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Debris Photos (GRAPHIC)
Yahoo News photos ^ | 2/2/03 | freepers

Posted on 02/02/2003 7:34:59 AM PST by Mark Felton

Edited on 02/02/2003 12:51:23 PM PST by Admin Moderator. [history]

[Your attention please. This thread has generated a ton of abuse reports. Some have been from long established freepers. Others have been from relative newbies. Some have been complaining about the thread. Others have been complaining about the complainers.

Throw on top of it the fact that some of the newbies who showed up on this thread happen to be returning bannees, who before being banned were friendly with some of the very people they are bickering with here, and something is striking us as just not right.

If you are interested in the debris photos, this is the thread for it. If not, don't join in this thread. It is not disrespectful to those who died to post pictures of the debris in our opinion. What they show and where they landed may help piece together what killed these brave people.

If you feel that is the wrong decision, we apologize and mean no harm. But please, no more arguing about it on the thread, and no more abuse reports on the matter.

Thanks, AM.]

Fires, believed started by debris from the downed space shuttle Columbia, burn in an area near Dallas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Seven astronauts perished when the shuttle broke to pieces as it re-entered the atmosphere at the end of a 16-day mission. (AP Photo/Joe Cavaretta)
Sun Feb 2, 1:14 AM ET

Fires, believed started by debris from the downed space shuttle Columbia, burn in an area near Dallas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Seven astronauts perished when the shuttle broke to pieces as it re-entered the atmosphere at the end of a 16-day mission. (AP Photo/Joe Cavaretta)



A video image of a helmet that dropped into a yard in Norwood Community, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia is seen Feb. 1, 2002. Many parts of the shuttle, along with human remains, were found in the area. NASA officials later removed the helmet. (Rick Wilking/Reuters)
Sat Feb 1, 9:31 PM ET

A video image of a helmet that dropped into a yard in Norwood Community, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia is seen Feb. 1, 2002. Many parts of the shuttle, along with human remains, were found in the area. NASA (news - web sites) officials later removed the helmet. (Rick Wilking/Reuters)



A small brush fire started by a falling piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Athens, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during re-entry over Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Fla., Feb. 1, 2003. Authorities have not speculated on the cause of the crash. (Jeff Mitchell/Reuters)
Sat Feb 1,10:35 PM ET

A small brush fire started by a falling piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Athens, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during re-entry over Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Fla., Feb. 1, 2003. Authorities have not speculated on the cause of the crash. (Jeff Mitchell/Reuters)


A piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia is photographed near Lufkin, Texas, Feb. 1, 2003. NASA lost contact with the shuttle at around 9 a.m., about 16 minutes before its scheduled landing at Kennedy Space Center. (Reuters)
Sat Feb 1, 9:31 PM ET

A piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia is photographed near Lufkin, Texas, Feb. 1, 2003. NASA (news - web sites) lost contact with the shuttle at around 9 a.m., about 16 minutes before its scheduled landing at Kennedy Space Center (news - web sites). (Reuters)


Goldie Hamilton looks at a piece of debris that dropped into her yard in Alto, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia February 1, 2003. Many parts of the shuttle along with human remains were found in the area. Hamilton lives in the house in the background. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sat Feb 1, 9:15 PM ET

Goldie Hamilton looks at a piece of debris that dropped into her yard in Alto, Texas from the space shuttle Columbia February 1, 2003. Many parts of the shuttle along with human remains were found in the area. Hamilton lives in the house in the background. REUTERS/Rick Wilking


A piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia dropped into this yard in Alto, Texas, February 1, 2003. Debris from space shuttle Columbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sat Feb 1, 9:18 PM ET

A piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia dropped into this yard in Alto, Texas, February 1, 2003. Debris from space shuttle Columbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking



Stan Melasky, left, and his brother Steve Melasky look over a piece of debris, believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia, that fell on their farm near Douglass, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)
Sat Feb 1, 7:43 PM ET

Stan Melasky, left, and his brother Steve Melasky look over a piece of debris, believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia, that fell on their farm near Douglass, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)


An Anderson County sheriff's deputy walks past a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Palestine, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during reentry over East Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Florida, February 1, 2003. Shaken NASA officials vowed to find out what caused the space shuttle Columbia to break up, saying they would look closely at the impact of a piece of foam insulation that struck the orbiter's left wing at takeoff. REUTERS/Jeff Mitchell
Sat Feb 1, 8:52 PM ET

An Anderson County sheriff's deputy walks past a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia outside Palestine, Texas after the shuttle broke apart during reentry over East Texas on its way to a scheduled landing in Florida, February 1, 2003. Shaken NASA (news - web sites) officials vowed to find out what caused the space shuttle Columbia to break up, saying they would look closely at the impact of a piece of foam insulation that struck the orbiter's left wing at takeoff. REUTERS/Jeff Mitchell


A piece of space shuttle debris sits on the ground outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Sat Feb 1, 7:25 PM ET

A piece of space shuttle debris sits on the ground outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)


Searchers mark a small piece of debris while looking for remnants of the space shuttle outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)
Sat Feb 1, 7:29 PM ET

Searchers mark a small piece of debris while looking for remnants of the space shuttle outside Bronson, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. Space shuttle Columbia broke apart in flames 200,000 feet over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)


Resident Bugs Arriola looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2003 in Nacogdoches, Texas. People have been told not to touch any of the debris as there could be toxic chemicals on the material. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)
Sun Feb 2,10:11 AM ET

Resident Bugs Arriola looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia, Sunday, Feb. 2, 2003 in Nacogdoches, Texas. People have been told not to touch any of the debris as there could be toxic chemicals on the material. (AP Photo/Donna McWilliam)


Vollunteer firefigher John Berry looks out at small piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia in a rural area north of Palestine, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. The shuttle broke apart in flames over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/LM Otero)
Sat Feb 1, 7:41 PM ET

Vollunteer firefigher John Berry looks out at small piece of debris believed to be from the space shuttle Columbia in a rural area north of Palestine, Texas, Saturday, Feb. 1, 2003. The shuttle broke apart in flames over Texas on Saturday, killing all seven astronauts just minutes before they were to glide to a landing in Florida. (AP Photo/LM Otero)


A couple looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia that dropped onto the highway in Alto, Texas February 1, 2003. Debris fromColumbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking
Sat Feb 1, 9:23 PM ET

A couple looks at a piece of debris from the space shuttle Columbia that dropped onto the highway in Alto, Texas February 1, 2003. Debris fromColumbia rained down onto fields, highways and a cemetery in Texas on Saturday, sending dozens of residents to hospitals after they handled the smoldering metal wreckage. All seven astronauts on board were killed in the break-up, which scattered potentially toxic debris across a 120-mile (190-km-long) swath of eastern Texas. REUTERS/Rick Wilking


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To: mommadooo3; 2sheep; Jeremiah Jr; Prodigal Daughter
Just an insignificant observation....if you look at the first photo, in the upper right corner, is a lake that really resembles a dove carrying an 'olive branch'. Weird?

CLICK

51 posted on 02/02/2003 8:39:28 AM PST by Thinkin' Gal
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To: DesideriusErasmus
FreeRepublic is one of the few sites that has members from ALL professions of life. Many are experts in their fields, many are near-geniuses.

While they discuss and 'talk over' various things about the pictures they see, they come up with some good theories. AND, it's well-known, that there are govt. lurkers here. Who knows if a freeper discussion leads them in a direction they overlooked?

If these photos upset you, don't 'look' here. Unless of course, you come here just to complain.

52 posted on 02/02/2003 8:40:46 AM PST by mommadooo3
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To: Thinkin' Gal
Thanks. From one of your links is the following:

"In the 19th century, Columbia was recognized as the literary (inspired?) name of America, personified as a mighty, and yet peaceful, female figure. The word "Columbia", itself, is derived from the Irish word "Colum", meaning "Dove", and is traced back to the Irish Monk, St. Columba, who, in 563, brought the spirit of Christianity to Scotland via his famous monastery at Iona."

53 posted on 02/02/2003 8:42:36 AM PST by Mark Felton
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To: Mark Felton
thank you, I now feel this did little damage
54 posted on 02/02/2003 8:42:56 AM PST by The Wizard (Demonrats are enemies of America)
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To: DesideriusErasmus
You're new to FR, I see. There is a unique feature we have here that I suggest you become familiar with.

It's called CLICK ON BY

Nobody forced you to open this thread.

55 posted on 02/02/2003 8:43:54 AM PST by Howlin
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To: Mark Felton
A lot of these pieces are unidentifiable to the layperson but the one in post # 12 obviously is part of the surface of the shuttle with the silhouettes of the tiles and a couple of them still attached in a shriveled state.
56 posted on 02/02/2003 8:45:03 AM PST by xp38
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To: KineticKitty
Did you find a picture of the mission patch?

If you did, ping me. That is unbelieveably sorrowful, IMO.

57 posted on 02/02/2003 8:45:23 AM PST by Howlin
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To: Thinkin' Gal
WHOA, Lady!!! What an awesome find!!! Am I too much of a 'screwball' to think that maybe the Lord has used His creation to send a message of 'peace, be still'? (btw, I ran out of asbestos undies and tin foil. Can ya tell? LOL!)

Here's a question, on the news yesterday I heard one of the reporters mention something about the Columbia flight being #16. Then the time of arrival was 9:16 and the time they were lost was 16 minutes before 'landing'. You're the Holy Number Lady, just co-incidence?

58 posted on 02/02/2003 8:48:16 AM PST by mommadooo3
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To: goodnesswins
I have been here a long time, since July 20, 1998, and I NEVER knew it was a requirement to click on EVERY SINGLE THREAD, how about you? :-)
59 posted on 02/02/2003 8:48:23 AM PST by Howlin
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To: DesideriusErasmus
"y'all ain't from here, are ya?"
60 posted on 02/02/2003 8:49:36 AM PST by j_tull (Osama Mama MUST be defeated!)
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To: McGavin999
A very nice thought.
61 posted on 02/02/2003 8:50:04 AM PST by Howlin
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To: Thinkin' Gal; McGavin999
Far out! Totally!
62 posted on 02/02/2003 8:50:49 AM PST by Howlin
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To: DesideriusErasmus; Mark Felton
It looks like you just signed on here a few weeks ago. Before you act like a public scold on FR, perhaps you should just hang out more. As they say, never miss a good opportunity to shut up.
63 posted on 02/02/2003 8:51:42 AM PST by Pharmboy (Dems lie 'cause they have to)
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To: mommadooo3
Launched on the 16th.
64 posted on 02/02/2003 8:52:48 AM PST by Howlin
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To: mikenola
Cherokee County Sheriff James Campbell kneels next to a 7-foot piece of debris found west of Rusk, Texas, Saturday.
65 posted on 02/02/2003 8:52:59 AM PST by mikenola
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To: Amelia; justshe; JeanS; deport; MJY1288; Mo1; Brad's Gramma; OldFriend
This is a good thread.

Don't miss #51.

66 posted on 02/02/2003 8:54:08 AM PST by Howlin
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To: Howlin
"Shuttle mission STS-107 embroidered patch"

http://spaceflightnow.com/store/patches/sts107.html

67 posted on 02/02/2003 8:54:21 AM PST by _Jim
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Comment #68 Removed by Moderator

To: mommadooo3
Many are experts in their fields, many are near-geniuses.

Near? Just near? :)

69 posted on 02/02/2003 8:59:22 AM PST by isthisnickcool
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To: Mark Felton
Is it just me or isn't it a bit unusual that so much debris has landed "just off the highway"...or on the highway? Perhaps some of this debris is debris that's always been there...fallen off cars, or trucks, or off the backs of pickups or garbage trucks.
70 posted on 02/02/2003 9:00:03 AM PST by DouglasKC
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To: nhoward14
Exactly what justification do you have for claiming "a heckofa lot of airliner parts fall off in routine flights"? I will spare you my opinion as an engineer about this statement if you can answer this question.

I will concede that no one seems to keep statistics on this. My information is based entirely on several news reports of incidents over the past years.

So if, in the next few months, there are no stories of airplane parts being mistakenly reported as shuttle parts, I'll accept humiliation.

71 posted on 02/02/2003 9:00:50 AM PST by js1138
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To: Howlin
The thing I love the most about the American people is the fact that they always manage to change a tragedy into a triumph. We take apart what happened and find out what went wrong, then we fix it and go on. We've done this all throughout our history.

We just keep plunging forward. Something happens, we stop a while to mourn and then go forward. It's our nature, and I love that about us.

72 posted on 02/02/2003 9:03:52 AM PST by McGavin999
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Comment #73 Removed by Moderator

To: DesideriusErasmus
Oh, be quiet!
74 posted on 02/02/2003 9:06:07 AM PST by manna
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To: Mark Felton
My guess is the "debris" is ice. If it turns out to be the culprit, It was probably a solid chunk rather than a bit of frost.
75 posted on 02/02/2003 9:06:12 AM PST by js1138
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To: DouglasKC
Highways have lots of people going back and forth and looking. People don't drive cars through the woods. They will be finding things for years. Much will be found during hunting season.
76 posted on 02/02/2003 9:07:18 AM PST by djf
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Apparently, the Texas Amber Alert system was activated yesterday in order to spread the word about the toll-free number to call to report debris.

77 posted on 02/02/2003 9:07:23 AM PST by Timesink
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To: Howlin
THAT'S what they said. Thanks for the correction. Brain's not too sharp today, weighed down with the loss.
78 posted on 02/02/2003 9:08:55 AM PST by mommadooo3
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Comment #79 Removed by Moderator

To: isthisnickcool
LOL!!! Thanks I needed that chuckle.

OK..., yuppers, there ARE geniuses on FR. NOW, if someone wants me to 'provide the links/data', I'll send them YOUR way. LOL.

80 posted on 02/02/2003 9:12:18 AM PST by mommadooo3
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To: manna
Pertinent & succinct!!
;-)
81 posted on 02/02/2003 9:12:37 AM PST by djf
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To: DesideriusErasmus
I've reported you to the moderator for being a disruptor.
82 posted on 02/02/2003 9:14:57 AM PST by The FRugitive
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To: DesideriusErasmus
What is done & said illuminates & explains who is here

So what are you "bringing to the table?"

83 posted on 02/02/2003 9:15:17 AM PST by Howlin
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To: McGavin999
Thanks for pointing that out. We need to be reminded over and over what we're all about and how we got to this date and time in history.
84 posted on 02/02/2003 9:17:01 AM PST by Howlin
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To: DesideriusErasmus
You are over the top my friend.
85 posted on 02/02/2003 9:17:49 AM PST by Balata
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To: DouglasKC
. . . isn't it a bit unusual that so much debris has landed "just off the highway . . .

Not really. This is just the easiest to discover; hence it shows up first in the discovery process. More "remote" debris locations will be uncovered as time passes. It wouldn't surprise me to hear of debris attributable to this terrible event being found years from now . . .

86 posted on 02/02/2003 9:17:49 AM PST by BraveMan
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Comment #87 Removed by Moderator

To: Ronaldus Magnus
If you want to complain about something related to this tragedy, it should be about the hideous "Democrat Underground" remarks that the Admin Moderator allowed to be posted yesterday during the first moments of this tragedy. As a result, many of us found out about the deaths of these fine Americans in the most hurtful way possible.

Are you saying the folks from DU were gleeful about what happened yesterday? If so, that's AWFUL!!!!

88 posted on 02/02/2003 9:20:12 AM PST by deziner
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To: DesideriusErasmus
What is done & said illuminates & explains who is here.


And I see you are still here..... Got some kind of fixation?
89 posted on 02/02/2003 9:21:38 AM PST by deport
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To: Mark Felton
From another post on another thread, the last communication (saved the clip but don't know who to credit). It's a good, clear quicktime clip.

http://qs240.pair.com/sfnvideo/sts107/030201nasatv_qt.html
90 posted on 02/02/2003 9:22:50 AM PST by Helen
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To: djf
Thanks.
91 posted on 02/02/2003 9:23:31 AM PST by manna
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To: Mark Felton

A National Guardsman stands near debris believed to be from the shuttle along a highway in Nacogdoches, Texas.

92 posted on 02/02/2003 9:23:33 AM PST by Lady Jag (Googolplex Start Thinker of the Seventh Galaxy of Light and Ingenuity)
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To: DesideriusErasmus
KNOCK IT OFF.
93 posted on 02/02/2003 9:23:37 AM PST by Admin Moderator
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To: DesideriusErasmus

A small American flag stands inside a tape barrier cordoning off debris Saturday near Palestine, Texas.

94 posted on 02/02/2003 9:26:54 AM PST by Lady Jag (Googolplex Start Thinker of the Seventh Galaxy of Light and Ingenuity)
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To: sciencediet

Debris brings out curiosity, grief

02/02/2003

By LEE HANCOCK / The Dallas Morning News

NACOGDOCHES, Texas – A small, curved sheet of metal transformed a downtown parking lot into an instant memorial to the seven astronauts who perished Saturday.

Hundreds of people showed up to look at the 3-by-3-foot piece of debris from space shuttle Columbia. It was one of hundreds that showered the landscape from North Texas east to the Louisiana border – objects including a space helmet, shuttle tiles and a 4-by-6-foot door.

Chris Nelson and his family stood at the edge of the parking lot surrounded by yellow crime-scene tape. He held a camera in one hand and an American flag in the other.

"I've been flying it to support our troops overseas," Mr. Nelson said. "I brought it because I felt like it ought to be here. I asked the National Guard if they would like to use it as a cover to put over the piece to honor what we've lost."

Sprays of flowers and roses of every color lay on the sidewalk. Some people simply left notes to the astronauts.

DAMON WINTER / DMN
Bystanders look at a large chunk of debris from space shuttle Columbia in downtown Nacogdoches. The East Texas town saw a flurry of activity after Saturday morning's tragedy.

"May God be with these families and our nation," one said.

"For your courage and bravery, may God provide peace and comfort to your families," said another.

Officials counted more than 800 pieces of debris in Nacogdoches County. The largest was a drum 4 ½ feet tall and 10 feet around.

"Other than one small dent in the side, it's in pristine condition," state Rep. Max Sandlin said.

Others were shreds no bigger than a quarter, testimony to the terrible speed of Columbia's fall.

The shuttle was traveling an estimated 12,500 mph, or 208 miles a minute. It exploded at 200,000 feet, or 38 miles above earth.

The hail of debris over hundreds of miles was bound to make the Columbia explosion much more than a television experience for those who stumbled onto pieces in roadways, pastures, yards and parking lots.

Stunning discoveries

TOM FOX / DMN
Debris, roughly six feet in length, resembling a piece of wall or fuelage from space shuttle Columbia was found in Rusk, Texas.
Bob White, 28, lives on a farm in Sabine County, about 50 miles east of Nacogdoches. He awoke to the same sound that so many others heard from Dallas to Louisiana – a window-rattling sonic boom, followed by what seemed to be a minute of thunder.

Mr. White's two sons, 4 and 6, went outside to look for signs of what had exploded.

The boys told Mr. White they'd found a human leg near their hog pen. They covered it with a blanket and called police.

"From the hip to the foot," Mr. White said, "it's all there, scorched from the fire."

A Texas Department of Public Safety trooper stood guard over the scene. By 3 p.m., no one had shown up to take the leg away.

In nearby Hemphill, Clark Bennett noticed something on FM2971 but didn't think much of it until a friend, Mike Gibbs, an X-ray technician at Sabine County Hospital, told him about the explosion. The men met on the road at 9 a.m. and realized they'd apparently found an astronaut's remains.

"I wouldn't want anyone seeing what I saw," Mr. Gibbs said. "It was pretty gruesome."

The shuttle's crew cabin is built to withstand much greater pressure than the rest of the ship. That may have helped keep the astronauts' bodies from disintegrating.

'We can't touch it'

James Couch of Norwood in San Augustine County said he didn't hear anything when the shuttle came down, but his family did – a rumbling noise and a sharp thump on the roof – and they set off to investigate.

"We found debris in the yard and on the roof, mostly pipe and pieces, and some type of metal alloy. And a helmet," he said. "It's just a regular space helmet. It's intact. The only thing that's missing is the shield that goes on the front."

Police came to guard the debris, he said, and that was fine with him.

"We can't touch it," he said. "We don't want to touch it."

Knowing what to do

"What impressed me was that some people just innately knew what to do," said Terrie Gonzalez, managing editor of the Cherokeean/Herald in Rusk in Cherokee County, who trailed police much of the day as they followed up on reports of shuttle debris.

"One man found 10 pieces, spray-painted circles around them and marked them with a dowel rod and streamer," she said.

NASA team members reviewed some photos she shot and identified what they thought was an interior compartment and a pouch used in medical experiments.

Some people who found wreckage picked it up and carried it home. Others, like Pat Ivy, felt compelled to guard what they'd found.

Mr. Ivy, who lives in Cherokee County, found a chunk of charred metal on U.S. Highway 84 between Palestine and Rusk. He moved it to the road's shoulder and waited for law officers to arrive.

By midafternoon, dressed in overalls and work boots with a Styrofoam cooler at his side, he was still sitting in the bed of his pickup alongside the road.

"I want to make sure it gets in the right hands," he said. "They've got to piece this back together, and it's gonna take all these parts."

'It really was debris'

NASA officials warned people not to touch debris because they might be contaminated with hazardous chemicals and fuels.

The Fire Department in Palestine, a small Piney Woods town, set up a makeshift decontamination station in the hospital parking lot.

People who had picked up debris and who later feared for their health stripped naked and endured a rigorous cleansing process.

Medics then took them to the emergency room to check heartbeats, respiratory function and other vital signs.

Jamie Wooten, 22, was among 30 people who went through the decontamination process. She and four family members had handled a piece of 3-inch-thick insulation material that fell near their home.

"It was on the road. We pulled it up and brought it into our yard," she said. "We were joking about it being debris, and the police came by and said it really was debris."

A piece of debris about the size of a 12-inch crescent wrench fell through the roof and ceiling of a Nacogdoches optometrist's office.

Don Rudasill, owner of 20/20 EyeCare, said his wife, Kay, and niece, Robin, entered the office about 9 a.m. The two women are opticians.

"When they went to un-forward the phones and boot up the computers, this piece of debris was on the front desk and there was a hole in the ceiling," Mr. Rudasill said.

He described the piece as "a fairly dense metal object."

The place to be

Kelly Allen and her friends were trying to decide whether to stay in downtown Nacogdoches with all the television reporters and satellite trucks or go to the airport to look at another big piece of debris.

"I'm staying right here for CNN," she said. "I live in the middle of nowhere. This is a big deal. Somebody may put my name in the New York papers, saying I'm some idiot from East Texas, but I still want to see what's going on."

Nearby, Jo Carlson sat in a lawn chair, drinking tea from a Mason jar. She said she was there to block people from parking in her building's lot. But she said she was also there to soak up the atmosphere.

"I like to watch the crowd and hear what people are saying," she said.

Staff writers Robert T. Garrett, Dave Michaels, Lee Powell, David Sedeño, Robert Tharp, Scott Parks, Stella Chavez and Connie Piloto and The Associated Press contributed to this report.


95 posted on 02/02/2003 9:27:54 AM PST by Mark Felton
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To: DesideriusErasmus

96 posted on 02/02/2003 9:27:57 AM PST by Lady Jag (Googolplex Start Thinker of the Seventh Galaxy of Light and Ingenuity)
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To: DesideriusErasmus
You have no idea what you are posting about.
97 posted on 02/02/2003 9:28:27 AM PST by not-alone
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To: DesideriusErasmus
Ura Nidiot. Given your heretofore demonstrated spelling prowess, I think you can probably decode that succinctly and 'pertinantly' enough...

98 posted on 02/02/2003 9:29:05 AM PST by Treebeard (Lord, save us from omnipresent moral busybodies...)
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To: DesideriusErasmus

A road sign over Interstate 35 heading into downtown Dallas, Texas, asks motorists to report any shuttle debris to authorities.

99 posted on 02/02/2003 9:30:00 AM PST by Lady Jag (Googolplex Start Thinker of the Seventh Galaxy of Light and Ingenuity)
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Comment #100 Removed by Moderator


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