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Just War or a Just War?
JIMMY CARTER ^ | 3-9-03

Posted on 03/09/2003 4:57:11 AM PST by SJackson

ATLANTA — Profound changes have been taking place in American foreign policy, reversing consistent bipartisan commitments that for more than two centuries have earned our nation greatness. These commitments have been predicated on basic religious principles, respect for international law, and alliances that resulted in wise decisions and mutual restraint. Our apparent determination to launch a war against Iraq, without international support, is a violation of these premises.

As a Christian and as a president who was severely provoked by international crises, I became thoroughly familiar with the principles of a just war, and it is clear that a substantially unilateral attack on Iraq does not meet these standards. This is an almost universal conviction of religious leaders, with the most notable exception of a few spokesmen of the Southern Baptist Convention who are greatly influenced by their commitment to Israel based on eschatological, or final days, theology.

For a war to be just, it must meet several clearly defined criteria.

The war can be waged only as a last resort, with all nonviolent options exhausted. In the case of Iraq, it is obvious that clear alternatives to war exist. These options — previously proposed by our own leaders and approved by the United Nations — were outlined again by the Security Council on Friday. But now, with our own national security not directly threatened and despite the overwhelming opposition of most people and governments in the world, the United States seems determined to carry out military and diplomatic action that is almost unprecedented in the history of civilized nations. The first stage of our widely publicized war plan is to launch 3,000 bombs and missiles on a relatively defenseless Iraqi population within the first few hours of an invasion, with the purpose of so damaging and demoralizing the people that they will change their obnoxious leader, who will most likely be hidden and safe during the bombardment.

The war's weapons must discriminate between combatants and noncombatants. Extensive aerial bombardment, even with precise accuracy, inevitably results in "collateral damage." Gen. Tommy R. Franks, commander of American forces in the Persian Gulf, has expressed concern about many of the military targets being near hospitals, schools, mosques and private homes.

Its violence must be proportional to the injury we have suffered. Despite Saddam Hussein's other serious crimes, American efforts to tie Iraq to the 9/11 terrorist attacks have been unconvincing.

The attackers must have legitimate authority sanctioned by the society they profess to represent. The unanimous vote of approval in the Security Council to eliminate Iraq's weapons of mass destruction can still be honored, but our announced goals are now to achieve regime change and to establish a Pax Americana in the region, perhaps occupying the ethnically divided country for as long as a decade. For these objectives, we do not have international authority. Other members of the Security Council have so far resisted the enormous economic and political influence that is being exerted from Washington, and we are faced with the possibility of either a failure to get the necessary votes or else a veto from Russia, France and China. Although Turkey may still be enticed into helping us by enormous financial rewards and partial future control of the Kurds and oil in northern Iraq, its democratic Parliament has at least added its voice to the worldwide expressions of concern.

The peace it establishes must be a clear improvement over what exists. Although there are visions of peace and democracy in Iraq, it is quite possible that the aftermath of a military invasion will destabilize the region and prompt terrorists to further jeopardize our security at home. Also, by defying overwhelming world opposition, the United States will undermine the United Nations as a viable institution for world peace.

What about America's world standing if we don't go to war after such a great deployment of military forces in the region? The heartfelt sympathy and friendship offered to America after the 9/11 attacks, even from formerly antagonistic regimes, has been largely dissipated; increasingly unilateral and domineering policies have brought international trust in our country to its lowest level in memory. American stature will surely decline further if we launch a war in clear defiance of the United Nations. But to use the presence and threat of our military power to force Iraq's compliance with all United Nations resolutions — with war as a final option — will enhance our status as a champion of peace and justice.

Jimmy Carter, the 39th president of the United States, is chairman of the Carter Center in Atlanta and winner of the 2002 Nobel Peace Prize.


TOPICS: Editorial; Foreign Affairs; Government
KEYWORDS:

1 posted on 03/09/2003 4:57:11 AM PST by SJackson
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To: SJackson
"The peace it establishes must be a clear improvement over what exists."

Hhhmmmm, let me see....bloody tyrant victimizing his people, or free Iraqis holding an election to determine their leadership.....gosh, I'll have to think about that.....tough choice....

2 posted on 03/09/2003 5:00:40 AM PST by anniegetyourgun
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To: SJackson
Jimmy Who?
3 posted on 03/09/2003 5:01:01 AM PST by MEG33
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To: SJackson
The first stage of our widely publicized war plan is to launch 3,000 bombs and missiles on a relatively defenseless Iraqi population

JIMMY, YOU DAMN LIAR!!! You know very well we are not targeting civilians!

4 posted on 03/09/2003 5:01:38 AM PST by AmericaUnited
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To: MEG33
Jimmy Who?

Jimmy "the most incompetent POTUS this nation has seen" Carter.

5 posted on 03/09/2003 5:03:54 AM PST by marvlus
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To: SJackson
Jimmah ??
Thet yew, Jimmah boy ???

Jimmah, ah finely figgered out whut ails you. Yo momma wanted penis, an' yo dadduh thowt she said " peanuts".

Whut they got wuz jes nuts .

6 posted on 03/09/2003 5:05:32 AM PST by genefromjersey (**** 'em all, but six. Save the last six for pallbearers !)
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To: SJackson
given carter's vast foreign policy successes, i think we must take him very seriously. after all, under his administration we learned how to crash our military aircraft into each other, how to bend over and spread it for iran, and, after he left the white house, how to win a nobel peace prize by giving atomic bombs to certifiable loons.

i personally do not believe jimmy carter exists or ever existed. i think that the person believed by many to be carter is actually ramsey clark in a not-very-good rubber mask.

dep

7 posted on 03/09/2003 5:08:04 AM PST by dep
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To: SJackson
American efforts to tie Iraq to the 9/11 terrorist attacks have been unconvincing.

Carter and his dove friends insist this war can only be just if Iraq is tied to 9/11. What they don't get is Hussein's hatred of the U.S. makes it a certainty he will trade with terrorist groups who are ready and able to launch an attack on the U.S. Carter always was a dim bulb.

8 posted on 03/09/2003 5:10:35 AM PST by McLynnan
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To: SJackson
I am truely relieved, that just like he did in Korea, Jimmy has found the true path for future peace. < /wretching>
9 posted on 03/09/2003 5:13:17 AM PST by KC Burke
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To: SJackson
In the case of Iraq, it is obvious that clear alternatives to war exist.

As some know, I have been skeptical of the Iraq invasion--as I believe all people should be about all invasions. But, really, the quality of "thought" for the opposition is as much an argument FOR the war as any put forth by the administration. What alternatives would Carter have us pursue? Unilateral surrender? Ceding Israel to Saddam?

The antiwar people are much more effective when they shut up, rather than when they display their stupidity by letting us hear their "thought" processes.

10 posted on 03/09/2003 5:13:58 AM PST by jammer
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To: McLynnan
American efforts to tie Iraq to the 9/11 terrorist attacks have been unconvincing.

unless one looks here.

dep

11 posted on 03/09/2003 5:20:20 AM PST by dep
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To: SJackson
Its violence must be proportional to the injury we have suffered. Despite Saddam Hussein's other serious crimes, American efforts to tie Iraq to the 9/11 terrorist attacks have been unconvincing.

I'm convinced.

12 posted on 03/09/2003 5:27:22 AM PST by xzins (Babylon, you have been weighed in the balance and been found wanting!)
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To: SJackson
No wonder this self-deluded fool was such a bad President. He didn't have a clue what his job was.

These commitments have been predicated on basic religious principles, respect for international law, and alliances that resulted in wise decisions and mutual restraint.

When you get your premise wrong, there is not much left of your conclusions. These international commitments were predicated on shared interests in countering the globalistic goals of communism who were the international thugs of the day. A decision to arm yourself so heavily that in 15 minutes you could destroy civilization as we know it is hardly what I would call restraint. A decision not to engage in mutual suicide is hardly what one would call restraint. It is called self-preservation - which was the whole point of MAD in the first place.

13 posted on 03/09/2003 5:28:53 AM PST by AndyJackson
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To: SJackson; anniegetyourgun; AmericaUnited; marvlus; dep; KC Burke; jammer; McLynnan
Love that comment about Southern Babtists being the captives of Israel. Gotta problem with the Jews, Jimmuh?
14 posted on 03/09/2003 5:29:59 AM PST by ricpic
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To: SJackson
Simply put:
Carter was a failed govenor, Carter was a failed President,
Carter is a failed ex-President.
He deserves to be ignores.
15 posted on 03/09/2003 5:30:33 AM PST by ozdragon
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To: genefromjersey
FunNEY!!
16 posted on 03/09/2003 5:31:53 AM PST by ricpic
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To: SJackson
Note: Following passage edited for reality.

"As a Christian and as a president who was severely provoked by international crises... and, having peanuts for both brains and 'nads, it took Ronald Reagan's huevos muy grandes to save this great nation.

17 posted on 03/09/2003 5:37:07 AM PST by Feckless
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To: SJackson
Jimmy Carter never met a dictator he didn't love. PATHETIC!!
18 posted on 03/09/2003 5:37:29 AM PST by conservativecorner
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To: xzins
How are you convinced when even the Israelis can not find the direct connection or even a slight connection of Al-Queeda and Iraqi alliance? The only nation supporting that theory is the US and the US alone, even the Brits are questioning that imagery of that alliance.

Big deal that Al-Q people are in Iraq, arent our people in unfriendly countries and other nations people in unfriendly countries seeking refuge under suspicious circumstances, i.e temp shelter from the law or that nations porous borders, etc..

I have too many things to accomplish this Sunday to get into the details. Just dont believe everything this admin says or claims, or you may end up being a clone.

19 posted on 03/09/2003 5:39:06 AM PST by smokegenerator (www.pedalinpeace.org ---- Serbian Cycling Challenge for the Children of Serbia)
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To: SJackson
Greetings SJackson, FReepers, et al:

There you go again…

Given the foreign policy track record of jiminy-the-peanut-cricket, one must apply a "Jimmy Carter speak" common sense decipher.

If jiminy-the-peanut-cricket is opposed, we must support.
If jiminy-the-peanut-cricket supports, we must oppose.

20 posted on 03/09/2003 5:54:02 AM PST by OneLoyalAmerican (This charade has gone on long enough, it is time to liberate the Iraqi people.)
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To: smokegenerator
1. The 1st WTC bombing was unquestionabley, iraqi/al qaeda.

2. A July 21, 2001 article in an Egyptian newspaper article headlined, "America, an Obsession with Osama bin Laden" indicated that Baghdad knew what was coming three months later, the former U.S. intelligence chief told the court. The report, written by an Iraqi, predicted bin Laden would target both New York City and the Pentagon. Woolsey noted a line in the story that predicted bin Laden would "strike America on the arm that is already hurting," explaining that the phrase was likely a reference to the 1993 bombing of the World Trade Center. from James Woolsey, former CIA director

21 posted on 03/09/2003 5:54:34 AM PST by xzins (Babylon, you have been weighed in the balance and been found wanting!)
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To: xzins
Egyptian ragpaper- the paper you use to lay down for your dog to poop on.

Would you believe the Mossad claim that there is no direct link or any link of the Al-Qeeda and Iraq or some bullsht Egyptian paper? I tend to believe the Mossad more as they have zero love for that regime and would love to pin this on Iraq. Or you tend to believe any crp story that toes the US party line?

22 posted on 03/09/2003 5:58:37 AM PST by smokegenerator (www.pedalinpeace.org ---- Serbian Cycling Challenge for the Children of Serbia)
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To: smokegenerator
I'm believing a former CIA director.

Why would he lie?
23 posted on 03/09/2003 6:10:40 AM PST by xzins (Babylon, you have been weighed in the balance and been found wanting!)
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To: xzins
Which one may face jail time for, what? incompetence or something along that line? I will get that name for you and the accusations. The FBI Director being under the gun for a possible forced resignation, etc... The list goes on and on... I need overnight hotel accomadations for this list to be completed...:)
24 posted on 03/09/2003 6:19:06 AM PST by smokegenerator (www.pedalinpeace.org ---- Serbian Cycling Challenge for the Children of Serbia)
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To: SJackson
How do you prevent nuclear weapons proliferation?

.

.

.

.

.

.

.

. revoke Jimmy Carter's visa

25 posted on 03/09/2003 6:23:02 AM PST by AeWingnut
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To: SJackson
So by this and the new Xpres Clintoon / Dole tv show the old rule of X-pres's commenting about the current administration has gone out the window?
26 posted on 03/09/2003 6:26:03 AM PST by OXENinFLA
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To: SJackson
Jimmy, the peaNut, Carter, is a pip.

He failed, spectacuarly, in protecting Americans and America's interests during his four year debacle of a presidency. And the economy suffered because of it.

Nothing could convince me of the rightness of this war more than Carter's opposition.

Hey, Jimmy, watch out for that attack rabbit, it's been seen stalking in Rosalyn's azalia bushes.

27 posted on 03/09/2003 6:29:42 AM PST by Pietro
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To: SJackson
The war's weapons must discriminate between combatants and noncombatants. Extensive aerial bombardment, even with precise accuracy, inevitably results in "collateral damage." Gen. Tommy R. Franks, commander of American forces in the Persian Gulf, has expressed concern about many of the military targets being near hospitals, schools, mosques and private homes.

GAUGING THE HUMANITARIAN COST OF WAR

U.S. Hopes to Limit Civilian Casualties, But Others Aren't So Optimistic

WASHINGTON, D.C., MARCH 8, 2003 (Zenit.org).- Concerns over civilian casualties in an Iraq war are fueling opposition to any such conflict. Estimates of deaths or the number of refugees caused by a war vary widely, but all agree that large numbers of innocent people would suffer.

A leaked U.N. report calculated up to a half-million people could require medical attention in case of a military conflict, the British daily Guardian reported Jan. 29. The World Health Organization estimated that about 100,000 civilians could be wounded, and another 400,000 would be hit by disease due to the bombing of water and sanitation services and the lack of food.

The U.N. Children's Fund calculated that around 3 million people, 80% of them children under age 5, would be in a dire situation regarding a lack of food. The U.N. report noted that some 16 million Iraqis depend on the monthly food basket of basic goods supplied by the government. In the event of war these supplies likely would be disrupted.

On Jan. 28 a group of U.K. aid organizations -- Oxfam, CAFOD, Christian Aid, ActionAid and Save the Children -- published a joint press release warning that military action could trigger a major humanitarian disaster. "Military action against Iraq could devastate the lives of millions of people," Oxfam director Barbara Stocking was quoted as saying. "The humanitarian situation in Iraq is now more fragile than it was on the eve of the 1991 Gulf War."

The declaration also commented that under the Geneva Conventions it is against international humanitarian law for "any objects indispensable to the survival of the civilian population" to be targeted during military action. In the case of Iraq, these objects include infrastructure such as ports, railways and roads vital for the distribution of food aid across the country as well, as the water and sanitation system, powered by the main electricity supply.

Poor hospitals, widespread malnutrition

A report released by the New York-based Center for Economic and Social Rights (CESR) warned that the fragile Iraqi health care system, already badly damaged by 12 years of economic sanctions, is woefully inadequate to deal with the effects of a new war.

The report said that 92% of hospitals surveyed indicated they were lacking basic medical equipment. Shortages of medications, including antibiotics, already undermine routine care.

"Our report confirms that it is unlikely that international relief agencies can avert a major humanitarian disaster," said Michael Van Rooyen, director of the Center for International Emergency, Disaster and Refugee Studies at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, in a CESR press release.

The report's findings are based on a research mission from Jan. 19-29 by a CESR team of 16 humanitarian experts, including Hans von Sponeck, former U.N. humanitarian coordinator for Iraq. Team members interviewed U.N. and Iraqi government officials; visited hospitals, clinics, public markets, electricity, water and sanitation plants, and other civilian sites; and reviewed confidential U.N. documents.

Another warning voice comes from the U.S.-based Catholic Relief Services. A briefing on its Web site comments that Iraq is facing a humanitarian crisis. Many children are living in poor conditions, and about 25% of young men and women show signs of chronic malnutrition. Already in 2001 the number of people with access to drinkable water dropped to only 11%, compared with 92% in 1989.

Catholic Relief Services contended that a military intervention has the potential to lead to tremendous human costs among an already suffering Iraqi people. Its officials "echo the bishops' call that at this time constructive alternatives to war must first be exhausted."

International aid agencies would not likely have the funds to fully cope with the effects of a war. U.N. agencies say donors have given only a quarter of the $120 million needed for emergency supplies, Reuters reported March 5.

"We urgently need additional funds," said Elisabeth Byrs, spokeswoman for the U.N. Geneva Office for Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. "Very little money has been provided. There's a gap of about $90 million."

The U.N. World Food Program, for example, has so far received pledges of just $7.5 million for food after appealing for some $23 million in a contingency plan to feed 900,000 Iraqis in a 10-week period. And the U.N. Children's Fund (UNICEF), which will head relief work for water and sanitation, has just $2 million of the $14 million it was to receive under the U.N. appeal for funds.

Hoping to limit the damage

The United States and its allies have tried to address concerns over the humanitarian consequences of a war. Arguments are made that liberating Iraq will lead to an improvement in human rights and liberties. This position was explained in comments made by British Prime Minister Tony Blair, cited in a Zenit analysis of two weeks ago, entitled "War in Iraq: No Simple Answers."

Defenders of military intervention also try to compare Iraq to the situation in Afghanistan. On the negative side, a group called the Iraq Body Count Project notes that last year's military action in Afghanistan caused 3,000 to 3,400 civilian deaths.

But U.S. Secretary of Defense Donald Rumsfeld, in a speech Feb. 14, observed: "Today the Afghan people are free." More than 1 million refugees have been able to return home, he said, and children are back in school.

"And the careful use of precision-guided weapons helped ensure that there were fewer civilian casualties in this war than perhaps in any war in modern history," stated Rumsfeld. The defense secretary also noted that the United States has already provided $850 million to help rebuild Afghanistan, with another $3.3 billion authorized over the next several years.

A March 5 press release by the U.S. Defense Department affirmed that the American military would go to great lengths to limit civilian deaths and to minimize damage to nonmilitary facilities if war erupts.

A senior U.S. Central Command official briefed reporters in the Pentagon on the steps the military takes to avoid or minimize collateral damage. He admitted, however, that it's nearly impossible to eliminate all such damage.

But, the official said, potential targets are carefully considered to see if they are likely to result in noncombatant casualties, damage to nonmilitary structures or protected sites, or if the target is in close proximity to known human shields.

The press release explained that some experts have predicted a war with Iraq now would result in fewer civilian casualties than in the 1991 Gulf War. The official briefing reporters explained that in Operation Desert Storm, 20% of the bombs used were precision-guided. The rest were gravity-fall "dumb bombs." In a war in Iraq today, 70% would be precision-guided, the official said.

General Tommy Franks, who heads the U.S. forces, refused to speculate on the number of civilian casualties. Still, he added, U.S. planners would do what they could to avoid such casualties.

In spite of such reassurances, grave fears persist as to the damage a war will cause. The Pope's insistent requests for prayers show his concern on this matter. Last Sunday, John Paul II said, "It is also necessary to seek and go down every possible avenue to avoid war, which always brings mourning and grave consequences for all."

28 posted on 03/09/2003 6:31:36 AM PST by AncientAirs
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To: SJackson
Dear Mr. Carter,

I admire you as a Christian, as I admire the Pope.

Unfortunately, you have even less credibility in the arena of foreign policy than the Pope, as the American people discovered by the time 1980 rolled around.

Just War Doctrine is clearly beyond you, as you are too simple-minded to compete in this arena.

I would have thought the violation of the "Agreed Framework" by North Korea would have finally had you realizing this. I guess you never will, but we now have the final confirmation we need.
29 posted on 03/09/2003 6:37:54 AM PST by AFPhys
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To: SJackson
Carter hands over the Panama Canal

He friggin poisons everything he touches. Best he continues hammering nails and keeps his big mouth shut!

30 posted on 03/09/2003 6:45:52 AM PST by MadelineZapeezda
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To: smokegenerator
You really appear to be dense regarding the dangers from these terrorist Islamofacists and their state sponsors, but I'll give you a chance to prove you aren't...

I challenge you to read the final six paragraphs of http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/860385/posts and refute Prime Minister Blair's take on his responsibilities.
31 posted on 03/09/2003 6:46:58 AM PST by AFPhys
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To: dep
Thank you much. How do we send it to Jimmy Carter?
32 posted on 03/09/2003 8:15:03 AM PST by McLynnan
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To: MEG33
Let me refresh your memory.
M.E.O.W.
Double digit inflation
Double digit unemployment
Going to his daughter for advice on nuclear disarmorment.
WH conferance on the family, with NOW as the leading participant
Brother Billy and Lybia
Cannibalizing fighter aircraft for spare parts.
Odd/even days for gasolne buying.
DOE
Panama canal
The Equal Rights amendment.
The Soviet invasion of Afghanistan
SALTII
The seizure as hostages of the U. S. embassy staff in Iran
Desert 1
Hamilton Jordan snorting coke at Club 54
Bert Lance

OTOH he did remake the office of VP into something worth more than a bucket of warm spit, so he's got that going for him. and Camp David.


33 posted on 03/09/2003 8:18:48 AM PST by Valin (Age and deceit beat youth and skill)
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To: SJackson
Ignoble Laureate. Billie Carter was an only son.
34 posted on 03/09/2003 8:20:10 AM PST by Consort
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To: SJackson
I really wish he would shut his pie-hole and go back to building houses for poor folks.
35 posted on 03/09/2003 8:25:01 AM PST by LibKill (If you stare into my tag line long enough, it stares into you.)
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To: SJackson
I went to DU and one of those bozos actually had the gall to start a thread about how much they MISS Carter's term in office. Yeah guys, thats why he lost to Reagan in a landslide and 4 years later, his VP inspired ONE WHOLE STATE to vote for him. I swear, people like this must have severe brain damage if they actually had pride in that dunce.
36 posted on 03/09/2003 9:35:40 AM PST by Democratshavenobrains
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To: Valin
Do I remember correctly that he "held himself hostage" by staying at the White House in order to show sympathy with the hostages?
37 posted on 03/09/2003 9:55:39 AM PST by MEG33
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To: AFPhys; Destro; joan
Have you ever seen upclose the carnage of terrorist work at a small-scale level? You know, where you see decapitated schoolchildren heads set on their school desk? I believe I know more about how to deal with terrorists than you ever will imagine. How the US/NATO/UNPROFOR stands by while those same peopel are standing next to YOUR leader.

The War Not Reported   With the NATO bombing of Serbia presumably over, there is a staggering amount of material about the 79-day War on Serbia for media critics to analyze. The conflict will likely be our century's most controversial American war after Vietnam, and for many of the same reasons: Both wars caused more civilian deaths than military damage, both wars were fought to defend a vague moral cause. And both wars found the most powerful media outlets pumping out blatant propaganda from the White House and Pentagon.

Our first April 404 report on the Kosovo media war showed bias from the start, as wild rumors of Serb concentration camps and "rape hotels" were uncritically reported. Our follow-up the next month on White House PR found officials -- particularly Clinton -- escalating the rhetoric by comparing Milosevic to Hitler and suggesting that a Holocaust was at hand. And these were just examples of the most outrageous hyperbole; to find more analysis, we now provide an index of our Kosovo war coverage, which includes over sixty articles on topics ignored by the mainstream American press.

Repeating military and government propaganda was just half the equation, however. Besides demonizing the Serbs with Pentagon/ NATO exaggerations and lies, the American press also ignored stories reported in European media that disputed this simplistic good guy- bad guy version of events. Purposely excluding the other side of the story like that is a journalist's cardinal sin. Why did it happen? In that April 404 report, we pondered two reasons. In times of war (declared or not), the U.S. media always rushes to salute the military. A more cynical view was that the press pushed this story to recover an audience lost when the Clinton impeachment abruptly fizzled.

Since mainstream American media coverage was so homogeneous, the rare occasions when a network or paper broke ranks was notable in itself. On July 1, House intelligence committee chairman Porter Goss of Florida, a Republican critical of the war, announced that Serb crimes were greatly exaggerated. "Yes, there were atrocities. But no, they don't measure up to the advance billing," he said. There was no a scorched-earth destruction of crops and livestock; many Kosovo Albanians were certainly missing or in hiding, but only a fraction of the 600,000 that Clinton announced in May; and the claim of 100 thousand Kosovo Albanian men killed was at least ten times too high. Perhaps most interesting about those statements was that only USA Today and NBC Evening News mentioned this story, which was certainly humiliating to NATO. It was completely ignored by the rest of the major media including the Washington Post, and New York Times, even though there was no breaking news on July 1 to dominate their respective "Crisis in Kosovo" and "Crisis in the Balkans" special sections.

It's valuable to examine closely The New York Times coverage, which has been particularly shameful. Their one-sided emphasis on the plight of the Kosovar Albanians has been astonishing -- surely the newspaper has led the world's media in the number of pictures of weeping and distraught victims of the Serbs. It's puzzling; rarely does the "newspaper of record" pay so much persistent attention to human misery. Contrast the Times' wallowing in Balkan pathos with their duck-in, duck-out coverage of recent African famines and civil wars, or particularly their indifferent coverage of last year's revolution in Indonesia. As we documented in a special 404 report on Indonesia media coverage, the Times downplayed one of the most dramatic events of our decade, as a million or more citizens stormed the capitol and threw out a great tyrant.

Since the end of the war, misinformation still abounds in every Times article; of the estimated 200,000 Serbs living in Kosovo at the end of the war, the paper stated on July 25 that 80,000 have fled. UN refugee officials have said that the number is exactly twice that, and those that remain are mostly being sheltered by priests in Serbian Orthodox monasteries or guarded by KFOR troops.

But the most outrageous example of Times bias is its perverse coverage of the KLA. In a gushing Sunday, June 13 Times Magazine profile, the terrorist group is presented as a gutsy but rag-tag group of volunteers from around the world gathered to fight for their homeland -- the anti-fascist WWII Abraham Lincoln brigade reborn, perhaps. In this rose- colored view of the group, there's no hint of KLA involvement with shadowy financiers, arms traffickers and the global drug trade. To date, the NY Times has made only a single passing reference to the links between the KLA and international heroin smuggling, which was documented in our April feature, "Kosovo 'Freedom Fighters' Financed by Drug Money, CIA." Yet these shady connections are frequently mentioned in articles on the KLA that appear in the European press.

In light of staggering number of recent atrocities against Kosovar Serbs, it will be interesting to see how long The Times can continue painting their picture of the noble KLA freedom fighter. The Times appeared hard pressed to keep the KLA out of the story of the recent massacre of 14 Serb farmers, mentioning little beyond a statement that the group denies involvement. (A July 27 Times editorial made the slight concession that "Some of the violence may be coming from rogue elements of the Kosovo Liberation Army.") Meanwhile, other American media has recently well- documented the KLA's campaign of terror. "The Serbs have a choice: leave or be killed," a 21-year-old KLA fighter told USA Today. "We have every right to do what we want to them. No one is going to stop us. No one is going to tell us we can't." (July 31, 1999)


The Search for Serb Atrocities   In the weeks leading to the NATO bombing of Serbia, a propaganda war was already underway. As introduced in an earlier Monitor 404 item, the American press spun tales of great horrors: there was a Serb concentration camps in a sports stadium and reports of horrible Serb atrocities. But a French reporter found the stadium empty, and the French press also noted that the source of atrocity claims came from the controversial KLA rebels fighting the Serbs.

The French reporters weren't the only ones telling both sides of the story; the British press also did a yeoman's job in war reporting, even though their government was as gung-ho for pounding the Serbs with bombs as the Clinton Administration. Consider the balanced reports from London Guardian journalist Audrey Gillan. After visiting Macedonian refugee camps in April, she wrote heartbreaking stories of brutality by roving gangs of Serb thugs, then also wrote about misdeeds on the other side, such as the KLA buying £ 4 million of guns on the black market, purchased in part with profits linked to heroin smuggling.

Gillian also showed how stories get distorted during times of war -- for both cynical and innocent reasons. Like other reporters, she arrived in Macedonia to verify reports of Serbian atrocities and "rape camps," the latter being a claim made by British Foreign Secretary Robin Cook. "Young women are being separated from the refugee columns," he had famously said, "and forced to undergo systematic rape in an army camp. We have evidence from many refugees who have managed to escape that others were taken to rape camps." Wrote Gillian:

...Among the rape victims arriving in Macedonia nobody spoke of anything like the camps the British Foreign Secretary referred to. Benedicte Giaever [a field coordinator for human rights group OSCE, the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe] told me there had been rape, but not systematic and not on a grand scale. The same was true of the killing. "We don't have big numbers," she said. "What we have are consistent small numbers -- two here, five there, ten here, seven there."

"...These people have just arrived and I would say they are still under a lot of stress and tension," Giaever says. "In that situation, 5 people can easily turn into 75. It's not that they want to lie but often they are confused. It's not to say it didn't happen. But a story could have moved around from village to village and everyone from that village tells it as if it happened to them."

No matter how hard she looked, Gillian and her colleagues just couldn't find evidence of the mass murders that NATO was touting.
[Ben Ward, a researcher for Human Rights Watch] doesn't think there is evidence of mass executions. "It is very rare for people not to know someone who knows about people being killed. But there doesn't appear to be anything to support allegations of mass killings," he said. "It is generally paramilitaries who are responsible. It doesn't seem organized. There appear to be individual acts of sadism rather than anything else..."

...Ward believes that those who stayed longer in Kosovo have been subjected to more violence, that many have been terrorized because they have stayed so long. Many have fled terror but some of those Ward spoke to said they were fleeing the NATO bombs. "The Serbs didn't touch us until NATO attacked," a Kosovar told him.

That article of Gillian's appeared in the London Review of Books, May 27. Like the rest of her excellent Kosovo reporting, it hasn't appeared anywhere in the American press -- more about this in the item below. (June 1, 1999)



38 posted on 03/09/2003 10:43:16 AM PST by smokegenerator (www.pedalinpeace.org ---- Serbian Cycling Challenge for the Children of Serbia)
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To: AFPhys
Some of the terrorist acts committed by your KLA friends that You supported. Hope you enjoy your taxpayer money at work here

Zlocini OVK nad civilnim stanovnistvom
KLA crimes over civilian population
 
 

Jezivi prizori iz sela Glodjani posle masakra koji je OVK pocinila 08.09.1998. godine
Gruesome scenes from Glodjani village after the massacre commited by KLA
on September, 8th 1998.

 
 
Postar Nenad Jaredic, ubijen u
jednoj od OVK teroristickih akcija
Postman Nenad Jaredic, killed in one KLA action
Masakrirano telo pronadjeno u kampu
OVK u selu Klecka
Massacred body found in KLA campus in Klecka village
 

 

 I*Net a.d. Beograd

39 posted on 03/09/2003 11:01:42 AM PST by smokegenerator (www.pedalinpeace.org ---- Serbian Cycling Challenge for the Children of Serbia)
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To: AFPhys
 

"Oslobodilacka vojska Kosova"
"Kosovo Liberation Army"

"Terorizam je nezakonita primena sile ili nasilja prema ljudima ili imovini da bi se zastrasila ili suzbila vlada, civilno stanovnistvo, ili neki njegov deo, a u svrhu postizanja politickih ili drustvenih ciljeva." (FBI definicija terorizma)
"Terrorism is an unlawful use of force or violence on people or property to terrify or repress Governments, civilian population, or a part of it, with ultimate aim of achieving political or societal aims" (FBI's definition of terrorism)

<click for enlarged image>
Mapa "Velike Albanije"

"Great Albania" map

Prvo rukovodstvo OVK sacinjavali su militantni ucesnici studentskog protesta u Pristini 1981. godine, pristalice marksisticko-lenjinisticke ideologije Envera Hodze, tadasnjeg predsednika Albanije. Tom prilikom su uhapseni i proveli u zatvoru vise godina. Smatra se da su u tom periodu uspostavljene prve veze izmedju vrha danasnje OVK i albanske narko-mafije. Tokom godina ideoloska baza organizacije se gubi i OVK postaje konglomerat islamskog fundamentalizma, neo-nacizma, marksizma i ritualne krvne osvete sa finansijskim zaledjem u albanskim nacionalistima iz dijaspore i narko mafiji. Original leadership of KLA was comprised of militant participants of the 1991 Student demonstrations in Pristina, followers of the Marxist-Leninist ideology of Enver Hoxha (Albanian president of that time). At that time they were arrested and have spent several years in prison. It is believed it was during that incarceration that initial ties were formed between the current leadership of KLA and the Albanian drug-smuggling mafia. Over the years, ideological foundations of the organisation have disappeared and KLA has become a conglomerate of Islamic fundamentalism, neo-Nazism, Marxism and a ritual revenge with financial backing in Albanian nationalists and drug-smuggling mafia.

<Zlocini OVK nad civilnim stanovnistvom>
Zlocini OVK /
KLA crimes

(slike su neprijatne
!)
(unpleasant photos!)

Od gubljenja autonomnog statusa AP Kosova i pocetka raspada Jugoslavije, 1989. godine, akcije albanskih separatista se intenziviraju, a pocev od februara 1997. OVK sistematski sprovodi teroristicku aktivnost na Kosovu i Metohiji - eliminisanje nekooperativnih Albanaca, napadi na pripadnike i objekte srpske milicije i konstantno sirenje straha medju srpskim zivljem (ubistva snajperskim hicima, premlacivanje, pritisak da se napuste domovi). Samo u periodu od 01.01. do 31.10.1998. pocinjeno je oko 2350 teroristickih akcija, u kojima je 260 osoba ubijeno, a 509 teze i lakse ranjena. Teroristi nisu birali svoje zrtve - ubijana su i deca, zene i starci na surov nacin, cesto pred clanovima porodice. Since the loss of the autonomous status of Autonomous Region of Kosovo & Metohia, in 1989, and the break-up of Yugoslavia, actions of Albanian separatists have intensified, and from the beginning of February 1997, KLA had systematically been exacting terrorist activity in Kosovo & Metohia. Terrorist activities consisted of elimination of Albanians who would not cooperate with KLA, attacks on Serbian Police force and their objects and continuously spreading terror among non-Albanian population (murders by sniper fire, beatings, forcing people to leave their homes). Just in a ten month period in 1998, (between 1st January and 31st October) 2,350 terrorist actions were committed in which 260 people were murdered and 509 were wounded (some more and others less seriously). Terrorists were not selective about who their victims would be - they killed children, women and elderly in a cruel manner, frequently in front of their families.


Mudzahedin Aslan Klecka u
OVK kampu u selu Klecka
Mujahedin Aslan Klecka in
KLA campusin Klecka village

Izvori finansiranja OVK ostaju manje-vise nepoznati do 1998. u toku koje je, na osnovu poternica INTERPOL-a, uhapsen 81 kosovski Albanac pod optuzbom krijumcarenja i prodaje narkotika. Na leto iste godine italijanska policija razbija lanac albanske narko-mafije u Milanu. U ovoj akciji uhapseno je preko 100 osoba, medju kojima i grupa kosovskih Albanaca koja je oruzje nabavljeno preprodajom narkotika svercovala preko Italije i severne Albanije na Kosovo. Istovremeno biva osnovan fond 'Domovina zove' sa otvorenim bankovnim racunima sirom sveta, sa istim ciljem - pokrivanje troskova OVK donacijama Albanaca iz dijaspore. Financial backing of KLA had remained more or less secretive until 1998, when based on Interpol arrest warrants, 81 Kosovar Albanians were arrested on the basis of smuggling and selling narcotics. During the summer of that same year, Italian police had broken the Albanian drug-mafia chain in Milan. In that action alone, more than 100 persons were arrested, among which a group of Kosovo Albanians which was, with the drug money, buying weapons and smuggling them over Italy and North Albania to Kosovo. At the same time, they have created a fund called "Home Land Calling", with bank accounts all over the world, with the same ultimate aim - covering KLA expenses with the donations of expatriate Albanians.

Krajnji cilj OVK portparol organizacije Jakup Krasnici vidi na sledeci nacin: 'Zelimo vise od nezavisnosti Kosova - ujedinjenje svih Albanaca na Balkanu', odnosno, stvaranje velike Albanije pripajanjem ne samo Kosova, vec i delova Makedonije, Grcke i Crne Gore. The main purpose and aim of the so called "KLA" is summarised by it's spokesman Jakup Krasnici as: "We want far more than independent Kosovo - we want the union of all Albanians in the Balkans" meaning they wish the creation of a "Great Albania" by annexing not just Kosovo, but also parts of Macedonia, Greece and Montenegro.

INET originalni tekst - INET original text - Sanja Markovic, Bojan Gajic


40 posted on 03/09/2003 11:05:40 AM PST by smokegenerator (www.pedalinpeace.org ---- Serbian Cycling Challenge for the Children of Serbia)
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To: smokegenerator
Woolsey has no claims against him.

Besides, the point is that the news article by the Iraqi journalist was written in JULY 2001, approx. 3 months BEFORE 9/11. It doesn't matter if it's yellow journalist rag, National Enquirer....if it's written BEFORE 9/11 then there's a safe assumption of prior knowledge.

And a link between Al Qaeda and Iraq.
41 posted on 03/09/2003 11:36:14 AM PST by xzins (Babylon, you have been weighed in the balance and been found wanting!)
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To: smokegenerator
Hmm... Kosovo article (read "'Toon and Germany and France") ==

vs. present discussion: Blair and "... Saddam, take a stand against other rogue states such as North Korea, or come to grips with terrorism in general? "

non-sequitur, as expected...
42 posted on 03/10/2003 4:58:31 AM PST by AFPhys
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To: AFPhys
Yes, all the past is relevant to todays worldly activity regardless if it is "New" or "Old" Europe.
43 posted on 03/10/2003 6:45:05 AM PST by smokegenerator (www.pedalinpeace.org ---- Serbian Cycling Challenge for the Children of Serbia)
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To: smokegenerator
Well, I've seen lame responses before, but your response to my challenge in post#31 that you reply to Blair's concerns has to be the longest, and most lame ever. As I said a moment ago: non-sequitur... and the response here again is: non-sequitur.
44 posted on 03/10/2003 11:42:29 PM PST by AFPhys
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To: AFPhys
AFPhys has written in profile:Constitutional conservative (NOT libertarian) ... haven't heard anything I disagree with Ann Coulter about.

Summation- she is a racist with her reasoning and rationale of someone who is sick. She is an attention grabber who can talk a "pretty talk" with such ugly legs.

You havent answered my prior questions, so I assume that dodging is character of your personality. Silence is quilt in this matter as there is no defense to trying create a truth out of a lie.

45 posted on 03/11/2003 3:38:36 AM PST by smokegenerator (www.pedalinpeace.org ---- Serbian Cycling Challenge for the Children of Serbia)
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To: smokegenerator
You have really elevated yourself now.

Continued non-sequitur without any response to Blair's clearly expressed and simple concerns and now ad hominem attack, not only on me but on another.

What is your nic again?
46 posted on 03/11/2003 4:15:01 AM PST by AFPhys
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To: AFPhys
tweedle dee, tweedle dumb AF... YU neglect/fail to answer my questions.
47 posted on 03/11/2003 8:51:21 AM PST by smokegenerator (www.pedalinpeace.org ---- Serbian Cycling Challenge for the Children of Serbia)
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