Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

The Christian Testimony of Condoleezza Rice
The Layman, October 2002, via Rice2008.com ^ | October 2002 | Condoleezza Rice, Ph.D

Posted on 11/08/2002 1:13:57 PM PST by B-Chan

THE CHRISTIAN TESTIMONY OF CONDOLEEZZA RICE

"I started to think of myself as that elder son who had never doubted the existence of the Heavenly Father but wasn't really walking in faith in an active way any more."

Miss Condoleezza Rice (47) is the American National Security Advisor. She has reached the highest political office for an African-American woman to have attained. Her father was a Presbyterian minister and she was trained as a girl to be a concert pianist and a competitive ice skater. During an August 4 Sunday school class at the National Presbyterian Church, Washington, she explained something of her own faith in God. Here are some excerpts:

I was a preacher's kid, so Sundays were church, no doubt about that. The church was the center of our lives. In segregated black Birmingham of the late l950s and early 1960s, the church was not just a place of worship. It was the place where families gathered; it was the social center of the community, too.

Although I never doubted the existence of God, I think like all people I've had some ups and downs in my faith. When I first moved to California in 1981 to join the faculty at Stanford, there were a lot of years when I was not attending church regularly. I was traveling a lot. I was a specialist in international politics, so I was always traveling abroad. I was always in another time zone.

One Sunday I was in the Lucky's Supermarket not very far from my house I will never forget - among the spices an African-American man walked up to me and said he was buying some things for his church picnic.

And he said, "Do you play the piano by any chance?"

I said, "Yes." They said they were looking for someone to play the piano at church. It was a little African-American church right in the center of Palo Alto. A Baptist church. So I started playing for that church. That got me regularly back into churchgoing. I don't play gospel very well - I play Brahms - and you know how black ministers will start a song and the musicians will pick it up? I had no idea what I was doing and so I called my mother, who had played for Baptist churches.

"Mother," I said, "they just start. How am I supposed to do this?" She said, "Honey, play in C and they'll come back to you." And that's true. If you play in C, people will come back. I tell that story because I thought to myself "My goodness, God has a long reach." I mean, in the Lucky's Supermarket on a Sunday morning.

I played for about six months for them and then I decided to go and find the Presbyterian Church again. I'm a devoted Presbyterian. I really like the governance structure of the church. I care about the Presbyterian Church. On a Sunday morning, I went to Menlo Park Presbyterian Church [in Palo Alto]. The minister that Sunday morning gave a sermon I will never quite forget. It was about the Prodigal Son from the point of view of the elder son.

It set the elder son up not as somebody who had done all the right things but as somebody who had become so self-satisfied'; a parable about self-satisfaction, and contentment and complacency in faith, [and] that people who didn't somehow expect themselves to need to be born again can be so complacent.

I started to think of myself as that elder son who had never doubted the existence of the Heavenly Father but wasn't really walking in faith in an active way any more.

I started to become more active with the church to go to Bible study and to have a more active prayer life. It was a very important turning point in my life.

My father was an enormous influence in my spiritual life. He was a theologian, a doctor of divinity. He was someone who let you argue about things. He didn't say, "Just accept it." And when I had questions, which we all do, he encouraged that.

He went to great lengths to explain about the man we've come to know as Doubting Thomas; he thought that was an incident in the life of Christ about the fact it was OK to question. And that Christ knew that Thomas needed to feel his wounds; feel the wounds in His side and feel the wounds in His hands. That it was what Thomas needed - he needed that physical contact. And then, of course, Christ said when you can accept this on faith, it will be even better.

I [liked] the fact that my father didn't brush aside my questions about faith. He allowed me as someone who lives in my mind to also live in my faith.

In this job, when we faced a horrible crisis like September 11, you go back in your mind and think, "Is there anything I could have done? Might I have seen this coming? Was there some way?"

When you go through something like that, you have to turn to faith because you can rationalize it, you can make an intellectual answer about it but you can't fully accept it until you can feel it here (taps chest). That time wasn't a failure, but it was a period of crisis when faith was really important for me.

I try always not to think that I am Elijah, that I have somehow been particularly called like a prophet. That's a dangerous thing. In a sense, we've all been called to whatever it is we are doing. But if you try to wear the imprimatur of God - I've seen that happen to leaders who begin too much to believe in that - then there are a couple of very good antidotes to that. I try to say when I pray, "Help me to walk in Your way, not my own." To try to walk in a way that is actually fulfilling a plan, and recognize you are a cog in a larger universe.

I think people who believe in the Creator can never take themselves too seriously. I feel that faith allows me to have a kind of optimism about the future. You look around you and you see an awful lot of pain, suffering and things that are going wrong. It could be oppressive. But when I look at my own story or many others that I have seen, I think, "How could it possibly be that it has turned out this way?" Then my only answer is it's God's plan. And that makes me very optimistic that this is all working out in a proper way. So we must all stay close to God and pray and follow in His footsteps.

I really do believe that God will never let his children fall too far. There is an old gospel hymn, "He knows how much you can bear." I really do believe that. I greatly appreciate, and so does the president, the prayers of the American people. You feel them. You know that they are there. If you just keep praying for us, it is so important to all of us.

In many ways, it's a wonderful White House to be in because there are a lot of people who are of faith, starting with the president. When you are in a community of the faithful, it makes a very big difference not only in how people treat each other but in how they treat the task at hand.

Among American leadership, there are an awful lot of people who travel in faith. It's a remarkable thing and I think it probably sets us apart from most developed countries where it is not something that is appreciated quite as much in most of the world.

I've watched over the last year and a half how people want to have human dignity worldwide. You hear of Asian values or Middle Eastern values and how that means people can't really take to democracy or they'll never have democracy because they have no history of it, and so forth. We forget that when people are given a choice between freedom and tyranny, they will choose freedom. I remember all the stories before the liberation of Afghanistan that that nation wouldn't "get it," that they were all warlords and it would just be chaos. Then we got pictures of people dancing on the streets of Kabul just because they now could listen to music or send their girls to school.

The Layman, October 2002


TOPICS: Constitution/Conservatism; Culture/Society; Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Government; News/Current Events; Politics/Elections
KEYWORDS: christians; condoleezzarice; elections2004; gop; republicanparty; testimony
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-96 next last
"They said they were looking for someone to play the piano at church. It was a little African-American church right in the center of Palo Alto. A Baptist church. So I started playing for that church. That got me regularly back into churchgoing. I don't play gospel very well - I play Brahms - and you know how black ministers will start a song and the musicians will pick it up? I had no idea what I was doing and so I called my mother, who had played for Baptist churches. 'Mother,' I said, "they just start. How am I supposed to do this?' She said, 'Honey, play in C and they'll come back to you.'"

LOL! Not a bad sense of humor for a Calvinist! (For those who don't get it, the key of C is the easiest key to "fake it" in on the piano -- it has no sharps or flats!)

More and more I begin to like this Condoleezza Rice!

1 posted on 11/08/2002 1:13:57 PM PST by B-Chan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
Did A.C. Green ever get married? I think he and Condoleeza would be an AWESOME TWOSOME!
2 posted on 11/08/2002 1:17:12 PM PST by princess leah
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
Amen to that.
3 posted on 11/08/2002 1:17:55 PM PST by SternTrek
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
Why, then is she "pro-choice?"
4 posted on 11/08/2002 1:18:14 PM PST by sauropod
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
Isn't she pro-abortion?
5 posted on 11/08/2002 1:19:51 PM PST by tiki
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
Huraay for Ms. Rice - a woman of values, faith and strength.
6 posted on 11/08/2002 1:21:26 PM PST by Hila
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: sauropod
Yes, she is laissez-faire abortion, regulation for everything else.

7 posted on 11/08/2002 1:22:09 PM PST by JohnGalt
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: sauropod
Well, she is a mainstream Protestant, after all. What can one expect? She probably takes the Pill, too. Find me a conservative, intelligent, Catholic black woman politician and I'll support her. Until then, I'm cautiously optimistic about Dr. Rice.
8 posted on 11/08/2002 1:23:17 PM PST by B-Chan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
I love her like a daughter!

Viva la Revolucion!
9 posted on 11/08/2002 1:24:09 PM PST by SwinneySwitch
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
I laughed at the same paragraph! I've always found that when someone doesn't know the key they want, just go to "C" and they'll all follow. LOL!
10 posted on 11/08/2002 1:24:19 PM PST by EggsAckley
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
Must be PC USA, not Pres Church PCA. That is a huge difference.
11 posted on 11/08/2002 1:26:12 PM PST by sauropod
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
bump
12 posted on 11/08/2002 1:26:38 PM PST by rwfromkansas
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Hila
It seems she is pro-abortion! Hopefully, she'll have a revelation that her faith is all about life and not the "right" to kill, especially the most innocent of citizens. Otherwise, hooray for Condoleezza in her acknowledging her Creator.
13 posted on 11/08/2002 1:29:49 PM PST by Hila
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: sauropod
Well, in these troubled times, we Christians have to find allies where we can, so long as we do not compromise our own beliefs in the process. God often uses those outside the letter of His Will (and which of us may cast the first stone in that regard?) to further His purposes. Remember that the emperor Constantine wasn't baptized until just before his death -- but he followed the Lord's command in hoc Signo vinces and converted the most powerful nation of his day to a Christian nation.
14 posted on 11/08/2002 1:30:14 PM PST by B-Chan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

I do find it curious that this 'testimony' is completely devoid of the words "Jesus" and "Lord." The word "Christ" is used, but only in referring to the lesson of "Doubting Thomas."

I'm not jumping to any conclusions; just pointing out my own puzzlement. I hope and pray her faith is in the saving work of the Lord Jesus Christ on her behalf, and not in simply believing in the mere existence of a "Creator" and His Son. (Even the devil himself knows they exist.)

15 posted on 11/08/2002 1:30:52 PM PST by newgeezer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: newgeezer
Well, she is a mainstream Protestant, after all. What can one expect?
16 posted on 11/08/2002 1:31:24 PM PST by B-Chan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
We are on the same side here.

Rectitudine Sto. Sauropod

17 posted on 11/08/2002 1:33:51 PM PST by sauropod
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 14 | View Replies]

To: Prodigal Daughter; Thinkin' Gal
Mt 7:20
18 posted on 11/08/2002 1:36:24 PM PST by 2sheep
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
*bump* for later reference.

19 posted on 11/08/2002 1:38:40 PM PST by No.6
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: SwinneySwitch
Me too. In fact, she reminds me of my daughter-in-law. A black woman with very high standards of behavior and a strong work ethic, who doesn't see race, just character.
20 posted on 11/08/2002 1:38:47 PM PST by lady lawyer
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: newgeezer
My thoughts also - the absence of the powerful word "Jesus" makes me wonder. But then again, it is not mine to judge :)
21 posted on 11/08/2002 1:41:37 PM PST by txzman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
Thanks for posting this. Today has been a particularly bad day and, as such, some of what she said is helpful.

I think it is perhaps appropriate, given the recent election, to take a moment and contrast the difference between the Republican and Democrat parties and their recognition and elevation of blacks in government. Compare Condoleezza Rice to Dr. Joycelyn Elders. Both make a representative statement about black Americans. I don't mean this comparison to belittle Dr. Joycelyn Elders and her efforts, but I do believe that there is a world of difference between the two women.

Moreover, I don't believe that race and gender have anything to do with Condoleezza Rice's position in the Bush administration, but much to do with Dr. Joycelyn Elders' position in the Clinton administration.

It seems to me that the party of Lincoln has done a much better job of living Dr. King's vision of recognition of ability and charater above color (and gender) than the party of "America's first black president". G.W. Bush doesn't seem to see color, but he sure can spot, promote and surround himself with ability.

22 posted on 11/08/2002 1:56:09 PM PST by GBA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tiki
Much talk has been written about Rice's views on abortion. I think she has said she is "moderate" on this issue, meaning pro-abortion in some cases. I don't think she supports partial-birth, and she probably supports parental notification.

The main reason why her views on this issue are important is because she is being touted as a potential VP/P pick. Remember, G.H.W.B used to be pro-abortion, but he "changed" his mind to join Reagan's ticket. People can debate how much his views changed. He did a lot of pro-life things, the best of which was putting Thomas on the court. Of course he also gave us Souter...Back to Rice. If she ever were VP or Pres, but especially Pres, I would expect that she too would at least have a public "conversion." She may already be changing to pro-life. We should pray for her. If she does, or already has, she's not going to call a press conference for it. But if she's ever in a position to appoint judges, we need to apply a lot of pressure on her!
23 posted on 11/08/2002 2:03:29 PM PST by votelife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: votelife
Has she stated publically what her views are? I've heard both sides. Perhaps she will let us all know when the time is right.
24 posted on 11/08/2002 2:04:52 PM PST by rintense
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
What's with all the Protestant-bashing? Would you lump her in with, say, the Baptists, or the "Bible-Churchers" as being without "true faith"?
25 posted on 11/08/2002 2:07:37 PM PST by smokinleroy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: JohnGalt
Yes, she is laissez-faire abortion, regulation for everything else.

Not exactly. She's the only person in the Bush administration I've heard who claimed that she was "a 2nd amendment absolutist" (i.e., no federal regulations whatsoever). Personally, she has described herself as "mildly pro-choice", the exact same words used by Texas Senator Kay Bailey Hutchison.

She probably isn't sufficiently conservative on the abortion issue to get a republican nomination, but several people in the pro-life camp (such as Jerry Falwell) have spoken very highly of her when she explained her views privately. Her views on the 2nd amendment (i.e., the roll-back of all federal restrictions) would also probably make her unelectable to the general population as well.
26 posted on 11/08/2002 2:07:59 PM PST by Technogeeb
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: GBA
Amen to Condy and to your post!!!
27 posted on 11/08/2002 2:08:16 PM PST by Pinetop
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: rintense
I've never seen her say anything about it...Not really relavent for NSA, but I've read that she's moderate on it. W didn't use to be a Christian until around his 40s. Then in debates he was giving credit to Christ. If he can change, I hope that Condi can change, especially if the party wants to run her as a future candidate. I think she would be great, but I'd want to hear more about her views on the life issue.
28 posted on 11/08/2002 2:09:24 PM PST by votelife
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: txzman
>My thoughts also - the absence of the powerful word "Jesus" makes me wonder. But then again, it is not mine to judge

No, it IS yours to judge, rebuke, reprove, discern, take heed lest you be deceived, etc. 

 "Judge Rightly" Is Not Some Guy’s Name

 Nicer than God

 Nice is NOT a fruit of the Spirit

 CHRISTIANS ARE TOO NICE........!!!!!!!

 When nice is a vice

 HELP MY INTOLERANCE

29 posted on 11/08/2002 2:22:58 PM PST by 2sheep
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: smokinleroy
Not at all. I'm referring to the fact that many mainstream Protestant denominations (such as the Rice's Presbyterians) tend to approve of contraception and abortion while preaching a social gospel heavy on the feel-good and light on the Jesus. No bashing of Protestants as such was intended.

By the way: most Baptists do not consider their denomination to be Protestant.
30 posted on 11/08/2002 2:28:45 PM PST by B-Chan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: newgeezer
Exactly what I picked up on - I really didn't hear much "Christian Testimony" in that article. Mostly just that there is some sort of faith in a "creator".

31 posted on 11/08/2002 2:29:55 PM PST by TheBattman
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: TheBattman
One God. One morality. Decency toward others. Deed over creed.
32 posted on 11/08/2002 2:37:24 PM PST by onedoug
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
No bashing of Protestants as such was intended.

Oh, I guess the phrase "Well, she is a mainstream Protestant, after all" kind of sounded like you meant all mainstream Protestants.

most Baptists do not consider their denomination to be Protestant

Never heard that before. Do you consider Baptists to be mainstream Protestants?

33 posted on 11/08/2002 2:54:52 PM PST by smokinleroy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: smokinleroy
Oh, I guess the phrase "Well, she is a mainstream Protestant, after all" kind of sounded like you meant all mainstream Protestants.

No. I meant that Dr. Rice's beliefs are typical of mainstream Protestants, which they are. I apologize for my imprecision.

..."Most Baptists do not consider their denomination to be Protestant." Never heard that before. Do you consider Baptists to be mainstream Protestants?

No.

34 posted on 11/08/2002 2:59:30 PM PST by B-Chan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
I do agree with others here that there's something fishy about someone's "Christian Testimony" that makes no reference to salvation or personal faith in Christ. Otherwise, she does seem to be a good conservative (plus she's pleasant to look at).
35 posted on 11/08/2002 3:12:15 PM PST by smokinleroy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
When you are in a community of the faithful, it makes a very big difference not only in how people treat each other but in how they treat the task at hand.

This is a great line. It is the essence of the difference between Clintonistas and Bush.

36 posted on 11/08/2002 3:18:46 PM PST by twntaipan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
most Baptists do not consider their denomination to be Protestant

As someone raised Baptist and now belonging to the Disciples of Christ denomination, I'm curious to know where you picked up that little tidbit. Respectfully, I think you are wrong. The Southern Baptist Convention (I believe the largest single grouping of that denomination) is most definitely Protestant in outlook and practice. And some of them even like to dance.

As far as Ms. Rice's views on abortion are concerned, I believe she struggles with the issue as many people do. It may take her a lot of time and much prayer, but I for one am not going to condemn her for this.

As a Roman Catholic you may have a different view since, correct me if I'm wrong, your task is to submit to church teaching and just push all doubts aside. For us it is much more a personal struggle and journey, and I would vote for Condoleeza Rice for any office she might choose to run for in a second.

37 posted on 11/08/2002 3:21:59 PM PST by katana
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 30 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
Baptists (Protestants) aren't "Pro-Choice".
38 posted on 11/08/2002 3:50:17 PM PST by FreedomFriend
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: katana
As someone raised Baptist and now belonging to the Disciples of Christ denomination, I'm curious to know where you picked up that little tidbit. Respectfully, I think you are wrong.

I very well might be. Most non-Baptist sources (including the Catholic Encyclopedia) class the Baptists as a Protestant movement, but of the Baptist sources I've read almost none of them claims kinship with or descent from the Protestant movement started by Luther, Calvin, and Zwingli. Here's just a small sampling of Baptist denials of Protestantism I've found on the Web:

Flamingtorch.org: "The Christian Flag is a Protestant flag, not a Baptist flag!"

Pastor Martin Lamb of the Landmark Missionary Baptist Church, Bedford, Indiana: "Baptists are not Protestants and never have been."

Pastor Steve Sparks, Victory Independent Fundamental Baptist Church, Loganville, Ga.:"Baptists are not Protestants! The name Protestant was given to those churches which came out of Roman Catholicism during the Reformation which began in the 1500's. It originally applied through the 1700's to Lutherans, and Anglicans. Later Presbyterians, Episcopalians and Methodist were added to the lists of Protestants denominations. Though many people including Webster's Dictionary refers Baptists as being Protestants, it is not correct to refer to them as such or to lump all non-Catholic denominations in one group and label them Protestant. Historically, Baptists were never a part of the Roman Catholic Church or the Protestant Reformation and therefore can not be correctly called "protestors" or Protestants... Baptists, basing their beliefs solely on the Bible, have never held to these teachings and see them as heresy. Thus, history and the doctrines of Protestantism clearly show that Baptists are not Protestants. "

Are Baptists Protestants? I don't think so; like the mainstream Protestants, they are reformed in theology and congregational in structure, but they do not claim descent from the "reformers" of the 16th Century. In fact, most of the Baptist sources I've read claim that "Jesus was a Baptist" as well as all of the Apostles and saints of the early Church!

I only hope they don't realize that Jesus' first miracle was turning water into wine. Then we're all in trouble.

39 posted on 11/08/2002 4:07:41 PM PST by B-Chan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 37 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
"Find me a conservative, intelligent, Catholic black woman politician and I'll support her. " What about a conservative, intelligent Catholic white woman? Me-Me-Me! Kathleen
40 posted on 11/08/2002 4:08:18 PM PST by kathleenlisson
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: kathleenlisson
White, black, it's all the same to me as long as the woman in question is conservative, intelligent, and Catholic. For what office are you running?
41 posted on 11/08/2002 4:10:09 PM PST by B-Chan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 40 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan
Aah, I am just support staff. Loyal volunteer, envelope stuffer, lit dropper, phone caller, precinct captain. - Kathleen
42 posted on 11/08/2002 4:15:10 PM PST by kathleenlisson
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: sauropod
She is PCUSA. I am Reformed Presbyterian and we are vehemently pro-life. The PCUSA is not that way. Rice is a good lady, regardless of her somewhat pro-choice leaning on this.....she is not a major pro-abort.
43 posted on 11/08/2002 4:19:22 PM PST by rwfromkansas
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: txzman
This seems more of a witness of how faith has changed her life than a true "testimony" per se. That would account for the difference.
44 posted on 11/08/2002 4:20:57 PM PST by rwfromkansas
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: newgeezer
This so-called testimony is not really such. A testimony describes how one came to faith. This is more about how her faith influences her life. I am not worried in the slightest about her not saying "Jesus" every 2 sentences. She has a unified view of God.
45 posted on 11/08/2002 4:22:54 PM PST by rwfromkansas
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 15 | View Replies]

To: smokinleroy
Yet again, the theme of the essay is not even truly a testimony. I do not know why the Layman chose to give this that title.
46 posted on 11/08/2002 4:24:38 PM PST by rwfromkansas
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: B-Chan; Thinkin' Gal; Prodigal Daughter; Uncle Bill; shaggy eel; Crazymonarch; Alouette; Yehuda; ...
Ask yourself...
47 posted on 11/08/2002 5:00:39 PM PST by 2sheep
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: votelife
She said ..."I really do believe that God will never let his children fall too far. There is an old gospel hymn, "He knows how much you can bear." I really do believe that. I greatly appreciate, and so does the president, the prayers of the American people. You feel them. You know that they are there. If you just keep praying for us, it is so important to all of us."

48 posted on 11/08/2002 6:02:33 PM PST by victim soul
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: 2sheep
Aw, please, not the Trilateral thing... that's so '70s...
49 posted on 11/08/2002 6:03:03 PM PST by B-Chan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 47 | View Replies]

To: tiki
No.
50 posted on 11/08/2002 6:04:54 PM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-96 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
News/Activism
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson