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CIA ABDUCTED FORMER IRAQI GENERAL FROM DENMARK
Deutsche Presse-Agentur | March 22, 2003

Posted on 03/22/2003 9:48:01 AM PST by Wallaby

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CIA abducted former Iraqi general from Denmark; tabloid report
Deutsche Presse-Agentur
March 22, 2003, Saturday  
13:24 Central European Time

Copenhagen

Former Iraqi general Nizar al-Khazraji, who disappeared Monday while under house arrest in Denmark, was abducted to Saudi Arabia by CIA agents, the Danish tabloid B.T. reported Saturday.


Al-Khazraji allegedly was spirited out of his Danish home, where he had been under house arrest since November.
Four CIA agents had kidnapped the former army chief-of-staff, who had been living as a refugee in the town of Soroe west of Copenhagen since 1999, first to Germany and then to Saudi Arabia by special plane, the report said.

Al-Kharaji led the Iraqi forces between 1987-1990 and has been accused of involvement in chemical attacks against the Kurdish minority in northern Iraq. He fled Iraq in 1995 and has denied involvement in attacks on Kurds.

Al-Khazraji allegedly was spirited out of his Danish home, where he had been under house arrest since November while Danish authorities investigated his involvement.

Police officials said it could not be ruled out that the former general had been taken by the CIA, and said it was unclear whether this would have been done against his will or not.

Danish prosecutors issued an international arrest warrant via Interpol for the al-Khazraji. dpa tb emc jm



TOPICS: Breaking News; Foreign Affairs; Front Page News; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: alkhazraji; cia; denmark; iraq; iraqidefectors; jihadnextdoor; khazraji; nizar; terrorwar; warlist
It was reported earlier this week that General Khazjari was missing and feared to be kidnapped.
1 posted on 03/22/2003 9:48:02 AM PST by Wallaby
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To: Wallaby
The French have said this,too.
2 posted on 03/22/2003 9:50:40 AM PST by MEG33
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To: MEG33
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/872271/posts
3 posted on 03/22/2003 9:52:12 AM PST by Oldeconomybuyer (Let's Roll)
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To: Byron_the_Aussie; Great Dane; nunya bidness; The Great Satan; Alamo-Girl; okie01; Fred Mertz; ...
The Iranian take on the story:


Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion.

TOP IRAQI DISSIDENT GENERAL JOINS US COMMAND COUNCIL IN QATAR - IRAN REPORT
BBC Monitoring International Reports
March 19, 2003


Tehran, 19 March: Former Iraqi army chief, Nizar al-Khazraji, who has escaped from Denmark in defiance of Swedish court ruling banning his movements for his part in war crimes, has joined the US command council in Qatar, Iraqi opposition source said on Wednesday 19 March .

He had told IRNA so far that the US has invited several opposition figures to join the command council to conduct attack on Iraq.


He was denied asylum as immigration authorities thought it likely he was involved in chemical weapon attacks on Kurds in northern Iraq in the late 1980s.
Nizar al-Khazraji, suspected of crimes against Kurds in the late 1980s, is not allowed to leave Denmark. He has surrendered his passport and is required to report to police three times a week. These restrictions were imposed by a local court on 19 November.

Khazraji was head of Iraq's armed forces from 1987 to 1990, fled to Jordan in 1995 and four years later applied for political asylum in Denmark.

He was denied asylum as immigration authorities thought it likely he was involved in chemical weapon attacks on Kurds in northern Iraq in the late 1980s.


4 posted on 03/22/2003 9:53:11 AM PST by Wallaby
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To: Wallaby
What a difference two years can make.

Damn, we're good!

5 posted on 03/22/2003 9:53:33 AM PST by riri
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To: riri
Where I come from, this isn't kidnapping-- it's a jail break.
:o)
6 posted on 03/22/2003 9:56:10 AM PST by Maximum Leader (run from a knife, close on a gun)
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To: Oldeconomybuyer
Do a search on CIA in the forum. Does it come up empty for you? It does for me.
7 posted on 03/22/2003 9:56:37 AM PST by Wallaby
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To: Wallaby
Great info, Wallaby. Thanks for the update.
8 posted on 03/22/2003 10:00:37 AM PST by Victoria Delsoul
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To: Victoria Delsoul; oceanview; The Great Satan; Mitchell; thinden; Nita Nuprez
Now the Kurds are saying he's in South Kurdistan!

Al-Khazraji in south Kurdistan.

9 posted on 03/22/2003 10:05:27 AM PST by Wallaby
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To: Wallaby
Nope, I get nothing when I search "CIA". I found the earlier article by searching "Denmark".
10 posted on 03/22/2003 10:06:54 AM PST by Oldeconomybuyer (Let's Roll)
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To: Wallaby
Search terms need at least 4 letters.
11 posted on 03/22/2003 10:07:43 AM PST by Senator Pardek
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To: Wallaby
Three-letter words don't show up in forum searches. They have to be at least four letters.

I'm told you can search the site with Google if you need to find a three-letter word like CIA.
12 posted on 03/22/2003 10:08:16 AM PST by Cicero (Marcus Tullius)
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To: Cicero; Senator Pardek; Oldeconomybuyer
Thanks for the info.
13 posted on 03/22/2003 10:13:40 AM PST by Wallaby
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To: a_Turk
What's the Turkish perspective on this? Note that there were reports in Denmark that Khazraji was in Ankara!


Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion.

Al-Khazraji in south Kurdistan
By Bryar Mariwani
KurdishMedia.com
22 March 2003

London/Kurdistan (KurdishMedia.com)
The sudden and the mysterious disappearance of the suspected war criminal has brought the vanished former-chief Iraqi army under the spotlight of the world media.

Interpol have issued an international warrant to arrest the former Iraqi military chief.

Hawlati, the independent Kurdish weekly, said yesterday that Al-Khazraji is in South Kurdistan, without giving further details.

The website Iraqipages.com reported today that Al-Khazraji has been taken to Kurdistan and is now in Sulemani to supervise the military attack against the Iraqi troops in a northern front.


Al-Khazraji was in charge of the Iraqi military troops when more than 182,000 Kurds were killed in the genocide operations called Anfal.
Recently, a London-based Iraqi opposition group told the Danish newspaper, Ekstra Bladet, quoting a source "very close" to the general in Denmark, that General Khazraji was in Saudi Arabia.

The Danish newspaper Jyllands-Posten on the other hand reported few days ago that the general was in the Turkish capital, Ankara.

Sources close to KurdishMedia.com reveal that Al-Khazraji was kidnapped by the US in order to give intelligences which the US can use in its war against Iraq.

Al-Khazraji was in charge of the Iraqi military troops when more than 182,000 Kurds were killed in the genocide operations called Anfal. Al-Khazraji was also in charge of the Iraqi army when the Iraqi jets bombed the Kurdish city of Halabja with chemical weapons in 1988.


14 posted on 03/22/2003 10:16:52 AM PST by Wallaby
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To: Wallaby
 

March 19, 2003, Wednesday
Associated Press

Bush asks Saddam's soldiers not to fight, but they likely fear Saddam
By SALAH NASRAWI, Associated Press Writer

CAIRO, Egypt

(snip)

Meanwhile, an exiled Iraqi general who has been rumored as a possible successor to Saddam has disappeared from his home in Denmark.

Iraq watchers speculate that Gen. Nizar al-Khazraji, Saddam's former chief of staff, could re-emerge in the Middle East to give legitimacy to any army rebellion against Saddam. His son, however, asserts that he has been abducted by Iraqi agents.

Al-Khazraji had been under house arrest as Danish prosecutors investigate accusations that he ordered chemical weapons attacks that killed more than 5,000 Iraqi Kurds in 1988.

Al-Khazraji, 64, has repeatedly denied involvement. He earlier had tried to go to Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq, apparently to rally anti-Saddam forces.


15 posted on 03/22/2003 10:39:33 AM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Wallaby
Actually we were just organizing his travel arrangements.
16 posted on 03/22/2003 10:40:27 AM PST by mewzilla
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To: Wallaby
More background, for people like me who haven't been keeping up.

Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion.

Agence France Presse
March 18, 2003 Tuesday

Family of ex-army chief fears he was abducted by Iraqi intelligence

DUBAI, March 18

The family of ex-Iraqi army chief Nizar al-Khazraji, touted as a possible successor to President Saddam Hussein, has been hearing all sorts of rumors about his whereabouts since he went missing but fears he was abducted by Iraqi intelligence, his son said Tuesday.

"We have been hearing a new rumor every 10 minutes, the latest being that he is in a training camp for the Iraqi opposition in Hungary," Ahmad al-Khazraji, 38, told AFP by telephone from the family home in Denmark.

He said that since his father went missing after going for a daily walk in the southwest town of Soroe Monday morning, the family had heard that he was in one of any number of Arab countries -- including Saudi Arabia, Syria and Jordan -- as well as in Turkey, Iran and Kurdish-held northern Iraq. "We hope one of these reports turns out to be true. But what we fear is that Iraqi intelligence caught up with him," Ahmad said, dismissing suggestions that the family may be covering up for Khazraji until he reaches a safe place.

Danish police suspect Khazraji might have fled the country or been kidnapped by Iraqi agents. They said an international warrant was issued for his arrest.

A London-based Iraqi opposition source had told AFP Monday that Khazraji, 65, had gone to Saudi Arabia.

The source, who spoke on condition of anonymity, said the report on Khazraji's whereabouts came from "someone very close" to him in Denmark, noting that the former army chief has "always had good ties with Riyadh."

Khazraji had no travel documents, but could easily have left Denmark, which is part of the Schengen agreement for the free circulation of people, said special prosecutor for international criminal affairs, Birgitte Vestberg.

Khazraji, who headed the Iraqi armed forces during the invasion of Kuwait in 1990, fled to Jordan in 1995 and three years later applied for political asylum in Denmark, where he has since lived.

Despite being charged with war crimes for chemical weapon attacks on Iraqi Kurds in the 1980s, he has been tipped as a potential US nominee to succeed Saddam and was also said to enjoy Saudi backing.

Khazraji's son denied that his father had been under house arrest, saying he was free to move inside Denmark but could not leave the country.

His disappearance comes in the countdown to a US-led invasion of Iraq aimed at toppling Saddam.

US President George W. Bush has given the Iraqi leader until early Thursday to go into exile or face war.


17 posted on 03/22/2003 10:45:17 AM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Wallaby

Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion.


Agence France Presse
November 29, 2002 Friday

Dissident officer doubts Iraqi army will fight for Saddam

DUBAI, Nov 29

Fugitive former Iraqi chief of staff General Nizar al-Khazraji said he doubted the army would put up much of a fight in the event of US-led military action to oust President Saddam Hussein, in comments published Friday.

"I doubt the capacity of the Iraqi army to fight, particularly if communications are cut between Saddam Hussein and his top commanders," Khazraji said in an interview with the London-based Arabic daily Al-Hayat. The former army chief said the most effective Iraqi military units remained the Republican Guard and Special Republican Guard, consisting of seven divisions totalling nearly 150,000 elite troops.

"They have the best of the weaponry available but even those weapons are already old and outdated and will not allow an equal fight."

Khazraji said that within the regular army there remained considerable opposition to Saddam, adding that there had been at least three attempted putsches by senior army officers since Iraq's invasion of Kuwait in 1990.

In a first instalment of the interview published by Al-Hayat Thursday, Khazraji called on Washington to maintain its pressure on the regime to encourage new putsch attempts.

The army defector, who faces a war crimes trial in Denmark where he now resides for his role in the use of chemical weapons against Kurdish rebels in the 1980s, said units still loyal to him were ready to rise up as soon as he "set foot in Iraq."

He said he intended to move to Kurdish-held northern Iraq to lead the uprising as soon as he obtained permission from the Danish authorities to leave the country.

But Danish prosecutors say they charged the general on Tuesday precisely to prevent him leaving the country after hearing that he had obtained a visa for Saudi Arabia.


18 posted on 03/22/2003 10:52:26 AM PST by Nita Nuprez
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Comment #19 Removed by Moderator

To: Wallaby
This is an interesting story. Here's some early background. Apparently, he was sacked by Saddam right before the Gulf War.


Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion.

The Associated Press
November 8, 1990, Thursday

Soviets Support Military Action, Bush Orders in 150,000 Troops
By LISA GENASCI, Associated Press Writer

A U.S. campaign to gain support for U.N. military action against Iraq got a boost Thursday, with the Soviet Union offering its qualified approval. President Bush, as expected, ordered a new round of troop deployments, adding up to 150,000 soldiers to the multinational force facing off against Iraq.

In another development, Iraqi strongman Saddam Hussein sacked his army chief, suggesting dissension in the ranks over Kuwait, which his forces overran three months ago.

(big snip)

Iraq's army newspaper and U.S. officials said Saddam replaced his military chief of staff, Gen. Nizar Al-Khazraji, with the head of his elite Republican Guards, Gen. Hussein Rashid. It did not say when or why Khazraji was dismissed.

Western analysts with knowledge of Iraq's military machine said Khazraji's surprise dismissal indicated growing opposition in some military quarters to Saddam's strategy on Kuwait.

"It's very ominous," said Hans-Heino Kopietz, with Control Risks, an international security firm in London.

"It's not wise to change horses in mid-stream at this point in time. Khazraji's dismissal now is indicative of some opposition to Saddam within the military," said Kopietz, just back from a Middle East tour.

Khazraji had been chief of staff since 1985 and was one of the top officers in Saddam's inner circle of military advisers.

He was sacked amid increasingly tough U.S. and British warnings that they might use force to dislodge Iraq from Kuwait if necessary.

Saddam regularly purges those he perceives as a threat. It was the second replacement of a high-level Iraqi official in two weeks. Oil Minister Issam Chalabi was fired Oct. 28 and replaced by Brig. Gen. Hussein Kamel, Saddam's cousin and son-in-law.

Some analysts said Rashid's appointment was in part designed to keep the Republican Guards on Saddam's side.


20 posted on 03/22/2003 11:07:19 AM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Nita Nuprez
Last one...


Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion.

United Press International
March 20, 1996, Wednesday

Iraqi army officer defects to Jordan

LONDON, March 20

A former Iraqi army chief of staff has defected to the opposition in the ''self-haven'' area of Kurdish northern Iraq, the opposition Iraqi National Congress said Wednesday. It said Gen. Nizar al-Khazraji, who was chief of staff during the 1991 Persian Gulf War [not according to the other articles], had ''entered the liberated areas in Iraqi Kurdistan on his way to Jordan.''

Al-Khazraji was also commander of the army's 7th Division during the 1980-88 Iraq-Iran war, the group said. It did not say when he defected or give any further details of his flight.

Al-Khazraji, a Shiite Arab from southern Iraq, was captured by dissidents during the April 1991 uprising in the south that followed the Gulf War but was released and returned to Baghdad, the congress said. The U.S.-led military coalition that drove Iraqi invasion forces from Kuwait made northern Iraq a safe haven area for Iraqi Kurds.

A number of high-ranking Iraqi officers have defected to the opposition since the war. President Saddam Hussein's sons-in-law, Lt. Gen Hussein Kamel al- Majid and his brother Lt. Col. Saddam Kamel al-Majid, defected to Jordan in August 1995 but returned to Iraq mid-February. The two brothers, with their father and a third brother, were killed just days later when clansmen, angered by their defection, stormed the house where they were staying.


21 posted on 03/22/2003 11:21:47 AM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Wallaby
BT is a tabloid, but that doesn't mean they don't hit the truth once in a while, if this is true, I am all for it.
22 posted on 03/22/2003 11:45:09 AM PST by Great Dane
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To: Wallaby; *war_list; W.O.T.; 11th_VA; Libertarianize the GOP; Free the USA; knak; MadIvan; ...
Maybe he knows where to find the nasty weapons!

OFFICIAL BUMP(TOPIC)LIST

23 posted on 03/22/2003 11:50:39 AM PST by Ernest_at_the_Beach (Where is Saddam?)
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To: Nita Nuprez; Wallaby
"I doubt the capacity of the Iraqi army to fight, particularly if communications are cut between Saddam Hussein and his top commanders," Khazraji said in an interview with the London-based Arabic daily Al-Hayat.

Hmmm, hasn't that just happened?

24 posted on 03/22/2003 12:36:54 PM PST by aristeides
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To: aristeides
Yeah, that's one reason I posted that article. Someone has been doing a lot of planning. I wonder if the general knew he was going to be "kidnapped?"
25 posted on 03/22/2003 1:09:09 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Nita Nuprez; aristeides; Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks for the background, Nita. Here's an interesting claim in an Australian article that appeared 7 hours ago

CIA HAS IRAQI GENERAL

In February last year London-based Arabic daily Al-Hayat quoted opposition sources in Syria as saying the US had chosen Khazraji to run Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam.

26 posted on 03/22/2003 1:58:19 PM PST by Wallaby
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To: Great Dane
"Exiles in bid to turn commanders," by Lydia Georgi in Dubai, The Sunday Tasmanian, 23 March 2003:
EXILED Iraqi army officers are in contact with former comrades under President Saddam Hussein's command to persuade them to switch sides, an opposition spokesman has confirmed.

"Contacts are under way with Iraqi army commanders, chiefly in the Republican Guard," Albert Yelda, of the Iraqi National Coalition, an umbrella group including ex-officers, said from Londo


27 posted on 03/22/2003 2:06:39 PM PST by Wallaby
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To: Wallaby
Two of your articles say Khazraji was "touted as a possible successor to President Saddam Hussein." Then we have in the Australian article of a few hours ago: "In February last year London-based Arabic daily Al-Hayat quoted opposition sources in Syria as saying the US had chosen Khazraji to run Iraq after the overthrow of Saddam." I think it is a safe bet we'll be hearing a lot more about this Khazraji.
28 posted on 03/22/2003 2:13:58 PM PST by Wallaby
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To: Wallaby
I would think there is one huge Negotiation Party going on right now behind the scenes. Meanwhile, the press is waiting for another display of 'Shockinaw' to boost their ratings. lol.

Did you see the thread about Bob Arnot reporting about the anthrax? The thread is a tortuous read because of the flame wars, so holler if you want a synopsis.
29 posted on 03/22/2003 2:16:41 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Wallaby
I think it is a safe bet we'll be hearing a lot more about this Khazraji.

I agree. All the old AP articles I read said that Saddam replaced him a few months before Gulf War I because he disagreed with the decision to invade Kuwait. Five years later, he defects but remains in touch with his former colleagues in the military. He sounds like a valuable asset to me, assuming he's not the one who gassed the Kurds.

30 posted on 03/22/2003 2:21:35 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Wallaby
 

The Associated Press
April 3, 1996

Former Iraqi Chief of Staff Vows to Topple Saddam

AMMAN, Jordan

A former Iraqi chief of staff who defected last month vowed Wednesday to coordinate with disgruntled army officers and rebel groups to topple Saddam Hussein.

In his first public statement since defecting to Jordan on March 21, Lt. Gen. Nizar al-Khazraji said he had close links with the Iraqi National Accord, an opposition group composed mainly of former Iraqi army officers and diplomats.

"The suffering and the great catastrophe of our Iraqi people caused by Saddam Hussein, his sons Odai and Qusai and the few thugs supporting him is known to everyone," the one-page statement said.

"The desolation of Iraq was created by Saddam's belligerent ... policies, which will destroy Iraq and the region at large," said Al-Khazraji, adding that he would work for "the final and decisive stage of liberation and salvation of our country"

The general, who was Iraq's chief of staff during the last three years of the 1980-88 war with Iran, fled Baghdad through the Kurdish-rebel-controlled north of Iraq.

Iraqi dissidents said Al-Khazraji, who comes from a renowned family of military officers, was dismissed by Saddam in 1990 when he protested the invasion of Kuwait.



Xinhua News Agency
APRIL 4, 1996

defector general joins iraqi opposition party

amman, april 4

general nizar al khazraji, iraq's former army chief of staff who defected to jordan last month, has announced that he joined the iraqi national accord movement, an exile group opposed to the regime of saddam hussein. khazraji, who has been granted to stay in jordan for one-month but not political asylum, was described by iraqi exiles as a credible and honest military officer, according to today's english-language daily jordan times.

the iraqi national accord movement opened its regional office here last week. breaking a self-assumed silence more than 10 days after he arrived here following his defection from iraq, the general, a shiite from southern iraq, accused saddam regime of destroying "the sovereignty and integrity of iraq, its people and its armed forces."

"the desolation of iraq was created by saddam's belligerent and ill-conceived policies which have and will destroy iraq and the region," he said in a statement issued wednesday.

according to well-informed sources, khazraji did not address the media after his defection through northern iraq and arrival in jordan before wednesday because he was involved in "intense contacts" with other iraqi groups and did not want to state a public position until he was sure of broad support. the sources declined to reveal the outcome of the general's contacts.

western diplomats and media here did not show great interest in the former army chief of staff, doubting whether he will have vital military information since he has been living in a low profile in iraq for several years. they also doubt his ability to gather all the iraqi exile opposition groups around him after hussein kamel, the son-in-law of president saddam hussein, who defected to jordan last august, failed to do so and got killed following his return to baghdad.

 


31 posted on 03/22/2003 2:46:24 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Wallaby

Two more names associated with al-Khazraji to watch:  Wafiq Samerrai and Nizar al-Qaseer

 

Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion.


Associated Press Worldstream
April 08, 1996

By JAMAL HALABY

AMMAN, Jordan

The former chief of Iraq's military intelligence, Wafiq Samerrai, has arrived in Jordan and plans to stay at the Arab kingdom for an unspecified time.

Information Minister Marwan Mouasher told an informal press briefing Monday that Samerrai ''asked to come to Jordan and the government has accepted his request.''

''He did not ask for political asylum, but requested to come and reside for a while,'' Mouasher said. ''We are not sure how long that will be.''

Samerrai arrived in Jordan on Thursday from Saudi Arabia, where he performed the minor Muslim pilgrimage, or umra, to the holy shrines in Mecca and Medina.

Iraqi dissidents on Saturday reported the arrival of Samerrai, who has been living in Syria since his defection in 1994. They said he was in Jordan on a brief visit to coordinate policies with the Iraqi National Accord, an opposition group that opened offices in the Jordanian capital in February.

Samerrai is the second Iraqi general to be allowed to live in the kingdom, which is trying to rally Iraqi opposition groups to join hands in a unified anti-Saddam Hussein front.

In February, the government gave permission for residency to Lt. Gen. Nizar al-Khazraji, the Iraqi army's chief of staff until Baghdad's August 1990 invasion of Kuwait.

Jordan has in recent months been trying to distance itself from Iraq, its one-time ally. It has publicly attacked the Iraqi leadership and granted asylum to senior Iraqi defectors.

Samerrai carries considerable weight among exiled Iraqi opposition groups. His stay in Jordan, if it becomes permanent, could deal a serious blow to efforts by Syria to forge a Damascus-based, anti-Saddam alliance to counter what is widely seen as Jordanian efforts to gain influence in Iraq.

Jordan has denied that it harbors any ambitions in neighboring Iraq. It says its primary concern is to help end the suffering of the Iraqi people, burdened by crippling U.N. Sanctions imposed after Iraq's invasion of Kuwait.

Jordan's relations with Syria, its northern neighbor, have been tense since the kingdom signed a peace treaty with Israel in October 1994, departing from promises not to break Arab ranks and cut a separate deal with the Jewish state.

Relations worsened when Jordan undertook an active role in Iraqi affairs, challenging Syria's own efforts to gain leverage among Iraqi dissidents.

Syria is Iraq's sworn Arab enemy. The two Middle Eastern neighbors have for decades been locked in ideological disputes arising from the fact that they are ruled by rival factions of the Baath party.


The Associated Press
July 29, 1996

Former Minister Defects From Saddam Hussein's Regime

CAIRO, Egypt

The engineer who supervised construction of a "super gun" for Iraqi leader Saddam Hussein's artillery has defected and is seeking asylum in Germany, Iraqi dissidents said Monday.

Nizar al-Qaseer, who also served as irrigation minister until he was sacked last year, slipped into Kurdish-controlled northern Iraq and sought the help of Kurdish rebels, the dissidents said.

They said al-Qaseer, who is accompanied by his family, wants to go to Germany, where he studied engineering.

The dissidents, who live in Jordan, spoke on condition of anonymity.

Meanwhile, an Iraqi opposition group claimed three of its members were killed Thursday when their plot to assassinate Saddam was uncovered.

Their plot was uncovered minutes before the men were to board a helicopter to the Habaniya resort, where they planned to attack Saddam, the National Democratic Trend said in a statement faxed to The Associated Press.

The men, all members of the air force, were killed by Iraqi security, the statement said. It identified them as Maj. Fawzi Karim Al-Hamadani, Capt. Hussam Aldin Khalaf Al-Assadi and Abdellah Ghaidan, a non-commissioned officer.

The report could not be confirmed independently.

Both Iraqi opposition groups and Israeli media recently have reported the executions of dozens of army officers after what they said was a failed coup attempt in June. Several air force officers also were arrested, opposition groups said.

The latest defection follows the March departure from Iraq of Gen. Nizar al-Khazraji, a former chief of staff of the Iraqi army. Al-Khazraji directed the armed forces during the final three years of the 1980-88 Iran-Iraq war and was one of the highest ranked officers ever to defect from Saddam's regime. He defected to Jordan.

Al-Qaseer was the top aide to Gen. Hussein Kamel Al-Majid, Saddam's son-in-law who was responsible for Iraq's military-industrial complex. Al-Majid and his brother defected to Jordan in August 1995, but returned to Baghdad in February and were killed.

After al-Majid's defection, al-Qaseer was relieved of his ministry job and moved to the ceremonial post of presidential adviser.

The dissidents said al-Qaseer had been in charge of Iraq's ambitious program to build a huge artillery piece known as the "super gun" before the scheme was uncovered in the aftermath of the 1991 Gulf War.


32 posted on 03/22/2003 2:52:50 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Nita Nuprez
>Two of your articles

I didn't mean to be talking to myself. I meant to direct that remark above to you, Nita.

33 posted on 03/22/2003 3:09:44 PM PST by Wallaby
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To: Nita Nuprez
Thanks. I'll keep a look out for anything new on Wafiq Samerrai and Nizar al-Qaseer.
34 posted on 03/22/2003 3:38:33 PM PST by Wallaby
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To: Nita Nuprez
Great. Ping me if something turns up.

;-)
35 posted on 03/22/2003 3:41:33 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Nita Nuprez
What's the deal with the English translators for Xinhua? Were they skipping ESL class when capitalization was explaiined?
36 posted on 03/22/2003 3:44:07 PM PST by Wallaby
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To: Nita Nuprez
I did see the anthrax thread a few hours ago. I'll give it another look.
37 posted on 03/22/2003 3:46:29 PM PST by Wallaby
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To: Wallaby
LOL! Must have been a Gen-X'r.

Sometimes I think everyone under age 30 has lost the concept of Capitalization.
38 posted on 03/22/2003 3:48:53 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Wallaby
bump
39 posted on 03/22/2003 3:50:29 PM PST by chasio649
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To: Wallaby

Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion.

Deutsche Presse-Agentur
June 5, 1996

Iraq's ex-intelligence chief supports free democratic regime

Damascus

The former chief of Iraq's military intelligence, Wafiq Samerrai, said Wednesday that he is backing the establishment of a democratic regime in Iraq.

Samerrai's remarks came after his return to Damascus from Jordan, where he reportedly held talks with the Iraqi National Accord, an opposition group that opened an office in Amman in February. Samerrai, who has been living in Damascus since his defection in 1994, reportedly discussed ways of coordinating policies to topple Iraqi President Saddam Hussein.

He said his visit to Jordan had enabled him to reach a "clear vision about Jordan's stand towards Iraq."

"I'm absolutely against confederation and I am supporting the establishment of a free democratic system that could preserve Iraq's unity and arabism," Samerrai told reporters.

King hussein reportedly favours a federation of the country's main groups, Kurds, Shiite Moslems and Sunni Moslems, to prevent the country breaking up into mutually hostile cantons. Many iraqi dissidents argue that will only hasten the country's fragmentation.

Samerrai stressed that the unity of all Iraqi opposition groups will be a "complicated issue."

But he suggested unity between all national Iraqi forces, other than the religious and Kurdish currents, and what he called a consolidated coordination with the Kurdish and religious blocks.

He underscored the importance of a Syrian role in the proposed changes in Iraq, stressing that the Syrian leadership stands alongside the Iraqi people and is "concerned" about the future and unity of Iraqi territory.

"Excluding Syria's significant role would prolong Saddam's staying in power," Samerrai said.


40 posted on 03/22/2003 3:56:00 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Wallaby
Police officials said it could not be ruled out that the former general had been taken by the CIA

Did they rule out an "Alien Abduction"?

41 posted on 03/22/2003 4:00:44 PM PST by jackbill (waiting to be removed by administrator)
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To: Wallaby

It seems that Wafiq Samerrai, who had recently defected, predicted the death of Saddam's sons-in-law.

Not for commercial use. Solely to be used for the educational purposes of research and open discussion.

Deutsche Presse-Agentur
February 21, 1996

Kamel Majid's return sets stage for new episode in Iraqi drama

Cairo

Two high-ranking Iraqis and sons-in-law of President Saddam Hussein who defected to Jordan last August returned to Baghdad Wednesday after being "pardoned" by the Iraqi leader.

The return of General Hussein Kamel al-Majid, his brother Saddam Kamel and their wives mystified both foes and friends of the Iraqi regime who gave widely divergent theories about what was going on.

Many held the view that al-Majid - who as Minister of Industry had played a key role in Iraq's armament acquisition programme - had been allowed by his father-in-law to defect to Jordan for ulterior motives. The motives may have included a desire to mislead U.N. teams trying to dismantle Iraq's capability for manufacturing weapons of mass destruction, in addition to collecting information from dissident Iraqi groups on possible collaborators inside Baghdad.

Iraqi opposition leaders abroad noted however that al-Majid had failed to unify anti-Saddam forces or gain the trust of most Arabs during his seven-month-sting in Jordan.

"He wanted to come to Syria and to go to Saudi Arabia on official visits but he received no response from either country ... and I believe that he will be killed this year," said Wafiq Samerrai, a former Iraqi intelligence chief.

But Bayan Jabr, another prominent Iraqi opposition figure, representative of Mohamed Baker al-Hakim, leader of the Supreme (Shiite) Council of the Islamic Revolution in Iraq, asserted al-Majid was from the beginning a part and parcel of the ruling Iraqi clan.

Mashaan al-Jabouri, leader of the Iraqi homeland Party, differed with this view. He said that he did not believe al-Majid's defection had been a playact orchestrated by Saddam because the Iraqi leader would not have "accepted to involve his daughters in such odd situations".

However, he predicted that al-Majid's return to Baghdad would lead to a bloody struggle inside the ruling family, particularly because of long-rumoured rivalries between al-Majid and Saddam's powerful son, Oday.

Reaction elsewhere ranged from a U.S. expression of almost disinterested "amazement" to a brief front page report in one leading Arabic daily titled "Playact is over".

Some Arab analysts said a family drama with unpredictable consequences may be unfolding in Iraq. Even the most ruthless Arab leaders have been known to have their soft spot - and in Saddam's case this may be his daughters.


So much for the "soft spot."


42 posted on 03/22/2003 4:04:32 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: riri
~Wink~
43 posted on 03/22/2003 4:06:19 PM PST by VaBthang4 (Could someone show me one [1] Loserdopian elected to the federal government?)
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To: Wallaby
Let's see: CIA involvement in his disappearance "could not be ruled out" and he may have gone willingly. Who writes their headlines?
44 posted on 03/22/2003 4:29:19 PM PST by Reverend Bob (Liberate Iraq!)
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Related thread: Special Forces in Baghdad as Saddam's army crumbles
45 posted on 03/22/2003 6:24:22 PM PST by Nita Nuprez
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To: Wallaby
I thought of that possibility earlier, it makes sense.
46 posted on 03/22/2003 6:36:07 PM PST by Great Dane
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To: Reverend Bob
>Who writes their headlines?

Some guy who knows how to sell newspapers.

FORMER IRAQI GENERAL FROM DENMARK MAY HAVE BEEN ABDUCTED FROM CIA -- AND MAY NOT HAVE BEEN
spells NO SALE.
47 posted on 03/22/2003 6:56:12 PM PST by Wallaby
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To: Wallaby
Den tidligere irakiske hærchef, Nizar al-Khazraji, som lever på tålt ophold i Danmark, skal fortsat være varetægtsfængslet i surrogat i sit hjem i Sorø.

Retten i Sorø besluttede fredag at forlænge surrogat-fængslingen med yderligere fire uger frem til den 21. marts. Det betyder, at al-Khazraji, som er sigtet for krigsforbrydelser mod kurderne i det nordlige Irak, ikke må forlade Danmark.

Dommeren i Sorø mener fortsat, at der er grundlag for at holde den tidligere hærchef i en slags husarrest, fordi der er grund til at frygte, at han vil stikke af fra en eventuelt kommende retssag.

I stedet for en fængselscelle har han dog fået lov til at bo i sit hjem.

Nizar al-Khazraji er sigtet for krigsforbrydelser mod kurderne i Nordirak i perioden 1984-1988, da mere end 180.000 mennesker forsvandt, og der i flere tilfælde blev brugt giftgas mod civile.

http://www.ekstrabladet.dk/VisArtikel.iasp?PageID=194608

48 posted on 03/22/2003 7:08:03 PM PST by yianni
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To: yianni
kgf0-3495 94 gnq,.b p pae9rig-0423 1$@#%#$ jdsa[pdfgm re0-0v9cz09-gke 0- = 0 98 87 ad $^%$#% e4543$#% Y$%YKW_PRE

adjgf[a'-12 -3q]0 0 =304 iy-098er098b 3$#%#QL$% [e-0- rel;54 343$#^% $#[p;fdsg=-c -0r-=q3


http://www.LooksGreekToMe.com


49 posted on 04/06/2003 12:19:16 PM PDT by Nita Nupress
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