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Iranian Alert -- August 7, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 8.7.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 08/07/2003 12:02:51 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movment in Iran from being reported.

From jamming satellite broadcasts, to prohibiting news reporters from covering any demonstrations to shutting down all cell phones and even hiring foreign security to control the population, the regime is doing everything in its power to keep the popular movement from expressing its demand for an end of the regime.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: bushdoctrineunfold; iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement; warlist
To find all the links to all 59 threads since the protests started, go to:


1 posted on 08/07/2003 12:02:51 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- August 7, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 8.7.2003 | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

2 posted on 08/07/2003 12:07:14 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Huge Recovery in Iran's Exports to EU

Economy Section
Aug 7, 2003

LONDON -- The value of Iran's exports to the European Union rose by over 50 percent in the first quarter of 2003 following last year's fall in the wake of a worldwide downturn.

Figures obtained exclusively by IRNA from Eurostat showed that Iranian exports to the world's biggest trading bloc grew to eur 1.7b ($1.9b) in the first three months of this year, compared with eur 1.1b in the same period in 2002.

The surge in the recovery halved the EU trade surplus with Iran to eur 400m in the first quarter even though EU exports to Iran continued their rise, reaching eur 2.1b, up from eur 1.9bn in the first three months of last year.

The increase in Iranian exports was dominated by the rise in EU oil imports to eur 1.5b. It was led by Italy, Iran's biggest market, whose imports grew by eur 130m to eur 500m.

The rise was also highlighted by almost a 200 percent increase to eur 300m in purchases by the Netherlands, home of the Rotterdam oil market.

The continuing growth in EU exports was led by Germany, Iran's largest supplier, whose sales increased by eur 100m to eur 600m. There was also a significant rise in Swedish exports from eur 67m to eur 118m.

Figures from Eurostat showed Iran retained its position as the EU's fourth largest trading partner in the Middle East and second biggest oil supplier in the region after Saudi Arabia.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1613.shtml
3 posted on 08/07/2003 12:31:20 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: AdmSmith
http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/nm/20030807/wl_nm/iran_students_dc_1
4 posted on 08/07/2003 12:53:58 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; *Bush Doctrine Unfold; *war_list; W.O.T.; Eurotwit; freedom44; FairOpinion; ...
Thanks for the threads!

Bush Doctrine Unfolds :

To find all articles tagged or indexed using Bush Doctrine Unfold , click below:
  click here >>> Bush Doctrine Unfold <<< click here  
(To view all FR Bump Lists, click here)



5 posted on 08/07/2003 12:55:17 AM PDT by Ernest_at_the_Beach (All we need from a Governor is a VETO PEN!!!)
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To: DoctorZIn
US's Iran Sanction Policy Faces Congressional Scrutiny

August 07, 2003
Oil & Gas Journal
PennWell Publishing

US lawmakers wanting the White House to turn up the political heat on Iran this year may seek to tighten existing sanction laws designed to discourage foreign investment in Tehran's oil and gas sector.

"Finding ways to restrict the increasing wave of foreign investment into Iran and Libya must be an integral part of the same effort to suppress terrorist financing," said Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen (R-Fla.), chair of the House Subcommittee on the Middle East and Central Asia. Her remarks were made at a June 25 oversight hearing on implementation of the Iran-Libya Sanctions Act, first passed by Congress in August 1996 and reauthorized with some revisions in August 2001.

"While we are gratified by recent statements from the EU [European Union] countries on Iran's nuclear objectives, mere rhetoric while negotiating further investment deals with Iran, are not sufficient grounds, do not justify, lack of ILSA implementation," she said.

A congressional aide said that the chairwoman wants to tighten the law, which now gives President George W Bush the authority to waive or exempt countries or companies from various financial sanctions. Exactly how the law may be tightened is now being studied, said those familiar with the discussions.

ILSA today

ILSA has not succeeded in stopping petroleum sector investment, although some observers and analysts do credit the law with slowing development, especially when the law was first passed, said a US Department of State official who spoke at the hearing.

The current law gives the White House wide discretion on when and how sanctions should be imposed. And as yet, no country has been sanctioned. In May 1998, then-Sec. of State Madeline Albright announced that the White House decided to waive sanctions that could have been imposed on a French-Russian-Malaysian consortium developing the massive South Pars gas field (OGJ, May 25, 1998, p. 18).

While the secretary found that the investment did constitute "sanctionable activity" under the 1996 statute, policymakers came to the conclusion that imposing sanctions would not have stopped the deal from taking place, noted Anna Borg, DOS deputy assistant secretary of the Bureau of Economic and Business Affairs. Many of the US's staunchest allies in Europe and Asia also argue the statute violates international law and is unenforceable.

Under the terms of the reauthorizing legislation, DOS will be reporting to Congress between August and February 2004 on how effective ILSA has been. The law, which is designed to punish non-US oil companies that invest $20 million in either country, is a particular source of rancor for key US allies as well as multinational and state-owned oil companies. Both US and non-US companies hoped recent G-8 talks would be a platform on which the US government would look to repair diplomatic relations strained from the Iraq conflict by updating sanctions policies in Iran and Libya (OGJ Online, May 30, 2003).

It remains unclear what the White House plans to do in the months ahead. Some House leaders are convinced that economic sanctions are a key way to loosen the grip of Iran's conservative clerics who control key parts of the government. But tightening the law could be an uphill, although not an impossible, task given the vicarious nature of geopolitics.

In the Senate, there is far less support for economic sanctions than the House, and a tougher ILSA law might easily languish. Still, it's always dangerous to say something can never happen, oil lobbyists say. There is always a chance some politically expedient deal could be struck. Decoupling Libya from a new sanctions law is something being informally eyed, for example. Tripoli continues to seek a more favorable position with Washington, and there is hope by some companies with investments there that a resolution over the 1988 PanAm Lockerbie bombing might help jumpstart the political process, maybe this year.

The future

The White House has quietly told some key lawmakers it would rather Congress leave ILSA alone, US government sources said. Many of the countries that could be targeted under ILSA are needed to win crucial international consensus on the administration's evolving Iraq reconstruction policy. But both opponents and proponents of ILSA acknowledge that the issue is likely to remain a front-burner issue for the foreseeable future.

"Sooner than later the White House will have to decide if ILSA helps or hurts its own policy objectives in the Middle East region," an oil lobbyist following the issue said.

Some of the US's most important allies appear willing to wait, but for how long is still a key question.

Japan backs down

The Japanese government, taking heed of US concerns about nuclear proliferation, said it would consider delaying an agreement to help Iran develop Azadegan oil field, thought to contain estimated reserves of 24-40 billion bbl of oil.

"Suspicion about Iran's nuclear development is not an issue affecting only our country," Yasuo Fukuda, Japan's chief cabinet secretary, told reporters in Tokyo. "We can't sign the crude oil accord ignoring it."

DOS said June 30 it opposed the investment after it became known that Japan's state-controlled Inpex Corp., Japan Petroleum Exploration Co., and publicly traded trading company Tomen were in final negotiations with Iran to invest at least $2 billion to produce 300,000 b/d of oil from Azadegan field over a 20-year period.

"This would be a particularly unfortunate time to go forward with major new oil and gas deals" in Iran, DOS spokesman. Richard Boucher said in a statement on the department's web site, responding to a question whether the US asked Japan not to conclude the Azadegan field agreement.

The US is opposed to such investments in Iran "at any time," Boucher said, but especially now "given recent revelations about Iran's nuclear programs and efforts being made through the International Atomic Energy Agency to deal with the threat Iran poses."

http://ogj.pennnet.com/home.cfm
6 posted on 08/07/2003 3:36:40 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Is Iran Developing "The Bomb"?

August 06, 2003
NBC News
Andrea Mitchell

There was a ceremony in Tehran two weeks ago to welcome the newest missile to Iran’s arsenal — a missile designed in North Korea. The CIA says the new mobile missile could deliver a nuclear payload over a range from Cairo, Egypt, to Bombay, India, by the end of the decade if Iran is not stopped from developing a nuclear weapon.

But U.S. officials and foreign intelligence services told NBC News that Iran is within just a few years of building a nuclear bomb.

“THERE’S ALWAYS been a rolling assessment of when Iran can get nuclear weapons, and now it’s narrowed to two, three, or four years,” said nuclear weapons expert George Perkovich said. A recent French intelligence report, obtained by NBC News, warns that Iran “may obtain a sufficient quantity of fissionable materials to manufacture a nuclear weapon within a few years.”

IRAN’S NUCLEAR PLANTS

To experts, Iran’s progress is alarming, including:

- Near Natanz, 1,000 gas centrifuges that could be used for nuclear weapons are ready to be installed at a uranium enrichment plant hidden underground.

- Near Arak, there are plans for a reactor to make plutonium — another source of fuel for nuclear weapons.

This facility in Natanz, Iran, is the home of Iran's uranium enrichment program. Here, U.S. officials say, Iran has already begun installing gas centrifuges to help enrich uranium for fuel for nuclear weapons.

The French say Iran is also shopping in Europe for equipment to conduct nuclear tests.

How did Iran get so far so fast? “The big breakthrough seems to have been the access to the gas centrifuge technology from Pakistan,” said former National Security Council member Gary Samore.

Pakistan, an ally of the United States, denies helping Iran. But intelligence sources say a Pakistani nuclear scientist named Aq Khan, fired by his government, is now freelancing in Iran.

How to stop Iran from getting the bomb? Experts say there is no easy military option. No one knows where Iran’s secret programs are.

Ellen Laipson worked for the NSC and the Central Intelligence Agency: “It’s a huge intelligence challenge,” she said. “Iran is a very large country. It’s three times the size of Iraq. It has a sophisticated infrastructure.”

Laipson added, “There’s a strong possibility that we may be trying too late to dissuade the Iranians from getting a nuclear weapon. We need to coordinate a strategy to persuade Iran to forgo nuclear weapons with the international community and make it worth Iran’s while economically, politically, internationally — and that I think has to be done through engagement.”

A heavy water production plant near the city of Arak in northern Iran. Heavy water is needed to moderate nuclear reactions in plutonium-producing reactors.

She said: “I don’t think threatening military action alone will do the trick. It has to be a combination of instruments. In the end we may find that our influence and our leverage on Iranian decision-makers is less than we would want, and this is a fiercely independent country that may have decided that it’s going to pursue this course and be able to resist some of the pressures and inducements that the international community is trying to provide.”

A senior Iranian official told NBC News that the construction activity is aimed at producing nuclear energy, not bombs. But, given Iran’s huge oil and gas reserves, a State Department official called that explanation “ridiculous.”

http://msnbc.com/news/949171.asp?0sl=-31

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
7 posted on 08/07/2003 3:39:16 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Release Ordered For Iran Protesters

Reuters
Thursday, August 7, 2003; Page A14

TEHRAN, Aug. 6 -- Tehran's public prosecutor today ordered the immediate release of nine students jailed during pro-democracy protests in June and July, the official IRNA news agency said.

Judiciary officials have said that 4,000 people were arrested in the student-led demonstrations against Iran's clerical leaders. More than half of those arrested were quickly released but legislators said this week that at least 30 students were being held in Tehran's Evin prison.

© 2003 The Washington Post Company

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A26217-2003Aug6.html

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
8 posted on 08/07/2003 3:48:02 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Thanks for the ping
& good morning
9 posted on 08/07/2003 4:24:16 AM PDT by firewalk
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To: DoctorZIn; dixiechick2000; AdmSmith; nuconvert
http://www.usatoday.com/life/books/reviews/2003-08-06-persepolis_x.htm

An Interesting Story of a young Iranian Girl.
10 posted on 08/07/2003 6:33:03 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
Transforming the Middle East

By Condoleezza Rice
Thursday, August 7, 2003; Page A21
Washington Post Editorial

Soon after the conclusion of World War II, America committed itself to the long-term transformation of Europe. Surveying the war's death and destruction -- including the loss of hundreds of thousands of American lives -- our policymakers set out to work for a Europe where another war was unthinkable. We and the people of Europe committed to the vision of democracy and prosperity, and together we succeeded.

Today America and our friends and allies must commit ourselves to a long-term transformation in another part of the world: the Middle East. A region of 22 countries with a combined population of 300 million, the Middle East has a combined GDP less than that of Spain, population 40 million. It is held back by what leading Arab intellectuals call a political and economic "freedom deficit." In many quarters a sense of hopelessness provides a fertile ground for ideologies of hatred that persuade people to forsake university educations, careers and families and aspire instead to blow themselves up -- taking as many innocent lives with them as possible.

These ingredients are a recipe for regional instability -- and pose a continuing threat to America's security.

Our task is to work with those in the Middle East who seek progress toward greater democracy, tolerance, prosperity and freedom.

As President Bush said in February, "The world has a clear interest in the spread of democratic values, because stable and free nations do not breed ideologies of murder. They encourage the peaceful pursuit of a better life."

Let us be clear: America and the coalition went to war in Iraq because Saddam Hussein's regime posed a threat to the security of the United States and to the world. This was a regime that pursued, had used and possessed weapons of mass destruction; had links to terror; twice invaded other nations; defied the international community and 17 U.N. resolutions for 12 years -- and gave every indication that it would never disarm and never comply with the just demands of the world.

Today that threat is gone. And with the liberation of Iraq, there is a special opportunity to advance a positive agenda for the Middle East that will strengthen security in the region and throughout the world. We are already seeing evidence of a new commitment to forging ahead with peace among Israelis and Palestinians.

At the Red Sea Summits in June, Israelis, Palestinians and neighboring Arab states united behind the vision the president has set forth -- a vision of two states, Israel and Palestine, living side by side in peace and security. Israeli leaders increasingly understand that it is in Israel's own interest for Palestinians to govern themselves in a viable state that is peaceful, democratic and committed to fighting terror. Palestinian leaders increasingly understand that terror is not a means to Palestinian statehood but instead the greatest obstacle to statehood.

The end of Saddam Hussein's regime also reinforces the progress already underway across the region. Arab intellectuals have called for Arab governments to address the freedom deficit. Regional leaders have spoken of a new Arab charter that champions internal reform, greater political participation, economic openness and free trade. From Morocco to the Persian Gulf, nations are taking genuine steps toward political and economic openness. The United States supports these steps, and we will work with our friends and allies in the region for more.

Even greater opportunities will come once Hussein's criminal regime is replaced by an Iraqi government that is just, humane and built upon democratic principles. Much as a democratic Germany became a linchpin of a new Europe that is today whole, free and at peace, so a transformed Iraq can become a key element of a very different Middle East in which the ideologies of hate will not flourish. And in the nearly 100 days since major combat operations ended in Iraq, the Iraqi people have reclaimed their country and begun to forge a more hopeful future. As this transition to freedom continues, America will work with other nations to help Iraqis achieve greater security and greater opportunity.

The transformation of the Middle East will not be easy, and it will take time. It will require the broad engagement of America, Europe and all free nations, working in full partnership with those in the region who share our belief in the power of human freedom. This is not primarily a military commitment but one that will require us to engage all aspects of our national power -- diplomatic, economic and cultural. For instance, President Bush has launched the Middle East Partnership Initiative to bind us together in building a better future through concrete projects. He further has proposed establishing a U.S.-Middle East free trade area within a decade, to bring the people of the region into an expanding circle of opportunity.

For all its problems, the Middle East is a region of tremendous potential. It is the birthplace and spiritual home of three of the world's great faiths, and an ancient center of learning and tolerance and progress. It is filled with talented, resourceful people who -- when blessed with greater political and economic freedom and better, more modern education -- can fully join in the progress of our times.

America is determined to help the people of the Middle East achieve their full potential. We will act because we want greater freedom and opportunity for the people of the region, as well as greater security for people in America and throughout the world.

The writer is national security adviser to the president.

© 2003 The Washington Post Company

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A26193-2003Aug6.html
11 posted on 08/07/2003 9:07:51 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Transforming the Middle East

By Condoleezza Rice
Thursday, August 7, 2003; Page A21
Washington Post Editorial

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/959634/posts?page=11#11

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
12 posted on 08/07/2003 9:09:10 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Renowned Dissident Transferred to Hospital From Jail

August 06, 2003
Iran Weekly Press Digest
Iran WPD

The renowned Iranian dissident Akbar Ganji was transferred to a hospital from jail due to deterioration of his health condition, the students' news agency ISNA reported Wednesday.

The medical centre of the Evin prison in Tehran was forced to transfer the 47-year-old to a hospital where specialists should examine his ongoing disease which is said to be pneumonia.

Ganji has been detained since the year 2000 after he was charged for having "disgraced" Iran in front of "counter-revolutionaries" at a conference held in the same year in Berlin by Germany's Heinrich Boell Foundation.

The dissident, serving a six-year term. was further charged with insulting Islamic rules, threatening national security and having conducted "ideological terror against the Islamic Republic".

http://www.iranwpd.com/
13 posted on 08/07/2003 9:15:32 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: F14 Pilot
Thanks for the link! It does look like an interesting story.
14 posted on 08/07/2003 9:18:41 AM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("The Prez is as focused as a doberman on a hambone!"---Dennis Miller)
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To: DoctorZIn
"America is determined to help the people of the Middle East achieve their full potential. We will act because we want greater freedom and opportunity for the people of the region, as well as greater security for people in America and throughout the world."

There it is, in a nutshell.

Thanks for all of your posts!

15 posted on 08/07/2003 9:21:44 AM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("The Prez is as focused as a doberman on a hambone!"---Dennis Miller)
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To: dixiechick2000; DoctorZIn; RaceBannon; nuconvert; Valin; piasa; norton; risk; ewing; Ronin; ...
Nukes in Iran

As bomb-building capacity advances, how will U.S. policy change?

By DOUGLAS FRANTZ, Los Angeles Times
August 7, 2003

VIENNA, Austria - After more than a decade of working behind layers of front companies and in hidden laboratories, Iran appears to be in the late stages of developing the capacity to build a nuclear bomb.

Iran insists that, like many countries, it is building only commercial nuclear reactors to generate electricity

On Wednesday, Iran vowed not to surrender its nuclear power generating program, as U.N. experts met with Iranian officials in an effort to arrange unrestricted inspections of its nuclear facilities.

"The Islamic Republic of Iran will not give up nuclear technology as a basis for legitimate power," state television quoted President Mohammad Khatami as telling Iran's most senior officials.

Khatami said Iran has no desire for nuclear weapons, as the United States maintains, "because we cannot use such weapons based on our Islamic and moral teachings."

But a three-month investigation by the Los Angeles Times - drawing on previously secret reports, international officials, _independent experts, Iranian exiles and intelligence sources in Europe and the Middle East - uncovered strong evidence that Iran's commercial program masks a plan to become the world's next nuclear power.

No one is certain when Iran might produce its first atomic weapon. Some experts said two or three years; others believe the government has not given a final go-ahead. But it is clear that Iran is moving purposefully and rapidly toward acquiring the capability.

Among the findings:

n A confidential report prepared by the French government in May concluded that Iran is surprisingly close to having enriched uranium or plutonium for a bomb.

n Samples of uranium taken by U.N. inspectors in Iran in June tested positive for enrichment levels high enough to be consistent with an attempt to build a nuclear weapon, according to a foreign intelligence officer and an American diplomat.

n Iran is concealing several weapons-research laboratories and evidence of past activity at a plant disguised as a watch-making factory in a Tehran suburb.

In June, U.N. inspectors were refused access to two large rooms and barred from testing samples at the factory.

n Tehran secretly imported 1.8 tons of nuclear material from China in 1991 and processed some of it to manufacture uranium metal, which would be of no use in its commercial program but would be integral to weapons production.

n Abdul Qadeer Khan, a Pakistani nuclear scientist regarded by the United States as a purveyor of nuclear secrets, has helped Iran for years.

n North Korean military scientists recently were monitored entering Iranian nuclear facilities. They are assisting in the design of a nuclear warhead, according to people inside Iran and foreign intelligence officials.

A nuclear-armed Iran would present the United States with a difficult political and military equation. Iran would be the first avowed enemy of Israel to possess a nuclear bomb and the first nuclear-armed country labeled by the administration as a state sponsor of international terrorism.

Iranian nuclear weapons could shift the balance of power in the region, where Washington is trying to establish pro-American governments in Afghanistan and Iraq. Both of those nations border Iran and are places where Tehran wants to exert influence that could conflict with U.S. intentions, particularly Iraq.

The Bush administration, which partly justified its war against Iraq by stressing concerns that Saddam Hussein had revived his nuclear weapons program, calls a nuclear-armed Iran unacceptable. At a recent news conference, President Bush said he hopes international pressure will convince the Iranians that "development of a nuclear weapon is not in their interests," but he added that "all options remain on the table."

Foreign intelligence officers told the Times that the Central Intelligence Agency has briefed them on a contingency plan for U.S. air and missile attacks against Iranian nuclear installations. "It would be foolish not to present the commander in chief with all of the options, including that one," said one of the officials.

http://www.knoxnews.com/kns/world/article/0,1406,KNS_351_2164183,00.html
16 posted on 08/07/2003 10:45:09 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
Thanks for all of your hard work to keep us notified of what is happening Iran.

The left wing mediots around the world are spiking most news out of Iran. Cuba is jamming our satellite signals to Iran.

The entire Yellowcake Scam took the Iranian rebellion off the news and buried it.
17 posted on 08/07/2003 10:53:36 AM PDT by Grampa Dave (I think the Americans are serious. Bush is not like Clinton. I think this is the end," said Uday)
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To: Grampa Dave
Thanks for the encouragement.
18 posted on 08/07/2003 11:34:56 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
You and the other brave Iranians and Iranian supporters on Free Republic have done an incredible job keeping the rest of us up to date re what is happening in Iran.

Thanks again!
19 posted on 08/07/2003 11:41:06 AM PDT by Grampa Dave (I think the Americans are serious. Bush is not like Clinton. I think this is the end," said Uday)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Iran Advances In Efforts To Procure Taepo Dong-2

Report Section
Aug 7, 2003

LONDON [MENL] -- Iran has advanced in negotiations to procure a new long-range missile from North Korea.

Western intelligence sources said Teheran has been discussing the prospect of obtaining the Taepo Dong-2 from North Korea. The sources said the discussions began in early 2003 and reflect Iran's goal to quickly achieve capability to acquire missiles that can strike anywhere in Asia and Europe.

"The talks have been going on for several months and are serious," an intelligence source who focuses on Iran said. "Intelligence services have been monitoring these talks for a while now, but details remain unclear."

U.S. officials have confirmed reports of Iran-North Korean talks for the Taepo Dong-2. They said the talks were accelerated in January 2003 after the crisis in relations between Pyongyang and Washington that concerned North Korea's secret nuclear weapons program.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1625.shtml

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
20 posted on 08/07/2003 2:48:50 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Regime frees some of the students according to its demagogic policy

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Aug 7, 2003

Several students, members of Islamic Student Associations and relatives of regime's officials, have been released by the Islamic regime according to its demagogic policy.

It's to note that hundreds of students and protesters, looking for the establishment of a Secular state, are still held captive while several of them have been executed and other will be executed in the coming days.

The Islamic regime and its leader intend, by such anticipated releases, to calm the NGO's and foreign governments; To try to put a stop on the disintegration of the Islamic Student Associations which were a day one of the main pillars of the regime's so-called reformists; To create distinctive line between the students and all other demonstrators; And most importantly to rehabilitate Judge Mortazavi accused of the murder of the Canadian-Iranian journalist.

Nerveless, the regime's demagogy which is well know to the absolute majority of the Iranians will not reach its goals as most Iranians are preparing themselves for a wide scale revolution.

The need of a radical revolution is gaining momentum and reaching spheres that till now were looking for gradual reforms. in this line and in an unprecedented manner, Dr. Mohammad Maleki, head of Tehran University wrote, today, an open letter to the Iranian students by declaring his understanding of their radical believes and hoping them victory in their endeavor for regime change in Iran.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1629.shtml

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
21 posted on 08/07/2003 2:50:16 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Support for strike by Iranian journalists to protest against crackdown on press

Press Release
Aug 7, 2003

Reporters Without Borders today announced its full support and solidarity with the one-day strike that hundreds of Iranian journalists are to stage tomorrow to protest against a crackdown in which many of their colleagues have been arrested or summoned for questioning. The strikers will call for the release of the detained journalists and will condemn the unexplained murder of journalist Zahra Kazemi while in custody.

Secretary-general Robert Mnard said the announced strike was symptomatic of the discontent within the profession, pointing out that Reporters Without Borders had registered more than 50 cases of journalists being arrested or called in for questioning over a month. A total of 24 journalists were currently in prison and Reporters Without Borders called for their release, he said.

"Not a week goes by without their coming under more pressure," Mnard said. "Any of them can be arrested at any moment under any pretext. How can they work in such conditions? And how can they not be afraid when they know that several of the journalists currently detained are being held by the staff of Tehran public prosecutor Said Mortazavi and Revolutionary Guards in the same centre where Zahra Kazemi received the blows that caused her death?"

Reporters Without Borders voiced particular concern about the conditions in which some of these journalists are being held. The wife of Reza Alijani, detained since 14 June, told the ISNA news agency that she did not recognise her husband during her last prison visit because he had lost so much weight. The wife of Taghi Rahmani has received no word of him since his arrest on 14 June. Her requests to visit him have all been turned down, as have the requests made by the wives of several other detained journalists.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1630.shtml
22 posted on 08/07/2003 2:51:32 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: All
Annan takes up Kazemi case

By Bruce Campion-Smith
Aug 7, 2003

OTTAWA—United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan has promised to take up the case of Zahra Kazemi, the Montreal photojournalist who died while in Iranian custody.

Annan made the pledge to Foreign Affairs Minister Bill Graham Tuesday afternoon during a "lengthy" telephone conversation the two men had about the case, Graham's spokesperson Isabelle Savard said.

"Kofi Annan had heard about the case. He was highly concerned," she said yesterday.

"He said when he had a chance, he would raise it to help us to continue to put pressure on Iran."

Kazemi, 54, was arrested after taking pictures outside a prison and died July 10 after being interrogated by Iranian authorities. Iranian Vice-President Mohammad Ali Abtahi has publicly admitted that she was probably killed while in custody.

Her violent death and quick burial in Iran — against the wishes of her family — outraged Canadian authorities. Ottawa recalled its ambassador to Iran in protest and hasn't ruled out sanctions.

Graham has called on the Iranian government to hold an open inquiry into her death. Ottawa also wants Kazemi's body returned to Canada.

Graham's phone call to Annan this week was meant to keep up the pressure, Savard said.

"It's to mobilize the international community on the case itself and the security of journalists around the world, freedom of expression and all these issues," she said.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_1627.shtml
23 posted on 08/07/2003 2:53:21 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Rise of Iraq's Shiites could pose threat to Iran's clerical rulers

from the August 08, 2003 edition
By Nicholas Birch | Special to The Christian Science Monitor

TEHRAN, IRAN – Well before the first bomb dropped on Baghdad, Western analysts worried that liberation from Saddam Hussein's Sunni-based tyranny could push Iraq's Shiite majority into the arms of Iranian theocrats.
In the chaos that followed, such concern has seemed justified. Protesters in Shiite districts of Baghdad brandish posters of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, founder of Iran's theocracy. In Iraq's holy city of Najaf, thousands flock to hear the speeches of Moqtada al-Sadr, a virulently anti-American advocate of clerical rule.

But an extraordinary outburst this week from Ayatollah Khomeini's grandson shows that the renaissance of Iraq's Shiites is a double-edged weapon that potentially is every bit as dangerous for Iranian rulers' grasp on power as it is for Washington.

Speaking to journalists in Najaf Tuesday, Seyyed Hussein Khomeini said that "Iranians insist on freedom, but they are not sure where it will come from. If it comes from inside, they will welcome it, but if it was necessary for it to come from abroad, especially from the United States, people will accept it."

While his name carries great weight for Iranians, Mr. Khomeini has little standing in the Shiite hierarchy. But his comments echo the discontent many Iranians feel about heavy-handed clerical rule.

Faced with US warnings not to meddle in Iraq's affairs, Iran has limited itself to barbed declarations that no one has the right to interfere in another country's affairs. "Tehran has no intention of trying to impose its political model on Iraq," says Amir Mohebbian, a columnist for the ultra-conservative daily Resalat. "All clerics, whether political or apolitical, share our goals and objectives."

But other Iranian observers say there is plenty of evidence that many in Iran would like Iraq to adopt clerical rule. The outspoken support of senior ayatollahs in the Shiite's sacred city of Qom, Iran, they say, has gone a long way toward legitimizing Najaf-based Mr. Sadr.

The rationale behind such behavior is clear, argues Seyyed Mostafa Mohaghegh Damad, expert on Islamic law at Tehran University. "The revival of politically independent seminaries in Najaf will have a spillover effect on Iran. It could create a breathing space for those wishing to conform to the age-old precepts of Shiite tradition - the pious, apolitical links between senior ayatollahs and their followers."

Mesmerized by the push for change of Iran's reformist government, the West has tended to underestimate clerical opposition to the Iranian regime. One London-based clerical opposition group estimates that of approximately 5,000 ayatollahs in Iran, only 80 wholeheartedly support it.

While Ruhollah Khomeini was alive, doubts about his doctrine of clerical rule were tempered by his clerical credentials. The same is not true of his successor Ali Khamenei, only a middle-ranking cleric when he was appointed supreme leader in 1989. "Senior clerics treat his theological pronouncements with disdain," says Nadeem Kazmi, of the London-based Al-Khoei Foundation, a charity with close links to the apolitical Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani in Najaf.

But what Ayatollah Khamenei lacks in credentials, he has made up for in surveillance, such as increased attempts to bring Qom's independent seminaries under state control. Nobody knows how many dissenting clerics have been executed by special clerical courts, although some sources put the figure at 60 since 1989.

"If Qom remains under the same kind of oppressive atmosphere, everyone will come to Najaf," Seyyed Hussein Khomeini said on Tuesday.

In a recent book on Iran's ruling elite, German Iranian scholar Wilfried Buchta goes further. "A Shia grand ayatollah from outside the Iranian system of power..., could issue fatwas [legal judgments] on religious-social matters that run counter to Khamenei's political line," he writes. "If this should happen, it could bring the whole system to the verge of breakdown."

Following a series of high-level clerical defections in recent years, some Iranian analysts see signs that dissatisfaction in Iran has spread to traditionally pro-regime clerics. But most Iranians doubt the clerics will transform passive opposition into active revolt. "If we're going to depend on them, we have a long wait on our hands," says Davoud Hermidas Bavand, law professor at the Supreme National Defense University in Tehran. The political editor of reformist daily Etemad, Rouzbeh Mirebrahimi, agrees. "Even if Grand Ayatollah Ali Sistani stood up in Najaf and criticized the Iranian regime, which he won't, nobody would listen to him."

But this is north Tehran, where students brandish copies of Nietzsche and whisper "God is dead" behind closed doors. While their more secular reform movement seems deadlocked, more traditionally minded Iranians may be willing to listen to clerics in Iraq who advocate separation of mosque and state.

http://www.csmonitor.com/2003/0808/p06s01-wome.html
24 posted on 08/07/2003 5:19:44 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Rise of Iraq's Shiites could pose threat to Iran's clerical rulers

from the August 08, 2003 edition
By Nicholas Birch | Special to The Christian Science Monitor

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/959634/posts?page=24#24

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
25 posted on 08/07/2003 5:21:42 PM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: DoctorZIn
Good article! Thanks!
26 posted on 08/07/2003 5:33:21 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("The Prez is as focused as a doberman on a hambone!"---Dennis Miller)
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To: DoctorZIn
But this is north Tehran, where students brandish copies of Nietzsche and whisper "God is dead" behind closed doors.

Ugh. Why is it that the worst of (or the internal enemy of) Western culture is what seems to leak through?

Or is this just the reporter's bias/prejudice/NYT-style-lie?

27 posted on 08/07/2003 6:25:10 PM PDT by Eala (It's the press. Of course it lies.)
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran's Rulers 'Should Call Referendum'

August 07, 2003
BBC News
Pam O'Toole

The grandson of Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini, the leader of Iran's 1979 Islamic Revolution, has made a stinging attack on the country's current Islamic system and rulers.

In an interview with the BBC Persian Service, Hossein Khomeini, a hojatoleslam - or middle ranking clergyman - accused the current rulers of oppressing the Iranian people and committing human rights abuses.

Speaking from the Iraqi holy city of Najaf, he said that Iran's reformist movement was finished and called for a referendum to decide how the country should be governed in the future.

He was also highly critical of the way Iran's Islamic system of government has developed.

'Guilty of oppression'

Hojatoleslam Khomeini questioned the principle of velayat faqih, or Islamic jurisprudence, upon which the system is based.

He added that, if his grandfather were alive today, he would have opposed all of Iran's current leaders because of what he described as their excesses and wrongdoing.

These people, he alleged, did not even carry out their own Islamic beliefs.

They were guilty of oppressing the Iranian population, killing people or jailing them for no reason.

As for the reformists, he said, they were finished.

People who had voted for President Khatami hoping things would change had seen things get worse, rather than better, in his second term of office, he said.

Strong rejection

Hojatoleslam Khomeini maintained that those who voted for an Islamic Republic in Iran more than 20 years ago were now in a minority.

The vast majority of today's Iranians were either under voting age or not yet born when that decision was taken.

What was needed now, he said, was a referendum on Iran's Islamic system of government.

One way or another, he said, that could resolve the current situation without a drop of blood being spilled.

His comments mark one of the clearest and strongest rejections of the Islamic system of government by an Iranian cleric.

They will be seen as particularly significant because they have been made by the grandson of the man whose name has become synonymous with Iran's Islamic Revolution.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/middle_east/3133915.stm
28 posted on 08/07/2003 6:33:58 PM PDT by MasterZin
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To: Ernest_at_the_Beach; Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; ...
Iran's Rulers 'Should Call Referendum'

August 07, 2003
BBC News
Pam O'Toole

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/959634/posts?page=28#28

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
29 posted on 08/07/2003 6:35:58 PM PDT by MasterZin
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To: MasterZin
Welcome to Free Republic!

Thanks for the post!
30 posted on 08/07/2003 10:56:55 PM PDT by dixiechick2000 ("The Prez is as focused as a doberman on a hambone!"---Dennis Miller)
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To: All
This thread is now closed.

Join Us at the Iranian Alert -- August 8, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST

Live Thread Ping List | 8.8.2003 | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”

31 posted on 08/08/2003 12:08:33 AM PDT by DoctorZIn (IranAzad... Until they are free, we shall all be Iranians!)
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To: MasterZin; DoctorZIn
hyde is that you...
32 posted on 08/08/2003 7:43:52 AM PDT by firewalk
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To: BeforeISleep
LOL, I got the ping last night and was wondering the same thing.
33 posted on 08/08/2003 7:45:02 AM PDT by Constitution Day ("This board is fast and danger")
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To: Constitution Day
(-:
34 posted on 08/08/2003 7:48:04 AM PDT by firewalk
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To: nuconvert
http://www.tehran24.com/cgi-bin/tango.cgi?images/030705-42S&jpg<imgsrc=http://www.tehran24.com/cgi-bin/tango.cgi?images/030705-42S&jpg
35 posted on 08/08/2003 4:26:23 PM PDT by nuconvert
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