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AIR FORCE CROSS AWARDED POSHUMOUSLY TO SGT JOHN CHAPMAN
Fox News | 1-10-03 | Fox News

Posted on 01/10/2003 7:55:09 AM PST by DWar

Edited on 01/10/2003 9:53:16 AM PST by Admin Moderator. [history]

Fox news just reported the posthumous awarding of the Air Force Cross to Sgt John Chapman.

Medals were given to his widow with his two daughters, to his mother and to his father.

While fighting in Afghanastan, Sgt Chapman was credited with saving the lives of the SEAL team with which he worked by heroic action. While under fire he attacked and secured an enemy machine gun position and immediately began attacking another. He began to take fire from three directions whie enjoying only minimal cover and succumed to his wounds. His SEAL team leader credited Sgt Chapmen with saving the lives of the entire team.

The Air Force Cross is the highest award issued by the United States Air Force.

May God bless this American hero and bless and comfort his greiving family.


TOPICS: Breaking News; Culture/Society; Foreign Affairs; Miscellaneous; News/Current Events
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An American Hero.
1 posted on 01/10/2003 7:55:09 AM PST by DWar
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To: DWar
God bless him
2 posted on 01/10/2003 7:58:20 AM PST by KantianBurke
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To: DWar
It probably doesn't take the pain away, but it might help.
3 posted on 01/10/2003 7:58:21 AM PST by Thebaddog
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To: DWar
Never heard of an "Air Force Medal of Honor"....There is just the "Medal of Honor".
4 posted on 01/10/2003 7:58:37 AM PST by dakine
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To: dakine
Never heard of an "Air Force Medal of Honor"....There is just the "Medal of Honor".

No, each branch of service has its own medal. Very similar, but different.

5 posted on 01/10/2003 8:01:41 AM PST by RoughDobermann
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To: dakine
" Never heard of an "Air Force Medal of Honor"....There is just the "Medal of Honor". "

I report. You decide.
6 posted on 01/10/2003 8:03:14 AM PST by DWar
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To: DWar
God bless all who wear a uniform in defense of freedom. TSgt Chapman's family has endured a terrible personal loss and our prayers and heart felt sympathies go to them. May the Lord bless and comfort them.
7 posted on 01/10/2003 8:04:30 AM PST by blastdad51
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To: RoughDobermann
actually, I think he was supposed to get the Air Force Cross....there is only one Congressional Medal of Honor, but as RoughDobermann points out, the actual medal varies for each service.
8 posted on 01/10/2003 8:05:29 AM PST by fly_navy
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To: DWar
It is unfortunate that this is often the only way we can really tell who the greatest among us are.

I am damn proud that Sgt John Chapman, an airman and soldier with the heart of a lion, was a fellow countryman. I can only hope that I might someday be able to stand before the Almighty with the poise and honor of this great American.

Our nation is both blessed by his sacrifice and diminished by his loss.

9 posted on 01/10/2003 8:05:41 AM PST by Imal
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To: dakine

Air Force Medal of Honor

10 posted on 01/10/2003 8:05:54 AM PST by RoughDobermann
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To: DWar
It wasn't a "Medal of Honor", it was the Air Force Cross.

From an Air Force web site:

The Air Force Cross is awarded to U.S. and Foreign military personnel and civilians who have displayed extraordinary heroism in one of the following situations: while engaged in action against a U.S. enemy, while engaged in military operations involving conflict with a foreign force, or while serving with a Friendly nation engaged in armed conflict against a force in which the United States is not a belligerent party. The Air Force Cross is awarded when the heroic actions fall just short of warranting the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Prior to 1960, when Congress established the Air Force Cross, enlisted men were decorated with the Distinguished Service Cross for heroic actions. In the Vietnam era, countless airman performed brave acts which were above and beyond the call of duty; however, of the enlisted airmen, only 20 were awarded the Air Force Cross. Since 1975, only one airman has earned the award, bringing the total to 21 recipients. The following section consists of brief, chronological accounts of these airmen and the heroic events which led to their decoration.

11 posted on 01/10/2003 8:07:24 AM PST by jackbill
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To: dakine

Army Medal of Honor

12 posted on 01/10/2003 8:07:28 AM PST by RoughDobermann
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To: dakine

Navy Medal of Honor

13 posted on 01/10/2003 8:08:11 AM PST by RoughDobermann
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To: RoughDobermann
No, each branch of service has its own medal. Very similar, but different.

The medal designs are different, yes, but the award is identical. There is no such thing as an "Air Force Medal of Honor." There is only a Medal of Honor.

14 posted on 01/10/2003 8:09:22 AM PST by Junior (Mary had a little lamb, surprising the hell out the attending physicians.)
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To: DWar
I always thought it was called the Congressional Medal of Honor.
15 posted on 01/10/2003 8:10:20 AM PST by i are a cowboy
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To: DWar; All
http://foxfall.com/fmd-moh-usaf.htm

Air Force Medal of Honor
Establishing Authority

The Air Force Medal of Honor was established by Act of Congress (Public Law 86-593, 86th Congress, approved August 10, 1956).

Effective Dates

The Air Force Medal of Honor has been in effect since November 1, 1965.

Criteria

The Medal of Honor is awarded for conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of one's life, above and beyond the call of duty. This gallantry must be performed either while engaged in action against an enemy of the United States; while engaged in military operations involving conflict with an opposing foreign force; or, while serving with friendly foreign forces engaged in an armed conflict against an opposing armed force in which the United States is not a belligerent party.

For award of the Medal of Honor there must be no margin of doubt or any possibility of error. To justify the award, a person must clearly render himself conspicuously above his comrades by an act so outstanding that it clearly distinguishes his gallantry as being beyond the call of duty. It must be the type of action which if not done would not leave him open to criticism, but must be done without detriment to his mission or to the command to which he is attached. Further, the recommendation must be submitted within three years of the act, and the medal must be awarded within five years of the act (there have, however, been exceptions to the rules governing the timing of recommendations and awarding the Medal of Honor).

Order of Precedence

The Medal of Honor is worn before all other decorations and medals. It is the highest honor that can be conferred on a member of the Armed Forces.

Devices

Additional awards of the Air Force Medal of Honor are denoted by oak leaf clusters.

Designer/Sculptor

The Air Force Medal of Honor was designed and sculpted by Lewis J. King, Jr. of the Army's Institute of Heraldry.

First Recipient

The first person to receive the Air Force Medal of Honor was Major Bernard F. Fisher, whose medal was presented to him on January 19, 1967, for heroism above and beyond the call of duty during the Vietnam War.

Description and Symbolism

Obverse

Within a wreath of laurel in green enamel, a gold-finished bronze five-pointed star, one point down, tipped with trefoils and each point containing a crown of laurel and oak on a background of green enamel. Centered upon the star is a ring of 34 stars surrounding a representation the head of the Statue of Liberty. The star is suspended by rings from a bar inscribed with the word VALOR above the adaptation of the thunderbolt from the Air Force coat of arms. This medal is adapted from the original Medal of Honor and was modified to provide a design unique for the Air Force.

Reverse

The reverse of the Air Force Medal of Honor is plain (for engraving the recipient's name).

Ribbon

The ribbon is a light blue moired silk neckband one and three sixteenths inches wide and twenty four inches long, behind a square pad in the center made of the ribbon with the corners turned in. Thirteen white stars are woven into the pad.

16 posted on 01/10/2003 8:11:32 AM PST by DWar
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To: dakine

TYPES OF THE MEDAL OF HONOR

17 posted on 01/10/2003 8:12:12 AM PST by SMEDLEYBUTLER
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To: RoughDobermann
Thanks, I looked at the Air Force Awards and Decorations chart and calls the top one "Medal of Honor", I thought that there was only one "Medal of Honor" for all branches.
18 posted on 01/10/2003 8:12:43 AM PST by dakine
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To: Junior
Yes, the award is identical ("He was awarded the CMH"), but like you said the physical medal if different for each branch.
19 posted on 01/10/2003 8:14:04 AM PST by RoughDobermann
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To: RoughDobermann
Valor: Strength of mind in regard to danger; that quality which enables a man to encounter danger with firmness; personal bravery; courage; prowess; intrepidity.

Here's to SGT John Chapman, and to all that august company who have breathed life into the simple word:Valor.

20 posted on 01/10/2003 8:14:25 AM PST by ArrogantBustard (Joe Foss, RIP)
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To: Squantos; Travis McGee; sneakypete
FYI
21 posted on 01/10/2003 8:14:58 AM PST by harpseal (Stay well - Stay safe - Stay armed - Yorktown)
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To: DWar
I hope Fox News did not really say this, but given the extraordinary ignorance of things military by their production support people; they probably did. They are my favorite news program, but they drive me up the wall calling Lieutenant Generals "Lieutenant" and other such gaffs. Just not professional.

Technical Sergeant John Chapman has been awarded the Air Force Cross, not the Medal of Honor. The Air Force Cross is the second highest award for valor. This is not to denigrate his heroic acts, or his supreme sacrifice, just trying to get the story straight.
22 posted on 01/10/2003 8:15:16 AM PST by centurion316
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To: centurion316
" just trying to get the story straight. "

Fox News DID report this as the Air Force Medal of Honor. If indeed it was the Air Force Cross, please cite your source, for clarification.
23 posted on 01/10/2003 8:21:26 AM PST by DWar
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To: fly_navy
Fayetteville (NC) Observer
January 7, 2003

Chapman To Be Posthumously Awarded The Air Force Cross

By Henry Cuningham, Military editor

The Air Force on Friday will present its second highest award to the family of a Pope Air Force Base special operations airman who died while fighting in Afghanistan.

Tech. Sgt. John A. Chapman will posthumously receive the Air Force Cross during a ceremony at 10 a.m. at the base.

Gen. John Jumper, the Air Force chief of staff, will present the award to Chapman's widow, Valerie, and his mother and father.

Chapman was mortally wounded March 4, 2002, during Operation Anaconda.

He was assigned to the 24th Special Tactics Squadron at Pope. The squadron is part of Air Force Special Operations Command's 720th Special Tactics Group at Hurlburt Field, Fla.

The commanding officer of the 24th Special Tactics Squadron said Chapman stood in the face of hostile fire to save the lives of his fellow soldiers during a battle with Taliban forces, The Associated Press reported.

The 36-year-old technical sergeant was one of seven servicemen killed when al-Qaida and Taliban fighters engaged in a firefight with U.S. helicopters. He died while attempting to retrieve the body of an airman who had fallen from a helicopter during the attack, Lt. Col. Kenneth Rodriguez said at Chapman's funeral in Windber, Pa.

Chapman knew his team was going back into an area "crawling with enemy," Rodriguez said, but, "All he said was 'Let's go!' and go they did, right back into the jaws of death."

President Bush met with Mrs. Chapman and Sheila Harriman on March 16 during a visit to Fayetteville. Harriman's husband, Army Chief Warrant Officer Stan Harriman, also died during fighting in Afghanistan.
24 posted on 01/10/2003 8:22:42 AM PST by fly_navy
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To: centurion316
You are correct. He was NOT awarded the CMH.

Medal honors fallen soldier

25 posted on 01/10/2003 8:23:26 AM PST by TomB (Abuse of common sense comes as no surprise)
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To: centurion316
Technical Sergeant John Chapman has been awarded the Air Force Cross

Yes, that's what I saw/heard also. Earlier in the day, an Air Force spokesman was on, giving the history of the Air Force Cross, and TSgt Chapman's story. Very moving ceremony - only carried by FNC. Pity - how quickly we forget our true heroes. God bless him and his family.
26 posted on 01/10/2003 8:23:57 AM PST by baseballmom
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To: DWar
Fox News DID report this as the Air Force Medal of Honor.

Someone may have misspoke. When I heard it mentioned this morning on FNC, they got it right.

27 posted on 01/10/2003 8:25:54 AM PST by TomB (Abuse of common sense comes as no surprise)
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To: DWar
FYI

SECAF honors casualties, looks to future
by Tech. Sgt. Scott Elliott
Air Force Print News
09/05/02 - WASHINGTON -- In a speech to the service's first sergeants, the secretary of the Air Force paid homage to those who made the ultimate sacrifice in the war on terrorism, and painted a picture of the road that lies ahead.

RELATED LINKS
Dr. James G. Roche
While much has been accomplished, said Dr. James G. Roche, there is much left to do.

"We've achieved many of our objectives, but there remains much work to be done," Roche said at the Worldwide First Sergeant's Conference held recently in Jacksonville, Fla.

"We can't afford to get complacent or think for a moment we've got this enemy beaten," he said. "We need to prepare and resolve ourselves to see this through to the finish, regardless of where the fight takes us."

The forces of al-Qaida, he warned, are hard at work plotting their next acts of terror.

"They are a determined enemy and are likely now working on their next plan," he said. "We need to and will do our part to stop that from happening."

As armed conflicts go, casualties in the war on terrorism have been relatively light, but the secretary asked the assembled first sergeants to remember the airmen who paid the ultimate price.

"Let's never forget the seven of our fellow airmen who have lost their lives in this fight. Their collective sacrifice, along with the countless heroes who have gone before them, is why we live free in this great country," Roche said.

Those fallen airmen include:

-- Master Sgt. Evander Andrews, a civil engineer from Mountain Home Air Force Base, Idaho;

-- Master Sgt. William McDaniel II, a pararescueman from Kadena Air Base, Japan;

-- Tech. Sgt. John Chapman, a combat controller from Pope AFB, N.C.;

-- Tech. Sgt. Sean Corlew, an MC-130 Combat Shadow loadmaster from Hurlburt Field, Fla.;

-- Staff Sgt. Juan Ridout, a pararescueman from Kadena;

-- Staff Sgt. Anissa Shero, an MC-130 loadmaster from Hurlburt; and

-- Senior Airman Jason Cunningham, a pararescueman from Moody AFB, Ga.

Switching gears, the secretary turned his attention to challenges and priorities facing the service today.

"It's a very exciting time to be in our Air Force," he said. "As I think about our opportunities, I remain focused on the current century, not the (one) we left behind. As we look to the future, I ask you to briefly think about where we've been. We restructured and reorganized our force to meet a variety of threats versus a single threat, and we developed new ways of delivering military capability."

Of primary concern for both the near-term and long-range future, he said, is the expeditionary concept of operations.

"Fundamental to this effort is our transition to a capabilities-based expeditionary force," he said. "We need to make warfighting effects, and the capabilities we need to achieve them, the driving factor for everything we do."

To that end, the secretary said he and Air Force Chief of Staff Gen. John P. Jumper have several institutional challenges to keep in mind, including saving money, employing platforms and evaluating strategies.

"We must find ways to reduce costs through the integration of enterprise systems, adoption of best practices and smarter management," he said.

According to the secretary, weapons delivery, intelligence gathering, interdiction and transport do not necessarily need to be assigned exclusively to large aircraft or small, to manned or unmanned systems, or to space.

"We need to continue our development of advanced technologies, such as (unmanned aerial vehicles), smaller weapons and multimission aircraft," he said. "We will never again build a single-mission aircraft."

Continued refinement of the air and space expeditionary force construct is also on the secretary's agenda.

"We need to continue to evaluate our AEF strategies to better deliver combat capability and manage the tempo of our operations for our combat support and low density/high demand assets -- a title we need to retire in our time," he said.

28 posted on 01/10/2003 8:27:18 AM PST by DWar
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To: DWar
Greeting DWar, FReepers, et al: Everytime we proudly salute the USA flag, we honor the sacrifice of America's heros.

Red reminds us an American patriot's blood spilled for our freedom.

White reminds us tears were shed by an American family, when that precious blood spilled for our freedom.

Lest we never forget the priceless maintenance costs for the first flag of free people.

29 posted on 01/10/2003 8:28:18 AM PST by OneLoyalAmerican (Yes, typing this brought tears to my eyes.)
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To: TomB
The thread should be deleted and reposted to accurately reflect the story. The guy may have been a hero, but the Air Force Cross is most definitely NOT the Congressional Medal of Honor.
30 posted on 01/10/2003 8:29:51 AM PST by clintonh8r
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To: DWar
Bravo Zulu, Sergeant.

May God Bless his family, and may his children grow up knowing their daddy was a real hero.
31 posted on 01/10/2003 8:36:51 AM PST by Taxman
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To: clintonh8r
Sorry, if I posted the Fox News story was inaccurate. I'm still not sure whether it was or not until I can locate an official Air Force source for it. However, my purpose in posting the event was to honor the memory of a fallen American hero to whom I owe a debt of gratitude. It is important to "get it right" with regard to the award issued. And it is important to honor this brave American.
32 posted on 01/10/2003 8:37:49 AM PST by DWar
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To: clintonh8r
Please be aware that there is no such thing as a 'Congressional Medal of Honor'. The award is 'The Medal of Honor'. The Congressional thing is something that gets added on by a lot of folks, but its not part of the award name.
33 posted on 01/10/2003 8:38:21 AM PST by AzSteven
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To: dakine
The Air Force Cross is the highest decoration bestowed by the Air force!

The Congressional Medal of Honor is awarded by Congress.

The Presidential Medal of freedom is awarded by the President. Precision please!

Notwithsatnding that little rant, I saw the ceremony on Fox News. It was moving. The widow and daughters were brave! The parents were stalwart! I was misty eyed.

Hand salute! A moment of silence for our comrade-in-arms!

34 posted on 01/10/2003 8:42:17 AM PST by Young Werther
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To: OneLoyalAmerican
Heros All


Profiles of America's Fallen Heroes







Monday, July 22, 2002

Since the war on terror began in October, American soldiers have given their lives in defense of their country. They come from all over America and share one thing — they made the ultimate sacrifice in the name of freedom.


• Air Force Staff Sgt. Anissa A. Shero, Grafton, W.Va.

• Air Force Tech Sgt. Sean M. Corlew, Thousand Oaks, Calif.

• Master Sgt. Peter Tycz, Tonawanda, N.Y.

• Sgt. Gene Arden Vance Jr., Morgantown, W.Va.

• Army Staff Sgt. Brian T. Craig, Houston, Texas

• Sgt. 1st Class Daniel A. Romero, Lafayette, Colo.

• Sgt. Jamie Maugans, Wichita, Kan.

• Staff Sgt. Justin J. Galewski, Olathe, Kan.

• Chief Petty Officer Matthew J. Bourgeois, Tallahassee, Fla.

• Spc. Marc A. Anderson, Brandon, Fla.

• Army Pfc. Matthew A. Commons, Boulder City, Nev.

• Air Force Senior Airman Jason Cunningham, Camarillo, Calif.

• Army Sgt. Philip J. Svitak, Joplin, Mo.

• Petty Officer 1st Class Neil Roberts, Woodland, Calif.

• Tech. Sgt. John A. Chapman, Waco, Texas

• Sgt. Bradley Crose, Orange Park, Fla.

• Chief Warrant Officer Stanley L. Harriman, Wade, N.C.

• Staff Sgt. Walter 'Trae' Cohee III, Mardela Springs, Md.

• Sgt. Dwight J. Morgan, Mendocino, Calif.

• Capt. Matthew Bancroft, Burney, Calif.

• Capt. Dan McCollum, Irmo, S.C.

• Gunnery Sgt. Stephen L. Bryson, Montgomery, Ala.

• Staff Sgt. Scott Germonsen, Coram, N.Y.

• Marine Sgt. Nathan P. Hays, Wilbur, Wash.

• Lance Cpl. Bryan Bertrand, Coos Bay, Ore.

• Sgt. Jeannette L. Winters, Gary, Ind.

• Sgt. 1st Class Nathan Ross Chapman, San Antonio, Texas

• Staff Sgt. Brian Cody Prosser, Frazier Park, Calif.

• Master Sgt. Jefferson Donald Davis, Clarksville, Tenn.

• Sgt. Daniel Petithory, Chesire, Mass.

• CIA Officer Johnny 'Mike' Spann, Winfield, Ala.

• Pfc. Kristofer Tif Stonesifer, Doylestown, Pa.

• Spc. Jonn Joseph Edmunds, Cheyenne, Wyo.

• Master Sgt. Evander Earl Andrews, Solon, Maine



35 posted on 01/10/2003 8:43:47 AM PST by DWar
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To: i are a cowboy
I always thought it was called the Congressional Medal of Honor.

Not true.

36 posted on 01/10/2003 8:43:52 AM PST by Poohbah (When you aren't looking, this tagline says something else.)
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To: i are a cowboy
No, it is the Medal of Honor. It has to be approved by Congress.
37 posted on 01/10/2003 8:45:30 AM PST by SAMS
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To: RoughDobermann
Give it to this guy
38 posted on 01/10/2003 8:45:59 AM PST by 91B
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To: Young Werther
Correction, it is the Medal of Honor. Awarded by congress.
39 posted on 01/10/2003 8:47:50 AM PST by SAMS
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To: DWar
It is a military tradition to render a hand salute when encountering someone wearing the Medal of Honor. This is done irregardless of rank.
40 posted on 01/10/2003 9:12:27 AM PST by Electron Wizard
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To: 91B
Hackworth's stuff reads like an Iraqi romance novel.
41 posted on 01/10/2003 9:23:02 AM PST by SandfleaCSC
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To: DWar; Admin Moderator; harpseal; Travis McGee
FOX News just reported this as the Air force cross the third since Vietnam for Airmen........Serious possible error here Dwar .....
42 posted on 01/10/2003 9:23:10 AM PST by Squantos (Stay Safe Ya'll !)
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To: Electron Wizard
I attended Squadron Officer School in the Fall of '68. One of my classmates was a Thud driver with two Air Force Crosses!

What really knocked our socks off was one particular Dining Out, (where wives are invited!). There, in the receiving line, was an officer who was wearing his lettuce but what stood out was that little blue ribbon with the stars.

Ain't many people wearin' that thing and walkin' about. Hand Salute!

43 posted on 01/10/2003 9:26:43 AM PST by Young Werther
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To: Admin Moderator; DWar
http://www.fayettevillenc.com/story.php?Template=military&Story=5392734

44 posted on 01/10/2003 9:26:46 AM PST by Squantos (Stay Safe Ya'll !)
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To: DWar
This young man deserves the Congressional Medal of Honor and I hope that is what he received.

There is only one award called the medal of honor in the U.S. military. Take my word for it folks I am on active duty as a senior officer. It is the Congressional Medal of Honor. There is poosibly a version for each service, but the congress of the US must award it, and th President is the one who presents it.
45 posted on 01/10/2003 9:28:04 AM PST by CombatEngineer
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To: Squantos
I fixed it.
46 posted on 01/10/2003 9:54:45 AM PST by Admin Moderator
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To: CombatEngineer
>>Take my word for it folks I am on active duty as a senior officer.<<

Why am I not convinced. (See below)

>>It is the Congressional Medal of Honor.<<

You mean the Medal of Honor.

>>There is poosibly a version for each service,<<

Ding, Ding, Ding! "Possibly"??!! ANY officer, especially a "senior officer" knows each service had their own medal design. No "possibly" about it.

Cheers.
47 posted on 01/10/2003 9:57:35 AM PST by Gunrunner2
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To: DWar
"While under fire he attacked and secured an enemy machine gun position and immediately began attacking another."

Thank God for such men as Sgt. John Chapman.

"No greater love hath any man, than he should lay down his life for another."

Was John Chapman killed in the battle where John Walker (Taliban Johnnie) was captured?

48 posted on 01/10/2003 10:04:48 AM PST by Happy2BMe (Be Kind to Animals - Beware of Humans)
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To: DWar
Semper Fi bump
49 posted on 01/10/2003 10:08:48 AM PST by fnord (A man with two watches never knows what time it is ...)
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To: DWar
My step father Aubry Johnson earned the flying cross in Vietnam for giving ground cover for a fellow downed pilot and the rescue team even after he was hit. He was one of the few to earn this medel and live to tell it.
50 posted on 01/10/2003 10:14:13 AM PST by Steve Van Doorn
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