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The treachery of the French: Samuel Blumenfeld says nation cannot be trusted, master of betrayal
WorldNetDaily.com ^ | Sunday, February 2, 2003 | Samuel Blumenfeld

Posted on 02/02/2003 1:45:11 AM PST by JohnHuang2

Ever since Charles de Gaulle turned over French Algeria to the communist Arabs in 1962, forcing an exodus of over a million Europeans to metropolitan France, I've had nothing but contempt for France's foreign policy. That act of betrayal has had a profound effect on France's body politic – which has lacked integrity ever since.

It should be remembered that France conquered Algeria in the 1840s to stop the depredations of the Barbary thugs. Europeans then settled there by the hundreds of thousands, turning Algeria into a peaceful, thriving and productive part of the French empire.

And while Europeans took to the boats and fled Algeria – leaving behind farms, businesses and homes, Algeria became another socialist hell-hole. And so, Algerians have continued to migrate to France, finding it impossible to live in a country where Islamic terrorists slit the throats of children asleep in their beds.

Prior to de Gaulle's betrayal, France had been a strong ally of Israel, but when it surrendered Algeria to the Arabs, it then became pro-Arab. Thus, the French not only betrayed their own people in Algeria, but also the Christian Maronites in Lebanon as well as the Israelis.

It was the French who helped Saddam Hussein build the nuclear reactor, which the Israelis destroyed in 1981 in an amazingly skillful attack. "The central building is entirely collapsed," said one of the French technicians who flew back to Paris after the attack. "The atomic reactor is unreachable and the anti-radiation shield has disappeared." The Frenchman also reported that one of the bombs did not explode, thereby making it impossible to rebuild the reactor without first destroying everything that remains.

The technician complimented the Israelis on their skill. "The precision of the attack was stupefying. The Israelis chose their hour perfectly to avoid the maximum loss of human life."

Of course, Israel was condemned by the international community – the United Nations, Arabs and their sympathizers – for sparing the world a decade of nuclear threat from Saddam. When John Phillips, a Princeton student who had written a paper on how to build an atomic bomb, was approached by a Pakistani who wanted to buy his plan, he reported the incident to the FBI. He had no doubt that Iraq was building an atomic bomb with the technical help of the French. "France is the whore of nuclear proliferation," he said.

So it's no surprise that France, as of this writing, opposes President Bush's intention of getting rid of Saddam Hussein once and for all. Why? Are they actually helping Saddam build an atomic bomb in a clandestine way? Its chief use would be to threaten Israel. But that wouldn't bother the French. Their government has become a master of betrayal and it cannot be trusted because it has no moral standards, no moral backbone.

The glory of France is a thing of the past. Its brief period of great benign advance in the 19th century, when it built a brilliant colonial empire which liberated millions of Africans from disease and backwardness, came to an end when de Gaulle jettisoned the whole fabulous enterprise. And the result is an Africa in ruins and disease. De Gaulle, the destroyer, set France on its present path of wholesale betrayal of Western values. The country is now overrun by Muslims, and its philosophers have contributed the last chapter in the descent to philosophical insanity: deconstructionism.

France has become irrelevant to the great tasks that confront the Bush administration. Apart from providing us with fine perfumes, wines and cheeses, the French are incapable of saving Western civilization. Nor do they really want to. That job has been left to us.


TOPICS: Editorial; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events
KEYWORDS:
Sunday, February 2, 2003

Quote of the Day by monocle

1 posted on 02/02/2003 1:45:11 AM PST by JohnHuang2
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To: JohnHuang2; Bear_in_RoseBear
Oh, my! Ping-a-ring-a-ding-ding!
2 posted on 02/02/2003 1:50:58 AM PST by Rose in RoseBear (HHD [... tell us what you really think of France! ...])
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To: JohnHuang2
...apart from providing us with fine perfumes, wines and cheeses, the French are incapable of saving Western civilization. Nor do they really want to. That job has been left to us....


3 posted on 02/02/2003 2:00:09 AM PST by Byron_the_Aussie
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To: JohnHuang2
You sir are far to kind towards the French.
4 posted on 02/02/2003 2:01:10 AM PST by Joe Boucher
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To: JohnHuang2
In all honesty, Eisenhower gave de Gaulle the push. Right after the Second World War, both Britain and France nourished hopes of maintaining their prewar empires. After Nasser nationalized the Suez Canal, the French and British moved to retake it, only to be turned back by the 6th Fleet. French military strategy after the Second War was dominated by fantasy. They had the idea that a few elite troops, supported by a handful of aircraft, would compensate with elan, for what they lacked in punch.

The French fought the war in Indochina with a veritable pastiche of weapons, including Japanese and German surplus and castoff USN propdriven aircraft. Fantasy was no match for reality and the French were humiliated both in Indochina and Algeria.

America, more than anyone else, knew that the day of the District Commissioner was over. Deep down, the French knew it too, but they resented America most for not having an overseas empire to lose.

The French riposte to these setbacks was to withdraw entirely into a make-believe world. They acquired a small nuclear arsenal, and pointed it at everybody. They then plotted a return to world power based on the notion of "a French jockey on a German horse", a.k.a. the European Union.

But that world power was based on the flawed premise that they would hold the swing vote in a world finely balanced between two superpowers. That power was to be wielded in the United Nations, which was designed specifically to settle the disputes of several great powers. When the Berlin Wall collapsed, the underpinnings of French strategy and the reason for the UN's existence fell with it.

France is desperately embarked on a strategy to recreate a coalition to check the United States. In this effort, it will find a sympathetic hearing from every other aspirational power. Individually, they are overmatched, but severally, they may present a force. The anti-American coalition must be the most ill-assorted agglomeration in world history, consisting of medieval and modern societies, united only in their desire to stop the USA.

Yet such a coalition will prove unstable, as all alliances founded on the purely negative must become. Thieves part ways once the loot is divvied up. The American effort, by contrast, consists of the core set of societies who share a common set of values.
5 posted on 02/02/2003 2:28:21 AM PST by wretchard
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To: wretchard
Excellent commentary.
6 posted on 02/02/2003 2:32:47 AM PST by Caipirabob ([Formerly: Yakboy] Democrat.. Socialist..Commie..Traitor...Who can tell the difference?)
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To: Caipirabob
bump
7 posted on 02/02/2003 2:56:34 AM PST by expatguy
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To: wretchard
Thank you for your comments.
8 posted on 02/02/2003 2:57:17 AM PST by DB ()
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Comment #9 Removed by Moderator

To: wretchard
Fantasy was no match for reality and the French were humiliated both in Indochina and Algeria.

Yes, humiliated AND and joke to this day

10 posted on 02/02/2003 3:14:27 AM PST by Bad~Rodeo
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To: wretchard
Hmm... I'm comparing your post to the juvenile graphic posted by Byron the Aussie, and I'm having SUCH a hard time deciding which one provides more substance.
11 posted on 02/02/2003 3:31:49 AM PST by tictoc
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To: wretchard
"They then plotted a return to world power based on the notion of "a French jockey on a German horse", a.k.a. the European Union."

The French may want to try game theory, to support this outcome?
12 posted on 02/02/2003 4:13:27 AM PST by DUMBGRUNT
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To: JohnHuang2
A history professor once told me that the more he studied history the less sure he felt about when an event started and when it ended. As a history major, I have concurred with this statement many times.

The French are one of the most polluted cultures and societies in history and continue to fall. However, it goes back much further than Algeria. Some specifics that come to my mind right now are Joan of Arc and the French betrayal of her cause, the French Revolution and how barbaric savagery was embraced by the citizens of that country, and my "piece de resistance" The Dreyfuss Affair which brought down the French Government and is a tragedy to this day (see http://www.pbs.org/newshour/essays/january98/rosenblatt_1-13.html).

J'Accuse!!!

13 posted on 02/02/2003 5:49:03 AM PST by wireplay
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To: wireplay
The French are one of the most polluted cultures and societies in history and continue to fall.

When one contemplates just how influential the French Reign of Terror was on people like Jefferson, one walks away with a profound sense of relief that the pollution was opposed by thoughtful men, many of whom were unfairly vilified at the time (Washington, et al).

14 posted on 02/02/2003 6:45:40 AM PST by niteowl77
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To: JohnHuang2
European world dominance was killed by the internicine battles of WWI and WWII. All the Europeans - not just the French - lost the financial and military capabilities necessary to defend their possessions.

The empires were probably unsustainable anyway considering the demographics and the unstoppable spread of technology.

Regardless of the superiority of European cultures and their undoubted ability to provide peace and prosperity to previously benighted countries, they were tyrannies from the point of view of the natives because they treated them as subservient inferiors. Human beings never willingly accept that status.

By the way, I find many Frenchmen and much about their culture to be admirable.

15 posted on 02/02/2003 7:31:33 AM PST by liberallarry
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To: JohnHuang2
As always, your post was well conceived and thought provoking. It makes me recall how the French, erroneously following Rousseau's notion of the "General Will", allowed themselves to plunge into the abyss of "the Terror". Once committed to class struggle and the trap of using terror in their quest for "virtue", they ceded the core values of their revolution to the likes of Monsieur Robespierre. Soon the republic was lost to Imperial Napoleon. And so it has been for France, one betrayal after another: The Maid and the Burgundians; Conde; Henry of Navarre; Robespierre, Marat et al; Dreyfus; Petain and his Vichy; De Gaulle and the Algerians...their history is so pockmarked by the treacherous betrayal of idealism that it will never recover. As a backdrop to this sad scene, we must include an ancient and virulent strain of anti-Semitism that has chronically festered since Louis IX launched his medieval diaspora and which, sadly, continues unabated.
16 posted on 02/02/2003 10:44:03 AM PST by CharlesThe Hammer (Edmund Burke was right.)
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To: sphinx; Toirdhealbheach Beucail; curmudgeonII; roderick; Notforprophet; river rat; csvset; ...
Some recent French history ping, especially some of the posts.

If you want on or off the Western Civilization Military History ping list, let me know.
17 posted on 02/02/2003 11:40:01 AM PST by Sparta (Statism is a mental illness)
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To: wretchard; JohnHuang2
Also, remember the recent French surrender of the Ivory Coast to Islamofascist rebels.
18 posted on 02/02/2003 11:41:21 AM PST by Sparta (Statism is a mental illness)
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To: JohnHuang2
Is this the SAME Samuel Blumenfeld that writes about the public schools,and has various educational books out?
19 posted on 02/02/2003 11:44:45 AM PST by mommadooo3
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To: JohnHuang2
Froggie bttt
20 posted on 02/02/2003 11:47:11 AM PST by lodwick (God bless America)
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To: Sparta
<===Mash This

French Army to Market "Ultimate Surrender" Video Game

Paris - Inspired by the commercial success of the United States Army’s "Boot Camp" video game, the General Staff of the French Army has announced plans to market "Ultimate Surrender," a video game based upon the proud military traditions of the Gauls.

In the game we follow the exploits of Lucky Pierre, an apprentice garlic salesman from Marseilles, as he joins the French Army and begins a rigorous course of combat training.

The First Level of the game is called "Survival School," and the players have to help Lucky Pierre survive 24 hours without red wine or crème brulé.

The Second Level is "Capitulation," and the goal here is to see which player can have Lucky Pierre surrender the fastest without firing a shot or getting his uniform dirty.

Level Three is "Collaboration." Here the players battle to see who can collect the largest numbers of pairs of nylon stockings and packages of chocolates by having Lucky Pierre perform sexual favors for members of the occupying forces.

Level Four is "Be Ungrateful to America for Rescuing Your Sorry French Ass Once Again." In this extremely challenging part of the game contestants vie with one another to see who can make Lucky Pierre behave in the surliest manner when the United States inevitably comes to the rescue of the defeated French.

The Final Level is "Pretending to Have Been in the Resistance." Here contestants compete in a battle of tall tales and whoppers as they try to protect Lucky Pierre from treason charges.

Marketing tests show that "Ultimate Surrender" is a big hit with French teenagers and young adults who are too young to have experienced France’s lightening surrender to the Germans in 1940 or its defeat by the Vietnamese in 1954 at Dien Bien Phu. "Zees is a great tool to inspire ze patriotism in ze youths, n’est ce pas?" said General Jean-Jacques Loseur, Commander-in-Chief of the French Army, during his weekly press conference. "Since ze end of ze Cold War we French have not had many opportunities to surrender or to show great cowardice in the face of much weaker opponents."

When questioned about comments made in the French Chamber of Deputies that "Ultimate Surrender" makes the French Army look like a bunch of gutless mama’s boys, General Loseur pulled out a white handkerchief, put his hands over his head and said, "Oh heck, I give up."

21 posted on 02/02/2003 11:59:45 AM PST by SAMWolf (To look into the eyes of the wolf is to see your soul)
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To: JohnHuang2
France saw how when the EU did nothing in Bosnia and Kosovo the US Solved it so they will NEVER again come to even aid those countries in their own back yard. Cowards.
Germany will not honor NATO obligations because they don’t believe Iraq is a threat to them. Cowards

See: http://www.theworld.org/latesteditions/20030129.html
January 29, 2003

French / German interview (8:00)

Lisa Mullen of the The World interviews two ruling in France and Germany on their lack of support on Iraq:
Hervy Mariton, a member of the French national assembly in Paris, and Gerd Weisskirchen, a high ranking member Parliament for Germany's ruling SPD party.

Lisa Mullins to Hervy Mariton :

“For those American who recall the major role that the US played in both Bosnia and Kosovo two conflicts in Europe’s own back yard can you assure Americans that Europe is not reluctant now to use force under any circumstances.”

"I mean there may be those who think that Europe is more willing now to sit back and let the US do the toughest part of the job- that being waging the war.”

HervŽ Mariton- “It may the case."
22 posted on 02/02/2003 10:28:24 PM PST by Kay Soze
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To: m1911
weasley french ping
23 posted on 02/03/2003 7:58:37 AM PST by CapandBall
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