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The Deer Hunters: Freeper's Wild Game Recipes
10/3/02 | Dead Dog

Posted on 10/03/2002 10:12:37 AM PDT by Dead Dog

Hey Freepers, It's Deer Season:

Any of you guys have a favorite recipe for cooking, preparing, or aging wild game?


TOPICS: Editorial; Miscellaneous
KEYWORDS: game; hunting; recipes
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1 posted on 10/03/2002 10:12:37 AM PDT by Dead Dog
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To: Dead Dog
Stick a pheasant in the oven covered with cream of mushroom soup. Enough said.
2 posted on 10/03/2002 10:15:45 AM PDT by rudypoot
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To: Dead Dog; dighton; aculeus; Orual; general_re; Poohbah
"Any of you guys have a favorite recipe for cooking, preparing, or aging wild game?"

Tell it that Bill Clinton is eligible to run for President again ... or that Hillary is going to run in 2004 ...

I certainly know that hearing either one of those things would certain AGE me!

3 posted on 10/03/2002 10:16:04 AM PDT by BlueLancer
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To: Dead Dog; Vic3O3
Yuuummm! Fresh venison!

Hey Vic, you want to contribute your recipes? Or how about we do some advertising for Eddy and his venison snack sticks?

Here's hoping we put several of the antlered rats in the freezer this year!

Semper Fi
4 posted on 10/03/2002 10:16:14 AM PDT by dd5339
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To: rudypoot; dighton; aculeus; Orual; general_re; Poohbah
"Stick a pheasant in the oven covered with cream of mushroom soup"

Why would you want to cover your oven with cream of mushroom soup?
8')

5 posted on 10/03/2002 10:17:16 AM PDT by BlueLancer
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To: Dead Dog
When in hunting in Western Colorado, visit The High Lonesome Lodge.
6 posted on 10/03/2002 10:21:33 AM PDT by GSWarrior
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To: Dead Dog
I cut up onions, bell pepers, and celery in a pot and par boil the venison until tender. Then I place it on a grill and brown it over hickory wood.

This can be done with fresh meat. Otherwise I hang it in a cooler for 21 days.

7 posted on 10/03/2002 10:22:20 AM PDT by Chapita
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To: walkingdead; big ern; Poohbah
http://www.aces.edu/dept/extcomm/newspaper/venison.html

SAFE HANDLING, PROCESSING AND COOKING VENISON

AUBURN, NOV. 12---With deer season upon us, now is the time to think about how to process, store and cook venison to assure a tender, enjoyable product.

Alabama is one of the leading states for white-tailed deer. Deer are found in all 67 counties. With more than 200,000 deer harvested each year, the use of venison as an additional meat source is common.

Venison is usually obtained by three basic methods: slaughtered by a hunter, given to the consumer by a hunter, or purchased by the consumer. The first two methods occur regularly while the last method is less common. Presently, venison is not available to the consumer in Alabama because laws of the state prohibit the retail selling of fresh, wild game and its products.

When venison is obtained, sanitation should be careful considered. Many times, individuals that kill deer and choose to clean and process it themselves don't take the precautions necessary to ensure the wholesomeness of the meat.

If you process the deer yourself, it should be bled as soon as possible to ensure a quality product. After bleeding, the viscera and rear legs just above the scent glands should be removed. The body cavity should be washed thoroughly to remove all excess blood and residues.

Aging, is very important with respect to the eating quality of the venison. The meat should be aged for three to seven days at 32-36 F to improve the flavor and to permit enzyme activity to maximize tenderness. During the aging process it's also recommended that the hide remain on the carcass to prevent water loss.



After aging, the hide and as much fat as possible should be removed. The texture of the fat is similar to that of lamb. It is tallow-like and is sticky at room temperature. The fat also has a "wild" taste, which is not desirable to some people.

After aging, the carcass is ready for cutting into eatable portions. The portions should be double wrapped, using coated freezer wrap. The packages should be labeled, including the date and cut of meat, and frozen as quickly as possible.

If you don't process your deer, you may choose any number of deer processing plants or butchers and have processing done for approximately $35-45. The meat will be processed according to your specifications, packaged in portion sizes, dated and stamped "DEER--NOT FOR RESALE."

The nutritional content (protein, vitamins and minerals) of venison and beef makes them similar meat products. But there is usually a substantial difference in the amount of fat present. The difference being that venison contains a higher lean-fat ratio than a comparable cut of beef.

Different cuts of venison demand different cooking methods, which depend upon the tenderness of the cut. Tender cuts can be defined as those that come from less active muscle groups (loin). The less tender cuts come from more active muscle groups (shoulder, shank and neck).

The following are suggested methods of cookery for various cuts of venison.

Methods for tender cuts (steaks, chops):

Panfrying -- Heat frying pan until sizzling hot. Add 2 tablespoons of butter and place meat in hot pan. Sear on both sides, turning only once. Reduce heat slightly and finish cooking.
Roasting (round, loin) -- Season with salt and pepper and place on a rack in an uncovered pan. Cover surface of meat with bacon strips. Do not add water, and don't cover. Roast in slow oven at 300 F. Allow 20-25 minutes per pound.
Methods of less tender cuts (shoulder, shank, neck):
Stewing -- Cut meat into one-inch cubes, season with salt and pepper, sprinkle with flour, and brown in hot oil. Cover with boiling water, cover and cook slowly until tender. Do not boil. Add vegetables and cook until tender.
Braising -- Season with salt and pepper, rub with flour and brown in hot oil. Add small quantities of water (about 1 cup), cover and cook slowly until tender. Turn meat every 2-3 hours.
Venison can and should be a meat product used, or at least sampled, by all. With the consumer's constant concern for fat, the prospect for using venison as a meat source is becoming more than just a possibility.
For more information on deer processing, ask your county agent for a copy of Extension publication ANR-381, Field Dressing and Processing of Deer in Alabama.

SOURCE: Dr. William R. Jones, Extension Animal Scientist, and Chris R. Kerth, Assistant Professor, Animal Science

8 posted on 10/03/2002 10:23:57 AM PDT by Dead Dog
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To: Dead Dog
Only seven days until the opening of elk season!!!

Elk Bourguignon
1/4 lb diced salt pork
2 lbs elk chuck,rump, or round cut in 2' cubes
1-1/2 tsp salt
fresh ground pepper
2 Tbsps flour
1-1/2 cups dry red wine
1-1/2 cup
herb bouquet (1 carrps waterot, sprig of parsley, 1 bay leaf, 1/2 tsp thyme 1 clove
garlic, placed in cheesecloth and tied with string)
4 small onions cut in 1" peices
1/2 lb fresh mushrooms minced

Fry salt pork until crisp, drain and reserve drippings.
Brown elk slowly on all sides in 2 Tbsps of the drippings, sprinkle with salt, pepper and flour,toss to coat evenly. Place in heavy 2 quart casserole along with salt pork. Boil wine, water, and herb bouquet together, then pour over the meat.
Cover and bake at 350 until tender approx. 2 hours. Skim off all fat
Saute onions and mushrooms separately in a little of the fat for a few minutes.
Add onions to meat, bake another 30 minutes, add mushrooms, bake another 10 minutes.
Serves 4-6

9 posted on 10/03/2002 10:24:08 AM PDT by PrivateIdaho
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To: Chapita
Slice up some backstrap filets, pound them flat with a tenderizer and soak them in buttermilk for a few hours.

Then dredge them in salt and peppered flour and chickn fry them. Use the drippings to make venison cream gravy.

I guarantee it'll be one of the best things you've ever eaten.
10 posted on 10/03/2002 10:26:13 AM PDT by Zansman
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To: Dead Dog
Not a deer hunter, but I love venison.
My dad's brothers kill so many every year that they always give me extra.

I like to marinate the backstrap in buttermilk for a couple days, then rub it down with salt, pepper, rosemary and some garlic powder.
Then I wrap it in bacon strips and cook in the oven it sealed in foil, using relatively low (300°) heat, for 1-1/2 - 2 hours depending on size.

11 posted on 10/03/2002 10:28:26 AM PDT by Constitution Day
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To: Dead Dog
Dogrobber's Smothered Venison

2 lbs of venison (roast,chops or steaks)

2 large onions

1/2 package of onion soup mix

1 can Rotel Tomatos w/peppers

Optional- One sliced sweet red pepper

Brown the meat and place it in a bed of sliced onions in a baking dish. Put the sweet red peppers, Rotel tomatos and soup mix on top and then cover with foil. Cook at 250 degrees for at least one hour and then turn down to 225 and give it some more time. Its a slow bake thing and the longer and lower you cook it the more tender the game meat becomes. It works great on the somewhat tough 12 pointer that the Great Hunter takes in the fall. Serve with rice or potatos as there is a great pan juice to make a gravy with afterwards. Fine eating.

12 posted on 10/03/2002 10:38:39 AM PDT by Dogrobber
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To: rudypoot
CZECH VOMACKA SOUP (pronounced "Vo-MOTCH-ka")

2 cups diced potatoes
1 tablespoon minced onion
1 small clove of garlic
1 1/2 Cup milk, heated
1 egg
1 rounded tablespoon flour
1 pt. sour cream
Meat of one rabbit or two squirrels, cleaned and cut into bite-sized pieces

1. Cook potatoes, onion, and garlic in enough water to cover, about 10 minutes.

2. When potatoes are cooked, add hot milk

Beat the egg and flour until smooth and add enough sour cream to make one cup.

Mix well and add to potato mixture

Add meat, and simmer until meat is tender.

Garnish with sprinkle of parsley, chives, or grated cheese.

Serve with dark rye bread, fresh real butter, and a little vinegar to season soup with. Dark strong beer goes good here, too. Some cooks add diced carrots, celery, and green beans to soup.

13 posted on 10/03/2002 10:39:57 AM PDT by redhead
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To: Dead Dog
FYI Ted Nugent has a new book out "Kill it and Grill it" which is about the proper handling and cooking for game.
14 posted on 10/03/2002 10:41:41 AM PDT by dfwgator
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To: gc4nra
ping!

15 posted on 10/03/2002 10:41:57 AM PDT by AnnaZ
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To: Dead Dog
Just arrowed a doe this past weekend. Looking forward to trying some of these recipes.
16 posted on 10/03/2002 10:44:15 AM PDT by Axeslinger
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To: Dead Dog
Deer tartar
Kill deer
Slice meat
Eat
;^)
17 posted on 10/03/2002 10:48:02 AM PDT by Just another Joe
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To: Dead Dog
One of Dubya,s favorites; Possum with sweet potatoes;
One possum skinned and cleaned.
4 C. water
salt.
black pepper.
4 to 6 red peppers chopped.
4 large sweet potatoes,pared and sliced.
Combine all ingrediants except potatoes in large sause pan; Simmer 30 min.
Remove possum to baking pan;
Cook liquid till reduced by about half; Add liquid and potatoes to baking pan with possum. Bake in 350 degree oven about one hour or until possum is tender, basting frequently with pan liquids.
18 posted on 10/03/2002 10:56:31 AM PDT by Uncle George
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To: Dead Dog
My favorite for elk steaks (works for beef too):

Deep fry in a 60/40 mixture of butter and peanut oil. For me, the average porterhouse takes about 45 seconds to be fried perfectly. YMMV.

If you don't like that and have access to a wood cookstove (or something that gets VERY hot) you just heat up the stove top until it glows. Have a 50/50 mixture of salt/ground pepper (maybe a tablespoon each) and a handful of dried oregano nearby. (Turn on the ventilation or you'll be sorry.) Toss the salt/pepper and the handful of oregano on the cooking surface and drop the steak on top. About a minute or so per side and you're set.

The woodstove trick works good, but it is really best to have an outdoor set-up to do it on... otherwise you spend the next hour trying to get the smoke/ammonia (or whatever it is that salt gives off when you heat it like that) fumes out of the house. Try it though if you get the chance. Mmmm.

19 posted on 10/03/2002 11:02:43 AM PDT by Who dat?
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To: rudypoot
Stick a pheasant in the oven covered with cream of mushroom soup. Enough said.

Will that work for owl too?

I'm getting tired of the same ol "Spotted Owl Helper".

20 posted on 10/03/2002 11:06:56 AM PDT by FreeInWV
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To: Dead Dog
What a great idea for a thread, it's going to be a keeper for me.

Roast Saddle of Venison


Marinade

1 1/4 cups water
2 2/3 cups dry red wine
2 teaspoons mustard seeds
2 bay leaves
1 teaspoon thyme
2 onions, sliced
1/2 teaspoon pepper

Seasoning

2 cloves of garlic, cut in slivers
1 teaspoon salt

Sauce

To drippings in pan add:
1/2 Cup of Sour Cream
1 small glass of currant jelly
1 teaspoon of brandy

Trim all fat off the venison. Soak meat in marinade for 24 hours, turning occasionally. Cut deep slits in meat and insert slivers of garlic in meat; salt it, and place in a 350 degree oven. Roast uncovered until tender, about 2 hours for a young buck, 4 hours for an older buck, (time varies with age of animal), baste frequently with marinade and then with meat drippings. Remove meat and add sauce ingredients to drippings in roasting pan; cook till the mixture thickens. Spoon sauce over servings of meat.

21 posted on 10/03/2002 11:10:20 AM PDT by MissAmericanPie
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To: redhead
There was a Czech restaurant and hotel called Shumakers in New Prague, just south of our place in Minneapolis area. I liked to take my customers down there. Rabbit, elk, boar...you name it; it came with potatoes and creamy noodles.
22 posted on 10/03/2002 11:10:22 AM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: rudypoot
Stick a pheasant in the oven covered with cream of mushroom soup. Enough said.

Will that work for owl too?

I'm getting tired of the same ol "Spotted Owl Helper".

23 posted on 10/03/2002 11:12:05 AM PDT by FreeInWV
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To: Dead Dog
I process my own deer.

The deer should be cleaned and quartered ASA&P and packed into ice chests. Leave the drain open for all water to exit so the the meat is never wet. Continue with the ice chest for three days and keep up with the ice needed and drainage. If needed, you can use clean 1x2 wood to keep the quarters and other cuts off the bottom of the ice chest so that it will drain.

For each quarter, I cut out every muscle group as a single unit and cut away excess sinew. This is time consuming and requires the sharpest knife. Each of these muscle groups is packaged separtely and then frozen. Smaller units are packaged together for enough to make a meal. *Note that each backstrap is one muscle group, slice as needed for packaging.

When thawed, each of these muscle groups is cut at about 45 degrees and across the grain to a thickness of 1/2 inch or just less than this. Tenderize by pounding with a heavy glass drinking cup or a 'Bama jelly jar. Dip each tenderized steak in milk & egg and coat with seasoned flour. Fry slowly.

The smaller and lesser cuts, neck, ribs, and leg shanks are ground for hamburger meat for making other dishes.

I only process my deer for chicken fried steaks and hamburger. The most important part of all this is taking good care of the meat from the shot to the freezer.

24 posted on 10/03/2002 11:13:44 AM PDT by Deguello
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To: Dead Dog
Bump for later reading.
25 posted on 10/03/2002 11:20:25 AM PDT by Cloud William
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26 posted on 10/03/2002 11:20:45 AM PDT by Mo1
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To: Dead Dog
My brother in law makes a mean, tasty, Deer Jerky. If you haven't tried this you should.
27 posted on 10/03/2002 11:22:05 AM PDT by 1Old Pro
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To: MissAmericanPie
I had one of those "Roast Saddles" in a Cafe last night. Couldn't cut it with a Texas Chainsaw.
28 posted on 10/03/2002 11:25:11 AM PDT by Uncle George
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To: Dead Dog
Loose meat sandwich

1)Saute onions, mushrooms, bell peppers, and hungarian hot peppers in olive oil.
2)add 1 lb ground venison and brown with veggies and oil
3)drain and put in covered dish.
4)add shredded asiago, provalone, and mozzerella cheeses, and Open Pit Original bbq sauce. Mix, cover and let stand.
5)serve on steak buns
29 posted on 10/03/2002 11:43:28 AM PDT by DancesWithTrout
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To: FreeInWV
Cream of mushroom soup works with everything. Even loon.
30 posted on 10/03/2002 11:44:03 AM PDT by rudypoot
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To: rudypoot
Stick a pheasant in the oven covered with cream of mushroom soup. Enough said.

How do you get the mushroom soup off the oven when you are done?

31 posted on 10/03/2002 11:55:34 AM PDT by Blue Screen of Death
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To: Uncle George
Bless your heart, I'm sure they didn't cook it slow enough, and basting it often is absolutely essential to keeping it moist. I baste once every fifteen minutes.

Try my recipie, you'll change your mind about it.
32 posted on 10/03/2002 11:58:44 AM PDT by MissAmericanPie
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To: Eric in the Ozarks
Yep. Schumacher's is still there, and still in business. Pricey, but if you want to IMPRESS someone, take them there and perhaps even spend the night in their GORGEOUS rooms. Very, very nice.
33 posted on 10/03/2002 12:50:30 PM PDT by redhead
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To: dd5339
This is basically from Field & Stream...
2 venison tenderloins or backstrap steaks thawed.
1 bunch green onions
1 stick butter
1/2c Marsala or Red cooking wine (you can use real wine too)
1 tub of fresh mushrooms

Melt about 1/2 the stick of butter in a hot cast iron skillet. Sear the venison for 3-3.5 min/side, remove from pan on a warming plate. Chop up the green onions & mushrooms, melt the rest of the butter in the skillet & add the onion/mushrooms and saute. Add the wine and cook down to half. Then add the venison for another 2 min or so & serve!
34 posted on 10/03/2002 12:53:38 PM PDT by Vic3O3
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To: Dead Dog
Take your fresh killed deer, clean it well, butcher it, and put the meat in ice chests. Cover with water and ice. Leave it in the ice chests for three full days, changing the water every time it gets some color to it, and adding ice as necessary to keep the deer very cold.

After the three days, cut the meat into whatever cuts you like (I like thin steaks) season it with Tony Chachere's seasoning and some lemon pepper, then put it in a smoker and smoke it slowly using a lot of hickory.

umm, umm, good

35 posted on 10/03/2002 12:56:46 PM PDT by DETAILER
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To: Dead Dog
Anybody got a good recipe for venison roast (oven cooked, that is...)?
36 posted on 10/03/2002 12:57:04 PM PDT by Vic3O3
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To: dd5339; AdA$tra; rwfromkansas
Hey all you Freepers in NE Kansas, just a shameless plug for a great butcher shop! If you are hunters & tag out on a deer this year, I can personally recommend Winchester Meat Processing, in Winchester KS. That's 25mi due N of Lawrence, or 25mi W/NW of Leavenworth for those of you who don't know where Winchester is! Prices are reasonable, and the quality of processing is outstanding! Be sure to get some summer sausage & meat sticks! (no, I am not financially involved in this business--I'm just a loyal customer!)
37 posted on 10/03/2002 1:04:03 PM PDT by Vic3O3
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To: Chapita
How do you par boil something until it is tender?
38 posted on 10/03/2002 1:04:46 PM PDT by Old Professer
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To: BlueLancer
Tell it that Bill Clinton is eligible to run for President again

Does that mean it is open season on him?!
39 posted on 10/03/2002 1:11:01 PM PDT by AdA$tra
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To: redhead
My wife and I spent the night there after a two and a half hour dinner. The jetted tub, the little gas fireplace plus a bottle of wine...it was December and we had to open a window to let out some of the steam !
40 posted on 10/03/2002 1:11:10 PM PDT by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: Dead Dog
Fried quail, just like you would do chicken. Serve with grits & gravy.

Nothing better in this world!

41 posted on 10/03/2002 1:12:21 PM PDT by Pokey78
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To: MissAmericanPie
This sounds great. I'll have to try it. My favorite which I stumbled on by accident is to season a roast with garlic salt and ground cumin. Then I put it in the crock pot w/o water. Sprinkle in a handful of whole allspice and let it cook on slow all day. The flavor is great.

Plus you can use the drippings to cook some potatoes, carrotts, celery or whatever and save some drippings for a gravy. I've converted some non-vension eaters with this recipe.

Mrs. DE50AE
42 posted on 10/03/2002 1:21:08 PM PDT by DE50AE
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To: Zansman
Your not kidding.I especially like this recipe using the tenderloins.

We hunt in the Fairfield area.
43 posted on 10/03/2002 1:27:43 PM PDT by crude77
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To: Vic3O3
I always heard to cook with a clove of garlic and wrap with bacon.
44 posted on 10/03/2002 1:30:36 PM PDT by crude77
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To: Dead Dog
Slice some medallions of venison about 3/4-1" thick.
Get a heavy saute pan real hot.
Olive oil, salt and pepper the medallions.
Sear the meat quickly; about 60-90 seconds per side.
Remove from pan and keep warm.
Using same pan, saute some garlic, sliced mushrooms, worcestershire and shallots in olive oil or butter.
Deglaze pan with wine (red or white) and reduce.
Finish sauce by whisking in heavy cream.
Bring the medallions to the plate and spoon sauce over them.
45 posted on 10/03/2002 1:53:44 PM PDT by MistrX
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To: DE50AE
Sounds yummmm and easy, thanks I'll try it.
46 posted on 10/03/2002 2:03:08 PM PDT by MissAmericanPie
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To: Dead Dog

JACKALOPE

Ingredients:
3/4 oz Kahlua
3/4 oz Amaretto
3/4 oz Jamaican Rum
3 oz Pineapple Juice
1/2 oz Brown Creme de Cacao

Recipe:
Shake all but creme de cacao with ice and strain into sour glass.
Top with brown cream de cacao.


47 posted on 10/03/2002 2:03:19 PM PDT by Willie Green
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To: Willie Green
Nice touch! That might be the only game I can get this year.
48 posted on 10/03/2002 2:04:05 PM PDT by Dead Dog
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To: Pumba
Hey, where's your wife? How did she cook that Russian Boar Jim shot?
49 posted on 10/03/2002 2:05:42 PM PDT by Dead Dog
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To: Dead Dog
With respects, I have a great recipe for .... ahem... "dog" but it is interchangable with cat, gerbil, hamster and iguana
50 posted on 10/03/2002 2:18:38 PM PDT by SERE_DOC
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