.
2 posted on 06/25/2002 8:19:21 PM PDT by TBall
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To: BlackJack
Gotta wonder if foreign investors have ZERO confidence in Bush.

I suspect this is the case.
3 posted on 06/25/2002 8:21:11 PM PDT by gjpino
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Comment #4 Removed by Moderator

To: BlackJack
Sell,sell,sell,.....................................

Buy,buy,buy

5 posted on 06/25/2002 8:22:41 PM PDT by mdittmar
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To: BlackJack
Nasdaq is down 5% in after hours trading....
6 posted on 06/25/2002 8:24:19 PM PDT by Mulder
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To: BlackJack
Nasdaq 1423.99 -36.35 Closed Chart
DJIA 9126.82 -155 Closed Chart

These numbers are truly getting troublesome. When did we hit 9,000 on the DJIA, like 3 years ago? Every time the NASDAQ loses 15 points (which is nearly every day lately) it loses over 1% of it's value.


7 posted on 06/25/2002 8:27:18 PM PDT by AAABEST
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To: gjpino
I would have to say it has nothing to do with Bush. The fundamentals (honesty & integrity) say it all. We must reap what we sow. "NAZ" 1000 soon.
8 posted on 06/25/2002 8:27:30 PM PDT by davisdoug
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To: Mulder
Nasdaq is down 5% in after hours trading....

Ouch .... is it really?

9 posted on 06/25/2002 8:28:09 PM PDT by AAABEST
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To: gjpino
Clinton set us up for this. Too many fools with too much paper money.
10 posted on 06/25/2002 8:28:48 PM PDT by TBall
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To: gjpino
I suspect that most foreign investors are smart enough to realize that the identity of the U.S. president has almost nothing to do with how they will make their investment decisions.

The U.S. dollar is plunging for two reasons: 1) interest rates in the U.S. are at or near historic lows, and 2) corporate America's earnings estimates are an absolute joke.

As you hunker down and savor these thoughts, I intend to continue over-weighting my stock portfolio with small caps -- as corporate America collapses, savvy investors are going to realize that small companies with simple balance sheets and well-defined product and service lines are the only places that produce anything close to reliable financial reports.

11 posted on 06/25/2002 8:28:58 PM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: AAABEST
Quotes here
12 posted on 06/25/2002 8:30:52 PM PDT by Mulder
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To: BlackJack
Punt Scotland.

USA this year. Never been to Montana or the Dakotas.

We can play anywhere. This year my bucks stay home.
13 posted on 06/25/2002 8:32:17 PM PDT by lizma
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To: gjpino
It isn't Bush, it is a stock market that is still overvalued by 35% or so.
Eventually it has to hit the real bottom before it goes up.

People's desire and perception of the market were not realistic and it has to hit the fan some time. IMO!
14 posted on 06/25/2002 8:36:19 PM PDT by A CA Guy
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To: gjpino
Gotta wonder if foreign investors have ZERO confidence in Bush.

I suspect this is the case.

They're trading Dollars, not Presidents. Has little to do with who's in the White House, at least to sane people.

15 posted on 06/25/2002 8:37:56 PM PDT by meyer
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To: TBall
It also makes our products cheaper on the world market. That will enhance our exports and give a boost to the economy and create jobs.

A high value dollar subsidizes foreign exports into this country.

16 posted on 06/25/2002 8:38:21 PM PDT by Parmy
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To: AAABEST
Wanna buy some fancy, crispy paper?
17 posted on 06/25/2002 8:38:43 PM PDT by meyer
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To: gjpino
I believe the dollar will hold up better than the Euro particularly if there are terror attacks in places like the U.K., Germany, Italy and France. Fear is a big motivator. Right now money is seeking a more stable and conservative equilibrium.

When the Frogs and Italians see bombs going off they will panic again. They can run to the Suisse but then they give away interest .... Maybe then they might run back here. Where are they gonna run?

By the way, back in 1997 I knew some Swiss securities dealers. They told me over $ 500 Billion a week in U.S. dollars were flowing out of Russia and into Swiss banks. Where is that money now? It has already been invested into the U.S. market and then taken out of the U.S. market .... so where is the Russkie money?

18 posted on 06/25/2002 8:39:19 PM PDT by ex-Texan
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To: meyer
Wanna buy some fancy, crispy paper?

LOL

NOPE. Actually I like land and the improvements that go with it. Why do you think they call it REAL property?

19 posted on 06/25/2002 8:42:09 PM PDT by AAABEST
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To: BlackJack
INO Charts are great.

I've been watching tonight with morbid fascination.

Spooky.
20 posted on 06/25/2002 8:43:51 PM PDT by d4now
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To: Alberta's Child
I suspect that most foreign investors are smart enough to realize that the identity of the U.S. president has almost nothing to do with how they will make their investment decisions.

The U.S. dollar is plunging for two reasons: 1) interest rates in the U.S. are at or near historic lows, and 2) corporate America's earnings estimates are an absolute joke.

As you hunker down and savor these thoughts, I intend to continue over-weighting my stock portfolio with small caps -- as corporate America collapses, savvy investors are going to realize that small companies with simple balance sheets and well-defined product and service lines are the only places that produce anything close to reliable financial reports.

I'd add 3: There's some uncertanty over whether or not there will be another terrorist attack in the US.

Good post, Alberta's Child! It just so happens that I'm big on 4 things myself: Cash, Small caps, mid caps, and a little physical precious metal. I've always been a bit conservative with investments anyways, though I was lucky enough to rebalance my 401k more heavily towards cash in Feb of 2000.

21 posted on 06/25/2002 8:44:13 PM PDT by meyer
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To: monkeyshine
bump
22 posted on 06/25/2002 8:45:03 PM PDT by d4now
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To: AAABEST
Why do you think they call it REAL property?

Well, in that case, I think your opportunity will arise shortly if you have the dough. I think my 'hood got built just in time as I think that the building industry needs to hunker down for a couple of years.

Oh, and I actually do have some rather fancy crispy paper form the 1980's. It says "LTV" on it. Its from before the first bankruptcy.

23 posted on 06/25/2002 8:47:33 PM PDT by meyer
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To: AAABEST
Actually I like land and the improvements that go with it. Why do you think they call it REAL property?

If you lived in Hong Kong, you would have seen that real property decline in value by up to 60% over the past few years.

24 posted on 06/25/2002 8:48:14 PM PDT by Black Powder
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To: Black Powder
If you lived in Hong Kong, you would have seen that real property decline in value by up to 60% over the past few years.

Buying opportunity?

25 posted on 06/25/2002 8:48:59 PM PDT by meyer
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To: ex-Texan
Ooop! Meant $ 500 Million a week not the B word.
26 posted on 06/25/2002 8:49:54 PM PDT by ex-Texan
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To: BlackJack
Thanks for the "ino.com" link -- I hadn't heard of them before, and they have good charts.
27 posted on 06/25/2002 8:51:49 PM PDT by ThePythonicCow
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To: meyer
If you lived in the bay area in 1990 you would have seen the same results. Supply & Demand and other factors do play into the sceaniro. Been to Hong Kong. We have more land, better diverisfication and only those we can squash.
28 posted on 06/25/2002 8:52:19 PM PDT by davisdoug
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To: meyer
There's some uncertanty over whether or not there will be another terrorist attack in the US.

That's an interesting point, but I think this point tends to be overemphasized. When you think about it, what good will it do anyone to have yen or euros in their pockets if the world's largest, most affluent consumer base is under duress? I think any savvy investor will realize that the rest of the world would be impacted by a terrorist attack on the U.S. far more than the U.S. would be impacted itself.

As I look at all of the indicators I see a declining stock market and a declining dollar, but a robust real estate market and unemployment rates that are the envy of the world. Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems to me that the rest of the world is telling us that our government is sh!t and our major corporations are sh!t, but our nation is still very strong.

29 posted on 06/25/2002 8:53:42 PM PDT by Alberta's Child
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To: meyer
If you lived in Hong Kong, you would have seen that real property decline in value by up to 60% over the past few years.

Buying opportunity?

Only if you expect the value to rise within a reasonable amount of time, which it won't.

Reminds me of a friend who bought Nortel Networks at $20/share after it dropped from $80 because he thought it was a buying opportunity. Nortel shares are currently somewhere between 2 and 3 dollars.

30 posted on 06/25/2002 8:55:15 PM PDT by Black Powder
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To: marcleblanc
Actually a weak dollar is good for the US economy too. It will help take money from other economies by making US products less expensive.

This is part of the business cycle. We need this to help our economy. We've been sending our money out bigtime during the 90's...now it's time to get some of it back.

31 posted on 06/25/2002 8:55:36 PM PDT by for-q-clinton
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To: TBall
One of the Dem mantras of the 92 campaign was that the prosperity of the Reagan years "wasn't real" because it wasn't sustained....

I'd laugh, but my income is tied to the markets.

32 posted on 06/25/2002 9:00:04 PM PDT by Skip Ripley
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To: Alberta's Child
As I look at all of the indicators I see a declining stock market and a declining dollar, but a robust real estate market and unemployment rates that are the envy of the world. Maybe I'm wrong, but it seems to me that the rest of the world is telling us that our government is sh!t and our major corporations are sh!t, but our nation is still very strong.

Its really weird, but I'm afraid that too many people have a very short memory. We are pretty close to where we were, what, a couple of years ago as far as foreign exchange is concerned. That is certainly not the end of the world.

Foreign investors are pulling out a bit, but not due to faith or lack of faith in the US. They are pretty big into the stock market as well as T-bonds. Basically, the US money and stock markets have attracted tons of foreign investment and that has been what has sustained the dollar v. other currencies.

I really think that the rest of the world is basically putting their money where they think it will do the best, just like any other investor.

BTW, a devalued dollar isn't the end of the world; it makes US manufacturing cheaper as compared to foreign manufacturing. IOW, it might improve the trade balance a bit.

33 posted on 06/25/2002 9:01:56 PM PDT by meyer
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To: Alberta's Child
Trade deficit about 1 billion a day.....and now the budget deficit
is running 1 billion a day. Thats the reason for the fall of US dollar.
Non-US investors will sell US stocks because its a double hit for them.....down stock + down dollar. Markets will go down a lot from here.....commodities will do better over next couple years. Weak dollar could spark inflation.....or.....falling demand could lead to
deflation. We might see deflation first.....then hyperinflation.
Or.....I could be wrong! Who knows.
34 posted on 06/25/2002 9:03:04 PM PDT by BlackJack
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To: Black Powder
Its so hard to find the bottom...
35 posted on 06/25/2002 9:03:22 PM PDT by meyer
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To: Black Powder
If you lived in Hong Kong, you would have seen that real property decline in value by up to 60% over the past few years.

The idea that one should be able to make a lot of money off of investments in a short period of time is an unwise and probably a fairly modern concept, even the bible says something about slowly plodding.

I don't know about Hong Kong, but my property is my property no matter if a Nuke landed tomorrow. Real property is real, with the exception of California which is not a real place.

Every time a tenant pays rent, and you use that rent to pay principle they're putting money in the bank for you in the form of equity. Every time the value of the property goes up your net worth increases. Every time we have inflation your net worth and your rent goes up. When we have defaltion your rents don't go down, (although you may have more trouble keeping qualified tenants). Every dollar above the loan payoffs and expenses is postive cash flow.

All for mundane task of walking to your mailbox every month and plucking out a check. I don't see how you can beat that.

Disclaimer: I'm just some schmuck with 2 stupid pieces of property (working on a third I hope) who doesn't know much about economics but knows a little bit about property.

36 posted on 06/25/2002 9:07:02 PM PDT by AAABEST
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To: Alberta's Child; meyer
Care to give some examples of small caps?

Is there a list?

Do these small cap companies' shares sell under a certain price?

I take it IBM isn't a small cap.
37 posted on 06/25/2002 9:08:54 PM PDT by WillaJohns
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To: BlackJack
Or.....I could be wrong! Who knows.

I don't think you're wrong about the deficit spending. Why would free marketeers be confortable with our government growing nearly out of control? Why should they feel that we're any different than Europe anymore? Freemarketeers like freedom, not huge deficits and big government.

Mattafact, at least the Euro-supjects have their socailism built into their pathetic system.

We were always looked upon as "different". Maybe us being not so "different" any more has some second guessing. I don't know how much this has to do with what's happening but I know it has something to do with what's happening.

38 posted on 06/25/2002 9:12:41 PM PDT by AAABEST
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To: WillaJohns
I take it IBM isn't a small cap.

LOL!

39 posted on 06/25/2002 9:14:03 PM PDT by AAABEST
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To: gjpino
You give a President too much credit. The world used to have more confidence in our government, corporate, and financial institutions than they did their own. But our institutions have revealed themselves as sorely lacking, and now there is no stability premium attached to the dollar. Bush might be wise to put aside his grand plan to finish what his daddy started in Iraq and put some attention into figuring out how to restore some confidence in our government,financial, and religious institutions which are stinking up the country and giving the Eurotrash the satisfaction of believing that the United States is no longer morally superior to what is acceptable by their pathetic bureaucratic standards of operation.
40 posted on 06/25/2002 9:15:08 PM PDT by Biblebelter
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To: AAABEST
Just to mention....I was surprised to learn the EU nations actually
have a small TRADE surplus.....thats better than the US. EU is also
running budget deficits as they are more socialist.....but.....the fact that they don't have a huge trade deficit makes the Euro look better. These are interesting times. I never bought into this
"service economy crap".....we can't export services. We have been
losing Manuf jobs every year for decades. What the hell can we export besides raw logs, subsidized grain and software? We are in deep shit. Remember.....Prosperity is Just Around the Corner!
Sound familiar? Can you say "double dip"?
41 posted on 06/25/2002 9:21:15 PM PDT by BlackJack
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To: BlackJack
Hi friends. All this good ol' money talk has me wondering what I can do with some little chunks of pure gold nuggets my grandma gave me. They aren't big at all, but I am thinking I can at least sell them so I can buy a few packs of guitar strings or something. Where would one go about selling this type of stuff, just head to the nearest jewelry shop??? Thanks for the help folks.
42 posted on 06/25/2002 9:23:24 PM PDT by UofHoustonRepublican
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To: BlackJack
Buy GOLD Now!
43 posted on 06/25/2002 9:46:48 PM PDT by GoldMan
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To: Parmy
It also makes our products cheaper on the world market. That will enhance our exports and give a boost to the economy and create jobs.

That would be great if we actually produced something in this country to export.

44 posted on 06/25/2002 9:47:59 PM PDT by lewislynn
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Win the game and your complete registration fees are covered for FRiva Las Vegas.


45 posted on 06/25/2002 10:57:04 PM PDT by DoughtyOne
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To: BlackJack
service economy crap= Carny Capitalism

Carve up the cow long enough and before you know it ya cant milk her.

46 posted on 06/26/2002 2:45:34 AM PDT by mindprism.com
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To: Alberta's Child; meyer
Psychological factors, like CONFIDENCE play huge roles in markets. Foreigners have little confidence in Bush.
47 posted on 06/26/2002 5:49:11 AM PDT by gjpino
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To: gjpino
I think that's a stretch. Some of the more vocal socialists in Europe don't like Bush, but that has nothing to do with confidence. Besides, its irrational to equate "confidence" in a President with private investments in corporations unless that country is a radical third-world country like Zimbabwe. And the US ain't Zimbabwe.

What people have lost confidence in, if anything, is the highly inflated earnings reports that we've seen being exposed over the last several months. There's a great fear that there are a few more Enron/Worldcom situations, and the fear is not unfounded. When a huge auditing company decides to cook books, there's trouble in paradise.

Besides, its high time that the Clinton bubble got burst anyways. It was certainly a house of cards and unsustainable.

48 posted on 06/26/2002 6:02:36 AM PDT by meyer
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To: gjpino
Foreigners have little confidence in Bush.

What is your agenda?

Investors don't care about Bush's politics. They only care about markets. Presidents have almost zero influence over markets or the markets would always be rising.

49 posted on 06/26/2002 6:07:08 AM PDT by Dog Gone
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To: gjpino
Confidence certainly does play a huge role in markets, but I'm quite sure that any foreign investor who bases his investment decisions on his "confidence" in the President of the United States has probably never had more than $100 to his name anyway.
50 posted on 06/26/2002 6:54:10 AM PDT by Alberta's Child
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