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Debris Photos (GRAPHIC)
Yahoo News photos ^ | 2/2/03 | freepers

Posted on 02/02/2003 7:34:59 AM PST by Mark Felton

Edited on 02/02/2003 12:51:23 PM PST by Admin Moderator. [history]

[Your attention please. This thread has generated a ton of abuse reports. Some have been from long established freepers. Others have been from relative newbies. Some have been complaining about the thread. Others have been complaining about the complainers.

Throw on top of it the fact that some of the newbies who showed up on this thread happen to be returning bannees, who before being banned were friendly with some of the very people they are bickering with here, and something is striking us as just not right.

If you are interested in the debris photos, this is the thread for it. If not, don't join in this thread. It is not disrespectful to those who died to post pictures of the debris in our opinion. What they show and where they landed may help piece together what killed these brave people.

If you feel that is the wrong decision, we apologize and mean no harm. But please, no more arguing about it on the thread, and no more abuse reports on the matter.

Thanks, AM.]

Fires, believed started by debris from the downed space shuttle Columbia, burn in an area near Dallas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Seven astronauts perished when the shuttle broke to pieces as it re-entered the atmosphere at the end of a 16-day mission. (AP Photo/Joe Cavaretta)
Sun Feb 2, 1:14 AM ET

Fires, believed started by debris from the downed space shuttle Columbia, burn in an area near Dallas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Seven astronauts perished when the shuttle broke to pieces as it re-entered the atmosphere at the end of a 16-day mission. (AP Photo/Joe Cavaretta)



A video image of a helmet that dropped into a yard in Norwood Community, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia is seen Feb. 1, 2002. Many parts of the shuttle, along with human remains, were found in the area. NASA officials later removed the helmet. (Rick Wilking/Reuters)
Sat Feb 1, 9:31 PM ET

A video image of a helmet that dropped into a yard in Norwood Community, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia is seen Feb. 1, 2002. Many parts of the shuttle, along with human remains, were found in the area. NASA (news - web sites) officials later removed the helmet. (Rick Wilking/Reuters)



A small brush fire started by a falling piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Athens, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during re-entry over Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Fla., Feb. 1, 2003. Authorities have not speculated on the cause of the crash. (Jeff Mitchell/Reuters)
Sat Feb 1,10:35 PM ET

A small brush fire started by a falling piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Athens, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during re-entry over Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Fla., Feb. 1, 2003. Authorities have not speculated on the cause of the crash. (Jeff Mitchell/Reuters)


A piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia is photographed near Lufkin, Texas, Feb. 1, 2003. NASA lost contact with the shuttle at around 9 a.m., about 16 minutes before its scheduled landing at Kennedy Space Center. (Reuters)
Sat Feb 1, 9:31 PM ET

A piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia is photographed near Lufkin, Texas, Feb. 1, 2003. NASA (news - web sites) lost contact with the shuttle at around 9 a.m., about 16 minutes before its scheduled landing at Kennedy Space Center (news - web sites). (Reuters)


Goldie Hamilton looks at a piece of debris that dropped into her yard in Alto, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia February 1, 2003. Many parts of the shuttle along with human remains were found in the area. Hamilton lives in the house in the background. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sat Feb 1, 9:15 PM ET

Goldie Hamilton looks at a piece of debris that dropped into her yard in Alto, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia February 1, 2003. Many parts of the shuttle along with human remains were found in the area. Hamilton lives in the house in the background. REUTERS/Rick Wilking


A piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia dropped into this yard in Alto, Texas, February 1, 2003. Debris from space shuttle Columbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sat Feb 1, 9:18 PM ET

A piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia dropped into this yard in Alto, Texas, February 1, 2003. Debris from space shuttle Columbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking



Stan Melasky, left, and his brother Steve Melasky look over a piece of debris, believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia, that fell on their farm near Douglass, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)
Sat Feb 1, 7:43 PM ET

Stan Melasky, left, and his brother Steve Melasky look over a piece of debris, believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia, that fell on their farm near Douglass, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)


An Anderson County sheriff's deputy walks past a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Palestine, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during reentry over East Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Florida, February 1, 2003. Shaken NASA officials vowed to find out what caused the space shuttle Columbia to break up, saying they would look closely at the impact of a piece of foam insulation that struck the orbiter's left wing at takeoff. REUTERS/Jeff Mitchell
Sat Feb 1, 8:52 PM ET

An Anderson County sheriff's deputy walks past a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Palestine, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during reentry over East Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Florida, February 1, 2003. Shaken NASA (news - web sites) officials vowed to find out what caused the space shuttle Columbia to break up, saying they would look closely at the impact of a piece of foam insulation that struck the orbiter's left wing at takeoff. REUTERS/Jeff Mitchell


A piece of space shuttle debris sits on the ground outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Sat Feb 1, 7:25 PM ET

A piece of space shuttle debris sits on the ground outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)


Searchers mark a small piece of debris while looking for remnants of the space shuttle outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Sat Feb 1, 7:29 PM ET

Searchers mark a small piece of debris while looking for remnants of the space shuttle outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)


Resident Bugs Arriola looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2003 in Nacogdoches, Texas. People have been told not to touch any of the debris as there could be toxic chemicals on the material. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)
Sun Feb 2,10:11 AM ET

Resident Bugs Arriola looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2003 in Nacogdoches, Texas. People have been told not to touch any of the debris as there could be toxic chemicals on the material. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)


Vollunteer firefigher John Berry looks out at small piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia in a rural area north of Palestine, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. The shuttle broke apart in flames over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Sat Feb 1, 7:41 PM ET

Vollunteer firefigher John Berry looks out at small piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia in a rural area north of Palestine, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. The shuttle broke apart in flames over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/LM Otero)


A couple looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia that dropped onto the highway in Alto, Texas February 1, 2003. Debris fromColumbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sat Feb 1, 9:23 PM ET

A couple looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia that dropped onto the highway in Alto, Texas February 1, 2003. Debris fromColumbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking


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To: Thinkin' Gal
Dang Gal...you are good.
301 posted on 02/02/2003 1:47:11 PM PST by Bloody Sam Roberts ()
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To: Bloody Sam Roberts
bookmark for later
302 posted on 02/02/2003 1:48:43 PM PST by Double Tap
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To: BearWash; Jeremiah Jr; 2sheep; Prodigal Daughter
"even with a band of iron and brass"

(doesn't say aluminum, titanium, and copper, but close enough for government work.)

Note the word translated as brass:

05174 n@chash (Aramaic) {nekh-awsh'}
corresponding to 05154; TWOT - 2858; n m
AV - brass 9; 9

1) copper, bronze

***

Thank you.

303 posted on 02/02/2003 1:51:18 PM PST by Thinkin' Gal
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To: Mark Felton; Gorzaloon
Found in Nacogdoches, approximately 12" long


304 posted on 02/02/2003 1:51:50 PM PST by Lady Jag (Googolplex Start Thinker of the Seventh Galaxy of Light and Ingenuity)
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To: Thud


305 posted on 02/02/2003 1:53:46 PM PST by kcvl
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To: sneakypete
"Many are experts in their fields, many are near-geniuses."

Near? Just near? :)

And many are just near fields.

And some are outstanding in their fields.:)

306 posted on 02/02/2003 1:53:46 PM PST by Balata
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To: Arkinsaw
#34 & #149
 
Are these REALLY shoe soles??
 
They look like where the feet would be anchored to the floor (deck?) so you wouldn't go drifting off while you were performing some job function that required a bunch of physical movement.
 
Kinda like those aluminum things in the shoe store to size your feet.
 
(Anyone got a picture of an EVA suit?)

307 posted on 02/02/2003 1:56:13 PM PST by Elsie (I trust in Jesus.... THOUSANDS OF EXISTING MANUSCRIPTS speak of Him!)
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To: amom
That looks like an artifact of zooming in at an extremely bright object - though the DARK areas are interesting.
308 posted on 02/02/2003 1:57:56 PM PST by lepton
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To: Elsie
OK, let me rephrase. You can read the text while waiting for the pictures to download. Otherwise, you stare at a blank screen until the entire thing is downloaded.
309 posted on 02/02/2003 1:58:23 PM PST by snopercod
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To: kcvl

Wow!

Did this BOUNCE over after the impact or did someone ROLL it over?


310 posted on 02/02/2003 1:59:56 PM PST by Elsie (I trust in Jesus.... THOUSANDS OF EXISTING MANUSCRIPTS speak of Him!)
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To: Balata


311 posted on 02/02/2003 2:01:51 PM PST by kcvl
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To: deziner; Ronaldus Magnus
"are you saying the folks from DU were gleeful about what happened yesterday? If so, that's AWFUL!!!!"

How is this for one of the more 'tasteful' remarks from DU:


"Where is our "fearless leader"?
Just as some other people have said...lost in space "
312 posted on 02/02/2003 2:02:06 PM PST by XBob
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To: Elsie

A charred piece of debris believed to be from the shuttle was found in Palestine, Texas. Debris, which officials warned could be toxic, was scattered across east Texas.

313 posted on 02/02/2003 2:02:13 PM PST by Lady Jag (Googolplex Start Thinker of the Seventh Galaxy of Light and Ingenuity)
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To: sciencediet

314 posted on 02/02/2003 2:04:43 PM PST by kcvl
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To: Elsie

Larry Epps shows how close he was to being hit with debris from the Columbia space shuttle at his home near San Augustine, Texas, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2003. Epps said the part missed him by about 15 feet. After the shuttle broke up Saturday over eastern Texas, fragments of the shuttle were sent showering to the ground. (AP Photo/Eric Gay)

315 posted on 02/02/2003 2:05:43 PM PST by kcvl
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To: kcvl

Why is THIS barn BLUE?
316 posted on 02/02/2003 2:06:25 PM PST by Elsie (I trust in Jesus.... THOUSANDS OF EXISTING MANUSCRIPTS speak of Him!)
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To: freepersup
Looks like Columbia went from a 57 degree bank to going sideways, left wing forward, while on a horizontal plane. Is that a 90 degree bank?

Re-entering with the left wing forward would certainly explain the burn-through starting there. I don't know if that is what happened, though. Did it leave the 57 degree bank due to other problems, most likely a burn-through, or did the loss of control cause the burn-through?

317 posted on 02/02/2003 2:09:57 PM PST by Thud
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To: Thinkin' Gal
I've lost track of whether it was mentioned on this thread, but one of the first videos of debris burning clearly showed the shape of a tree in the form of the charred groundcover. Someone mentioned it looked like the tree on the flag of Lebanon (I have not seen the flag myself). This was the video that showed two people and a dog (I think) walking around the edge of the charred area. Whether it looked like a pine tree, an olive tree, or what, it was most definitely a distinct tree shape.
318 posted on 02/02/2003 2:10:03 PM PST by steve86
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To: sneakypete
Today, quite a few farmers in east Texas are out standing in their fields.
319 posted on 02/02/2003 2:10:03 PM PST by Erasmus
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To: kcvl
Thanks. See my No. 317.
320 posted on 02/02/2003 2:12:09 PM PST by Thud
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