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Pentagon Plans a Computer System That Would Peek at Personal Data of Americans
New York Times

Posted on 11/09/2002 9:31:25 AM PST by rs79bm

By JOHN MARKOFF

he Pentagon is constructing a computer system that could create a vast electronic dragnet, searching for personal information as part of the hunt for terrorists around the globe — including the United States.

As the director of the effort, Vice Adm. John M. Poindexter, has described the system in Pentagon documents and in speeches, it will provide intelligence analysts and law enforcement officials with instant access to information from Internet mail and calling records to credit card and banking transactions and travel documents, without a search warrant.

Historically, military and intelligence agencies have not been permitted to spy on Americans without extraordinary legal authorization. But Admiral Poindexter, the former national security adviser in the Reagan administration, has argued that the government needs broad new powers to process, store and mine billions of minute details of electronic life in the United States.

Admiral Poindexter, who has described the plan in public documents and speeches but declined to be interviewed, has said that the government needs to "break down the stovepipes" that separate commercial and government databases, allowing teams of intelligence agency analysts to hunt for hidden patterns of activity with powerful computers.

"We must become much more efficient and more clever in the ways we find new sources of data, mine information from the new and old, generate information, make it available for analysis, convert it to knowledge, and create actionable options," he said in a speech in California earlier this year.

Admiral Poindexter quietly returned to the government in January to take charge of the Office of Information Awareness at the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, known as Darpa. The office is responsible for developing new surveillance technologies in the wake of the Sept. 11 attacks.

In order to deploy such a system, known as Total Information Awareness, new legislation would be needed, some of which has been proposed by the Bush administration in the Homeland Security Act that is now before Congress. That legislation would amend the Privacy Act of 1974, which was intended to limit what government agencies could do with private information.

The possibility that the system might be deployed domestically to let intelligence officials look into commercial transactions worries civil liberties proponents.

"This could be the perfect storm for civil liberties in America," said Marc Rotenberg, director of the Electronic Privacy Information Center in Washington "The vehicle is the Homeland Security Act, the technology is Darpa and the agency is the F.B.I. The outcome is a system of national surveillance of the American public."

Secretary of Defense Donald H. Rumsfeld has been briefed on the project by Admiral Poindexter and the two had a lunch to discuss it, according to a Pentagon spokesman.

"As part of our development process, we hope to coordinate with a variety of organizations, to include the law enforcement community," a Pentagon spokeswoman said.

An F.B.I. official, who spoke on the condition that he not be identified, said the bureau had had preliminary discussions with the Pentagon about the project but that no final decision had been made about what information the F.B.I. might add to the system.

A spokesman for the White House Office of Homeland Security, Gordon Johndroe, said officials in the office were not familiar with the computer project and he declined to discuss concerns raised by the project's critics without knowing more about it.

He referred all questions to the Defense Department, where officials said they could not address civil liberties concerns because they too were not familiar enough with the project.

Some members of a panel of computer scientists and policy experts who were asked by the Pentagon to review the privacy implications this summer said terrorists might find ways to avoid detection and that the system might be easily abused.

"A lot of my colleagues are uncomfortable about this and worry about the potential uses that this technology might be put, if not by this administration then by a future one," said Barbara Simon, a computer scientist who is past president of the Association of Computing Machinery. "Once you've got it in place you can't control it."

Other technology policy experts dispute that assessment and support Admiral Poindexter's position that linking of databases is necessary to track potential enemies operating inside the United States.

"They're conceptualizing the problem in the way we've suggested it needs to be understood," said Philip Zelikow, a historian who is executive director of the Markle Foundation task force on National Security in the Information Age. "They have a pretty good vision of the need to make the tradeoffs in favor of more sharing and openness."

On Wednesday morning, the panel reported its findings to Dr. Tony Tether, the director of the defense research agency, urging development of technologies to protect privacy as well as surveillance, according to several people who attended the meeting.

If deployed, civil libertarians argue, the computer system would rapidly bring a surveillance state. They assert that potential terrorists would soon learn how to avoid detection in any case.

The new system will rely on a set of computer-based pattern recognition techniques known as "data mining," a set of statistical techniques used by scientists as well as by marketers searching for potential customers.

The system would permit a team of intelligence analysts to gather and view information from databases, pursue links between individuals and groups, respond to automatic alerts, and share information efficiently, all from their individual computers.

The project calls for the development of a prototype based on test data that would be deployed at the Army Intelligence and Security Command at Fort Belvoir, Va. Officials would not say when the system would be put into operation.

The system is one of a number of projects now under way inside the government to lash together both commercial and government data to hunt for patterns of terrorist activities.

"What we are doing is developing technologies and a prototype system to revolutionize the ability of the United States to detect, classify and identify foreign terrorists, and decipher their plans, and thereby enable the U.S. to take timely action to successfully pre-empt and defeat terrorist acts," said Jan Walker, the spokeswoman for the defense research agency.

Before taking the position at the Pentagon, Admiral Poindexter, who was convicted in 1990 for his role in the Iran-contra affair, had worked as a contractor on one of the projects he now controls. Admiral Poindexter's conviction was reversed in 1991 by a federal appeals court because he had been granted immunity for his testimony before Congress about the case.


TOPICS: Breaking News; Front Page News
KEYWORDS: govwatch; nwo; privacylist
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The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists.
1 posted on 11/09/2002 9:31:25 AM PST by rs79bm
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To: rs79bm
BTW, I find it a bit of a stretch to include this in the "election 2002" section of the NYT.
2 posted on 11/09/2002 9:32:39 AM PST by rs79bm
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To: rs79bm
The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists.

True, but it's also true for any attribute of government. We don't really need any restrictions on government power because the government is inherently virtuous and impossible to corrupt.

3 posted on 11/09/2002 9:36:55 AM PST by Grut
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To: rs79bm
I wouldn't be particularly thrilled to be a citizen of such a country.
4 posted on 11/09/2002 9:37:44 AM PST by The Duke
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To: rs79bm
This is pure crap. They don't utilize the information they currently have to enforce immigration laws, yet they want more leeway to spy into the personal lives of US CITIZENS?

On a thread this past week relating to immigration issues, I had provided a link to a copy of the Department of Labor's LCA (Labor Condition Application) database. It holds all of the applications for alien work visas dating back to 1991.

I'll provide a link to it again for the purposes of this discussion;

Labor Condition Application Database

During the discussion on the thread in question, a poster had attempted to claim that he had found invalid data. He had noticed that there was a company that had 104 records with 30 workers on each. This resulted in a total of 3120 H1-B visas. The assertion was that this could not be possible and indicated faulty data, but upon much analysis and debate, it became apparent that not only was this possible, but that it was highly likely that it was in fact correct.

It became apparent that MANY foreign owned companies had filed multiple applications for visas using the same job title and start date. This was not what we saw in relation to US OWNED companies, but chiefly from FOREIGN owned companies. Now, to get back to the FIRST company we looked at.

The company describes themselves as having a software development center in India and in Austin, TX, with sales offices scattered throughout the United States. They mention that they have 300+ engineers between India and Austin, yet they applied for 3120 visas for "Programmer/Analysts" for ALL of their locations in the US, even though offices other than Austin were supposedly "sales" offices.

A link to that info is provided below..

Take A Stand: Vote against H1B, Boycott H1B Companies

It was later shown that there was ANOTHER Indian company with an even shadier pattern, and that although they were listed as a gift and advertising company, they were bringing people into the US as "Programmer/Analysts".

One would have to wonder what those "extra" visas might be utilized for. It might not be too hard for a terrorist to purchase a work visa on the blackmarket in order to enter the United States unnoticed and unchallenged. It boggles the mind as to the number of them that might already be here...

A GAO investigation has uncovered MASSIVE fraud in the immigration system, and has reported that it is RAMPANT and "out of control". Yet NO enforcement action apparently has been taken.

From Immigration fraud 'out of control' - General Accounting Office slams INS for rampant problems

"The General Accounting Office has concluded that immigration fraud is rampant, even helping to open the door for terrorism, and that the Immigration and Naturalization Service has no idea how to get it under control."

In the Goverment Executive Magazine article, INS, GAO say immigration benefit fraud is pervasive , it is said that;

"The agency does not know the extent of the fraud, and has failed to provide its field offices with guidance in two key areas: how to conduct investigations of fraud and how to use technology to manage and share information about ongoing cases, the January report said. The INS, which has four service centers and 33 district offices that process applications and petitions for benefits, also hasn’t developed performance measures to use in offices responsible for investigating fraud, GAO said."

Now if WE can find a few questionable cases simply by looking at the LCA data and analyzing what we see here on Free Republic, I can't see why those whose job it is to look into these matters can't do a bit better.

I'd certainly say that there is NO reason WHATSOVER for the government to get expanded powers with the stated result of prying deeper into our personal lives if they can't manage and utilize the tools that they already have.

5 posted on 11/09/2002 9:38:47 AM PST by FormerLurker
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To: rs79bm
The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists.

Yup. With Hillary pulling the levers we'd have nothing to worry about.

6 posted on 11/09/2002 9:39:32 AM PST by Carry_Okie
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To: rs79bm
Before taking the position at the Pentagon, Admiral Poindexter, who was convicted in 1990 for his role in the Iran-contra affair, had worked as a contractor on one of the projects he now controls. Admiral Poindexter's conviction was reversed in 1991 by a federal appeals court because he had been granted immunity for his testimony before Congress about the case.

Ah, THAT Admiral Poindexter. I wonder how things are in Mena these days?

7 posted on 11/09/2002 9:40:43 AM PST by FormerLurker
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To: The Duke
Yes, but you have to realize that this information will be triggered by certain events. For example, if a certain person (terrorist..perhaps) just something extraordinaryily suspicious, then this is the type of system that would pick up on it.
8 posted on 11/09/2002 9:41:10 AM PST by rs79bm
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To: Carry_Okie
Yup. With Hillary pulling the levers we'd have nothing to worry about.

That is true. OTOH, if a system like this had been in place in the 60's Hillary might not be in a position to do any lever pulling.

9 posted on 11/09/2002 9:46:40 AM PST by Who dat?
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To: Who dat?
OTOH, if a system like this had been in place in the 60's Hillary might not be in a position to do any lever pulling.

They knew damned well who Hillary was and what she stood for. As Hugh Rodham's kid (and a big bitch on campus), she was obvious. It happened anyway, and let that be a lesson to you here.

You have a poor memory of the 60s. I remember well the FBI cameras taking pictures of protestors at the Novermber 7 Vietnam Day protest in San Francisco. I was one of the stupid kids in that crowd.

10 posted on 11/09/2002 10:03:38 AM PST by Carry_Okie
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To: rs79bm
Are you sure you're at the right discussion board? Wouldn't you fit in better at Stalinism.com?
11 posted on 11/09/2002 10:04:55 AM PST by WackyKat
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To: rs79bm
The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists.

The only people that make me nervous are panty-waist cowards willing to give the government unlimited power so they can can feel safe.

Actually, this sort of initiative might be a good thing in the long run. Eventually it will be abused and people will fear it. People hate that which they fear. The monster we're creating for ourselves in the name of 3,000 dead New Yorkers (one of whom was a personal friend) should be hated and feared.

Right now it's being embraced by power/freedom grabbing bureaucrats encouraged by a spoiled, easily frightened populace.

12 posted on 11/09/2002 10:08:12 AM PST by AAABEST
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To: rs79bm
"The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists."

Yes. They're only going to use it to arrest murderous terrorists. We can trust them. If we say otherwise, we're helping the murderous terrorsts. No complaints here. Nosiree-bob. I'd be much to afraid to compain.
13 posted on 11/09/2002 10:08:15 AM PST by Anchoragite
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To: FormerLurker
They don't utilize the information they currently have to enforce immigration laws, yet they want more leeway to spy into the personal lives of US CITIZENS?

That is the reality of open borders. Without screening who arrives in the U.S., the government must watch everyone. This is an entirely logical consequence of the government's foolishness with regard to immigration.

14 posted on 11/09/2002 10:10:13 AM PST by NoControllingLegalAuthority
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To: rs79bm
A local, liberal, political club had a speaker who warned of this system and scared the the heck out of the sheeple. The speaker also warned that the Feds were spying on library cards and had service techs who enter your house, look for guns or any other signs of illegal activity (drugs).

Of course the speaker warned that this was all a result of Bush's homeland security.
15 posted on 11/09/2002 10:10:35 AM PST by Eva
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To: rs79bm
"The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists." What a crock of crap! If you had any incling of history and why these seperations and protections were put into place in the first place then you would know that your statement is garbage. I guess you know more than the founders and those who set up the system. You have no respect for your freedom or your liberty and you will loose it.
"In order to deploy such a system, known as Total Information Awareness, new legislation would be needed, some of which has been proposed by the Bush administration in the Homeland Security Act that is now before Congress. That legislation would amend the Privacy Act of 1974, which was intended to limit what government agencies could do with private information."

Those that give up liberty for percieved security deserve neither liberty or secutity. I see a dictatorship comming.

16 posted on 11/09/2002 10:12:27 AM PST by Revel
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To: Eva
The speaker also warned that the Feds were spying on library cards and had service techs who enter your house, look for guns or any other signs of illegal activity (drugs).

Actually, that sounds a lot like TIPS, which, regrettably, did come from the homeland security.

What's with these folks anyway? Did they think "1984" was a How-To manual?

17 posted on 11/09/2002 10:14:12 AM PST by Anchoragite
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To: rs79bm
"Yes, but you have to realize that this information will be triggered by certain events. For example, if a certain person (terrorist..perhaps) just something extraordinaryily suspicious, then this is the type of system that would pick up on it."

You are gullible. This information will be used for anything and everything. Those that have power abuse it. Say something they don't like...Don't comply with something they want you to and bam... I guess you have forgotten about the attacks that were launched on anyone who was a threat to the Clinton's.

18 posted on 11/09/2002 10:18:29 AM PST by Revel
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To: rs79bm
NYT, says it all. Anything anti-American they can make up, they will.
19 posted on 11/09/2002 10:29:37 AM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: FormerLurker
NYTimes.
20 posted on 11/09/2002 10:29:56 AM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: Anchoragite
I know that the speakers was referring to the Homeland Security, but these white, rural Democrats have nothing to fear from the surveillance. On the other hand, this is Bellingham, WA that we are talking about, if they had been a little more vigilant, alot of people in the Maryland/DC area would not have suffered.

The new chief of police here, last fall, made a statement that he would not waste time or man power, chasing down illegal aliens or visa violators.
21 posted on 11/09/2002 10:42:20 AM PST by Eva
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To: Grut
You forgot the </sarcasm> tag, I hope.
22 posted on 11/09/2002 10:43:32 AM PST by New Horizon
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
I'd be less concerned with the New York Times than I would be with the Pentagon’s Office of Strategic Influence

From the above link;

The New York Times reported today that the Pentagon’s Office of Strategic Influence is “developing plans to provide news items, possibly even false ones, to foreign media organizations” in an effort “to influence public sentiment and policy makers in both friendly and unfriendly countries.”

The OSI was created shortly after September 11 to publicize the U.S. government’s perspective in Islamic countries and to generate support for the U.S.’s “war on terror.” This latest announcement raises grave concerns that far from being an honest effort to explain U.S. policy, the OSI may be a profoundly undemocratic program devoted to spreading disinformation and misleading the public, both at home and abroad. At the same time, involving reporters in Pentagon disinformation puts the lives of working journalists at risk.

23 posted on 11/09/2002 10:56:59 AM PST by FormerLurker
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Comment #24 Removed by Moderator

To: rs79bm
"The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists."

Some day soon, all you folks who believe this crap,...like this poor soul, are gonna' wake up and smell the coffee, and by then, it will be too late.

This is not a war on terror. That's just the distraction. This is really a war on the American People. There's no other way to look at the rediculous combination of the concepts of "homeland security" and "open borders". The two don't mix. But they're not supposed to. ...Yes, let's all remember. WE'RE THE ENEMY IN THE EYES OF UNCLE SAMMY-RAY.

25 posted on 11/09/2002 11:22:29 AM PST by Ranger Drew
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To: NoControllingLegalAuthority
That is the reality of open borders. Without screening who arrives in the U.S., the government must watch everyone. This is an entirely logical consequence of the government's foolishness with regard to immigration.

Excellent point.

26 posted on 11/09/2002 11:34:54 AM PST by Korth
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To: Korth
Thank you. Those who do not worry because George W. Bush is president might want to consider the consequences of massive government surveillance under the control of a President Hillary Clinton.
27 posted on 11/09/2002 11:50:50 AM PST by NoControllingLegalAuthority
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To: rs79bm
" An F.B.I. official, who spoke on the condition that he not be identified, said the bureau had had preliminary discussions with the Pentagon about the project but that no final decision had been made about what information the F.B.I. might add to the system. "

I would be shocked if "preliminary discussions" were not held. But this is just the Democrat's tying to turn the public against us. The motives of this publication needs to be publicly attacked and fast or they may succeed.

28 posted on 11/09/2002 11:59:33 AM PST by elfman2
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To: rs79bm
The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists.

Actually, it should make everyone nervous since the more information the government gets the less time it seems to spend actually looking for real criminals.

In the D.C. area, federal government agents harassed people who bought .223 rifles in that area who also happened to own white vans. This, despite the fact that not only had the perps not bought a rifle in that area, and not only were they not driving a white van, but there were other obvious leads (such as a blue Caprice whose plate was recorded at 10 of the post-shooting roadblocks) the police were ignoring.

Perhaps if there was some evidence that new intelligence-gathering abilities would actually be used to solve crimes, there might be at least some merit to supporting them. As it is, though, it seems the government so mis-uses its intelligence-gathering facilities that adding more would likely just further impede effective law enforcement.

29 posted on 11/09/2002 12:01:44 PM PST by supercat
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To: rs79bm
The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists.

The same was said about the RICO - that only the members of Mafia should be nervous. And now it is being applied against pro-life activists and many others. The only thing common between a nun praying before the abortion clinic and John Giotti might be Roman Catholic background, but RICO is being applied to non-Catholics as well.

30 posted on 11/09/2002 12:06:14 PM PST by A. Pole
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To: rs79bm
For now. Wait until the next Clinton gets in office. Then what will you say?
31 posted on 11/09/2002 12:26:46 PM PST by Hostage
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
NYT, says it all. Anything anti-American they can make up, they will.

Free Clue

32 posted on 11/09/2002 1:04:51 PM PST by Sandy
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33 posted on 11/09/2002 1:07:29 PM PST by Sandy
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To: rs79bm
Yeah, that's what German Jews said when guns were confiscated.
34 posted on 11/09/2002 1:09:12 PM PST by MissAmericanPie
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Total Information Awareness (TIA) System
Program Manager: Dr. John Poindexter
Deputy PM: Dr. Robert Popp

Program Objective:

The Total Information Awareness (TIA) program is a FY02 new-start program. The goal of the Total Information Awareness (TIA) program is to revolutionize the ability of the United States to detect, classify and identify foreign terrorists – and decipher their plans – and thereby enable the U.S. to take timely action to successfully preempt and defeat terrorist acts. To that end, the TIA program objective is to create a counter-terrorism information system that: (1) increases information coverage by an order of magnitude, and affords easy future scaling; (2) provides focused warnings within an hour after a triggering event occurs or an evidence threshold is passed; (3) can automatically queue analysts based on partial pattern matches and has patterns that cover 90% of all previously known foreign terrorist attacks; and, (4) supports collaboration, analytical reasoning and information sharing so that analysts can hypothesize, test and propose theories and mitigating strategies about possible futures, so decision-makers can effectively evaluate the impact of current or future policies and prospective courses of action.

Program Strategy:

The TIA program strategy is to integrate technologies developed by DARPA (and elsewhere as appropriate) into a series of increasingly powerful prototype systems that can be stress-tested in operationally relevant environments, using real-time feedback to refine concepts of operation and performance requirements down to the component level. The TIA program will develop and integrate information technologies into fully functional, leave-behind prototypes that are reliable, easy to install, and packaged with documentation and source code (though not necessarily complete in terms of desired features) that will enable the intelligence community to evaluate new technologies through experimentation, and rapidly transition it to operational use, as appropriate. Accordingly, the TIA program will work in close collaboration with one or more U.S. intelligence agencies that will provide operational guidance and technology evaluation, and act as TIA system transition partners.

Technically, the TIA program is focusing on the development of: 1) architectures for a large-scale counter-terrorism database, for system elements associated with database population, and for integrating algorithms and mixed-initiative analytical tools; 2) novel methods for populating the database from existing sources, create innovative new sources, and invent new algorithms for mining, combining, and refining information for subsequent inclusion into the database; and, 3) revolutionary new models, algorithms, methods, tools, and techniques for analyzing and correlating information in the database to derive actionable intelligence.


35 posted on 11/09/2002 1:12:03 PM PST by Sandy
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To: rs79bm
As the director of the effort, Vice Adm. John M. Poindexter, has described the system in Pentagon documents and in speeches, it will provide intelligence analysts and law enforcement officials with instant access to information from Internet mail and calling records to credit card and banking transactions and travel documents, without a search warrant.

OOPS! WRONG ! ! Sorry there Mr. Vice Admiral J. M. Pointiehead.... But iffin ya try that you may as well be slipping into one of those "snappy looking red coats."
36 posted on 11/09/2002 1:22:26 PM PST by TLI
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To: Ranger Drew
This is not a war on terror. That's just the distraction. This is really a war on the American People. There's no other way to look at the rediculous combination of the concepts of "homeland security" and "open borders". The two don't mix.

Words to remember. I sincerly hope that people wake up, if it's not already too late. How many people here are going to lobby against Homeland Security to Congress though I wonder?

BTW, excellent profile page.

37 posted on 11/09/2002 1:30:31 PM PST by FormerLurker
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To: NoControllingLegalAuthority
Those who do not worry because George W. Bush is president might want to consider the consequences of massive government surveillance under the control of a President Hillary Clinton.

Ah, but we have nothing to fear from a REPUBLICAN controlled Congress according to most people here on FR. Right.

38 posted on 11/09/2002 1:32:03 PM PST by FormerLurker
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To: FormerLurker
The truth is we cannot trust the government no matter the party in power. The founders knew that more than two hundred years ago. They sought to limit government. That effort failed in 1865. The federal government has been a rapidly growing monster since that year.

As Gerald Ford said (paraphrase), "A government big enough to give you everything you want is big enough to take everything you've got."

39 posted on 11/09/2002 1:43:52 PM PST by NoControllingLegalAuthority
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To: NoControllingLegalAuthority
As Gerald Ford said (paraphrase), "A government big enough to give you everything you want is big enough to take everything you've got."

HE said that? I knew there was a reason that I voted for him.. :)

40 posted on 11/09/2002 1:54:02 PM PST by FormerLurker
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To: New Horizon
You forgot the </ sarcasm> tag, I hope.

I wouldda put it in, but my keyboard threw up on me first.

41 posted on 11/09/2002 2:14:04 PM PST by Grut
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To: AAABEST
Hmmmm ..... why do I think that you're not a conservative, as of which this site was developed for ...... hmmmmmmm......
42 posted on 11/09/2002 2:19:27 PM PST by rs79bm
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To: rs79bm
Will they wipe everyones butts to...sheeeeesh all of this technology and they can't find terrorist cells on our land?
43 posted on 11/09/2002 2:40:51 PM PST by TaRaRaBoomDeAyGoreLostToday!
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To: rs79bm
Hmmmm ..... why do I think that you're not a conservative, as of which this site was developed for ...... hmmmmmmm......

Hmmmmm ...because you're an effen idiot who doesn't know WTF you're talking about. Hmmmmm, because only a vacuous moron would think having a super computer designed to monitor every aspect of the lives of citizens in a free country coincides with "conservative" values.

Hmmmm, most of us were logged on to FR while you were still picking your nose in China trying to figure out how to send an email. Hmmm, I have dozens of FReepers who know me in real life that fully understand my conservative values. Can you name one single FReeper who knows you personally? Hmmmmmm.

44 posted on 11/09/2002 3:11:31 PM PST by AAABEST
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To: NoControllingLegalAuthority
The truth is we cannot trust the government no matter the party in power.

Ford's quote is good, but I like Albert Nock even better:

You get the same order of criminality from any State to which you give power to exercise it; and whatever power you give the State to do things FOR you carries with it the equivalent power to do things TO you.

45 posted on 11/09/2002 3:17:30 PM PST by SR71A
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To: rs79bm
Hmmmm ..... why do I think that you're not a conservative, as of which this site was developed for ...... hmmmmmmm......

Hmmmmmm..... and I thought conservatives were for smaller government and personal freedom. I suppose I was wrong.

46 posted on 11/09/2002 3:18:22 PM PST by FormerLurker
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To: rs79bm
The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists.

And only the witches should object to being drowned.

47 posted on 11/09/2002 4:02:05 PM PST by Djarum
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To: RedBloodedAmerican
NYT, says it all. Anything anti-American they can make up, they will.

On Wednesday, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency DARPA will begin awarding contracts for the design and implementation of a Total Information Awareness TIA system.

According to the IAO's blueprint, TIA's five-year goal is the "total reinvention of technologies for storing and accessing information ... although database size will no longer be measured in the traditional sense, the amounts of data that will need to be stored and accessed will be unprecedented, measured in petabytes."
-Wired


48 posted on 11/09/2002 4:06:00 PM PST by Djarum
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To: Sandy
Anyone who runs a server can capture packets and read what is being sent. Anyone.
49 posted on 11/09/2002 4:39:05 PM PST by RedBloodedAmerican
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To: rs79bm
The only people this should make nervous are the murderous terrorists.

The only people this won't make nervous are the timorous cowards who would turn in their own grandmother for a piece of government cheese.

And the murderous terrorists.

50 posted on 11/09/2002 4:49:29 PM PST by HetLoo
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