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Iranian Alert -- DAY 36 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
The Iranian Student Movement -- Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 7.15.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 07/15/2003 12:01:09 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movment in Iran from being reported.

From jamming satellite broadcasts, to prohibiting news reporters from covering any demonstrations to shutting down all cell phones and even hiring foreign security to control the population, the regime is doing everything in its power to keep the popular movement from expressing its demand for an end of the regime.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement
To find all the links to all 34 threads since the protests started, go to:


1 posted on 07/15/2003 12:01:09 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- DAY 36 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 7.15.2003 | DoctorZIn

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

2 posted on 07/15/2003 12:01:41 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
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3 posted on 07/15/2003 12:03:23 AM PDT by Support Free Republic (Your support keeps Free Republic going strong!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Canada Hunts for Body of Photographer in Iran

Mon July 14, 2003 04:10 PM ET

By David Ljunggren
OTTAWA (Reuters) - Canadian diplomats in Tehran are hunting for the body of a Montreal-based freelance photographer who died from alleged head wounds after being arrested, officials said on Monday.

The case of 54-year-old Zahra Kazemi is becoming increasingly confused amid disagreements between her mother -- who has given permission for the body to be buried in Iran -- and her son, who wants it returned to Canada for an autopsy.

Iranian President Mohammad Khatami on Sunday ordered a probe into the death of Kazemi, who was arrested in late June after taking pictures of Tehran's notorious Evin jail, where many dissidents are jailed.

Kazemi's son and friends in Canada insist she was beaten into a coma while Iranian officials say she fell ill after her interrogation started and died of "a brain attack."

Canadian officials denied reports Kazemi had already been buried, saying the argument between mother and son meant Iranian authorities were likely to take a final decision.

Ottawa is under increasing pressure from the family and activists in Montreal to ensure the return the body of Kazemi, a Canadian of Iranian descent. She died late on Friday.

"We're still verifying in Iran, through the Canadian embassy, where Ms Kazemi's remains are," a Canadian official told Reuters.

"Her remains are not buried yet. A final determination regarding the disposal of the remains -- i.e. whether they're going to be buried in Iran or whether they're going to be repatriated to Canada, as the son wishes -- will be in all likelihood a decision to be taken by a judicial body in Iran."

Canada -- which backs what it says is the son's ultimate right to decide -- wants to enlist the help of Ambeyi Ligabo, the U.N. Human Rights Commission's special rapporteur on promotion and protection of the right to freedom of opinion and expression, who is due to visit Iran from July 17 to 27.

Canada's ambassador in Tehran would try to meet Ligabo in Iran and persuade him to take an interest in the case, the official said.

Kazemi's son, Stephan Hachemi, has sent a letter to the Iranian embassy formally requesting the return of the body. He said he was sure Iranian officials had forced his grandmother to grant permission for the body to be buried quickly.

But the Canadian official said even if a decision were taken to bury Kazemi, "given the probable judicial component of the whole situation, the burial might not be in sight (imminent)."

Activists insist Ottawa be tough with Tehran.

"We have to be strong in our resolve to demand an independent inquiry and call Iran to task for its handling of this grotesque incident," Joel Ruimy, head of Canadian Journalists for Free Expression, told CBC television.

An official at the Iranian embassy in Ottawa said the fact Khatami had become involved meant the case of Kazemi was now gathering plenty of attention.

"This is a big political internal issue in Iran now," the official said.

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml;jsessionid=UAJKIC25X2NAQCRBAEZSFEY?type=topNews&storyID=3086773

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
4 posted on 07/15/2003 12:04:35 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
A Revolution's Lessons

By Pejman Yousefzadeh 07/15/2003
AP

The July 9th protests against the Islamic regime in Iran started out with the reform movement announcing that it would cancel protests because of concerns that the regime would crack down harshly on the protestors. In reward for the forbearance, leaders of the reform movement were kidnapped by regime enforcers.

Protests against the regime ultimately occurred, but it is worth noting these events to point out that the Islamic regime is absolutely devoted to putting a stop to any effort to reform or change it. The mullahs are not only ruthless about stifling dissent, they have gone so far as to get non-Iranian riot police in order to have a police force that is less reluctant to engage in savagery against Iranian demonstrators (the theory being that an Iranian police force might have greater difficulty in putting down revolts that were instituted by their own countrymen). The internal police force has been specifically trained to help preserve the power of the regime, and is skilled at clamping down on internal revolt. In instituting these safeguards, the mullahs demonstrate that they have learned from history.

Many of the leaders of the Islamic regime were revolutionaries themselves 25 years ago -- revolutionaries against the regime of Mohammad Reza Shah Pahlavi. The Shah had a powerful military, and a fearsome security apparatus: SAVAK (the Persian acronym and the words it represents translates to "Organization for State Information and Security" in English). However, the Shah was under increasing Western pressure to curb the abuses engaged in by SAVAK, and his military force was not skilled at internal crowd control and domestic peacekeeping. Because the Shah's security apparatus was not prepared to put down revolts against his regime, the Islamic Revolution -- given so little chance to succeed -- was able to bring an end to the Pahlavi dynasty, and to nearly two and a half millennia of monarchy in Iran/Persia.

In addition, the Shah himself was always wary about the use of force against demonstrators, and that wariness ultimately gave the revolutionaries confidence that the Shah would not crack down on them. Marvin Zonis (who was one of my professors when I was in graduate school) noted this wariness in his psychological profile of the Shah. He tells us that the Shah was hesitant about cracking down on protestors who initially began to dissent against the Shah's regime in 1963 (the year that Ayatollah Khomeini emerged as one of the main figures in opposition to the Shah), and that the Shah had to be prodded by his prime minister, Asadollah 'Alam to take drastic measures to preserve his reign. When the Islamic Revolution of the late 1970s came around, there were no leaders like 'Alam to urge the Shah to repeat the clampdown of 1963 in order to preserve his reign. Additionally, as Zonis points out and as the Shah himself hints to in his own autobiography, the Shah was reluctant to crack down on the protestors because he didn't feel that he had the backing of the United States to do so. All in all, the Shah did not have the proper instruments of state power to control his population, and failed to use the instruments that he did have. The mullahs will not make that mistake.

So what can be done to counter the mullahs' absolute determination to hold on to power? One thing that would help would be increased media coverage of the events in Iran. The regime's leaders will have a harder time taking drastic steps to curb the pro-democracy movement if they realize that the world is watching them, and if they realize that they will come in for strong international condemnation and increased isolation if they impose brutal crowd control methods to keep power.

Additionally, it would help if other countries would do more to isolate the regime. Despite its support for terrorism, its appalling human rights record, and the threat it poses to peace and stability, the friendship of the Iranian regime is still courted by other countries -- including European countries. This causes the regime to believe that it has nothing to fear in terms of retaliation if it does take measures to crack down on protests. Instead of their current course of action, European countries would do well to inform Iran publicly and directly that there will be no business done between the two countries unless the regime respects and gives voice to the demands of the pro-democracy movement.

The protests against the Islamic regime have now reached a critical stage. The regime is determined to do whatever it can to keep power. For its efforts to be frustrated, the international community must recognize and seek to frustrate the regime's determination to implement harsh measures against the dissident movement, and the international media should place the regime's actions under a microscope in order to prevent the mullahs from believing that their totalitarian and repressive methods will not be noticed by the rest of the world. As important as regime change in Iran is, it will not be implemented easily. Only by focusing more attention on Iran, and by isolating the regime further will the international community be able to head off the Islamic Republic's efforts to outlast the pro-democracy movement.

http://www.techcentralstation.com/1051/defensewrapper.jsp?PID=1051-350&CID=1051-071503D
5 posted on 07/15/2003 12:08:02 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Valin; Eala; norton; nuconvert; piasa; Persia; rontorr; risk; ewing; happygrl; JulieRNR21; ...
A link about Iran's History.

http://www.fas.harvard.edu/~iohp/
6 posted on 07/15/2003 2:31:40 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: Valin; Eala; norton; nuconvert; piasa; Persia; rontorr; risk; ewing; happygrl; JulieRNR21; ...
http://www.iiaf.net

http://www.iiaf.net/history/commemorates.html
This link shows the brutality of the Regime.
7 posted on 07/15/2003 2:47:34 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
Thanks for the ping
bttt
8 posted on 07/15/2003 4:32:52 AM PDT by firewalk
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To: All
American Companies Armed Iran For Many Years

Translated from Russian by Maria Gousseva
Jul 15, 2003

US special services discovered that 18 American companies supposedly supplied weapons to the country

As a result of an investigation of illegal supplies of military technologies to Iran agents of US special services discovered that 18 American companies supposedly supplied weapons to the country.

Associated Press reports that through London's company Multicore Ltd., related to the Iranian military, Teheran was supplied with spare parts for the F-14, F-4 and F-5 battle planes, to the S-130 troop-carriers, Hawk anti-aircraft missiles and military radars.

The information is spread by the Immigration Bureau and the War Crimes Investigation Service. No charges have been brought yet; violations of the act on control over weapons export are being investigated.

In this connection Pentagon Inspector Joseph Schmitz declared that "lives of US pilots were jeopardized with the illegal military supplies." The investigation is being held at the time when the USA is intensifying the pressure upon Iran; it also demands that Iran must stop supposed experiments with nuclear weapons. The USA demands that American companies must stop all kinds of contacts with Iran which may give the country more advanced military technologies.

Intelligence agents focused on activity of Multicore for the first time in February 1999 when special services suspected that a Californian branch of the company supplied spare parts for F-14 fighters to Iran. A search was held in the company in December 2000 when thousands of spare parts for battle planes and cruise missiles were discovered at the storehouses of the London company. Soon after that, two workers of the company were found guilty of violating the agreements on arms export. A brother of one of the men, Sorosh Homaini was arrested in London; his activity is still investigated in Great Britain. In 1998, the USA sentenced the criminal to 21 months of imprisonment for an attempt to start illegal export of military radars; later he was expelled from the USA.

A Multicore spokesperson in London with whom Associated Press contacted denied that the company illegally supplied weapons to Iran. Representatives of American companies insist they had no notion that their weapons further went to Iran; many of them deny that they had any kind of contacts with London's Multicore. Majority of US companies are now cooperating with the structures conducting the investigation.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1160.shtml
9 posted on 07/15/2003 6:54:03 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Cuba Accused of Blocking U.S. Satellite Feeds to Iran

July 15, 2003
Miami Herald
Nnancy San Martin

WASHINGTON -- Transmitters in Cuba are jamming the signals of at least four U.S.-based television stations owned by Iranian Americans who are critical of the Tehran regime and use satellites to transmit programs to Iran, according to broadcasters and a private U.S. firm that has pinpointed the source of the interference.

All the transmissions affected so far are beamed from Los Angeles -- which has a large population of Iranian exiles -- by privately owned stations that oppose Iran's theocratic government, officials of the four stations said.

U.S. government officials said they are still trying to determine whether three other satellite broadcasts, transmitted by the Voice of America from Washington to Iran, are also being disrupted.

''We simply don't know if our signals are being jammed,'' said Joe O'Connell, a spokesman for the Broadcasting Board of Governors, which is in charge of the U.S.-funded VOA broadcasts.

IMPROVING QUALITY

News of the Cuban jamming came as U.S. authorities revealed they have been studying ways to enhance TV Martí broadcasts to Cuba by using analog satellite transmissions -- rather than digital transmissions currently being used -- that are more difficult to jam and more easily captured by the estimated 10,000 to 15,000 satellite dishes on rooftops across the island.

''In the future, things might change,'' O'Connell said, adding that his office recently ran some experiments on improving satellite transmission to the island. ``The whole idea was to find effective ways to enhance TV and Radio Martí to Cuba.''

The disruptions of the California broadcasts were first detected on July 5. Broadcasters have since been unable to get their programs to reach Iran, where the ruling Muslim clerics have sought to bar access to media not controlled by the government.

''We never thought that in a country such as the United States we'd be suppressed from freedom of speech,'' said Kourosh Abbassi, a spokesman at Azadi Television, which promotes political change in Iran. ``Seeing as we have no ax to grind with the Cuban government, they must be in cahoots with the Iranian government.''

ANTI-AMERICAN

Cuba has long been friendly with the equally anti-American Iranian regime, even selling biotechnology used to manufacture medical products to Tehran in the late 1990s that a Cuban defector alleged in 2001 could be used to produce biochemical weapons.

The jamming, first reported by NBC News, began as the Washington-based VOA began broadcasting a new Persian-language television program, News & Views, to Tehran as Iranian students launched a series of street protests against their government.

FCC officials confirmed that they were looking into the jamming reports.

John McCarthy, a spokesman for Loral Skynet, the operator of the Telstar-12 satellite used by the California broadcasters to beam their signals to Iran, told The Herald that the company has identified the source of the jamming, but declined to discuss further details.

However, according to a letter from the Loral Skynet made public by Azadi Television, a privately owned U.S. transmitter location company was able ``to provide an ellipse of the most probable location of the source of the interference, which it identified as being in the vicinity of Havana, Cuba.''

Efforts to reach Cuban officials for comment were unsuccessful.

It is presumed that Iran is using jammers in Cuba, 90 miles off the U.S. coast, because they are physically closer to the Telstar satellites.

The other affected stations are Channel 1, Pars TV and National Iranian TV, which began its broadcasts to Iran three years ago.

The U.S.-funded VOA uses two satellites for its transmissions to Iran, Telstar 12 and another that covers the Middle East, Europe, Russia and North Africa.

BALLOON IN THE SKY

TV Martí relies primarily on a regular TV signal, not a satellite, broadcast from a balloon tethered 10,000 feet above Cudjoe Key in the Florida Keys. Those transmissions are easily blocked by the Cuban government.

But TV Martí, with little fanfare, has also been broadcasting since 1990 on satellite through New Skies 806, the Latin America net portion of the U.S. International Broadcasting Bureau. IBB, a U.S. government agency, is the parent agency of the Office of Cuba Broadcasting in Miami.

TV Martí's satellite broadcasts are widely available in Latin America via cable services. But its digital service requires Cubans with satellite reception dishes to use a hard-to-obtain converter, O'Connell said.

Regular, analog, satellite transmissions to the island have not been used in the past because the number of satellite receiver dishes in Cuba has been limited. But over the past five years there has been a boom in Cuba's black market for satellite receivers that U.S. officials hope to tap into.

U.S. officials have been struggling with Cuban jamming of TV and Radio Martí for a decade. In May, the Pentagon deployed a special airplane to test improvements in transmissions to Cuba, using a technology meant to break through the ''wall'' of Cuban jamming efforts and make the U.S.-operated stations more effective at reaching Cubans.

TV Martí costs about $11 million a year. About another $15 million goes to Radio Martí.

http://www.miami.com/mld/miamiherald/news/6304655.htm

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
10 posted on 07/15/2003 7:02:08 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Reformers: Iran Must Chose Democracy or Despotism

Tue July 15, 2003 08:47 AM ET
By Jon Hemming
TEHRAN (Reuters) - Some 350 reformist intellectuals urged Iran's Supreme Leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei Tuesday to end repression and free political prisoners, saying the Islamic Republic must choose between democracy and despotism.

The politicians, academics, activists and lawyers said Khamenei, Iran's most powerful figure, should overhaul the hard-line judiciary and conservative institutions that have blocked much of moderate President Mohammad Khatami's reforms.

Around a dozen journalists have been arrested since violent protests last month and one Canadian photographer died after being detained. Some 4,000 were arrested during the student unrest in which slogans targeted both hard-liners and reformers.

"Resorting to violence, crackdowns and authoritarian methods, as we see today toward students, will bear no result but exacerbating the crisis," said the letter to Khamenei, a copy of which was faxed to Reuters.

"Such methods...are not only illegal and lack popular, religious and moral legitimacy, but are also useless and inefficient," it said.

The letter was the latest in a string of missives sent by parliamentarians and dissidents calling for change. Last month 250 intellectuals wrote an open letter accusing the clerical establishment of putting themselves in the place of God.

Pro-reform journalist and former deputy Culture Minister Issa Saharkhiz, whose office distributed the letter to the media, was arrested Tuesday on unspecified charges, his office said.

The manager of the magazine Theater Sinema was also arrested Tuesday on charges connected to a picture published in it, the ISNA student news agency said.

"VITAL DILEMMA"

The intellectuals' letter to Khamenei reflected a debate over the precedence of the Islamic or the republican side of the Islamic Republic; whether officials appointed by Iran's top cleric Khamenei or those popularly elected should hold sway.

"We believe the Islamic Republic is now in a vital dilemma," the letter said.

"One way is to succumb to a despotic interpretation of Islam and the constitution by appointing people who do not have any standing before public opinion...whose measures have led to a storm of frustration," it said.

"The other way is to succumb to a democratic interpretation of the constitution...to save the country and repel foreign threats."

With U.S. troops at both Iran's front and back doors in Iraq and Afghanistan, Iran has come under increasing pressure over allegations it was developing nuclear arms and backing terrorism, giving a new edge to the domestic political debate.

The United States strongly supported the demonstrations. Tehran has accused Washington of blatant interference in its affairs.

Khatami's efforts to create more open, responsible rule have been frustrated by appointed conservatives who have blocked his reform bills at every turn and hard-line judges who have banned some 90 pro-reform publications in the last three years.

The intellectuals said their minimum demands were an overhaul of the judiciary, changes to the 12-man Guardian Council which can veto laws, the approval of two bills giving Khatami more power and the release of political prisoners.

http://www.reuters.com/newsArticle.jhtml?type=topNews&storyID=3091476

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
11 posted on 07/15/2003 7:04:01 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Journalist sought to expose injustice
Life ended as she pursued her passion

KINDA JAYOUSH
The Gazette Canada.com
Tuesday, July 15, 2003

Montreal photojournalist Zahra Kazemi dedicated herself to documenting the living conditions in war-torn areas and exposing injustices against women and children.

Her life ended shortly after her arrest in Tehran last month while covering one of those stories she was most passionate about.

Iranian authorities detained Kazemi on or about June 23 as she was taking pictures of the notorious Evin prison in northern Tehran, where many political dissidents are locked up.

Melanie Navarro, assistant editor of Montreal's Recto Verso magazine, where Kazemi's pictures and articles were published over the past seven years, described Kazemi as a courageous person with a strong humanitarian sense.

"She was a woman who was really full of love for everybody. A very special person," Navarro said. "She had a strong passion for her work and was very much interested in social issues and women's rights."

Kazemi, 54, who arrived in Montreal from France in 1993, worked hard to confront injustices and was able to connect with people and capture their innermost feelings in her pictures.

"With her kind heart, she knew how to get close to people and portray their emotions and sufferings," Navarro said.

"She was very active and when she was confronted with injustices, she did not settle until she exposed them," she added.

Kazemi, who was of Iranian descent, travelled extensively around the Middle East and covered living conditions in Palestinian refugee camps.

Her last report with Recto Verso was in April. It included an article and pictures about the critical living conditions in Afghanistan after the U.S.-led coalition toppled the Taliban regime.

After this report and before heading to Iran, she was in Iraq for six weeks to document the situation there after the end of the U.S.-led war.

She went to Tehran as an Iranian citizen on her way to Turkmenistan where she was planning to cover a story about Russians being expelled from the former republic of the ex-Soviet Union. After that she wanted to head to North Korea.

Kazemi stayed longer than planned in Iran to cover last month's protests by students demanding reforms. About 4,000 people were arrested.

Kazemi was detained while taking pictures of Evin prison. Her family was later notified by the Iranian authorities that she was in a hospital.

Her family alleged she was beaten into coma. Friends who visited her said they saw severe cuts and bruises on her face and head.

Navarro said Kazemi's colleagues want to see more details on what happened between the arrest and her being taken to hospital.

"Whatever has happened shouldn't have happened," she said. "It is too late for Zeba to return, but we really need her body to be repatriated to have it examined and know exactly how she died."

kjayoush@thegazette.canwest.com

© Copyright 2003 Montreal Gazette

http://www.canada.com/montreal/news/story.asp?id=D33DECB8-367E-461B-BE90-19CC6113CEC1
12 posted on 07/15/2003 7:09:24 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
The jamming, first reported by NBC News, began as the Washington-based VOA began broadcasting a new Persian-language television program, News & Views, to Tehran as Iranian students launched a series of street protests against their government.

Interesting co-incidence? When did the Persian VOA signal start and the private sector satellite signals start having their interference. (Note for the tinfoil crowd: I am not linking the two) I just am exploring a theory that the Cubans have grown skilled in jamming VOA / TV-Marti satellite signals and they figured they would do the mullahs a favor.

What are some other people's thoughts on this?

13 posted on 07/15/2003 7:17:04 AM PDT by jriemer (We are a Republic not a Democracy)
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To: jriemer
I think Castro and Chavez are, and have been working, check by jowl with the Iranian thugs..Castro for oil from Iran and Chavez because he does whatever Castro tells him to do.
The mullahs bombed the Jewish Center in Bueanas Aires and have their hezbollah gangs in a number of places in Central and South America.

So does AQ.
14 posted on 07/15/2003 8:01:56 AM PDT by the Real fifi
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To: jriemer
The Persian VOA has been transmitting for some time now. I remember reading complaints about a change in format last winter. But that Castro is doing this for the mullahs seems pretty evident.

What's surprising to me is Loral's reluctance to speak out, and the seeming inaction from the feds over this. I just don't feel like we're getting the whole story...

15 posted on 07/15/2003 8:08:45 AM PDT by Eala (Freedom for Iran -- http://eala.freeservers.com/iranrally)
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To: the Real fifi
I think Castro and Chavez are, and have been working, check by jowl with the Iranian thugs..Castro for oil from Iran and Chavez because he does whatever Castro tells him to do. The mullahs bombed the Jewish Center in Bueanas Aires and have their hezbollah gangs in a number of places in Central and South America.

Many have concentrated on the Afghanistan and Iraq wars but really we have a multi-front campaign that spans contients.

There are AQ insurgents South East Asia spreading towards Australia. There are bona-fide communist governments giving safe haven to AQ in and around Venezuela and Brazil in South America. To wrap it up, AQ still has bases of operations in Africa that have never tackled-head head on since the Kenya and Tanzania bombings.

To think that AQ is purely a Middle-Eastern terrorist outfit is naive in the extreme.

16 posted on 07/15/2003 8:23:06 AM PDT by jriemer (We are a Republic not a Democracy)
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To: jriemer
Just as it is idiotic to accept the Clinton era formulation that it is not operating under state-sponsorship.
17 posted on 07/15/2003 8:48:06 AM PDT by the Real fifi
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To: jriemer
...When did the Persian VOA signal start and the private sector satellite signals start having their interference....

They began jamming I believe the day before VOA TV Iran was to begin, Sunday July 6.
18 posted on 07/15/2003 10:02:16 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Eala
..The Persian VOA has been transmitting for some time now....

True, but the TV broadcasts began July 6th.
19 posted on 07/15/2003 10:03:23 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Iran’s Supreme Leader Receives Hefty Kickback on Auto Sales!?

July 15, 2003
AFP
Khaleej Times

TEHRAN - The office of Iran’s supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei has taken the rare step of seeking to dispel a popular myth that it receives a hefty cut on the sale of new cars, press reports said on Tuesday.

“The rumours that say that this office receives a percentage off the cars manufactured in Iran are sheer lies, and only try to sow anxiety and mistrust,” Khamenei’s office was quoted as saying in a statement.

“This office has asked the ministry of intelligence to identify those spreading such rumors so they could be dealt with according to the law,” it added.

According to a rumour frequently heard in Tehran, particularly from struggling taxi drivers, the high price of even low-quality cars can be attributed to a “religious tax” that sees up to a third of their cash sent to Khamenei.

Many drivers argue that a car such as the locally-produced Paykan, which is based on the 1960’s British Hillman Hunter, cannot be worth its sale price of 7,500 dollars.

http://www.khaleejtimes.com/DisplayArticle.asp?xfile=data/middleeast/2003/July/middleeast_July263.xml&section=middleeast&col=
20 posted on 07/15/2003 10:13:31 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Manley to Iran: Send Canadian's Body Home

July 15, 2003
Ottawa Citizens
Robert Fife

Deputy Prime Minister John Manley warned yesterday that Canada's relations with Iran could be seriously jeopardized if it does not return the body of a slain Montreal photojournalist and explain how she died while in custody in Tehran.

Mr. Manley told reporters Canada has been steadily seeking improved relations with Iran, particularly with the government of reformist President Mohammad Khatami, who on Sunday ordered an inquiry into the death of Zahra Kazemi.

But Mr. Manley made it clear that Iran will be putting its relationship with Canada back on a rocky footing if it does not return Ms. Kazemi's body and explain her death. In recent years, both countries have worked hard to repair the damage caused when Canada helped spirit U.S. diplomats out of Iran following the 1979 seizure of the U.S. diplomatic mission in Tehran by Iranian militants.

"It's a serious issue and it will be put in that context with the Iranian authorities. ... This will be a setback if we can't resolve it," he said. "We believe the family, of course deserves, a full explanation for what happened. The body should be returned."

While using strong diplomatic language, Mr. Manley also conceded part of the problem may lie with the hardline Muslim clerics who control the judiciary, army and secret service agencies and oppose the reformers backing Mr. Khatami's efforts at liberalization.

"There have been a number of free and open elections, but those elections are not the only sources of government authority in that country, and that is one of the causes of our concern," Mr. Manley said.

"But there has been indication on the part of the people of Iran, as they have demonstrated in two elections in a row now, that they want to see reform and they want to see liberalization, and hopefully the country will be able to move in that direction."

Neither Mr. Manley nor the Iranian embassy in Ottawa was able to provide detailed information on what is happening in Tehran to assure Ms. Kazemi's body is returned.

Mr. Manley also would not comment on reports that the Canadian Embassy was slow in helping Ms. Kazemi after she was arrested.

Iranian Ambassador Mohammed Mousavi has returned to Iran, and officials in the embassy said they didn't even know whether Ms. Kazemi's body has been buried or is still in a morgue.

However, the embassy official said Mr. Khatami is determined to find out the truth of Ms. Kazemi's death, and noted the story has received front-page coverage, at least in reformist papers in Iran, including the Iran Daily.

Ms. Kazemi, 54, who worked for Camera Press Institute, was arrested while taking photos from the Evin prison compound north of Tehran, where families of those under arrest were staging a demonstration June 23.

The Iran Daily said Ms. Kazemi suffered a stroke during interrogation and died in hospital. Ms. Kazemi's son, Stephan Hachemi, believes his mother was beaten into a coma and wants her body returned to Canada and examined by independent medical experts.

Mr. Khatami has assigned four cabinet ministers, including the interior minister, to clarify every aspect of the woman's death, including who was responsible for it.

As foreign affairs minister in 2001, Mr. Manley ended a longstanding Canadian policy of keeping its distance from the Islamic fundamentalist regime of Mr. Khatami, a moderate reformer who was elected in 1996 and who has in recent years showed signs of warming to the West.

Government officials said they had "conflicting information" about the whereabouts of the body of Ms. Kazemi, previously thought to have been buried in Iran.

The body is probably still at the Forensic Institute in Tehran, Canadian Reporters Without Borders president Tanya Churchmuch said.

Foreign Affairs spokesperson Reynald Doiron said Canadian officials are trying to confirm the body's location while Philip MacKinnon, Canada's ambassador to Iran, is raising the issue "at the highest levels."

It was reported Monday that Ms. Kazemi's remains might have been buried when her mother, who lives in Iran, signed papers permitting her interment. Ms. Kazemi's son, Montreal resident Stephan Hachemi, said yesterday he believes his mother has in fact been buried in Iran. Mr. Hachemi has hired a lawyer and is calling on Iran to explain how and why his mother died.

Robert Fife is Parliamentary bureau chief.

http://www.canada.com/ottawa/ottawacitizen/story.asp?id=1587CFC7-217A-4163-9716-DB27E95D6352
21 posted on 07/15/2003 10:14:20 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Dissidents seek to apply more pressure on Khamenei

Tuesday, July 15, 2003 - ©2003 IranMania.com

TEHRAN, July 15 (AFP) - A group of 350 Iranian dissidents has written an open letter to supreme leader Ayatollah Ali Khamenei demanding a major reform of the clerical regime and the freeing of all political prisoners.

"The judiciary needs to undergo fundamental changes. One of the main reasons of general discontent is the unjust manner of the judiciary in the arrests, prosecutions and trials," said the strongly-worded declaration, the latest in a series signed by reformists, liberals, journalists, intellectuals and several clerics.

"Political prisoners, journalists and students must be immediately freed and the newspapers which were banned without due process must be allowed to start their activities again," it said.

The signatories also targetted the Guardians and Expediency Councils, two unelected legislative oversight bodies that have frequently blocked reforms passed by the reformist-held parliament.

They said the bodies "lack a public base and do not have an appropriate view of peoples' problems".

Among the signatories to the letter was Zohreh Aghajari, whose brother, pro-reform dissident Hashem Aghajari, was sentenced to death last year on charges of blasphemy after he questioned the right to rule of clerics.

He is currently awaiting a revision of his sentence.

Other signatories were close allies of embattled pro-reform President Mohammad Khatami, members of the banned-but-tolerated Iran Freedom Movement (IFM), journalists, and prominent academics.

Also on the list of names that followed the five-page letter were relatives and supporters of top dissident cleric Grand Ayatollah Hossein Ali Montazeri, who was initially tapped to replace revolutionary leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini as supreme leader but fell out of favour and then spent five years under house arrest.

The letter said the nearly 25-year-old Islamic republic was facing three major crisis, concerning its legality, public participation in elections and efficiency.

"Resorting to violence, suppression and authoritative methods will only intensify these crises," the letter read.

"You have always related the general discontent to economic corruption, poverty, discrimination and high prices, whereas the roots of the problem lies in the growing gap between government and nation," the letter said.

It nevertheless attributed Iran's economic crisis to "the existing political deadlock and presence of an economic Mafia".

Also Tuesday, Grand Ayatollah Montazeri issued his own statement, calling on officials to turn to their own people instead of allegedly seeking covert negotiations with the United States.

"Unfortunately we are witnessing that the officials are covertly sending people outside Iran to negotiate with the United States, at a time when they are not ready to come to terms with their own people and listen to them," Montazeri said in a statement released by his office.

"If they are afraid of the US, then they should comply with people's demands to win their support, it is only then that the US cannot topple the regime that has its own people's support," he said.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=17005&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
22 posted on 07/15/2003 10:15:30 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: the Real fifi
Just as it is idiotic to accept the Clinton era formulation that it is not operating under state-sponsorship.

The list of states that sponsor AQ is not a short one and not limited to the "usual suspects" either...

23 posted on 07/15/2003 10:17:26 AM PDT by jriemer (We are a Republic not a Democracy)
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To: DoctorZIn
Loral (Bernard Schwartz) to File Chapter 11

Posted by RinaseaofDs
On 07/15/2003 10:27 AM PDT with 4 comments

Fox News Website ^ | 7/15/2003 | RinaseaofDs
Chapter 11 couldn't have happened to a more corrupt CEO NEW YORK — Loral Space & Communications Ltd. (LOR), a satellite maker and operator, said Tuesday it filed for bankruptcy and sold half its business amid a protracted slump in telecommunications markets."

This may play a role in the Cuba story.

24 posted on 07/15/2003 10:53:14 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
Loral (Bernard Schwartz) to File Chapter 11

It may only become a question of who didn't Loral sell their technology to...

25 posted on 07/15/2003 11:03:17 AM PDT by jriemer (We are a Republic not a Democracy)
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To: jriemer
I was referring more to the fact that this has been going on for 10 days and no one has "fixed the problem".
Supposedly the FCC is working on this. Sounds like Loral's been very distracted with their own problems. Where's the media coverage? What's going on at Loral now or whoever they sold their business to? Anyone doing anything about that satellite to keep Cuba from targeting it for whatever purpose it or Iran wants?
26 posted on 07/15/2003 11:15:56 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Well you've been busy today! Lots of reading to catch up on. The journalist may just be the thing that turns the trick, especially if Canada remains strong about demanding the body back.
27 posted on 07/15/2003 5:04:41 PM PDT by McGavin999 (Don't be a Freeploader, contribute to FreeRepublic!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Hellloo?

I'm still sending out emails.

How about a run-down on your interview for those of us who can't seem to get paltalk to work? Maybe when there are more people here?
28 posted on 07/15/2003 5:08:37 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: nuconvert
Loral was one of the biggest DNC supporters out there, their CEO Bernard Schwartz donated over $4 million to Clinton. Loral is also the one who gave sensitive missile technology to the Chinese, and got a pass on it from the Clinton administration. These are some pretty dirty folks, and it's interesting that their satillite is involved in this. It may be only a coincidence, but then again, it may not. I would not put it past Loral to have sold the jamming technology either to Cuba directly or to the Chinese who sold it to the Cubans. Something to look into and may just be why the government is so silent on this.
29 posted on 07/15/2003 5:11:10 PM PDT by McGavin999 (Don't be a Freeploader, contribute to FreeRepublic!)
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To: McGavin999
Clinton gave everyone permission to sell what they wanted. I think it's just a coincidence though that it's Loral's satellite. They just happen to be the one that the American/Iranian stations are linked to.
30 posted on 07/15/2003 5:17:59 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
Iranian officials say she fell ill after her interrogation started and died of "a brain attack."

a brain attack? That's a new one.
Sounds a lot like "shot while escaping."

31 posted on 07/15/2003 9:09:41 PM PDT by Valin (America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.)
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To: Valin
It is a quagmire for Mullahs inside Iran.
32 posted on 07/15/2003 9:32:27 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
From your lips to gods ears.
33 posted on 07/15/2003 9:43:29 PM PDT by Valin (America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.)
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To: Valin
Sooner or later, they will be drowned in this self-made quagmire.
Just sit back and Watch how they destroy each other in this "family fight".....!
Well, Any updates about Satellite Jammings?





http://www.iiaf.net/history/commemorates.html
This link shows the brutality of the Regime.
34 posted on 07/15/2003 9:54:50 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: nuconvert
...How about a run-down on your interview for those of us who can't seem to get paltalk to work?...

We had a great time. There were a lot of Iranians calling in, more so than non-Iranian Americans. For the most part we were in agreement on the issues. Some were worried that Reza Pahlavi was going to restore the Monarchy, while others expressing their love of him.

One called me an agent of the CIA. .... LOL …I wish.

Probably the most important thing I took away from the show was the attitude that many Iranians hold that the US was the key to their future. Conspiracies are a common conversation among many Iranians. I hope that they can learn to put these conspiratorial fears behind them and become more pro-active in learning to make their case to their elected officials. They need to learn how our system works and work it. This will be important for a post Islamic Iran as well.

The host of the show wants me back. I will let you know when and if we do this.


Probably the most important thing I took away from the show was the attitude that many Iranians hold that the US was the key to their future. Conspiracies are a common conversation among Iranians. I hope that they can learn to put these fears behind them and take a more pro-active role in making their case to their elected officials. They need to learn how our system works and use it. This will be important for a post Islamic Iran as well.

The host of the show wants me back. I will let you know when and if we do this.
35 posted on 07/15/2003 10:02:15 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
One called me an agent of the CIA.

AH HA!!! Just as I suspected all along.

36 posted on 07/15/2003 10:05:26 PM PDT by Valin (America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
U.S. Condemns Cuba for Jamming Satellite Signals to Iran

July 15, 2003
The Associated Press
Sandra Marquez

A U.S. government agency on Tuesday echoed what Los Angeles-based satellite television station providers who transmit news to Iran have been saying for days: Cuba appears to be jamming their signals into Iran, where pro-democracy protests have been raging.

While Cuban authorities have long jammed U.S. government programming to their own country just off the coast of Florida, blocking transmissions to a third country in a distant hemisphere would be unprecedented, said Kenneth Tomlinson, who oversees the Voice of America as chairman of the Broadcasting Board of Governors.

"This has ominous implications for the future of international satellite broadcasting," Tomlinson said by telephone from Washington, D.C.

The Broadcasting Board of Governors issued a resolution Tuesday calling on the State Department and Federal Communications Commission to lodge a formal protest with the Cuban government for "this unwarranted and wrongful interference."

A Cuban government spokesman in Havana did not return a call for comment from The Associated Press.

Iran's Islamic government has accused U.S.-based satellite stations of stoking unrest by providing unfiltered information into a country that does not otherwise have a free press.

Iran itself can't block the programming because the signals must be jammed over the Atlantic Ocean, where the satellites are positioned.

U.S. officials believe Iran contracted with Cuba to do the job this month, on the eve of the four-year anniversary of large-scale student protests, "to block the flow of news in a period of time when they obviously thought they were going to lose control of their own people," Tomlinson said.

He said an interference signal jamming the satellites has been tracked to a facility near Havana -- a claim based on information provided by the satellite service providers.

"This putting together networks to block international communication is wrong and I think in the long run will mark these states as outlaw states," Tomlinson said.

Azadi Television is one of four Los Angeles-based satellite television stations whose broadcasts into Iran were reduced to black static for days from July 6-13. The jamming continues on an intermittent basis.

Kayvan Abbassi, whose family opened the station six months ago, said operators have tried several times to avoid the jamming by changing their signal, but to no avail.

"The first time it took them five hours to jam it," said Abbassi, whose station's name means "freedom" in Farsi. "Yesterday, it took them minutes."

Another station, Pars Television, transmits to Iran on the same satellite as Azadi, but on a different transponder. As a result, Iranian viewers can still see its programs in some cities -- or at least hear the audio portion, said Reza Ansari, the station's marketing manager.

As a show of solidarity, Pars recently allowed Azadi to beam some of its programming on Pars' signal. Ansari said both stations share the goal of opposing the Iranian government.

"They don't want our programs to be watched by the Iranian people," Ansari said. "Everything we say is against the Iranian government and that is not good for them."

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/news/archive/2003/07/15/state2159EDT0174.DTL

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
37 posted on 07/15/2003 10:07:58 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Doc, You won't continue?

38 posted on 07/15/2003 10:10:03 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
What's the next step after comdemnation? Destruction.
39 posted on 07/15/2003 10:11:55 PM PDT by Valin (America is a vast conspiracy to make you happy.)
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To: F14 Pilot
...Doc, You won't continue? ...

What do you mean?
40 posted on 07/15/2003 10:14:49 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Friends in high places

By Dan De Luce
Jul 15, 2003

Western governments classify the People's Mojahedin as a terrorist group, but it can still boast allies in the US and UK.

Western governments describe the People's Mojahedin as a terrorist organisation, yet the group has allies in the House of Commons and the US Congress.

When one of its leaders was arrested by French police last month, her followers went on hunger strike. Several set themselves alight in front of television cameras, with two later dying.

French security officials claim that the People's Mojahedin was planning to stage terrorist attacks throughout Europe, but the group says that it advocates secular democracy and women's rights in Iran.

So who are the People's Mojahedin, and where did the group come from?

Its origins lie in the 60s, when opponents of the Shah's regime in Iran looked to socialist ideals and new readings of Islamic texts for inspiration in their campaign against the US-backed monarchy.

Outraged by the Shah's brutal suppression of dissent, the People's Mojahedin, or Mojahedin Khalq Organisation (MKO), chose to take up arms.

Bombings and assassinations, including several attacks that claimed the lives of US military officers and contractors, took a serious toll and provoked further repression by the regime.

The MKO's blend of Marxism and Islam influenced other opposition figures, and made its mark on the clerics who came to rule Iran after the fall of the Shah. However, divisions among the MKO's ranks became apparent, with some electing to part from an increasingly radical leadership.

As the only armed and organised opposition group during the final years of the Shah's rule, many historians say that the People's Mojahedin played an important role in his eventual overthrow in 1979.

During the chaotic days after the Shah had fled amid mass protests, the MKO seized the state television headquarters and other government buildings.

As Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini and his allies asserted control in what later became known as the "Islamic revolution", the MKO attracted a large following among students, who admired its record of fierce opposition to the Shah's regime.

Yet the group soon found itself marginalised as Islamic conservatives sought to defeat left-wingers. When the ayatollah demanded that the group disarm, it refused. Violent conflict eventually erupted between the Islamic clerical leadership and the MKO, which had done so much to weaken the Shah.

MKO members resumed the terror tactics practised during the Shah's era, assassinating senior figures and then speeding away on high-powered motorbikes.

Its underground war against the government reached a peak in June 1981, when a series of bombs exploded in Tehran's city centre during a major political meeting. The bombing killed 72 people, including chief justice Mohammad Beheshti, a senior figure close to the ayatollah, government ministers, numerous MPs and civil servants.

A month later, the president, Mohammad-Ali Rajei, and the prime minister, Javad Bahonar were killed in a bombing attack.

The government waged a determined campaign against the People's Mojahedin, using Militant Revolutionary guards and arresting and executing numerous MKO suspects.

In recent years, some journalists have questioned whether all those arrested were proven MKO agents, or whether they were merely rounded up in a sweeping move against all opposition.

Lethal attacks on the clerical leadership failed to bolster the MKO's position, and civilian casualties cost it support among ordinary Iranians.

"I remember my parents told us we couldn't go outside because they were afraid of more bombings by the MKO," Mustafa, a computer engineer, recalled.

With western governments backing Iraq in its war against Iran, the MKO decided to link its future with the Iraqi president, Saddam Hussein. The group acted as infiltrators and a source of military intelligence for Baghdad, and Saddam later used the MKO to help crush Kurdish and Shia opponents.

By siding with a regime bombing Iranian cities and killing hundreds of thousands of young Iranians, the MKO became despised in Iran and lost what support it still retained.

"The one thing in which there is common agreement among all political parties here, reformist or conservative, is that the MKO is a black organisation," Amir Mohebian, a conservative academic, said in an interview.

The 1980-88 Iran-Iraq war ended in stalemate, forcing the MKO into permanent exile and subservience to Saddam's repressive rule. A group that had been born in opposition to one dictatorship became dependent on another.

The recent collapse of Saddam's government has rendered the MKO homeless. The US bombed MKO bases during its attack on the Iraqi regime, but was slow to negotiate the group's surrender. Diplomats say that the US coveted intelligence about Iran held by the MKO.

More and more, analysts believe, the MKO may have become a pawn in a bigger contest between Washington and Iran. The George Bush administration sees the MKO as a possible lever in its campaign to restrict Iran's nuclear programme and force the extradition of al-Qaida suspects allegedly sheltering in the country.

Although it has staged occasional hit and run raids along the Iran-Iraq border, including mortar attacks, it is the MKO's skilful public relations effort that has kept it alive outside Iran.

Through its political wing, the National Council for Resistance, articulate spokesmen, fluent in foreign languages, explain the group's goals in clear terms, delivering user-friendly material to the media. Outsiders already hostile towards Iran's theocracy respond well to the group's message.

The MKO's ability to gain allies in parliaments, and publicity, infuriates Iran, which accuses Washington and other governments of adopting a hypocritical stance in their declared war on terrorism.

The MKO also has managed to raise serious sums of money from exiles and supporters. French police seized some $8m (£4.5m) during a recent raid on the MKO headquarters.

Former members have told horror stories about life inside the organisation, which, they say, resembles a cult. They have accused their former masters of punishing disobedience with torture, or even murder, and allege that the leadership separated some children from their parents.

Ervand Abrahamian, a history professor at Baruch College, in the US, has written a comprehensive history of the MKO. He says that the group has been sustained less by ideology than by a cult of personality surrounding its leader, Massoud Rajavi, and his wife, Maryam.

"If Massoud Rajavi got up tomorrow and said that the world was flat, his members would accept it," he told the New York Times.

Spokesmen for the MKO deny allegations of brainwashing, insisting that the organisation is the target of propaganda by the Iranian government, which it has labelled a "clerical dictatorship".

Whether the People's Mojahedin is a fanatical cult set on violence or the democratic organisation described by its leaders, its days of influence in Iran faded long ago.

Deprived of a base for its armed resistance, unpopular in its homeland and targeted for investigation by French authorities, it appears to be in terminal decline.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1171.shtml
41 posted on 07/15/2003 10:15:52 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Iran 'cancels' envoy's visit

By Jim Muir
BBC Tehran correspondent 7.15.2003

The first-ever visit to Iran by the UN special rapporteur on freedom of expression and opinion, Ambeyi Ligabo, has been postponed at the Iranian Government's request.

Kazemi's relatives claim she was beaten in custody
The reason given by officials was that there were difficulties in arranging Mr Ligabo's schedule.

The visit would have come at a moment when human rights are under strong pressure in Iran, with numerous recent arrests of liberal journalists and student leaders.

An Iranian foreign ministry official was quoted as saying that there were problems arranging the meetings the envoy had asked for.

But the special rapporteur was to have been here for 10 days - and it is not unusual for the schedules of visiting officials, even very high ones, to be fluid until the last moment.

Rights concerns

The visit would have taken place at a time when human-rights organisations both inside Iran and internationally are deeply concerned about a crackdown emanating largely from the hardline judiciary.

Since the street disturbances in Tehran and elsewhere in the middle of June, dozens of prominent liberal journalists and also student leaders have been arrested.


Iran's Supreme Leader is under pressure
Most recently, it was the turn of Issa Sarkhiz, a prominent reformist newspaperman.

If Mr Ligabo wanted to talk to student leaders, he would find it hard to do so without visiting them in jail since virtually all student activists of any stature have been arrested.

There is also great concern about the case of Zahra Kazemi, an Iranian Canadian photo-journalist who was arrested last month and died last week after being in a coma for two weeks.

President Mohammad Khatami has ordered an urgent inquiry into her death in custody.

Officials say a committee he set up has intervened to prevent her body being buried until the cause of death has been fully clarified.

Officially, the visit by the special rapporteur has been postponed, not cancelled, and a new date should be set later in the year.

But it is hard not to conclude that the postponement marks a setback for the efforts of reformists within the Iranian establishment to improve the country's image on human rights.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3069179.stm
42 posted on 07/15/2003 10:24:37 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Amnesty Int.'l calls for independent inquiry in the death of Canadian-Iranian journalist

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Jul 15, 2003

Amnesty International, the famous rights watch, added its voice today to the calls made by other international human rights organizations and Iranian opposition groups, such as SMCCDI, in calling for an independent and thorough investigation into the death in custody of 54-year-old photojournalist Zahra Kazemi on 12 July 2003.

"Iran's obligations under international human rights treaties require the establishment of an independent and impartial judicial inquiry to determine the causes of Zahra Kazemi's death," Amnesty International said in its statement e.mailed today.

"Such investigation must also determine whether Zahra Kazemi was ill-treated or tortured in custody as some reports have indicated," the organization added.

Zahra Kazemi, who had dual Canadian and Iranian nationality, died at the Baghiyetollah Hospital of Tehran which is under the management of the Islamic regime's Pasdaran Corp. She was arrested in late June for taking pictures of security forces beating on people who were protesting against the detention of family members outside the Evin prison located in northern Tehran. Those beaten were protesting against the detentions of their relatives arrested during the riots which rocked main Iranian cities last month.

"The authorities must enact concrete measures aimed at ending all forms of ill-treatment in Iran, such as acceding to the UN Convention against Torture and other Cruel, Inhuman and Degrading Treatment or Punishment," the organization said.

"Only a prompt, thorough, independent and impartial investigation will serve the interests of justice." Amnesty added.

For its part, SMCCDI issued, yesterday, an "Urgent Action" calling on World's Freedom Lovers and Journalists to protest against the murder of Zahra Kazemi.

The Mouvement asked for the immediate inquiry of an independent team compsed by members of the International Jurists and the famous Reporters Sans Frontieres on this case by reminding the murders, by the Islamic regime, of several Iranian and foreign journalists.

The Urgent Action which was mass e.mailed, to over 15 thousands e.mails, asked for the immediate transfer of those involved in this new murder to Canada in order to face public trial.

It requested from the Canadian government an immediate formal protest and retaliatory measures, against the Islamic republic, in case of the regime's refusal to accept such conditions.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1177.shtml
43 posted on 07/15/2003 10:36:09 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
US "not interested" in direct talks with Iran

World News
Jul 15, 2003

WASHINGTON - The United States said it did not want direct talks with Iran about its nuclear program and was only interested in dealing with the issue through the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA).

"At this point, all I can tell you is we're not engaged in or not seeking talks with Iran regarding its nuclear program," US State Department spokesman Richard Boucher said.

"Our policy has been to support the International Atomic Energy Agency's ongoing efforts to investigate the nuclear program," he told reporters when asked about a report that Washington had rebuffed overtures from Tehran for bilateral talks.

Boucher declined to confirm the report, in the Financial Times newspaper, that Iran had signalled its willingness to open such talks as a way of approaching US concerns about its alleged support for terrorism and the Middle East.

But he did say that the United States believed Iran's nuclear program, which Washington maintains is a front for atomic weapons development, was an international matter and not for the two countries to discuss among themselves.

"Iran's program is of concern to the international community, not just the United States," Boucher said.

"We look to Iran to respond to the requests from the International Atomic Energy Agency, for them to rectify the outstanding problems and answer unresolved questions," he added.

"We're not engaged and we're not seeking talks with Iran on their nuclear program," Boucher said. "That's where we are today."

Citing unnamed officials, The Financial Times reported that Tehran had indicated its readiness for discussions with the United States through its ambassador to the United Nations Mohammad Javad Zarif.

The paper said Zarif had given the signals in conversations with Americans in close contact with the Bush administration, including at least one former senior official.

Tehran's willingness to talk with the United States was also conveyed to US officials by Tim Guldimann, Switzerland's ambassador to Iran, the paper said.

Switzerland represents US interests in Iran.

The United States and other nations have been urging Tehran to be more open about its nuclear program and, in particular, to sign an additional protocol to the Non-Nuclear Proliferation Treaty that would allow UN inspectors to make unannounced spot checks on its facilities.

At present Iran is only obliged to accept prearranged visits with the IAEA, the UN's nuclear watchdog, and only to sites it chooses to declare.

A senior Iranian diplomat said in Moscow that Tehran was in favour of signing the protocol but that an agreement would depend on the rights of both signatories being clarified.

"We favour signing the protocol but we believe that the rights of Iran and the IAEA must be clarified," Russia's Interfax news agency quoted visiting Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Galiamali Khosru as saying.

Last week in Tehran, IAEA chief Mohamed ElBaradei failed to secure Iranian authorization for tougher inspections but the two sides agreed to hold more talks on the issue.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1174.shtml
44 posted on 07/15/2003 10:38:46 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Well, I thought you will not continue this thread.
Sorry, Perhaps it was a big misunderstanding Re#35.
45 posted on 07/15/2003 10:53:04 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
Sorry for the confusion.
It look like I messed up that post.
I'm not going anywhere.

Sorry.

DoctorZin
46 posted on 07/15/2003 11:04:45 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
"The host of the show wants me back. I will let you know when and if we do this."

Kudos! It sounds like you had a great show!

Please let us know when, and post a link where, we can hear you.

Thank you so much for the recap of the interview.

47 posted on 07/15/2003 11:34:27 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 (Saddam Hussein has made the case against himself---President Bush, September 2002)
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To: DoctorZIn; Eala; Valin; RaceBannon; piasa; happygrl; nuconvert; Texas_Dawg; rontorr; yonif; ...
Satan on the air

A crucial test for the theocracy: Students are protesting throughout the country, while the United States is increasing external pressure, principally because of Teheran's nuclear program. Reformers are looking to Europe for support, while the religious extremists cling to power.

In the Mecca of the media world that revolves around Hollywood, 60-year-old Sia Atabai has spent years within the countless ranks of nameless producers. The former Iranian pop star's television station, National Iranian Television (NITV), with its crude mixture of news, talk shows and low-budget films in Farsi, was at best well-known among expatriate Iranians.
Atabai's dream of becoming a Persian media mogul for his four million fellow countrymen living in the United States and Western Europe seemed excessively ambitious - until the middle of last week.

Ever since the outbreak of student protests against the religious leadership in Teheran, Atabai has at least been assured international attention well beyond the expatriate community. His station, NITV, which is also received in Iran and supposedly played a part in spurring the unrest, has become a nightmare for the mullahs.

The leadership of the theocracy is virtually panic-stricken. For the first time in the history of the Islamic Republic, the interior ministry has formed a crisis committee for the "Defense of Fundamental Islamic Values and Strengthening of Internal Security." Ali Junessi, director of the Iranian secret service, even demanded special courts intended to sentence "elements endangering the state" in abbreviated proceedings.

Even more threatening to the religious leadership is that, in contrast to unrest in the past, the liberal-leaning head of state, Mohammed Khatami, is not just facing pressure on the home front. In Washington, US President George W. Bush is becoming increasingly open in declaring his intentions, while the hawks in his administration are not ruling out military action.

The leader of the world's only remaining superpower has not only demonstratively welcomed protests against the regime, which Washington accuses of supporting the Al Qaeda terrorist network and stirring up opposition to US troops in Iraq. Bush is also attempting to exert pressure on the government in Teheran through the International Atomic Energy Organization (IAEO) in Vienna.

In a report issued last Monday, the head of the IAEO, Mohammed al-Baradei, accused the religious leadership of having failed to disclose "certain nuclear material and activities." In doing so, the world's chief nuclear inspector has bolstered Washington's concern that the mullahs have been developing a nuclear bomb for some time.

US intelligence services are not just concerned that Iran is gathering expertise on building nuclear weapons at its largest nuclear power plant in the port city of Bushir, which is scheduled for completion by the end of this year. They are also worried that Teheran could produce highly enriched uranium for use in nuclear weapons at a long-hidden facility near Natan, 240 kilometers south of the capital. A heavy water reactor that can also produce weapons-grade plutonium is also in the works in Arak, not far from the holy city of Ghom.

Teheran rejects claims of its alleged military ambitions as malicious insinuations by the "Great Satan." President Khatami assures that the sole purpose of Iran's nuclear program is "for the production of electricity." But in the wake of the al-Baradei report, US hawks such as Pentagon chief Donald Rumsfeld are now being joined by representatives of "Old Europe," such as German Foreign Minister Joschka Fischer, in voicing their "cause for concern."

At their conference in Luxembourg, the EU foreign ministers left no doubt as to their support for Washington. According to EU representatives, Teheran could only expect the anticipated trade and cooperation treaty with the EU to materialize once it is certain that Iran's nuclear program is intended solely for peaceful purposes. And the mullahs need this treaty more than ever.

Allah's self-proclaimed earthly representatives have managed to lead their oil-rich country to the brink of both political and economic ruin. There is no end to complaints about corruption and nepotism among the clerics, who control large segments of the state-owned economy. About two-thirds of Iran's 70 million people are younger than 30, and they suffer from unemployment and a lack of prospects. Every other Iranian is unemployed.

The riots of the past week are at best an indication of the true extent of frustration. More than ever before, the protestors can now depend on sympathy from within the population. Residents have given refuge to demonstrators, and drivers have blocked traffic to obstruct security forces, though their efforts failed to prevent security crackdowns.

But although the images photographed by some observers are reminiscent of revolutionary scenes in the late 1970s, Iran's rulers continue to maintain a firm hold on the majority of the population. Most of all, the students lack a charismatic leader who can truly mobilize public opinion, someone like the one-time founder of the Republic, Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, who also had at his disposal an untainted social model - his design for a theocracy.

The activists of today want a different republic. Just as during the "Hot Summer" of 1999, when students challenged the mullahs for the first time, the current demonstrators' slogans are democracy and freedom of speech.

Whether such pressure will truly produce results remains questionable. The Khatami administration, in the context of the nuclear conflict, has signaled its willingness to fully cooperate with the IAEO in the future, and has even agreed to unannounced inspections of its facilities. However, it still refuses to allow certain tests demanded by the IAEO.

The only good news for the regime has come from France, where the interior ministry has taken legal action against the European headquarters of the Peoples' Mujahedin. In protest, fanatical adherents to the group soaked themselves in gasoline and set themselves on fire in Rome, Bern and London.

However, it seems unlikely that the worldly Khatami will prevail in the struggle for power in Teheran. Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, well-known for his virulent dislike of America, maintains an iron grip on both the judicial system and the security services, which were not reactivated until last Wednesday, when they were deployed on a special mission. To prevent further calls for demonstrations through the expatriate TV station, they stormed houses in Teheran and seized the devil's equipment - satellite dishes that were previously largely tolerated - from rooftops.

Nevertheless, NITV producer Atabai has no doubt that the uprising has been successful. The telephone calls and faxes he has received from throughout the theocracy have convinced him that "Iran can now liberate itself."

DIETER BEDNARZ

http://www.spiegel.de/spiegel/english/0,1518,254205,00.html

*** A German View ****
48 posted on 07/15/2003 11:46:17 PM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
This Thread is now closed.

Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- DAY 37 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 7.16.2003 | DoctorZIn


49 posted on 07/16/2003 12:01:32 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: F14 Pilot
MARCH, APRIL & MAY 2003 : (JAPANESE PAPER ALLEGES THAT IRANIAN NUCLEAR SCIENTISTS TRAVELED TO NORTH KOREA) In related news, a Japanese newspaper reported today that Iranian nuclear scientists have traveled to North Korea three times this year, perhaps in an effort to learn techniques to evade international inspectors. Two Iranian scientists visited North Korea in March, an Iranian nuclear official traveled there in April, and two others spent more than a week there in May, according to Tokyo's Sankei newspaper (Agence France-Presse, June 11).
50 posted on 07/16/2003 1:50:24 AM PDT by piasa (Attitude adjustments offered here free of charge.)
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