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How a genius fighter pilot improved military strategy (Boyd)
The Atlanta Journal-Constitution ^ | 12/29/2002 | James P. Stevenson

Posted on 12/29/2002 3:46:59 PM PST by FreedomPoster

NONFICTION: Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War. By Robert Coram. Little, Brown & Co. $27.95. 484 pages.

The verdict: Due credit for "one of the most important unknown men of his time."

John Boyd was the smartest man I ever knew; he was also an exemplary leader. If he had asked me to take an 80 percent pay cut to work on a project he could not discuss, I would have committed without question.

His brilliance was exceeded only by his intellectual selflessness. Over the 18 years that he included me in his telephonic ashram, there were periods during which he would spend hours walking me through concepts that I originally believed unfathomable. I learned that coupled with his genius was an ability to break down the most complex into the understandable.

"Boyd was one of the most important unknown men of his time," Robert Coram writes. "He did what so few men are privileged to do: He changed the world. But much of what he did, or the impact of what he did, was either highly classified or of primary concern to the military."

Until I read "Boyd," I thought I knew Boyd. But what I thought I knew were selected bits of confetti. Coram, a former reporter for The Atlanta Journal-Constitution who is best-known for such novels as "Dead South" and "Atlanta Heat," has blended these scraps into a magnificent biography.

Boyd, who died in 1997, was a U.S. Air Force fighter pilot who could not stop thinking about his work. As a captain, he converted fighter-pilot bar talk into the first manual on aerial combat to teach American pilots countermoves to every possible enemy maneuver. Boyd taught himself calculus and at age 33 started work on an engineering degree at Georgia Tech.

It was at Tech that Boyd began to develop his "energy-maneuverability theory," which ultimately changed the way aircraft are designed and enabled America for the first time to assess the combat capability of foreign aircraft.

Boyd was asked to look into the overweight design of the FX, the initial concept for the F-15 Eagle. He used energy-maneuverability to reduce its weight and cost and increase its performance. His follow-up project, the F-16, increased the U.S. Air Force's inventory with the ultimate air-combat fighter.

Boyd went to Vietnam to brief pilots on his energy-maneuverability concepts to more effectively evade surface-to-air missiles. One pilot told me, "I heard Boyd's brief, believed it, and lived. My wingman ignored it and died."

After retirement as a colonel, Boyd refused lucrative offers from industry and donated his time to the U.S. Department of Defense. His thinking evolved from analyzing airplanes and missiles to ferreting out the causes of success in conflict. This led to his seminal work, "Patterns of Conflict," an unpublished, two-day briefing that he gave for almost two decades throughout the military.

Based on Boyd's strategic theories, then-Defense Secretary Dick Cheney rejected the Army's initial Iraqi invasion plan in favor of a modification. Boyd's concepts also prompted the Marine Corps to alter its standard tactics. Its first application was in Desert Storm, during which the only complaint was that the Marines went too fast.

Boyd always told his acolytes, as Coram calls them, that each would have to decide whether they wanted to look back one day at the privileged positions they held or their contributions to their country --- "to do or to be." Putting country first, Boyd told them, would inevitably stall their career. Boyd was an example; his advocacy of doing the right thing instead of toeing the Air Force party line incurred the wrath of senior generals.

It was no surprise then that at Boyd's funeral --- which Coram captures with Kodachrome precision --- the Air Force was represented by a single officer while the Marine Corps attended en masse.

James P. Stevenson is the author of "The $5 Billion Misunderstanding: The Collapse of the Navy's Stealth Bomber Program." He lives in Maryland.

> ON THE WEB: To read the first chapter, go to ajc.com/living/books.


TOPICS: Foreign Affairs
KEYWORDS: boyd; maverick; military; tactics
Interesting to see a decent review of a military history book in the AJC. I have not read this book, but it looks pretty interesting. The promised first chapter doesn't appear to be on line, as promised; perhaps it will appear tomorrow.

It's worthwhile to note that this month's Soldier of Fortune magazine also has a revealing article about Air Force generals acting to protect themselves and their sacred cows, rather than the front-line pilots.

1 posted on 12/29/2002 3:46:59 PM PST by FreedomPoster
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To: Sparta
Ping.
2 posted on 12/29/2002 3:47:25 PM PST by FreedomPoster
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To: FreedomPoster
Bump
3 posted on 12/29/2002 3:50:10 PM PST by Fiddlstix
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To: FreedomPoster
Everyone else was out of the house today, so I had time to read this through without interruption. It's a great book!

This isn't just Air Force and F16 history, the events covered affected all services, the military history ranges from the Korean war to the Gulf war. It includes an introduction into J. Boyd's thinking on conflict. According to the book, some put J. Boyd's work into the same class as Sun Tzu and Clausewitz. Similar to those two, his ideas have entered the lexicon of business strategy, and probably (though more quietly) into that of politics.

It's well worth the time. There are a couple of web sites dedicated to Mr Boyds work.. but I didn't note them on the first pass through the book, so you'll have to wait for somebody more thorough to find them .. or lookup 'OODA Loops' on the web.

I was never in the military, but J. Boyds approach to the problems of being right but non-orthodox while working in a large organization struck home to this cubicle dweller.

4 posted on 12/29/2002 4:03:29 PM PST by slowhandluke
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To: FreedomPoster
bttt
5 posted on 12/29/2002 4:07:07 PM PST by Balata
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To: FreedomPoster; All

Boyd and Military Strategy
... From Air Force Fighter Pilot to Marine Corps Warfighting: Colonel John Boyd,
His Theories on War, and their Unexpected Legacy," thesis by Major Jeffrey L ...
www.d-n-i.net/second_level/boyd_military.htm - 43k - Cached - Similar pages

Warfighting, Brought to You by John Boyd
... of tactics at the Amphibious Warfare School, Marine Colonel Michael Wyly (decanting
wine, at right of picture) to retired Air Force Colonel John Boyd in 1979. ...
d-n-i.net/fcs/cowan_proceedings.htm - 28k - Cached - Similar pages
[ More results from d-n-i.net ]

Robert Coram | New
... F-15. Coram lives in Atlanta. | RETURN TO TOP |. "The military services
should welcome more people like Colonel John Boyd. He was ...
www.robertcoram.com/new.html - 16k - Cached - Similar pages

[DOC]A Security Model for Higher Education:
File Format: Microsoft Word 2000 - View as HTML
... The purpose of this paper is to explain how I adapted a process model developed
by Colonel John Boyd, USAF, called the OODA (Observe, Orient, Decide, and Act ...
www.giac.org/practical/Lance_Jordan_GSEC.doc - Similar pages

Barnes & Noble.com - Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art ...
... It is all there...Bravo! —William Diehl. From the Critics From James Schlesinger
The military services should welcome more people like Colonel John Boyd. ...
search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/ isbninquiry.asp?endeca=1&ean=9780316881463 - 46k - Cached - Similar pages

JOHN BOYD SYMPOSIUM
... Pvt57@aol.com" BULLETIN. The works of the late Colonel John Boyd, USAF
(ret) will be central to our study. Anyone interested in information ...
www.infowar.com/conf/confzc.html-ssi - 10k - Cached - Similar pages

www.infowar.com/iwftp/cspinney/c199.txt
... men? I met Colonel John Boyd in 1973, when I went to work for him
in the Pentagon as a 27-year-old captain in the Air Force. He ...
33k - Cached - Similar pages
[ More results from www.infowar.com ]


6 posted on 12/29/2002 4:09:46 PM PST by backhoe
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To: FreedomPoster
*sigh*

Another book on the "must read before I die list."

I better live to 120, or else go to prison for a long long time.

7 posted on 12/29/2002 4:12:48 PM PST by Skooz
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To: FreedomPoster
Technically, based on the contents of the article, Boyd looks more like someone who improved military tactics, not strategy. Minor quibble though; excellent article. Original thinkers are pretty rare; rarer still in the peacetime military, where following protocol takes precedence over originality.
8 posted on 12/29/2002 4:13:12 PM PST by Vast Buffalo Wing Conspiracy
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To: Vast Buffalo Wing Conspiracy
That SoF article I mentioned shows rather conclusively that, even in a wartime military, following protocol takes precedence over originality (and survivability of the frontline fighters).

I really need to scan, OCR, edit, and post one SoF article a month. They're pretty much the only publication you can buy at a Borders or B&N that is reporting on the war at the grunt level.
9 posted on 12/29/2002 4:27:39 PM PST by FreedomPoster
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To: FreedomPoster
I have to wonder why he retired as a Colonel. Passed over for BG? In that case, the AF would seem to have some explaining to do.

Also - I must be wrong, but my recollection is that Marine ground forces weren't used in Desert Storm except as a bluff. Can somebody set me straight on this?

10 posted on 12/29/2002 4:34:34 PM PST by Grut
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To: FreedomPoster
FYI there is a growing number of persons in and around the military that refer to themselves as Boydians. From accountants to Intel. Read the book... resistance is futile...

"Believe and live"

B
11 posted on 12/29/2002 4:34:58 PM PST by Bobibutu
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To: FreedomPoster
Sounds interesting.

I remember reading a book by Adolph Galland in which he claimed that Woerner Moelders (sp?) A German pilot, developed most modern combat fighter tactics.

12 posted on 12/29/2002 4:41:13 PM PST by yarddog
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To: Grut
High rank has more to do with Politics as primary and ability secondary. Boyd was in their faces and was not PC. He was right and would not back off... gonna bump someone like that up the ladder?

B
13 posted on 12/29/2002 4:42:35 PM PST by Bobibutu
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To: Grut
There were substantial Marine ground forces deployed along the Persian Gulf coast of Saudi / Kuwait. See the Battle of Khafji, for instance.
14 posted on 12/29/2002 4:43:32 PM PST by FreedomPoster
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To: Grut
>>In that case, the AF would seem to have some explaining to do.

Go find and read the SoF article I referenced - you can say *that* again.
15 posted on 12/29/2002 4:44:45 PM PST by FreedomPoster
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To: Gunrunner2
FYI BUMP!
16 posted on 12/29/2002 4:45:20 PM PST by Balata
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To: backhoe
As usual, backhoe, you are the man with the comprehensive dossier. Since I was a driver in the Marine fighter community during the relevant period [early 60's through early 70's], I can confirm that we were instructed in the basic concepts of energy maneuverablility and used them every day. Boyd's mathematics and charts were a little beyond a lot of us, but, when you were going up the front side of the egg, [after the head-on pass] you better unload a little during the decel through the transonic range or you'll dig in and give your opponent an automatic 200' altitude advantage going over the top of the egg - bummer, gotta do a layout, light it up and scoot. That is all John Boyd. In fact, according to one of his charts which I saw in the mid 60's, from an energy maneuverability standpoint, one of the toughest birds in the whole US inventory was the F-106. We used to hassle with them down at Tyndall-very hard to work against if properly handled, which they mostly weren't. Of course the Air Farce was too stupid to put a gatling gun in them and turn them into a true, slip and slide, eat your lunch, dogfighter. Anyhow, saw Boyd once at Cherry Point - he was right in the ready room, talking to us, the drivers, as opposed to the Wing Commander. A most impressive man, even then marked for destruction by the Air Farce Coneheads.
17 posted on 12/29/2002 5:16:11 PM PST by Bedford Forrest
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To: yarddog
Boyd invented some new moves that were only possible with jets. The larger claim is that he created a engineering theory that showed how and why air combat tactics worked. The claim is that a well trained pilot would in any given situation know all his possible moves, and all the enemies possible counter-moves and all the counter-counter-moves.

Such complete knowledge can lead to stalemate, like tic-tac-toe. But this is more a game of poker. The 'who' counts. So does the ability to pull off the counter-counter-move before the enemies counter-move. Thus he pushed for very small, very manueverable fighers - the F16.

It's a fascinating book.

18 posted on 12/29/2002 5:16:27 PM PST by slowhandluke
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To: Bedford Forrest
Thanks, and I found your commentary very interesting.
19 posted on 12/29/2002 5:24:09 PM PST by backhoe
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To: Bedford Forrest
My personal favorite was the pirouette-down-the-axle.

Always loved dropping that one on 'em at the bar. Watered their eyes.

20 posted on 12/29/2002 5:33:12 PM PST by SmithW
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To: SmithW
"My personal favorite was the pirouette-down-the-axle."

Very much against my better judgment, I will confess that I have never heard of that one. Go ahead. What is it?

21 posted on 12/29/2002 5:41:03 PM PST by Bedford Forrest
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To: Bedford Forrest
Similar to a vertical rolling scissors.
22 posted on 12/29/2002 5:46:59 PM PST by SmithW
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To: FreedomPoster
There were substantial Marine ground forces deployed along the Persian Gulf coast of Saudi / Kuwait. See the Battle of Khafji, for instance.

OK, thanks.

23 posted on 12/29/2002 5:48:59 PM PST by Grut
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To: Grut
but my recollection is that Marine ground forces weren't used in Desert Storm except as a bluff.

The Marine Corps liberated Kuwait City. Both the 1st and 2nd Marine Divisions along with aircraft from the 3rd Marine Air Wing saw plenty of action during Desert Storm. In fact, the Marine Corps moved so fast that the Army's VII Corps and elements of the XVIII Corps had to get into the fight almost 24 hours sooner than planned.

'"I can't say enough about the two Marine divisions. If I use words like "brilliant", it would be an under-description of the absolute superb job they did in breaching the so-called impenetrable barrier. It was a classic, absolutely classic military breaching of a very, very tough minefield, barbed wire, fire-trenches type barrier. They went through the first barrier like it was water. They went across into the second barrier line, even though they were under artillery fire at the same time. They continued to open up the breach. And then they brought both divisions steaming through that breach. Absolutely superb operation, a textbook, and I think it will be studied for many, many years to come as the way to do it."'
Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf 27 February 1991 Riyadh, Saudi Arabia

24 posted on 12/29/2002 5:50:35 PM PST by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: Skooz
Likewise. Later reference...
25 posted on 12/29/2002 5:53:46 PM PST by OKSooner
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To: SmithW
"Similar to a vertical rolling scissors."

Right. Fairly apt description. Rolling scissors in the heavy buffet with the VSI pegged going through ten grand like a pair of anvils - no ego problems in this gaggle- right?

26 posted on 12/29/2002 6:38:44 PM PST by Bedford Forrest
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To: Balata
Thanks for the bump.

Boyd is well known and the OODA Loop is quite well know, in the fighter busines and business in general.

He was a great tactician, but when you achieve Flag rank, you now have to think stratgically, and Boyd loved where he was and retired. He would have failed as a general precisely because he couldn't think large enough, which is not an attack on him, just a reality check.

We are all familiar with the "egg" and all that, but with the advent of more powerful fighters, it seems to carry less weight with the young pups out there.

They seem to be all "muscle" and no art. "No problem" they say, "I'll just plug in the blower and have all the energy I need." Right, and you will lose too, as I (an old dog) will not play your game and will use my energy wisely (save gas). I'll be able to stay in the fight while trhe young pups piss away their gas. And then when the young pup has to run away he gets to take a heater up the butt.

Ahhh. . .the memories.

Cheers.

27 posted on 12/29/2002 6:53:10 PM PST by Gunrunner2
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To: backhoe
Worked in Thailand as a tec. rep. for 2 years 67 69 and worked with a Pilot I think was Boyd,, should say talked about a problem with the F4 ejection ,If the Gib got out the pilot could not eject--remembered debriefing two pilot a Col. Finley and , a Chicago Joe---the air flow caused by venturi effect would not allow the the 2000 psi piston to eject canopy---was change to exploive bolts--- I think Boyd was the man that reported Problem---- and recommmend the FIx
28 posted on 12/29/2002 7:48:18 PM PST by ralph rotten
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To: sphinx; Toirdhealbheach Beucail; curmudgeonII; roderick; Notforprophet; river rat; csvset; ...
Thanks for the ping FreedomPoster

If you want on or off the Western Civilization Military History ping list, let me know!!!!
29 posted on 12/29/2002 9:22:51 PM PST by Sparta
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To: Sparta
Bump.
30 posted on 12/29/2002 9:34:11 PM PST by SAMWolf
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To: Sparta
John Boyd - USAF
The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of Air Warfare
by
Robert Coram
John Boyd in 1952 after winning his wings as an Air Force pilot. After basic flying instruction in Mississippi, he trained in jets at Williams AFB, then combat training in the F-86 at Nellis AFB before being sent to Korea. (Boyd Family Photo)
During the 1950s John Boyd dominated fighter aviation in the U.S. Air Force. His fame came on the wings of the quirky and treacherous F-100; the infamous "Hun." Boyd was known throughout the Air Force as "Forty-Second Boyd" because he had a standing offer to all pilots that if he could defeat them in simulated air-to-air combat in under 40 seconds he would pay them $40. Like any gunslinger with a name and a reputation, he was called out many times. As an instructor at the Fighter Weapons School (FWS) at Nellis AFB, he fought students, cadre pilots, Marine and Navy pilots, and pilots from a dozen countries who were attending the FWS as part of the Mutual Defense Assistance Pact.

He never lost.

Boyd was famous for a maneuver he called "flat-plating the bird." He would be in the defensive position with a challenger tight on his tail, both pulling heavy Gs, when he would suddenly pull the stick full aft, brace his elbows on either side of the cockpit so the stick would not move laterally, and stomp the rudder. It was as if a manhole cover were sailing through the air and then suddenly flipped 90 degrees. The underside of the fuselage, wings, and horizontal stabilizer became a speed brake that slowed the Hun from 400 knots to 150 knots in seconds. The pursuing pilot was thrown forward and now Boyd was on his tail radioing "Guns. Guns. Guns."

The myth of "Forty-Second Boyd" still rankles AF fighter pilots. They say there is no "best" pilot; that everyone has a bad day. But if they went through Nellis in the late 1950s, they know Boyd had no bad days. And they cannot come up with the name of anyone who ever defeated him.

Boyd was equally famous in the classroom where he developed the "Aerial Attack Study." Until Boyd came along, fighter pilots thought that air combat was an art rather than a science; that it could never be codified. Boyd proved them wrong when he demonstrated that for every maneuver there is a series of counter maneuvers. And there is a counter to every counter. Afterwards, when fighter pilots attacked (or were attacked), they knew every option open to their adversary and how to respond.
An F-100 taking off from Nellis AFB circa 1959. Note checkerboard pattern on the vertical stabilizer and nose. This indicates it was a "Hun" from the Fighter Weapons School. It was in the Hun that Boyd became famous as "Forty-Second Boyd," the man who defeated all challengers in simulated air-to-air combat in less than 40 seconds. (USAF Photo)
After the study was declassified, foreign pilots passing through Nellis took it home where it changed the way every air force in the world flies and fights. Even today, more than 40 years later, nothing substantial has been added to the Aerial Attack Study.

After a six-year assignment at Nellis, Boyd returned to college for another undergraduate degree. He went to the Georgia Institute of Technology where, one night while studying for an exam in thermodynamics, he had the epiphany that became his famous Energy-Maneuverability Theory, or E-M Theory, as it came to be known.

The E-M Theory changed everything that everyone thought they knew about fighter combat. It enabled fighter pilots to evaluate their energy potential at any altitude and at any maneuver. And, perhaps more importantly, the energy potential of their adversary. It changed forever the way aircraft are fought in combat.

Boyd then used E-M as a design tool. Until E-M came along, fighter aircraft had been designed to fly fast in a straight line or fly high to reach enemy bombers. The F-X, which became the F-15, was the first Air Force fighter ever designed with maneuvering specifications. Boyd was the father of the F-15, the F-16, and the F-18.

America has dominated the skies for the past 30 years because of John Boyd.

After he retired, he developed a theory of combat that, according to Vice President Dick Cheney who was Secretary of Defense at the time, was responsible for America's swift and decisive victory in the Gulf war.
John Boyd after retiring from the Air Force. (Boyd Family Photo) John Boyd's grave in Arlington National Cemetery, Section 60, gravesite 3660. He was buried in March, 1997.
(Photo by Chet Richards)
But it is as a fighter pilot that many retired Air Force officers today remember John Boyd.

For the past three years I have been researching Boyd's life for a biography titled "Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War." It will be published by Little, Brown and Company in November. The chapters covering Nellis in the 1950s will be of much interest to fighter pilots.



31 posted on 12/29/2002 9:59:00 PM PST by dennisw
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To: dennisw
Thanks; I assume that's the book excerpt that was promised?

In any case, it's cool to know he was a fellow GA Tech grad. While I certainly enjoyed Thermo, I never had any epiphanies while studying it. In fact, I used to read my Thermo book if I wanted to fall asleep. ;-)

FP
GT BME '82
GT MSME '85
32 posted on 12/30/2002 3:41:26 AM PST by FreedomPoster
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To: FreedomPoster
actually, here's the first chapter on-line ... interesting reading, I want more.
33 posted on 12/30/2002 4:35:30 AM PST by fnord
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To: Skooz
Another book on the "must read before I die list."

So many books....so little time.
OTOH think of the library heavens got!
34 posted on 12/30/2002 4:53:12 AM PST by Valin
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To: FreedomPoster
Good photos of the man and his airplane!
35 posted on 12/30/2002 5:12:41 AM PST by dennisw
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To: FreedomPoster
Now this has me wondering..............

As an AF Academy cadet in the mid '70's, I took a course taught by a particular Captain whose name now eludes me. This was a fascinating course that was, in effect, a class on "problem solving techniques". It was, hands down, one of the best courses I ever took. The "strawman" technique of building a solution, then tearing it down until very little remained......only to begin rebuilding your solution yet again, repeating this painful process over and over........was incredibly powerful.

The Captain had been a protege' of a Colonel who this Captain claimed to be the "father of the lightweight fighter program". The man was, apparently, a true genius......and my instructor couldn't say enough about him. I'm wondering if it was Boyd.

IF it was Boyd, two interesting tidbits passed on to us by the good Captain.

A) The Colonel once said that he could develop the best tank on earth.............because he knew absolutely nothing whatsoever about tanks.

B) The Colonel used to delight in the fact that his measured IQ was only 85. You read that right...........85.

36 posted on 12/30/2002 5:19:14 AM PST by RightOnline
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To: RightOnline
The Colonel used to delight in the fact that his measured IQ was only 85. You read that right...........85.

IIRC, the AF's minimum IQ for commissioning was 115, so I kind of doubt that. Besides, in that case he'd have made General.

37 posted on 12/30/2002 5:32:05 AM PST by Grut
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To: Grut
I was commissioned and my IQ was never measured. To the best of my knowledge, there has never been a "minimum IQ" prerequisite for commissioning.
38 posted on 12/30/2002 5:34:13 AM PST by RightOnline
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To: Poohbah; section9; mhking
FYI ping.
39 posted on 12/30/2002 5:37:43 AM PST by hchutch
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To: backhoe
bump for later
40 posted on 12/30/2002 5:40:30 AM PST by steve in DC
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To: FreedomPoster
Is this the same Col. Boyd that Chuck Yeager refers to in his book?
41 posted on 12/30/2002 6:00:12 AM PST by nightdriver
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To: nightdriver
I don't know for sure, but from what I do know, I'd say "almost certainly".
42 posted on 12/30/2002 6:02:33 AM PST by FreedomPoster
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To: RightOnline
You are absolutely correct--no IQ measurements.
(There are the AFOQT tests, however, but those are more SAT-type than IQ. Now, the pilot/nav portion of the AFOQT does involve some problem solving/spatial relationship intuitive questions, but it is not an IQ test.)
43 posted on 12/30/2002 7:15:47 AM PST by Gunrunner2
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To: Grut
Also - I must be wrong, but my recollection is that Marine ground forces weren't used in Desert Storm except as a bluff. Can somebody set me straight on this?

Nah, you've just been reading historical accounts by sometimes fawning authors depending on senior Army sources, or Army after-action accounts downplaying the Marine role. From the early days of the ground combat [see the 11th Marines activities circa FE 24th, for example] to those of the Marine First and Second Division, combined with an Army heavy brigade for the push into Kuwait and into Kuwait City- see details of the fighting of the airport there for a particular example of the character of that operation.

In general, those Army units working alongside those of the Marines had generally favourable opinions of the operations of that brother service, though of course both have their own different ways of doing some things. But see *this account* for example, for an Army description of the efforts of the Marines fighting alongside them. Those participants do not seem to think that the Marines were *just* engaged as a decoy force.

My own activities as a newspaperman during the period were spent in part in covering the activities of a particular Army Explosives Ordnance Disposal detatchment, which was among the many tasked with cleaning up the *little surprises* left in Kuwait City by the fleeing Iraqis. [There's a long-standing rumor about why EOD was thought to be so desperately needed at once, if true, I can well understand why the matter would remain highly classified to this day, and be better dismissed as *just rumors and speculation....* I see nossink!] That EOD team set up shop in a building where their ground support and security was provided by Marines, and you never heard such high praise for the professionalism of the Marine grunts as from the senior NCOs of the EOD team, many with 25 years or so of service, repeatedly using the Marines as examples to their junior enlisted personnel and newer officers as the example they too should follow.

I am not and have never been a Marine. But those of that Corps have gotten and deserve my respect the hard, old-fashioned way, particularly during the Desert Storm/Shield period. They earned it.

-archy-/-

44 posted on 12/30/2002 8:23:36 AM PST by archy
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To: hchutch
Genghis John was an American original, all right.

I remember boot-legging my XO's copy of Boyd's "A Discourse on Winning and Losing" brief and running a Xerox, not being satisfied with the results, and HAND-TYPING it into Harvard Graphics on the one computer with a laser printer late one night.

The XO came into the office, looking for something he'd forgotten. I thought I was in trouble.

The XO looked at what I was doing smiled at me, punched me on the shoulder, and told me "Genghis John would be proud of you, boy!" He then asked me to run a second printout, and to save him a copy of the file on floppy.

Seems "Genghis John" Boyd thought that the Xerox machine--and the ability to bootleg copies of documents that higher-ups wanted to vanish--was the greatest tool ever invented.
45 posted on 12/30/2002 8:40:50 AM PST by Poohbah
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To: Poohbah
He's the guy who came up with OODA and the dictum of "Two simpler platforms can defeat a larger, more complex platform). He literally created the "Lightweight Fighter Mafia."
46 posted on 12/30/2002 8:55:45 AM PST by hchutch
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To: Poohbah
I finished this book last night.
It was awesome.

I think I'm going to gift a copy to my cousin who is in her first year at the Air Force Academy.

Semper Fi!
47 posted on 01/08/2003 11:04:19 AM PST by MudPuppy (To be "Someone" or to Do Something - what's your choice?)
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