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Iranian Alert -- DAY 23 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
Live Thread Ping List | 7.2.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 07/02/2003 12:31:57 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

In just 7 days (July 9th) the people of Iran are planning massive demonstrations events and strikes.

On this date, 4 years ago, the regime brutally attacked peaceful student demonstrators while in their dorms. The result was the loss of life and liberty of hundreds of students, many of which are still unaccounted for.

Once again, the regime has been threatening a major crackdown on the protesters. A major confrontation is just days away.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a country. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iran; iranianalert; protests; southasia; southasialist; studentmovement
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To find the links to all the 23 threads go to:


1 posted on 07/02/2003 12:31:57 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: JulieRNR21; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; RobFromGa; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; ...
Iranian Alert -- DAY 23 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 7.2.2003 Posted on 07/02/2003 12:31 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

2 posted on 07/02/2003 12:38:43 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 8 days until July 9th)
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To: JulieRNR21; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; RobFromGa; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; ...
This morning I would like to start with a personal story. I was chatting on line with an Iranian who was depressed because they had lost use of their satellite TV. Recently they had heard a helicopter over their home.

The next day there was posted a notice to turn in their satellite dish or face a huge fine (worth several months salary). This was depressing because they no longer had access to the news.

I was able to send them the link to our webpage and the daily thread and they were thrilled. They loved the banner I am using on my webpage, which VisualOps had created. He was thrilled to see a hero of her's on the artwork, Ahmad Batebi. He is a young Iranian who was arrested four years earlier in that student protests of 1999. He is most famous for the photo showing him holding up the t-shirt of a fallen student that was drenched in blood. This young man has been in prison for four years now and now has acquired MS and most of the time, if not all, was placed in solitary confinement.

The They we no longer alone. They were in touch with the rest of the world. I would expect we may hear from them in the days ahead, if they dare.

The protests are continuing, though smaller and spread across the country. There are clashes with the regime. Last night there were clashes in Khoozestan following the "executions of two freedom fighters."

“Slogans against the regime and its leaders were shouted by many despite the heavy presence.”

“Several protesters and members of the security forces, many of them of Iraqi origin, were injured in the clashes as residents tried to stop the public executions from taking place.”

“The two men were among those arrested during the violent clashes that rocked the City Of Ahwaz earlier this month and were involved in the popular uprising against the regime.”

We now have less than a week before the big show down. Soon we will see whose resolve is greater. I will report back as soon as I have information

3 posted on 07/02/2003 1:25:38 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: DoctorZIn
BUMP for the Brave Iranians! July 9, we are with you.


4 posted on 07/02/2003 3:29:23 AM PDT by putupon
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To: DoctorZIn
Let's all hope that this is the beginning of the end for the Mad Mullahs.
5 posted on 07/02/2003 3:33:32 AM PDT by CurlyBill (Voter fraud is one of the primary campaign strategies of the Democrats!!!!)
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To: *southasia_list
http://www.freerepublic.com/perl/bump-list
6 posted on 07/02/2003 4:37:57 AM PDT by Free the USA
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To: DoctorZIn
Great work. Happy to read that sort of story first thing A.M..
7 posted on 07/02/2003 4:51:18 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Does anyone have those "Free Iran now" images that wereposted the other day?
8 posted on 07/02/2003 4:52:56 AM PDT by ChadGore (Piss off a liberal: Hire Someone.)
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To: DoctorZIn
Wonderful story, great stuff to read first thing in the morning..
9 posted on 07/02/2003 6:59:46 AM PDT by ewing
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To: CurlyBill

Iranian students 25 years ago, begging for what they have now.

10 posted on 07/02/2003 7:03:37 AM PDT by 6323cd
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To: 6323cd
Your post implies that these are the same students still at the university 25 yrs later.
11 posted on 07/02/2003 7:24:06 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Good morning! Your post #3 was very interesting. I hope they can find a "home" here. Thank you for sending the link.

BTTT!

12 posted on 07/02/2003 7:40:06 AM PDT by dixiechick2000 (Free Iran!!!)
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To: JulieRNR21; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; RobFromGa; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; ...
Khatami Threatens to Resign if Students are Executed

July 02, 2003
The Media Line
Melanie Takefman

The Student protests in Iran are entering their third week and it seems the situation is still far from being under control. Over the past two weeks, more than 8,000 students have been arrested during demonstrations against the regime and religious clerics. At an emergency meeting of the High Council of National Security which took place this week, President Khatami condemned proclamations of senior religious clerics to execute the student leaders, according to the London-based daily A-Sharq Al-Awsat.

Participants at the meeting said Khatami gave a direct warning to the Judiciary Authority and an indirect warning to spiritual leader Ayatollah ‘Ali Khamanai, stressing that he will not hesitate to give in his resignation “straight to the people”if the threat to the lives of the student leaders is not removed.

During the meeting, Khatami harshly criticized Tehran’s Prosecutor General Sa’id Murtadawi, also known as “The Press Murderer”. Murtadawi was appointed by Iran’s spiritual leader ‘Ali Khamanai to thwart the activities of independent reform newspapers and incarcerate their editors. Murtadawi was recently given the unusual authorization to imprison people for long-terms even though the law does not allow detaining people for more than one day without presenting an indictment.

President Khatami delivered a speech on Wednesday during the opening session of the national judges seminar in which he stressed that the most important mission of a regime subordinate to God is to establish an efficient judiciary authority aimed at “creating an insecure atmosphere for those who make society insecure.” He later clarified his remarks, saying that the worst danger posed to society is violating people’s rights and liberties. “People are free within the framework of the law and our duty is to promote their freedom,” the President told the Iranian national news agency.

Khatami and his reform-supporting partners, among them head of Parliament, Mahdi Karoubi, are concerned about the fate of several detainees who were forced by Murta’sawi’s people to “confess” on national television to ties with opposition elements abroad. They were also made to confess to supporting the contents of television and radio satellite broadcasts transmitted by Iranian opposition activists based in Los Angeles.

The concern of Khatami and his supporters has increased in light of sermons and declarations of senior religious clerics, broadcasted continuously on Iranian television and radio. These sermons call for the execution of students and detainees in order to prevent a repetition of the demonstrations that occurred in July, 1999.

Khatami threatened to resign upon receiving information that the spiritual leader Khamanai approved the request of prosecutor general Muta’sawi to execute at least four of the student leaders prior to the protests anticipated to be held on the 9th of July.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news_en.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=07&d=02&a=8

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

DoctorZin Note: The funny thing is that the students want him to resign. He is struggling to stay in power, what little he has. It is also interesting that they are now reporting there are 8,000 students in custody and that the protests have been continuing. Just as I have been reporting to you.
13 posted on 07/02/2003 7:46:26 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: All
Death to Theocracy

July 01, 2003
CNSNews.com
Robert W. Tracinski

The Bush administration has been right in recent weeks to focus attention on Iran--but not because of the threat that Iran might build nuclear weapons. Iran is the source of a much more powerful weapon of mass destruction that already has been unleashed against the West: the ideology of Islamic theocracy, with its tactic of state-sponsored terrorism.

And we must confront this threat now because we have an opportunity to strike at the very heart of Iran's regime by supporting its repudiation by its own citizens.

Iran has long been the leading ideological and material source of terrorism. The Ayatollah Khomeini was the first to develop a systematic theory of modern Islamic theocracy--a totalitarian fusion of mosque and state that is nearly identical to the philosophy later espoused by Osama bin Laden. Under the theocracy founded by Khomeini, Iran has been a systematic exporter of the ideas and methods of terrorism, backing international terror groups like Hamas and Hezbollah.

Most important, Iran was the first Islamic regime to strike systematically at the United States, from the seizing of our embassy in Tehran in 1979 -- to the bombing of the Marine barracks in Beirut in 1983 -- to the kidnapping of Americans in Lebanon through the 1980s -- to Iran's probable involvement in the Khobar Towers bombing in 1996 -- to its sheltering of al Qaeda leaders responsible for the latest anti-American bombing in Saudi Arabia. For almost a quarter of a century, Iran has been at war against the United States of America.

The most dangerous precedent set by this not-so-secret war is the fact that America has refused to fight back. Every administration since 1979 has followed a policy of appeasement, from trading arms for hostages to the State Department's recent "secret" negotiations with the mullahs.

Iran's rulers use terrorism as a tactic because it allows them to wage war against America without suffering the consequences of a real confrontation with a powerful foe. But this only works because we have chosen not to respond.

Now, however, we have been given an unprecedented opportunity to strike at the heart of the mullah's power. When the Soviet Union fell, the world discovered that no one hated Communism more than those forced to live under it.

Similarly, no one in the Middle East hates Islamic theocracy more than the young people of Iran. For four years, Iranian students have held mass protests in the streets. These protesters are openly fighting for the right principles: the idea of a secular government with freedom of speech and separation of mosque and state.

Despite arrests of opposition leaders, the rebellion is growing--and it has been emboldened by America's invasion of Iraq. A reporter with McLean's, a Canadian newsmagazine, recently traveled across Iran and heard one message: "They would welcome American troops if they were sent to remove the leadership." A young female student told him: "We want more freedom. We want the freedom to speak our minds, and we think America can bring this to us."

These demands for freedom are more than loose talk. The Iranian dissidents have set July 9 as the date for a massive general strike to protest against theocracy -- an event that could initiate a showdown with the regime.

This opportunity is too important, and the threat from Iran is too urgent, to allow for a moment's delay. It is crucial for Congress and the administration to provide immediate material, diplomatic, and moral support for the Iranian rebels.

But we dare not depend on these unarmed dissidents to overthrow the mullahs on their own. We cannot abandon them to an Iranian equivalent of the Tiananmen Square massacre. We must be prepared to use our overwhelming military might to destroy Iran's theocracy.

The reasons for toppling Iran's theocracy are far stronger--and more certain--than the reasons for invading Iraq. President Bush has described America's military victory in Iraq as the "turning of the tide" in the War on Terrorism.

But supporting the rebellion against the mullahs would be more than a military victory. It could decisively turn the ideological tide in the Middle East. Helping to establish a secular government on the ruins of a theocracy would provide a vivid demonstration of the failure of Islamic fanaticism -- and a model of a free, prosperous, secular society.

This is the main battle in the War on Terrorism, and it is about to commence. America only needs to decide whether we will choose to fight it.

(Robert Tracinski is a senior editor at the Ayn Rand Institue in Irvine, Calif. The Institute promotes the philosophy of Ayn Rand, author of Atlas Shrugged and The Fountainhead.)

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news_en.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=07&d=02&a=3
14 posted on 07/02/2003 8:00:45 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: DoctorZIn
Who controls the troops and security forces. Instead of resigning, he should simply execute the spirtual leaders instead of the students.
15 posted on 07/02/2003 8:05:45 AM PDT by DannyTN (Note left on my door by a pack of neighborhood dogs.)
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To: DoctorZIn
Re #13

I wonder why they stopped lying and admit now that they have actually 8,000 in custody. I see the regime showing some cracks now.

16 posted on 07/02/2003 8:11:57 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
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To: All
Bush is on TV speaking about the Iranian regime. He had just spoken to Putin and they are putting pressure on the Iranians regarding their nuclear ambitions. BTW, it is Bush's b-day. He told the reports to remember to wish him happy birthday.... he said, Putin had.
17 posted on 07/02/2003 8:13:57 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: DoctorZIn
Re #13

If he would not support protesters, he should resign and go home.

18 posted on 07/02/2003 8:18:15 AM PDT by TigerLikesRooster
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To: nuconvert
It is still the same ideology driving them.
19 posted on 07/02/2003 8:27:10 AM PDT by 6323cd
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To: DannyTN
Who controls the troops and security forces. Instead of resigning, he should simply execute the spiritual leaders instead of the students.

There are a variety of military groups in Iran. They have a standard military (mostly conscripts and many sympathetic to the protest movement. I have written about this in past threads but the mullahs have never trusted the military, so they created several paramilitary forces to act as a check against the military. Some of these groups are better trained and equipped than the military itself. Frankly, these groups could easily take the country into civil war.

I like your idea about who should be executed. I think most Iranian agree with you, “attach them to trees,” as they say.

20 posted on 07/02/2003 8:27:46 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: 6323cd
It is still the same ideology driving them.

Welcome to the thread. What ideology is driving whom? We spend a lot of time here examing the players in Iran and their ideology. So could you please clarify your statement?

21 posted on 07/02/2003 8:33:22 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: DoctorZIn
Number of journalists held in unknown location in current crackdown rises to nine

Reporters sans frontières
July 2, 2003

PARIS - Reporters Without Borders today condemned the arrest of another journalist in Iran, Ali Akrami, which brought to at least nine the number of journalists arbitrarily detained in the past few weeks in a crackdown prompted by student demonstrations. It is not known where they are being held and their lawyers and relatives have been unable to get any word of them.

The organisation cautioned the authorities about a campaign orchestrated by judicial officials and revolutionary guards in the mosques and conservative press in which all the detained students and journalists are accused of being "mohareb" (persons who fight against God), which is punishable by death.

Reporters Without Borders also reiterated its call for the release of all the journalists imprisoned in Iran, which now totals at least 17. The recent arrests have made Iran the biggest prison for journalists in the Middle East.

Akrami worked for the reformist daily Nedat Eslahat, which has been closed by the authorities for some time. His wife said she has not seen him since 16 June, when he went missing while outside Tehran university, and she said she was worried about his fate.

State prosecutor Saïd Mortazavi has said the recently detained journalists were being held in Evin prisons. But lawyers of the journalists who have gone to the prison have not been able to locate their clients and found no mention of their names in the prison records.

Mohsen Sazgara, the editor of the website Alliran and the (closed) reformist daily Jameh, is meanwhile continuing the hunger strike he began on the day of his arrest on 15 June. He is now very weak, and his condition is all the more worrying because he has a heart ailment. His wife, who is also on hunger strike to protest against his imprisonment, was summoned by judicial officials on 25 June and was hospitalised the same day.

http://www.iran-daneshjoo.org/cgi-bin/smccdinews/viewnews.cgi?category=5&id=1057154724
22 posted on 07/02/2003 8:37:20 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: DoctorZIn; Tom Bombadil; JulieRNR21; Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; RobFromGa; fat city; ...
http://news.gooya.com/2003/07/01/0107-h-25.php

This link proves what DOCTORZIn said and you can see the pics that showing the action.
The Militant forces, threw a satellite dish from the roof of a house.
Internet access is also restricted thesedays.
Many webpages cant be opened by users.
23 posted on 07/02/2003 8:37:52 AM PDT by Khashayar (We will win one day!)
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To: DoctorZIn
"Failure of Iran's recent unrest a disgrace for US"

Wednesday, July 02, 2003 - ©2003 IranMania.com

Tehran, Jul 1 - Iran's former president Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani on Tuesday described the United States as a 'dinosaur with a bird's brain' and said that the failure of recent unrest in Iran, encouraged by Washington, was yet another disgrace for America, IRNA reported.

©2002 IranMania & AFP Photo/Atta Kenare Former President, Ali Akbar Hashemi Rafsanjani.

"The failure of recent riots in Iran brought about another disgrace for America," he told a festival, held by the Iranian Air Force here.

Iran's leaders have said that Washington was behind several days of rioting in Tehran and some other cities and that US officials' praise for the unrest constituted a 'blatant interference in Iran's internal affairs'.

©2003 AP

[Iranian students gather in a demonstration at the Amir Kabir university in Tehran, Iran, Monday, June 16, 2003. More than 250 university lecturers and writers have called on Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, to abandon the principle of being God's representative on earth and to accept his accountability to his people. The move follows a week of protests and riots in Tehran in which pro-democracy demonstrators clashed with police and vigilantes who support the hard-line clerical regime. Theprotests witnessed unprecedented condemnation of Khamenei, calls for his death, in a land where criticism of the supreme leader is punishable by imprisonment.]

"Recent unrest in our country was so much important for America that Mr. (George W.) Bush announced that he supports the protestors and will remain with them," Rafsanjani said.

"The American Congress also announced that it will establish channels to contact the rioters," the official, who heads the arbitrative Expediency Council, added.

Rafsanjani cited US-led occupation of Iraq as another blunder and said America is like a dinosaur which has a got a bird's brain.

©2003 IranMania.com

"More than three months have passed since the end of war in Iraq and insecurity still predominates in that country, but Washington is not responsible for the reasons for this insecurity," he declared.

By invading Iraq, US is now repeating its military debacle in Vietnam, he said forecasting a 'bitter experience for America' ahead.

"America must realize that it has embarked a hard work and it presumes that the world has no custodians.

"American Defense Secretary Donald Rumsfeld likens the troubles resulting from Iraq's occupation to the times when America was gaining independence.

"His analysis is false since the American people were seeking independence, but armed forces cannot bring independence for the Iraqi people," Rafsanjani said.

The former president, who partly served during the 1980-1988 imposed war of Iraq under Saddam Hussein, played down threats of any military action against Iran.

"The enemies of the Islamic Republic of Iran have the experience of the eight-year Sacred Defense in their archives and (know) that Iran is not a suitable ground for aggression," Rafsanjani said.

He reiterated that 'the Islamic Republic of Iran's doctrine is not to invade and attack although the country enjoys a favorable military power'.

©2003 ISNA Photo/Mehdi Ghasemi

A high-ranking police officer seen arguing with a masked student in the fourth consecutive day of protest in areas around Tehran University campus and dormitories on 13 June 2003 in Tehran.

The official, however, stressed the need for investment in the country's military and defense research establishments in the face of 'American floating of the plan to establish a unipolar world'.

"Under such conditions, it is necessary to maintain Iran's defense preparedness and our vigilance," he said.

Commenting further on the recent unrest in Iran, Rafsanjani said, "Washington paid a very heavy price to create an atmosphere of unrest in our country."

The riots were conducted by 'a bunch of thugs, hooligans and hoodlums who thought a miracle was in the offing in Iran', he added.

The riots followed a peaceful gathering of students to protest perceived privatization of state universities, which officials have denied, and took an ugly turn when vigilantes attacked students.

Police have said maximum security had been restored following the unrest and vowed to 'stand up with full force to those who seek to jeopardize the country's security'.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=16620&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs

24 posted on 07/02/2003 8:50:34 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: DoctorZIn
If Khatami resigns it will be civil war, this is the threat he is using against Khamenei. Sooner or later this game of poker will have a showdown.
25 posted on 07/02/2003 8:59:42 AM PDT by AdmSmith
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Comment #26 Removed by Moderator

To: DoctorZIn
YEMENI PRESIDENT DISCUSSES IRANIAN AL-QAEDA EXTRADITIONS. Yemen's President Ali Abdallah Salih said in an interview in London's "Al-Sharq al-Awsat" of 29 June that Iran has extradited approximately six Al-Qaeda members to Yemen, and Yemen currently has 80 of the terrorists in custody.

Other Yemeni Al-Qaeda members were returned via Oman and Saudi Arabia. Salih said Al-Qaeda causes unease in all the regional states so nobody encourages them or harbors them.

"These terrorists are ignorant extremists who pick and choose from Islam what suits their purposes and do not know anything about the principles of the religion," Salih said. BS

RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 7, No. 124, Part III, 2 July 2003

Expect more of this the coming week before IAEA will visit Iran on July 9th. What a day for a visit!
27 posted on 07/02/2003 9:11:46 AM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: DoctorZIn
APANESE PRIME MINISTER WEIGHS IN ON POSSIBLE OIL DEAL WITH IRAN.
Japanese Prime Minister Junichiro Koizumi on 2 July urged the Japanese consortium that includes Tomen Corporation, Inoex Corporation, and Japan Petroleum Exploration Company to examine from several angles the possibility of signing an oil-development contract with Iran, Jiji Press reported. Koizumi said important factors are nuclear nonproliferation, Japan's role in the international community, and domestic Iranian issues. On 1 July, Tokyo announced that Japan will not sign a contract with Iran for an oil-development project if Tehran fails to address international concern about its nuclear activities (see "RFE/RL Newsline," 1 July 2003). BS



IRAN-INDIA GAS PIPELINE LOOKS DOUBTFUL. The respected daily "New Delhi Business Standard" reported on 2 July that the possible discovery of more natural-gas reserves in the Krishna-Godavari basin in Andhra Pradesh and the deep waters off the Andaman Islands in the Bay of Bengal is threatening to overshadow the proposed natural-gas pipeline from Iran to India.

Citing anonymous "knowledgeable sources," the report said that even if India does import liquefied natural gas from Iran, it is unlikely to invest in a natural-gas pipeline, not least because supply and demand projections show that India's natural-gas supplies are sufficient to meet demand by 2006-07, and if there are more discoveries India could have a surplus of gas. The pipeline project was a major feature of Iranian President Mohammad Khatami's January visit to India, and India has voiced skepticism about the security of a pipeline that would pass through Pakistan (see "RFE/RL Iran Report," 27 January 2003 and 10 March 2003). BS



Source: RFE/RL NEWSLINE Vol. 7, No. 124, Part III, 2 July 2003
28 posted on 07/02/2003 9:16:38 AM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: TigerLikesRooster
I wonder why they stopped lying and admit now that they have actually 8,000 in custody. I see the regime showing some cracks now.

Time to storm the Bastille?

29 posted on 07/02/2003 10:33:42 AM PDT by SauronOfMordor (Java/C++/Unix/Web Developer looking for next gig)
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To: DoctorZIn
Iranians' ideology, from the mullahs to the government officials to the "students" to Uncle Tom Cobbleigh and all, is nothing more than this.

All they will settle for is total Muslim control of the world.

30 posted on 07/02/2003 10:44:35 AM PDT by 6323cd
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To: DoctorZIn
BTTT
31 posted on 07/02/2003 10:44:52 AM PDT by Sparta (Tagline removed by moderator)
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To: 6323cd
Iranians' ideology, from the mullahs to the government officials to the "students" to Uncle Tom Cobbleigh and all, is nothing more than this.

I understand your scepticism of the Iranian masses. But on what do you base your opinion?

If you were to read the articles and comments from Iranians living in Iran to these threads you will hear a very different attitude than the one you assert.

So my question is, on what do you based this opinion? Can you cite me polls, studies, or anything?

32 posted on 07/02/2003 10:49:59 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: 6323cd
BTW, you can find links to all the Iranian Alert Threads at:


33 posted on 07/02/2003 10:51:37 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: AdmSmith
Is the IAEA really going to Iran on July 9th? That's no coincidence.
34 posted on 07/02/2003 11:07:23 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: 6323cd
So, there's no such thing as a new generation not liking the gov't and the religious establishment's control over them and wanting to change it?
You can be sure there is, because that's what's going on in Iran right now.
Please read some of the posts from the past days, and you may see things quite differently.
35 posted on 07/02/2003 11:18:05 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
Is the IAEA really going to Iran on July 9th? That's no coincidence.

I found that fascinating as well.

36 posted on 07/02/2003 11:18:54 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: DoctorZIn
I base my opinion on the recent events in Iraq concerning the Shi'ite Muslim who blew up American soldiers after being whipped into a frenzy by some traveling Mullahs. (Shi'ites are the prominent sect in Iran.) One thing I do understand is that it doesn't matter what an Islamist's citizenship is; religious beliefs are the end game, regardless of national origin.

In case we've forgotten...

Almin Karamehmedovic
The Associated Press

March 29, 2003

IN THE IRAQI DESERT -- A suicide bomber killed four Americans in an attack Saturday north of the city of Najaf, U.S. military officers said.

Capt. Andrew Wallace said the victims were part of the Army's 1st Brigade, 3rd Infantry Division.

The attack occurred at a U.S. checkpoint on the highway north of Najaf.

A taxi stopped close to the checkpoint, and the driver waved for help. The soldiers approached the car, and it exploded, Wallace told Associated Press Television News.

U.S. Central Command in Doha, Qatar, confirmed the incident but had no additional details. Maj. Gen. Victor Renuart said that kind of attack was "a symbol of an organization that's starting to get a little bit desperate."

The suicide bombing was the first against U.S. and British forces since the invasion of Iraq began.

There have been warnings of suicide attacks in Iraq.

Iraqi dissidents and Arab media have claimed that Saddam Hussein has opened a training camp for Arab volunteers willing to carry out suicide bombings against U.S. forces in Iraq.

Terror mastermind Osama bin Laden also urged Iraqis last month in an audio tape aired on Arabic television to employ the tactic against the Americans. Other Arab militants also spoke about suicide missions against the invading armies.

Such suicide attacks are common by Palestinian militants in targeting the better equipped Israeli army during the uprising on the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

Iraqi Foreign Minister Naji Sabri was asked in a mid-March television interview, whether Iraq would use the tactic of suicide attacks against the invading American forces.

"We have prepared ourselves for all kinds of war. For many months, tens of thousands have volunteered to serve as martyrdom-seekers (suicide attackers) in the battle with the American enemy," he said. "We trained them and readied them. We have prepared ourselves for street fighting and desert fighting."

The biggest suicide bombing against the U.S. military abroad was in Lebanon when a truck packed with explosives drove into the U.S. Marine base at Beirut International Airport and exploded in the early morning Oct. 23, 1983, as the troops slept. The attack killed 241 American servicemen and leveled the base. Simultaneously, a Beirut base for French soldiers was attacked by another suicide bomber, killing 58 paratroopers.

The Americans and the French were in Lebanon as part of an ill-fated peacekeeping mission to end Lebanon's civil war. Iranian-backed Shiite Muslim militants were blamed for the attacks.

In 1996, a truck bomb at the U.S. Khobar Towers barracks in Saudi Arabia killed 19 U.S. servicemen.

37 posted on 07/02/2003 11:38:53 AM PDT by 6323cd
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To: 6323cd
Which do you think is better for America's safety & interest in the region, and safety at home and abroad? 1) An Iran run as it is now, with the ayatollahs having the final word? or 2) An Iran with more of a secular, democratic/parliamentary style gov't with the religious leaders in the background where they should be?

#2 is what the people of Iran would like. How about you?
38 posted on 07/02/2003 11:45:45 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: 6323cd
Did you know, that a mullah in Iran was beheaded last week? (although I certainly don't condone this)

I think there's a lot going on that you may not be aware of, because it really hasn't been reported to any great degree.
39 posted on 07/02/2003 12:00:36 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: 6323cd
I base my opinion on the recent events in Iraq concerning the Shi'ite Muslim who blew up American soldiers after being whipped into a frenzy by some traveling Mullahs. (Shi'ites are the prominent sect in Iran.) One thing I do understand is that it doesn't matter what an Islamist's citizenship is; religious beliefs are the end game, regardless of national origin.

I am not arguing that there are not Islamic fascists in Iran. The opposite is true. I am only arguing that this element in the Iranian regime is a small minority position in the Iran of today.

The people of Iran, according to their own polling; want a radical change in the regime. The majority are angry at the regime's emphasis on Islam and Palestine at the expense of the needs of their own people.

The majority no longer respect the mullahs in Iran, most consider them corrupt or fools. This is why there is a huge interest in pre Islamic religions in Iran today.

The problem is so serious that Iranian mullahs are now starting to support the protest movement, because they fear Islam will be dead in Iran if they don't support it and a regime change happens.

Are you aware of any of this? Have you been reading the news reports in the threads I mentioned? I understand your anger, I share it against the Islamic fascists, but I do not agree that the people of Iran are all Islamic fascists. Few are today. This is the very reason the regime is about to crumble. The students and people of Iran are demanding a secular democratic republic. I support this, and I believe you would to. Read the comments of the Iranian students and leaders. They often sound more conservative and informed about our founding principles than most conservatives I know. If they succeed, they will be one of our strongest allies. Please support them.

40 posted on 07/02/2003 12:02:09 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: nuconvert
Oh, goody. There will be fewer but better Muslims.
41 posted on 07/02/2003 12:15:54 PM PDT by 6323cd
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To: DoctorZIn
Is the IAEA really going to Iran on July 9th? That's no coincidence.

I found that fascinating as well.


I do not know how the date was decided, probably by IAEA. ElBaradei would stay in Iran for one day, but an accompanying delegation might stay longer and might visit Iran's nuclear facilities.
42 posted on 07/02/2003 12:26:40 PM PDT by AdmSmith
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To: DoctorZIn
The President has announced support for Liberia and the ouster of Taylor. It's unclear whether he'll send in troops or a force of 80 or so spec. ops type guys. The guess is the latter to protect the embassy and use it as a base.
43 posted on 07/02/2003 1:55:46 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
The other day I published the article below by Banafsheh... it had been unpublished at the time. It is very interesting reading.

A Constitutional Construct for the Post-mullah Era
July 02, 2003
Iran va Jahan
Banafsheh Pourzand and Elio Bonazzi

It has now been published as the lead story at:

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news_en.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=07&d=02&a=11

Congrats, Banafsheh!
44 posted on 07/02/2003 2:47:35 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: DoctorZIn
Have you noticed a decrease in the outgoing news from Iran since the satellite dish ban and web site blocking devices have gone into effect? Do you think they're finding ways around the blocking? I know you said you have helped and others have said so also. I suppose they could be confiscating laptops and other computers when they find them.
45 posted on 07/02/2003 4:21:15 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
So, Katami has decided to stand up for the Young Lions. I don't think it's a case of him suddenly developing courage so much as finally figuring out which side is going to win. :o)
46 posted on 07/02/2003 5:10:46 PM PDT by McGavin999
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To: DoctorZIn
This is a bit eerie. Any updates, Doc?
47 posted on 07/02/2003 7:09:34 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
As I said earlier this morning, the regime is trying to cut all contact with the outside world. The people are angry about this. I chatted with some in Iran last night where they said the building they live in had over 200 separate satellite dishes and the regime forced them to remove them all.

I also have noticed that we haven’t yet heard from Khashayar. It is likely that these attempts at closing them off from the outside world will backfire on the 9th. Time will only tell. If you are praying individual, pray for them.

DoctorZin
48 posted on 07/02/2003 7:53:12 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... 7 days until July 9th)
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To: putupon
bump
49 posted on 07/02/2003 8:18:46 PM PDT by GOPJ
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To: DoctorZIn
"I also have noticed that we haven’t yet heard from Khashayar"

Yes. I hope Khashayar is okay.

A week seems a very long time.
50 posted on 07/02/2003 8:22:16 PM PDT by nuconvert
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