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Sen. Leahy: West Nile Outbreak Could Be Terrorism
Newsmax.com ^ | Sept. 12 ,2002 | Carl Limbacher

Posted on 09/12/2002 5:56:05 PM PDT by honway

Sen. Leahy: West Nile Outbreak Could Be Terrorism

Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Pat Leahy, D-Vt., said Thursday that he suspects the recent outbreak of West Nile virus that has killed more than 30 Americans across the nation this summer is the work of terrorists.

"I think we have to ask ourselves, is it a coincidence that we're seeing such an increase in West Nile virus. Or is that something that is being tested as a biological weapon by the terrorists?" Leahy said in an interview with WKDR (Burlington, Vt.) radio host Mark Johnson.

"There are some people who, credibly, feel [the West Nile outbreak] is a test of our defenses and is a biological weapon."

Just as host Johnson attempted to grill the Vermont Democrat on his West Nile theory, the interview was interrupted by coverage of President Bush's address to the United Nations.

"I've never heard anybody mention West Nile virus as being a possible terrorist attack. What makes you say that?" the Vermont radio talker asked.

"It may be coincidence, the sudden increase [of West Nile cases]. Some of the same people who have ...," Leahy began to explain, just as WKDR broke in for coverage of the Bush speech.

Leahy unveiled his concerns about West Nile terrorism while recounting the anthrax attacks of last fall, when his Senate office was targeted by a weapons-grade sample of the deadly bioweapon.


TOPICS: News/Current Events
KEYWORDS: westnile
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To: dennisw
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51 posted on 09/16/2002 8:09:08 PM PDT by Lady GOP
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To: honway
Q: What are West Nile virus, West Nile fever, and West Nile encephalitis?

A. West Nile virus is a flavivirus commonly found in Africa, West Asia, and the Middle East. It is closely related to St. Louis encephalitis virus found in the United States. The virus can infect humans, birds, mosquitoes, horses and some other mammals.

Most WNV infected humans have no symptoms. A small proportion develops mild symptoms that include fever, headache, body aches, skin rash and swollen lymph glands. Less than 1% of infected people develop more severe illness that includes meningitis (inflammation of the spinal cord) or encephalitis. The symptoms of these illnesses can include headache, high fever, neck stiffness, stupor, disorientation, coma, tremors, convulsions, muscle weakness, and paralysis. Of the few people that develop encephalitis, a small proportion die but, overall, this is estimated to occur in less than 1 out of 1000 infections.

52 posted on 09/16/2002 10:47:59 PM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: honway
Old Disease Definitions with brief descriptions of symptoms

Old Diseases Defined 

This is a list of old diseases and their definitions
that may be helpful to you in your research.

Acute Mania Severe insanity
Addison's Disease

 

Marked by weakness, loss of weight, low blood pressure, gastrointestinal disturbances and brownish pigmentation of the skin.
Ague
Recurring fever & chills of malarial infection.  Also known as "Chill fever", "the Shakes".
American Plague Yellow fever
Aphonia Laryngitis
Apthae Thrush
Apoplexy Paralysis due to stroke
Atrophy Wasting away or diminishing in size
Bad Blood Syphilis
Bilious Fever
A term applied to certain intestinal and malarial fevers. (Typhoid, malaria, hepatitis for elevated temperature)
Biliousnes Jaundice or other symptoms of liver disease
Black Fever
Acute infection with high temperature and dark red skin lesions and high mortailty rate.
Blak plague Bubonic plague
Black pox Black Small pox
Blood Poisoning Bacterial infection; Septicemia
Bloody flux Bloody stools
Bloody sweat Sweating sickness
Brain fever Meningitis or typhus
Bright's disease kidney disease
Camp Fever Typhus
Cancer A malignant and invasive growth or tumor.
Canine Madness Hydrophobia
Carditis Inflammation of the heart wall
Catalepsy Seizures/trances
Cerebritis Inflammation of cerebrum or lead poisoning
Child bed fever Infection following birth of a child
Chin cough Whooping cough
Cholera Acute sever contagious diarrhea with intestinal lining sloughing.
Cold plague Ague
Colic
Paroxysmal pain in the abdomen or bowels.  Can occur from disease in the kidney.
Congestion

An excessive accumulation of blood or other fluid in a body part or blood vessel.  In congestive fever the internal organs become gorged with blood.
Convulsions
Severe contortion of the body cause by violent, involuntary muscular contractions of the extremities, trunk and head.
Congestive chills Malaria with diarrhea
Congestive fever Malaria
Corruption Infection
Crop sickness Overextended stomach
Croup
Spasmodic laryngitis, marked by episodes of difficult breathing and hoarse metallic cough.
Cyanosis Dark skin color from lack of oxygen in blood.
Cystitis Inflammation of the bladder
Day fever fever lasting one day
Domestic illness
Mental breakdown, depression, Alzheimers, Parkinsons or the after effects of a stroke.
Dropsy
Swelling with the presence of abnormally large amounts of fluid, often caused by kidney or heart disease.
Dropsy of the brain Encephalitis
Dry bellyache Lead poisoning
Dysentery Inflammation of the colon.
Eclampsia A form of toxins in the blood accompanying pregnancy.
Edema Swelling of tissues
Edema of lungs Congestive heart failure, a form of dropsy
Emphysema A chronic irreversible disease of the lungs
Encephalitis Swelling of brain; "sleeping sickness"
Epilepsy A disorder of the nervous system
Falling Sickness Epilepsy
Fatty Liver Cirrhosis of liver
Fits Sudden attack or seizures
Flux Dysentery.
French Pox Venereal disease.  Syphilis
Gangrene Death or decay of tissue in a part of the body---usually a limb.
Gout
Any inflammation caused by the formation of crystals of oxalic acid accumulating in the body.
Great pox Syphilis
Green fever Anemia
Heart Sickness Caused by loss of salt from the body.
Heat stroke
Body temperature rises and body does not perspire to reduce temperature.
Hives

A skin eruption of smooth, slightly elevated areas on the skin which is redder or paler than the surrounding skin.  A common cause of death of children three years and under.
Hydrocephalus Enlarged head, water on the brain.  Dropsy.
Impetigo Contagious skin disease characterized by pustules
Infantile paralysis Polio
Inflammation
Redness, swelling, pain, tenderness, heat and disturbed function of an area of the body.
Intestinal colic Abdominal pain due to improper diet.
Jaundice
Yellow discoloration of the skin, whites of the eyes and mucous membranes, due to an increase of bile pigments in the blood.
Kruchhusten Whooping cough
Lockjaw
Tetanus, a disease in which the jaws become firmly locked together.  Untreated, it is fatal in 8 days.
Long sickness Tuberculosis
Lung fever Pneumonia
Lung Sickness Tuberculosis
Mania insanity
Membranous Croup Diphtheria
Meningitis

Inflammation of the meninges characterized by high fever, severe headache, and stiff neck or back muscles.  Known as "brain fever".
Milk Fever Disease from drinking contaminated milk.
Milk Leg

A painful swelling of the leg beginning at the ankle and ascending, or at the groin and extending down the thigh.  It is usual cause is infection after labor.
Milk Sick
Poising resulting from the drinking of milk produced by a cow who had eaten a plant known as white snake root. 
Neurasthenia Neurotic condition
Palsy Paralysis or uncontrolled movement of controlled muscles.
Pericariditis Inflammation of the heart.
Phthiriasis Lice infestation
Phthisis Consumption.---Chronic wasting away.
Pleurisy Inflammation of the pleura, the lining of the chest cavity.
Pneumonia Inflammation of the lungs
Rheumatism Any disorder associated with pain in the joints
Rickets Disease of skeletal system.
Scarlet fever Disease characterized by red rash.
Scurvy Lack of Vitamin C.
Septic Infected.
Shakes Delirium tremors
Shaking Chills, ague
Ship's fever Typhus
Small pox Contagious disease with fever and blisters.
Teething
Often reported as a cause of death in infants. Symptoms were restlessness, convulsions, diarrhea and painful and swollen gums.
Tetanus
An infectious, often-fatal disease caused by a specific bacterium that enters the body through wounds.
Thrombosis Blood clot inside a blood vessel.
Thrush
A disease characterized by whitish spots and ulcers on the membranes of the mouth and tongue cause by a parasitic fungus.
Toxemia of pregnancy Eclampsia
Typhoid Fever

An infectious, often-fatal disease, usually occurring in the summer months--characterized by intestinal inflammation and ulceration.
Water on brain Enlarged head
White swelling Tuberculosis of the bone
Winter fever Pneumonia
Womb fever Infection of the uterus.
Worm fit
Convulsions associated with teething, worms, elevated temperature or diarrhea.
Yellow jacket Yellow fever

53 posted on 09/16/2002 10:50:01 PM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: honway
Leishmaniasis, also known as "kala-azar", "black fever" or "black sickness", is a widespread infectious disease in tropical or subtropical regions, which is spreading into Southern Europe. Cases of Leishmaniasis have also appeared in other European countries, for example several hundred per year in Switzerland. The death rate is high and alarming because of an increasing resistance against the classical therapy with antimonials. A new cure for this fatal disease has been discovered in Göttingen/Germany by Prof. Hansjörg Eibl, Max Planck Institute for biophysical Chemistry, and Prof. Clemens Unger, a former member of the University Hospital. The possible help for millions of infected people comes from Miltefosine, a structurally simple molecule. Cure rates of nearly 100 percent have now been observed in patient studies in India (The New England Journal of Medicine, December 1999).
--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Leishmaniasis is one of several names for various tropical diseases, which are caused by flagellates of the genus Leishmania. The parasites are transmitted by sandflies, blood-sucking insects of the tropical and subtropical zones. The manifestation of the disease may be visceral (kala-azar), mucocutaneous (American Leishmaniasis) or cutaneous (Aleppo boil). The incubation time varies from several weeks to months. More than 12 million people suffer from the disease, many of them even die as a result of the lack of a successful therapy. The main drawback of the different treatment strategies is the development of antimonial drug resistance in combination with the complicated intravenious administration.

54 posted on 09/16/2002 10:54:27 PM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: honway
From Common Civil War Medical Terms comes this:

fevers: elevation of body temperature above normal.

Camp: included typhoid and many other diseases; a catch-all phrase. intermittent: recurring fevers; usually malaria was the cause. remittent: usually used to refer to malaria typhoid: a disease characterized by chills, fever, abdominal distention, and an enlarged spleen. yellow: acute infectious disease transmitted by mosquitoes in which the symptoms are jaundice, fever, and protein. Has two stages in which delirium and coma could be the results of the second one.

55 posted on 09/16/2002 10:58:39 PM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: honway
West Nile Fever–a Reemerging Mosquito-Borne Viral Disease in Europe

Zdenek Hubálek and Jirí Halouzka ,br> Academy of Sciences, Brno, Czech Republic

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

West Nile virus causes sporadic cases and outbreaks of human and equine disease in Europe (western Mediterranean and southern Russia in 1962-64, Belarus and Ukraine in the 1970s and 1980s, Romania in 1996-97, Czechland in 1997, and Italy in 1998). Environmental factors, including human activities, that enhance population densities of vector mosquitoes (heavy rains followed by floods, irrigation, higher than usual temperature, or formation of ecologic niches that enable mass breeding of mosquitoes) could increase the incidence of West Nile fever.

The 1996-97 outbreak of West Nile fever in and near Bucharest, Romania, with more than 500 clinical cases and a case-fatality rate approaching 10% (1-3), was the largest outbreak of arboviral illness in Europe since the Ockelbo-Pogosta-Karelian fever epidemic caused by Sindbis virus in northern Europe in the 1980s. This latest outbreak reaffirmed that mosquito-borne viral diseases may occur on a mass scale, even in temperate climates.

West Nile virus is a member of the Japanese encephalitis antigenic complex of the genus Flavivirus, family Flaviviridae (4). All known members of this complex (Alfuy, Japanese encephalitis, Kokobera, Koutango, Kunjin, Murray Valley encephalitis, St. Louis encephalitis, Stratford, Usutu, and West Nile viruses) are transmissible by mosquitoes and many of them can cause febrile, sometimes fatal, illnesses in humans.

West Nile virus was first isolated from the blood of a febrile woman in the West Nile district of Uganda in 1937 (5) and was subsequently isolated from patients, birds, and mosquitoes in Egypt in the early 1950s (6-7). The virus was soon recognized as the most widespread of the flaviviruses, with geographic distribution including Africa and Eurasia. Outside Europe (Figure), the virus has been reported from Algeria, Asian Russia, Azerbaijan, Botswana, Central African Republic, Côte d'Ivoire, Cyprus, Democratic Republic of Congo (former Zaire), Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Israel, Kazakhstan, Madagascar, Morocco, Mozambique, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, South Africa, Tajikistan, Turkmenia, Uganda, and Uzbekistan. Furthermore, West Nile virus antibodies have been detected in human sera from Armenia, Borneo, China, Georgia, Iraq, Kenya, Lebanon, Malaysia, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Sudan, Syria, Thailand, Tunisia, and Turkey (8-10). Kunjin virus is closely related to West Nile virus (11,12), representing a counterpart or subtype for Australia and Southeast Asia; some West Nile virus seroreactions in Southeast Asia may, in fact, represent antibodies to Kunjin virus.

Hundreds of West Nile fever cases have been described in Israel and South Africa. The largest African epidemic, with approximately 3,000 clinical cases, occurred in an arid region of the Cape Province after heavy rains in 1974 (23). An outbreak with approximately 50 patients, eight of whom died, was described in Algeria in 1994 (1). Other cases or outbreaks have been observed in Azerbaijan, Central African Republic, Democratic Republic of Congo (former Zaire), Egypt, Ethiopia, India, Madagascar, Nigeria, Pakistan, Senegal, Sudan, and in a few European countries.

56 posted on 09/16/2002 11:03:22 PM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: Reaganwuzthebest
Yeah...agree with you on that. Our sloppy border enforcement is an open invitation to West Nile, tuberculosis and other foreign bugs and nasties.
57 posted on 09/17/2002 1:36:15 AM PDT by dennisw
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To: NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
The 1996-97 outbreak of West Nile fever in and near Bucharest, Romania, with more than 500 clinical cases and a case-fatality rate approaching 10% (1-3), was the largest outbreak of arboviral illness in Europe since the Ockelbo-Pogosta-Karelian fever epidemic caused by Sindbis virus in northern Europe in the 1980s

Thank you for the information. The Romania case seems to be the most serious outbreak of the West Nile virus in a climate comparable to the U.S. climate. Romania is 91,725 square miles, approximately the size of Oregon. If the West Nile virus had been spread across the entire European continent in three years then our current experience would not be unique, however, it did not.

There is little question that West Nile is a naturally occurring virus. The unproven suggestion is that an enemy may have intentionally spread the West Nile virus in the U.S., since there are no historical precedents for a mosquito-borne virus to completely cover the U.S. in three years. Of course there is a first time for everything.

I am not convinced that established migratory bird patterns support the spread in three years, absent intervention. For example, birds do not migrate from New York to Oregon.

58 posted on 09/17/2002 5:56:45 AM PDT by honway
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To: honway

59 posted on 09/17/2002 6:01:15 AM PDT by honway
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To: honway
The Latest CDC information on West Nile virus in the U.S.:

1460 Laboratory positive human cases

66 deaths

60 posted on 09/17/2002 6:09:31 AM PDT by honway
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To: NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
For example, birds do not migrate from New York to Oregon.

I guess a better example for the moment would be that birds do not migrate from NY to Montana, however,heath officials in Oregon are expecting the virus in their state any day now.

61 posted on 09/17/2002 6:13:27 AM PDT by honway
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To: honway
Miraculous, really, how the terrorists have recuited innocent birds and mosquitos to do their dirty work for them. If only they knew!

Beyond the innocents, who's getting fingered here? The first outbreak is related to an Israel outbreak in 1998.

62 posted on 09/17/2002 6:20:41 AM PDT by Nebullis
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To: honway
I guess a better example for the moment would be that birds do not migrate from NY to Montana...

The process involves birds, mosquitos, and a virus. A single bird doesn't need to travel the distance. Several birds and mosquitos can. It's a small, small world.

63 posted on 09/17/2002 6:22:51 AM PDT by Nebullis
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To: honway
More - here's the infected-bird map found here.


64 posted on 09/17/2002 6:29:35 AM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: Nebullis
Please see post #56 above for a better description of the history of where this disease has been found. I should have posted the URL of the site where I found that information, but did the post so late last night, I was too tired to be thinking really straight :-).
65 posted on 09/17/2002 6:40:48 AM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: Nebullis
OK, I found the link.

West Nile Fever–a Reemerging Mosquito-Borne Viral Disease in Europe

66 posted on 09/17/2002 6:42:45 AM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: honway
From the above-linked site:

West Nile Virus Ecology

Arthropod Vectors

Mosquitoes, largely bird-feeding species, are the principal vectors of West Nile virus. The virus has been isolated from 43 mosquito species, predominantly of the genus Culex (Table 1). In Africa and the Middle East, the main vector is Cx. univittatus (although Cx. poicilipes, Cx. neavei, Cx. decens, Aedes albocephalus, or Mimomyia spp. play an important role in certain areas). In Europe, the principal vectors are Cx. pipiens, Cx. modestus, and Coquillettidia richiardii, and in Asia, Cx. quinquefasciatus, Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, and Cx. vishnui predominate. Successful experimental transmission of the virus has been described in Culiseta longiareolata, Cx. bitaeniorhynchus, and Ae. albopictus (8,13). Transovarial transmission of the virus has been demonstrated in Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, Ae. aegypti, and Ae. albopictus, though at low rates.

Virus isolations have occasionally been reported from other hematophagous arthropods (e.g., bird-feeding argasid [soft] or amblyommine [hard] ticks) (Table 1), and experimental transmission has been observed in Ornithodoros savignyi, O. moubata, O.maritimus, O. erraticus, Rhipicephalus sanguineus, R. rossicus, Dermacentor reticulatus, and Haemaphysalis leachii (8,13). 

Vertebrate Hosts

Wild birds are the principal hosts of West Nile virus. The virus has been isolated from a number of wetland and terrestrial avian species in diverse areas (7-10,14-16). High, long-term viremia, sufficient to infect vector mosquitoes, has been observed in infected birds (7,17,18). The virus persists in the organs of inoculated ducks and pigeons for 20 to 100 days (18). Migratory birds are therefore instrumental in the introduction of the virus to temperate areas of Eurasia during spring migrations (12,14-16,19).

Rarely, West Nile virus has been isolated from mammals (Arvicanthis niloticus, Apodemus flavicollis, Clethrionomys glareolus, sentinel mice and hamsters, Lepus europaeus, Rousettus leschenaulti, camels, cattle, horses, dogs, Galago senegalensis, humans) in enzootic foci (8-10). Mammals are less important than birds in maintaining transmission cycles of the virus in ecosystems. Only horses and lemurs (20) have moderate viremia and seem to support West Nile virus circulation locally. Frogs (Rana ridibunda) also can harbor the virus, and their donor ability for Cx. pipiens has been confirmed (21).

Transmission Cycles

Although Palearctic natural foci of West Nile virus infections are mainly situated in wetland ecosystems (river deltas or flood plains) and are characterized by the bird-mosquito cycle, argasid and amblyommine ticks may serve as substitute vectors and form a bird-tick cycle in certain dry and warm habitats lacking mosquitoes. Even a frog-mosquito cycle (21) may function under certain circumstances.

In Europe, West Nile virus circulation is confined to two basic types of cycles and ecosystems: rural (sylvatic) cycle (wild, usually wetland birds and ornithophilic mosquitoes) and urban cycle (synanthropic or domestic birds and mosquitoes feeding on both birds and humans, mainly Cx. pipiens/molestus). The principal cycle is rural, but the urban cycle predominated in Bucharest during the 1996-97 outbreak (2,3). Circulation of West Nile fever in Europe is similar to that of St. Louis encephalitis in North America, where the rural cycle of exoanthropic birds—Cx. tarsalis alternates with the urban cycle of synanthropic birds—Cx. pipiens/quinquefasciatus.

67 posted on 09/17/2002 6:45:23 AM PDT by NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
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To: honway
There were non-typical foci of the virus in 1999 when it was introduced. By now, that evidence, whether conclusive or not has surely been squelched by the CDC and probably it's Fan Club , ProMed . Note that the CDC has done nothing at all in four years to either track down the origin of WNV, control its spread or protect the people. Do you know why? The CDC was gutted under Clinton and replaced with affirmative action stooges and is incapable of doing even a rudimentary job. The agency sits in Atlanta, collects $4 Billion every year, is rife with nepotism and unearned high salaries , knows absolutely nothing and does absolutely nothing. Read The Virus Hunters for early background on Four Corners and hantavirus and look at the anthrax attacks during which the CDC gave out NO credible information at all and people died. Note the FBI is going into the Florida building , not the CDC. They are incapable. The CDC needs to be abolished as it is far too broken to be fixed. It is a NATIONAL CRIME that after four years there is no definitive work on a vaccine for WNV . I said CRIME. The CDC is guilty of malfeasance.
68 posted on 09/17/2002 6:54:26 AM PDT by chemainus
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To: NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
Thanks!

WNV is endemic in many bird populations around the world. I have a hard time even imagining how or why anyone would suspect terrorist involvement. But, it's coming from Leahy...

69 posted on 09/17/2002 8:42:19 AM PDT by Nebullis
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To: NotJustAnotherPrettyFace
Although, as far as I'm aware, the WNV strain in the US is not the European strain.
70 posted on 09/17/2002 8:43:45 AM PDT by Nebullis
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To: honway; Fred Mertz; rubbertramp
Salman Pak: In 1985, the CDC sent three shipments of West Nile Fever virus to Iraq for use in medical research. Valerie Kuklenski, "Western Firms Supplied Iraq with Chemical Weapons," UPI, October 2, 1990

could going to war with Iraq be the only way we can get put an end to all the chemical weapons we provided them?

71 posted on 09/17/2002 9:13:14 AM PDT by thinden
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To: Great Dane
As a terrorist weapon, it's not very efficient, most people don't even get sick from it.

gotta remember, these people are "low tech".

72 posted on 09/17/2002 9:15:59 AM PDT by thinden
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To: thinden
gotta remember, these people are "low tech".

HAHAHAHA...... but thats going toooooooo low, don't you think.

73 posted on 09/17/2002 9:49:21 AM PDT by Great Dane
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To: Nebullis
Additionally, in a 1998 book, Natumaleza Cubana, the author, Carlos Wotzkow, narrates how he was fired from his work as an ornithologist at the Institute of Zoology in the early 1980s. The reason, among others, his objection to a Castro order creating the Biological Front, an effort to develop viruses that could be carried by "host" birds or other means into the U.S. This work was assigned to the Institute of Zoology, and its institutional derivatives, in collaboration with the Pedro Kouri Tropical Medicine Institute. The question that comes to mind is why would Castro do that?

74 posted on 09/17/2002 12:07:13 PM PDT by honway
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To: honway
Senate Judiciary Committee Chairman Pat Leahy, D-Vt., said Thursday that he suspects the recent outbreak of West Nile virus that has killed more than 30 Americans across the nation this summer is the work of terrorists.



Or maybe a few mosquitos flew in the carbo area of a plane. Naw, let's assume someone attacked us with mosquitos - more fun that way.
75 posted on 09/17/2002 12:31:15 PM PDT by Hammerhead
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To: newsperson999
good. damn crows....especially at 6am on my roof!!!!!
76 posted on 09/17/2002 12:32:42 PM PDT by Hammerhead
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To: thinden
could going to war with Iraq be the only way we can get put an end to all the chemical weapons we provided them?

Unfortunately, I believe the answer is yes. I hope at least future Administrations will learn from our mistake in arming Saddam Hussein in the 1980's.

77 posted on 09/17/2002 1:52:34 PM PDT by honway
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To: honway
I would hope so too.
78 posted on 09/17/2002 7:44:29 PM PDT by Fred Mertz
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To: honway
More likely, Cuba. Cuba's doing West Nile research longer than anyone else... if anyone thinks this problem is limited to enemies in the middle east they're kidding themselves.
79 posted on 09/17/2002 7:48:52 PM PDT by piasa
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To: honway
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/755994/posts?page=1

U.S. Gave West Nile, Other Viruses, to Iraq

80 posted on 09/23/2002 8:47:22 PM PDT by honway
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To: All
On the Fox News Channel program "On the Record" tonight former Senator Riegle stated that the West Nile virus outbreak in the U.S. should be investigated as a possible result of the Iraqi biological weapons program.

As a member of the U.S. Senate, Senator Riegle invesitgated the U.S. transfer of anthrax, West Nile virus, and other biological agents to Iraq.

81 posted on 09/26/2002 7:43:57 PM PDT by honway
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