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Joe Foss, WWII Hero and Former South Dakota Governor, Dies at 87
AP ^ | 1-1-2003

Posted on 01/01/2003 4:40:46 PM PST by Cagey

SIOUX FALLS, S.D. (AP) - Joe Foss, a former South Dakota governor and World War II hero who shot down 26 enemy planes, died Wednesday. He was 87.

Foss had not regained consciousness after he suffered an apparent aneurysm last fall. He died at a hospital in Arizona, said South Dakota Gov. Bill Janklow.

A Republican, Foss served in the state Legislature for five years before becoming governor in 1955. He won the Congressional Medal of Honor as a Marine pilot during World War II. He also earned the Distinguished Flying Cross.

"I always had the attitude that every day will be a great day," Foss said in a 1987 interview. "I look forward to it like a kid in a candy store, wherever I am."

Foss was born April 17, 1915, on a farm east of Sioux Falls. He once said his love of flying dated back to his childhood when he watched pilots fly over his family's home and wave to him from the cockpit.

"I thought, 'Someday I'm gonna trade these horses for an airplane,'" he said.

He was among the most prominent World War II heroes, shooting down 26 enemy planes. He also served as a colonel in the Air Force in the Korean War.

Foss was the first commissioner of the American Football League. He also hosted the television show "The American Sportsman" on ABC and was chosen president of the National Rifle Association in 1988, serving through 1990.


TOPICS: Front Page News; News/Current Events; US: South Dakota
KEYWORDS: joefoss
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1 posted on 01/01/2003 4:40:46 PM PST by Cagey
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To: SAMWolf
Ping
2 posted on 01/01/2003 4:42:13 PM PST by 4.1O dana super trac pak
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To: Cagey
I am very sorry to hear about this. He was a very noble and patriotic man.
3 posted on 01/01/2003 4:44:28 PM PST by PoorMuttly
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To: 4.1O dana super trac pak
Bump for an American Hero.
4 posted on 01/01/2003 4:45:15 PM PST by 4.1O dana super trac pak
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To: Cagey
I'm not sure, but I think this is the guy who shot-down the wingman of Germany's top ace, while at the same time the German ace was shooting-down Mr. Foss' wingman. After Mr. Foss himself was later shot down over France, the German ace "bent" the rules in order to throw Mr. Foss a dinner-party at the German squadron HQ.
5 posted on 01/01/2003 4:47:07 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: 1rudeboy
He will be missed.
6 posted on 01/01/2003 4:49:11 PM PST by Eric in the Ozarks
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To: 4.1O dana super trac pak
More from his bio. Quite an American, Joe Foss was.

Joseph Jacob Foss was born on April 17, 1915, in Sioux Falls, S.D., to a farm family near South Dakota’s largest city. Farm life was hard in the ’20s and ’30s and it was there young Foss learned the value of hard work and developed his skills as an outdoorsman.

At age 16, Foss, already entranced with aviation pioneer Charles Lindbergh, fell in love with airplanes after he and his father took a ride with a famed South Dakota aviator, Clyde Ice.

Two years later, Foss’s father died and the young man was stretched thin, trying to farm, hold down odd jobs and go to college. Economics won out, and the next year he dropped out of school. He farmed and did odd jobs until his younger brother was able to take over the farm.

He went back to school – Sioux Falls College and the University of South Dakota – and managed to eke out enough extra cash to take flying lessons. He joined the National Guard to hone his aviation skills and joined the Marines his senior year.

At age 26, he earned his wings, but was deemed too old to be a fighter pilot. But he was determined, eventually working his way into a carrier group. His first combat assignment was Guadalcanal.

His aerial marksmanship with the "Cactus Air Force" during that long and bloody combat for Henderson Field earned him international fame.

Foss’s war was over for a while after he shot down his 26th enemy plane. He returned to the home front to promote the war effort. After being presented the Medal of Honor, Foss returned to the Pacific in 1944 to work in search and destroy missions. Malaria forced him to leave the Pacific in late 1944. In 1945, he left the military.

Foss worked at odd jobs and started an aviation business and bought a car dealership with a friend. He helped develop the South Dakota Air

National Guard and ran for State Legislature and won. He was a member of the South Dakota House from 1949-1950 and 1953-1954. His next move was to run for governor of South Dakota. In 1955, the GOP moderate began the first of two two-year terms. The highlight of his administration was the creation of a state agency to promote business growth and economic development.

After serving as governor, Foss spent a short time working for Raven Industries before becoming the first Commissioner of the upstart American Football League. He helped build the league to respectability, leaving in 1966, just a few months before the historic agreement that led to the merger of AFL and NFL and the creation of the Super Bowl.

His next adventure, as host for the ABC network television program "The American Sportsman," took him all over the world for hunting and fishing excursions. Three years later, he started his own weekly syndicated series: "The Outdoorsman: Joe Foss."

In 1972, he began a six-year stint as Director of Public Affairs for KLM Royal Dutch Airlines. From 1988 to 1990, Foss was in the spotlight again as president of the National Rifle Association (NRA).

7 posted on 01/01/2003 4:49:38 PM PST by Cagey
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To: 1rudeboy
I believe all his combat flying was in the Pacific Theater.
8 posted on 01/01/2003 4:51:26 PM PST by Cagey
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To: 4.1O dana super trac pak
Thanks for the ping, 4.1O dana super trac pak


Joe Foss


Joe Foss (standing second from left) and pilots of VMF-121 at Henderson Field in February 1943. By that time, Captain Foss was in command of the squadron and had earned the Medal of Honor. (National Archives)

9 posted on 01/01/2003 4:51:49 PM PST by SAMWolf
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To: Cagey
Semper fi and farewell to a true patriot.
10 posted on 01/01/2003 4:52:08 PM PST by clintonh8r
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To: Cagey
The passing of these great Americans of WW II, especially Gov. FOSS, is indeed a sad thing. Suffice it to say that our generation applauds his service, sacrifice and patriotism. Would that we be so worthy of it.
11 posted on 01/01/2003 4:53:02 PM PST by tenthirteen
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To: 1rudeboy
I'm not sure

I am sure. Foss was a United States Marine pilot fighting the Japs in the South Pacific over Guadalcanal.

RIP Devil Dog

12 posted on 01/01/2003 4:54:57 PM PST by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: Cagey
Everyone best remember that Joe Foss made the news last year when he was singled out in an airport line, searched, and his Medal of Honor confiscated while the airport security people worked to determine if it was dangerous. It got some press, but it should have been a national outrage.
13 posted on 01/01/2003 5:00:20 PM PST by JennysCool
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To: Cagey
Good bio http://www.acepilots.com/usmc_foss.html
14 posted on 01/01/2003 5:01:38 PM PST by 4.1O dana super trac pak
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To: JennysCool
Thanks for the reminder.
15 posted on 01/01/2003 5:02:29 PM PST by 4.1O dana super trac pak
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER
My bad. Now I will spend the rest of the evening wondering who I was thinking of, and whether he was an American in the first place.
16 posted on 01/01/2003 5:03:18 PM PST by 1rudeboy
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER; Cagey; All
Mr. Foss was still serving on Board of NRA. He was to stand for re-election this spring. Very personable man as well as a true American hero...he shall be missed.
17 posted on 01/01/2003 5:03:51 PM PST by donozark
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To: JennysCool
I had totally forgotten that story. They must have been profiling that day. /sarcasm.

Yes, that should have been a national outrage.

18 posted on 01/01/2003 5:05:19 PM PST by Cagey
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To: 1rudeboy
There was a British POW pilot so respected by the Germans that they allowed the RAF to drop an artificial limb for him over the POW camp.
19 posted on 01/01/2003 5:07:24 PM PST by 4.1O dana super trac pak
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To: Cagey
War Medal Frustrates Foss Air Trip
by Brian Witte
Associated Press

'They're so nuts about this,' ex-governor says of security

Joe Foss, a former South Dakota governor and war hero, said he was hampered while going through airline security last week - after his Medal of Honor, a commemorative penknife and a dummy bullet on his key chain triggered tight scrutiny.

He said he was "sizzling" by the time he was finally allowed on the plane.

"They gave me a hassle all the way," the 86-year-old said in a telephone interview. "It was just like I was trying to carry some oddball piece of metal or something that would do something."

Foss said he has had a pacemaker for 20 years and had to be patted down because he couldn't walk through a metal detector. He said the medal attracted the security crew's attention after his jacket was sent through an X-ray machine.

Foss, who flew out of Phoenix on his way to a National Rifle Association meeting in Arlington, Va., said he eventually was allowed to bring the medal on the plane, but he had to check the penknife and the bullet, which has a hole in it and is harmless.

"They acted like I shouldn't be carrying it," Foss, 86, said, referring to the Medal of Honor. "And they didn't know what it was. It was just a piece of metal to them."

Foss, a former Marine Corps pilot who was awarded the medal by President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1943 after Foss shot down 26 enemy planes during World War II, said he brought it to show at the U.S. Military Academy at West Point. He plans to speak there next week.

Notable and ordinary passengers alike have been getting much greater scrutiny at airports since the terrorism attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon.

Congressman John Dingell is one of the latest examples. Dingell, who has a steel hip joint, knee brace and surgically implanted ankle pins, was asked to drop his pants at Washington's Reagan National Airport.

Foss flew on America West. Patty Nowack, a spokeswoman for the airline, said the security precautions are part of Federal Aviation Administration regulations.

But Foss said he thought the inspections are going too far in the wrong direction.

The former pilot said he thinks his one-way, first-class ticket and western attire made him seem suspicious to the security crew.

At the time, he was wearing a 10-gallon hat and large cowboy boots made out of ostrich.

To get on the plane, he had to take the boots off on three separate occasions.

"Evidently, they were looking for me over at the gate because when I came to the gate, they told me to stand in a certain area and wait till we boarded," Foss said.

Despite the thorough searching, Foss said he did not feel any safer on the plane.

"They're so nuts about this thing now," he said. "That whole program needs to go back, call themselves aside and start from square one. It's nutty. Why should you have to go through such a hassle?"

Foss was elected governor of South Dakota in 1954 and 1956. He once lead the NRA and the American Football League. He now lives in Scottsdale, Ariz.


20 posted on 01/01/2003 5:08:26 PM PST by JennysCool
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To: Cagey

GOD BLESS YOU JOE.

21 posted on 01/01/2003 5:12:09 PM PST by Dubya
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FOSS, JOSEPH JACOB

Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Marine Fighting Squadron 121, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing. Place and date: Over Guadalcanal, 9 October to 19 November 1942, 15 and 23 January 1943. Entered service at: South Dakota. Born: 17 April 1 915, Sioux Falls, S. Dak. Citation: For outstanding heroism and courage above and beyond the call of duty as executive officer of Marine Fighting Squadron 121, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, at Guadalcanal. Engaging in almost daily combat with the enemy from 9 October to 19 November 1942, Capt. Foss personally shot down 23 Japanese planes and damaged others so severely that their destruction was extremely probable. In addition, during this period, he successfully led a large number of escort missions, skillfully covering reconnaissance, bombing, and photographic planes as well as surface craft. On 15 January 1943, he added 3 more enemy planes to his already brilliant successes for a record of aerial combat achievement unsurpassed in this war. Boldly searching out an approaching enemy force on 25 January, Capt. Foss led his 8 F-4F Marine planes and 4 Army P-38's into action and, undaunted by tremendously superior numbers, intercepted and struck with such force that 4 Japanese fighters were shot down and the bombers were turned back without releasing a single bomb. His remarkable flying skill, inspiring leadership, and indomitable fighting spirit were distinctive factors in the defense of strategic American positions on Guadalcanal.

22 posted on 01/01/2003 5:14:52 PM PST by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: Cagey
Here is the citation:

FOSS, JOSEPH JACOB

Rank and organization: Captain, U.S. Marine Corps Reserve, Marine Fighting Squadron 121, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing.
Place and date: Over Guadalcanal, 9 October to 19 November 1942, 15 and 23 January 1943.
Entered service at: South Dakota.
Born: 17 April 1 915, Sioux Falls, S. Dak.

Citation:

For outstanding heroism and courage above and beyond the call of duty as executive officer of Marine Fighting Squadron 121, 1st Marine Aircraft Wing, at Guadalcanal. Engaging in almost daily combat with the enemy from 9 October to 19 November 1942, Capt. Foss personally shot down 23 Japanese planes and damaged others so severely that their destruction was extremely probable. In addition, during this period, he successfully led a large number of escort missions, skillfully covering reconnaissance, bombing, and photographic planes as well as surface craft. On 15 January 1943, he added 3 more enemy planes to his already brilliant successes for a record of aerial combat achievement unsurpassed in this war. Boldly searching out an approaching enemy force on 25 January, Capt. Foss led his 8 F-4F Marine planes and 4 Army P-38's into action and, undaunted by tremendously superior numbers, intercepted and struck with such force that 4 Japanese fighters were shot down and the bombers were turned back without releasing a single bomb. His remarkable flying skill, inspiring leadership, and indomitable fighting spirit were distinctive factors in the defense of strategic American positions on Guadalcanal.
23 posted on 01/01/2003 5:17:58 PM PST by PAR35
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To: SMEDLEYBUTLER
Thanks for the post -- I hope the President tenders appropriate remarks on his death -- and I hope they include his airport snub as a lesson to the screening "troops."
24 posted on 01/01/2003 5:18:33 PM PST by JennysCool
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To: Cagey
After serving as governor, Foss spent a short time working for Raven Industries before becoming the first Commissioner of the upstart American Football League. He helped build the league to respectability, leaving in 1966, just a few months before the historic agreement that led to the merger of AFL and NFL and the creation of the Super Bowl.

I don't know where you found this bio, but the AFL-NFL merger agreement wasn't hammered out until after Joe Willie Namath led the New York Jets to victory over the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III in 1969.

25 posted on 01/01/2003 5:21:02 PM PST by mrustow
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To: JennysCool
>>it should have been a national outrage.

I dang sure was. But yes, you're right, that alone should have caused Congressional hearings on our so-called airline security / passenger annoyance system.

RIP for great American. He has left a legacy few can hope to equal.

26 posted on 01/01/2003 5:22:36 PM PST by FreedomPoster
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To: JennysCool
"And they didn't know what it was. It was just a piece of metal to them."

I'm not surprised one bit. I doubt there are more than a handful of airport screeners who have ever opened a history book.

27 posted on 01/01/2003 5:23:33 PM PST by Cagey
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To: mrustow
From another reference:

On June 8, 1966, two months after Davis became the AFL commissioner, a merger agreement was announced. There would be a common draft starting in 1967, interleague preseason games starting in '67 and regular-season play combining the leagues in 1970. Territorial indemnification of $18 million was to be paid to the 49ers and Giants over a 20-year period.

28 posted on 01/01/2003 5:28:33 PM PST by Cagey
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To: mrustow
I don't know where you found this bio, but the AFL-NFL merger agreement wasn't hammered out until after Joe Willie Namath led the New York Jets to victory over the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III in 1969.

Sorry, but you are mistaken. The merger occurred in 1966 and the first Super Bowl (1967) was between the Green Bay Packers and the, I think, Oakland Raiders. The 1969 Super Bowl with Namath was the third. You are thinking about when they changed the names from AFL and NFL to simply the NFL.

29 posted on 01/01/2003 5:33:36 PM PST by Timmy
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To: 4.1O dana super trac pak
There was a British POW pilot so respected by the Germans that they allowed the RAF to drop an artificial limb for him

That was Douglas Bader, "The Legless Wonder"

30 posted on 01/01/2003 5:37:29 PM PST by Polybius
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To: Polybius
The internet is amazing.
31 posted on 01/01/2003 5:39:37 PM PST by 4.1O dana super trac pak
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To: Cagey
Guadalcanal was where my cousin, Howard Goodman, was taken out by the proverbial "Jap sniper."

Shortly after 911, Joe Foss was held up from boarding a plane, by security personnel who couldn't understand what certain metal keepsakes were, and insisted that he either surrender them or forgo the flight. Foss stood tough, and kept the metal objects, one of which was "a curious little metal cross." The brilliant Las Vegas Review-Journal writer, Vin Suprynowicz, devoted one of his columns to the incident in question.

An Old Man with a Curious Little Metal Cross

32 posted on 01/01/2003 5:39:48 PM PST by mrustow
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To: 1rudeboy
I don't think so. I believe that Joe Foss was in the Pacific.
33 posted on 01/01/2003 5:44:13 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants
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To: mrustow
There was a great picture of Foss, with a .357 Magnum and a black cowboy hat, that ran on the cover of Newsweek (or Time) when he became president of the NRA. Anybody got that one?
34 posted on 01/01/2003 5:46:06 PM PST by MoralSense
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To: Cagey
Joe was also the hero where the idiot at the airport security tried to confiscate his CMH claiming that it might be used as a "weapon".
35 posted on 01/01/2003 5:46:30 PM PST by Blood of Tyrants
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To: Cagey
"And they didn't know what it was. It was just a piece of metal to them."

Que quire decir?

36 posted on 01/01/2003 5:47:31 PM PST by billorites
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To: mrustow
Thanks for that link. What a great read.
37 posted on 01/01/2003 5:47:35 PM PST by Cagey
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To: Timmy
Kansas City
38 posted on 01/01/2003 5:49:53 PM PST by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: Timmy
I don't know where you found this bio, but the AFL-NFL merger agreement wasn't hammered out until after Joe Willie Namath led the New York Jets to victory over the Baltimore Colts in Super Bowl III in 1969.

Sorry, but you are mistaken. The merger occurred in 1966 and the first Super Bowl (1967) was between the Green Bay Packers and the, I think, Oakland Raiders. The 1969 Super Bowl with Namath was the third. You are thinking about when they changed the names from AFL and NFL to simply the NFL.

Maybe you want to clean the egg off your face, and ask the Admin. Moderator if you can get your posts deleted.

There was no merger until 1969. The name changes are inseparable from the merger. The first three Super Bowls pitted teams from DIFFERENT LEAGUES. With the merger, the old NFL became the NFC, and the AFL became the AFC. However, since there were more old NFL than AFL teams (there were only ten AFL teams), three of the old NFL teams joined the AFC: the Cleveland Browns, Pittsburgh Steelers, and Baltimore Colts.

The American Football League, 1960-1969

39 posted on 01/01/2003 5:52:10 PM PST by mrustow
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To: Cagey
A True American Hero ..

We will miss you, Sir ..

Semper Fi
40 posted on 01/01/2003 5:52:30 PM PST by NormsRevenge
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To: MoralSense

41 posted on 01/01/2003 5:53:19 PM PST by Cagey
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To: MoralSense
There was a great picture of Foss, with a .357 Magnum and a black cowboy hat, that ran on the cover of Newsweek (or Time) when he became president of the NRA. Anybody got that one?

No, but I wish I did!

42 posted on 01/01/2003 5:53:37 PM PST by mrustow
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To: 1rudeboy
Marine pilot in the European theater? I think not.
43 posted on 01/01/2003 5:55:10 PM PST by Doctor Raoul
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To: Cagey
My pleasure; thanks for the pic! (That Vin is, in his own way, a national treasure, if you ask me.)
44 posted on 01/01/2003 5:55:17 PM PST by mrustow
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To: 1rudeboy
Now I will spend the rest of the evening wondering who I was thinking of, and whether he was an American in the first place.

The situation you mentioned sounds more like World War One..

45 posted on 01/01/2003 5:56:28 PM PST by ErnBatavia
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To: Cagey
Huh? Where's that from?
46 posted on 01/01/2003 6:04:08 PM PST by mrustow
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To: mrustow
Maybe you want to clean the egg off your face, and ask the Admin. Moderator if you can get your posts deleted.

My. Aren't you a charming one! Are you always so courteous?

47 posted on 01/01/2003 6:09:04 PM PST by Timmy
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To: Cagey

Medal of Honor Heroes

WWI, WWII and Korean War Fighter Pilots

American Aces of WWII in Association with Amazon.com

AcePilots Main Page

Korean War Aces

WWI Aces

The Planes

Congressional Medal of Honor

Fifteen of the American aces of World War Two profiled on this web site were awarded the Congresional Medal of Honor. In chronological order, here is a brief introduction to those fifteen heroes, with links to their pages and relevant sources.

It is interesting that nine of the recipients were Marines who flew in the Solomons campaign, four were Army Air Force fliers in the Pacific, and two were Navy fliers. I don't know why the Marines dominated these awards, although I'm sure that the Marines who visit this site would be willing to tell me. :) Possibly the dramatic events at Guadalcanal in the first year of the war riveted the public's attention in those days.

Nor do I know why the Pacific Theater in general dominated the award. James Howard, a Flying Tiger who served in the ETO - flying Mustangs with the 354th FG, also won the Medal of Honor; I just haven't put up an article about him yet.

Several bomber aircrew, notably B-24 Liberator crewmen who flew the Ploesti mission, also received the Medal of Honor.

In the Korean War, fighter pilots Louis Sebille, George Davis, and Thomas Hudner won the MoH. Read about Hudner's dramatic MoH mission, an attempted rescue of our first Black naval aviator.

WWI World War Two Korea
Frank Luke
Eddie Rickenbacker
Butch O'Hare
John L. Smith
Robert Galer
Harold Bauer
Joe Foss
Jefferson DeBlanc
James Swett
Ken Walsh
Neel Kearby
Robert Hanson
Pappy Boyington
David McCampbell
Richard Bong
Tommy McGuire
Bill Shomo
James Howard
Thomas Hudner
Louis Sebille
George Davis

Medal of Honor One of the finest fighter pilots the Marine Corps ever produced also had one of the shortest combat careers. Lt. Col. Harold W. Bauer, aka "The Coach" or "Indian Joe" also led a Marine Fighting Squadron (VMF-212) during the Guadalcanal campaign. Among his legendary achievements was the destruction of four Val dive bombers that were attacking the destroyer McFarland on October 16, 1942.

Harold BauerRead the Harold Bauer article on this site, which describes The Coach's last mission and includes the text of his MoH citation.

Medal of Honor Joe Foss was the fourth Marine squadron leader at Guadalcanal to win the Medal of Honor. He led VMF-121 in combat from October, 1942 through January, 1943, shooting down 26 planes in eight weeks of active flying. He personally led the evening air search for Col. Bauer on November 13. Joe Foss survived being shot down over The Slot and also survived a bout with malaria. He went on to a very successful post-war career, including Governor of South Dakota, President of the NRA, and President of the old American Football League.

Joe FossRead the Joe Foss article on this site, which includes the text of his MoH citation.

Buy Wildcat Aces of World War 2 at Amazon.com. Highlights of the book include a profile of Joe Foss, and a wartime history of VMF-121. There are tables of Wildcat aces for: the year 1942, the squadron VMF-121, the year 1943, and the FM-2 pilots.


Medal of Honor Jefferson DeBlanc earned the Medal of Honor for downing five Zeros in the Solomons on January 31, 1943

Citation

For conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his life above and beyond the call of duty as Leader of a Section of Six Fighter Planes in VMF-112, during aerial operations against enemy Japanese forces off Kolombangara Island in the Solomons Group, 31 January 1943.

Taking off with section as escort for a strike force of dive bombers and torpedo planes ordered to attack Japanese surface vessels, First Lieutenant DeBlanc led his flight directly to the target area where, at 14.000 feet. our strike force encountered a large number of Japanese Zeros protecting the enemy's surface craft. In company with the other fighters, First Lieutenant DeBlanc instantly engaged the hostile planes and aggressively countered their repeated attempts to drive off our bombers, persevering in his efforts to protect the diving planes and waging fierce combat until, picking up a call for assistance from the dive bombers under attack by enemy float planes at 1,000 feet, he broke off his engagement with the Zeros, plunged into the formation of float planes and disrupted the savage attack, enabling our dive bombers and torpedo planes to complete their runs on the Japanese surface disposition and to withdraw without further incident.

Although his escort mission was fulfilled upon the safe retirement of the bombers, First Lieutenant DeBlanc courageously remained on the scene despite a rapidly diminishing fuel supply and , boldly challenging the enemy's superior number of float planes, fought a valiant battle against terrific odds, seizing the tactical advantage and striking repeatedly to destroy three of the hostile aircraft and to disperse the remainder. Prepared to maneuver his damaged plane back to base, he had climbed aloft and set his course when he discovered two Zeros closing in behind. Undaunted, he opened fire and blasted both Zeros from the sky in short, bitterly fought action which resulted in such hopeless damage to his plane that he was forced to bail out at a perilously low altitude atop the trees on enemy-held Kolombangara. A gallant officer, a superb airman and an indomitable fighter, First Lieutenant DeBlanc had rendered decisive assistance during a critical stage of operations, and his unwavering fortitude in the face of overwhelming opposition reflects the highest credit upon himself and adds new luster to the traditions of the United States Naval Service.

48 posted on 01/01/2003 6:12:42 PM PST by NormsRevenge
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To: Timmy
Maybe you want to clean the egg off your face, and ask the Admin. Moderator if you can get your posts deleted.

My. Aren't you a charming one! Are you always so courteous?

Aw, shucks! Wuddn't nuttin' to it.

49 posted on 01/01/2003 6:12:49 PM PST by mrustow
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To: mrustow; Timmy
Timmy was correct. The deal was "hammered out" in 1966.

Sports Illustrated

50 posted on 01/01/2003 6:16:25 PM PST by Cagey
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