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Iranian Alert -- September 4, 2003 -- LIVE THREAD PING LIST
The Iranian Student Movement Up To The Minute Reports ^ | 9.4.2003 | DoctorZin

Posted on 09/04/2003 12:03:04 AM PDT by DoctorZIn

The regime is working hard to keep the news about the protest movment in Iran from being reported.

From jamming satellite broadcasts, to prohibiting news reporters from covering any demonstrations to shutting down all cell phones and even hiring foreign security to control the population, the regime is doing everything in its power to keep the popular movement from expressing its demand for an end of the regime.

These efforts by the regime, while successful in the short term, do not resolve the fundamental reasons why this regime is crumbling from within.

Iran is a country ready for a regime change. If you follow this thread you will witness, I believe, the transformation of a nation. This daily thread provides a central place where those interested in the events in Iran can find the best news and commentary.

Please continue to join us here, post your news stories and comments to this thread.

Thanks for all the help.

DoctorZin


TOPICS: Extended News; Foreign Affairs; News/Current Events; War on Terror
KEYWORDS: iran; iranianalert; protests; studentmovement; studentprotest
Discover all the news since the protests began on June 10th, go to:


1 posted on 09/04/2003 12:03:04 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread

Live Thread Ping List | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”


2 posted on 09/04/2003 12:04:00 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Motorbike gunmen fire shots at British embassy in Iran

Independent - By Katherine Butler and Angus McDowall in Tehran
Sep 4, 2003

The British embassy in Tehran came under fire yesterday in an incident that threatens to turn an already charged atmosphere into the most serious crisis in relations with Iran since the Salman Rushdie affair.

The shooting caused limited damage and injured nobody. But it came on a day when the Iranian ambassador to Britain was recalled to Tehran over the arrest of an Iranian diplomat in Britain.

Shortly before midday in Tehran, shots rang out, hitting windows in upper storeys of the embassy compound. Witnesses said two men on motorbikes stopped in front of the embassy to fire the shots with a handgun before riding away at high speed.

The embassy building is protected by a high perimeter wall that stretches two hundred yards along Ferdowsi street, one of central Tehran's busiest thoroughfares. Bullet holes could later be seen in windows facing the street.

Richard Dalton, Britain's ambassador in Tehran, said: "This was a serious incident. Six shots were fired at the embassy building. Several of them entered offices on the second floor."

The embassy had been on high alert since relations with Iran soured last month over the arrest in Britain of Hade Soleimanpour, an Iranian diplomat. Argentina is seeking his extradition in connection with the bombing of a Jewish centre in Buenos Aires in 1994 which killed 85 people. After failing to secure his release through political channels, Morteza Sarmadi, the Iranian ambassador to Britain, flew to Iran yesterday "for consultations". He is not expected to return.

There was speculation that the embassy attack was the work of Iranians angry with the British and Americans after the assassination in Najaf last week of the Iranian-backed Shia cleric Ayatollah Mohammad Bakr al-Hakim. Ayatollah Hakim had been exiled in Iran and only returned to Iraq in May. His death caused widespread grief in Iran.

But it is more likely that the shootings reflect the struggle for power in Iran and were ordered by hardline religious conservatives eager to provoke the moderate President Mohammad Khatami into tougher action against Britain.

Iran has been incensed by the arrest of Mr Soleimanpour, which it says was politically motivated. Hardliners maintain that Britain is mimicking American policy in the Middle East.

Britain insists that the police had no choice but to respond to an international extradition request. A government spokesman said the matter was purely judicial. He said the former Iranian ambassador to Argentina did not enjoy diplomatic immunity because he was studying at a British university.

With Iranian hardliners calling for the expulsion of Mr Dalton, the British Government has been braced for reprisals. Mr Dalton cut short his holiday to fly back to Tehran after Mr Soleimanpour was refused bail.

The effect of the row, compounded by yesterday's shooting, is to undermine the strategy of constructive engagement in which Jack Straw the Foreign Secretary, has invested considerable energy. The Government has been working to repair links with Iran which were severed in 1989 after the fatwa calling for the murder of Salman Rushdie, author of The Satanic Verses. Diplomatic relations were restored in 1999. Mr Straw has been to Iran four times to urge Tehran's support for the "war on terror".

A rupture with Britain would leave Iran with few friends in the international community.

There is mounting concern that Tehran may be secretly developing a nuclear weapon. The IAEA, the UN's nuclear watchdog, revealed last week that its inspectors found enriched uranium at a power plant south of Tehran. The finding appeared to confirm the suspicions of those in the Bush administration who regard Iran as a member of the "axis of evil". Mr Blair has expressed concern about Iran's nuclear ambitions and the EU may postpone a valuable trade deal when it considers the IAEA inspectors' conclusions.

The Foreign Office said diplomatic ties had not been downgraded and discussions with Iran were continuing.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2133.shtml
3 posted on 09/04/2003 12:08:51 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Amir Taheri: Russia should stop its unjust suppression of Chechnya

Gulf News Online 03-09-2003

Sometime this week, the Kremlin will launch the latest phase in its four-year old plan to "tame Chechnya". Having killed almost a quarter of the Chechen people and driven nearly half of the remaining into exile, the Russian leadership is preparing a presidential election designed to provide a fig leaf of legitimacy to a regime made exclusively of Moscow's minions.

The programme, presented as a "Chechenisation" of the conflict, started last March with a constitutional referendum. Preoccupied with the war in Iraq, the international community paid little attention to the exercise which produced the usual 99.99 per cent approval for the text proposed by Moscow.

Needless to say, the text deprives the Chechens of many of the basic rights that they had enjoyed, at least on paper, throughout the Soviet era, including the right to self determination.

Now the conventional wisdom is that Moscow is holding a presidential election to legitimise the rule of Ahmad Qadyrov, the former Mufti of Chechnya who has been Russia's front man in Grozny for the past two years.

Although presenting himself as a "man of God", Qadyrov has raised a private army that has already established a record of murder, rape and plunder in the parts of the country controlled by the Russian army.

Big money

Backed by a group of Russian businessmen and a string of other shady characters, Qadyrov is spending big money trying to buy friends and, ultimately, votes. With a Kalashnikov in one hand and a copy of the Holy Quran in another, Qadyrov looks like a living caricature of the Chechens as drawn by Russian imperialists in the 19th century.

There is, however, no guarantee that Russian President Vladimir Putin will want to keep the Mufti turned politician in Grozny for a further four years.

Putin is trying to use the presidential election as a means of dividing the Chechen people so that, busy fighting one another, they would have no time to pursue their dream of self determination.

The first division started over four years ago when a group of ambitious adventurers, led by Shamil Bashaev, and backed by Arab money and "volunteers", took up arms against the democratic government of President Aslan Mashhadov.

Now the Russians are trying to divide the Chechens on the basis of religion as well. Branding all their opponents as "Wahhabis", the Russians hope to mobilise the traditional Sufi fraternities who have dominated Chechnya since it converted to Islam in the 16th century.

Applying the "divide and rule" doctrine, Moscow is encouraging and in some cases financing, the candidacy of several clan chiefs and Sufi pirs in the hope of preventing the emergence of any big bloc of Chechen voters. By the latest count there are 12 candidates, a number that could increase before the applications close next week.

Moscow may well be planning to drop Qadyrov, who is so unpopular that he can hardly venture out of his palace in Grozny without Russian bodyguards. In his place, Moscow may wish to see someone like Hussain Jabrailov whose family owns a chain of hotels in the Russian capital.

Another possible successor to Qadyrov is Aslan Aslankhanov who has been Chechnya's representative in the Russian parliament, the Duma, and a member of Putin's "United Russia" Party. Finally, Putin may wish to see Malik Saidallahyev, one of the richest businessmen in Moscow, as the next president of Chechnya.

The electoral show organised by Moscow is partly based on the hope that the United States and its allies, preoccupied with the global war against terror, will look the other way as Russian colonial rule is re-imposed on Chechnya. But this sham election is unlikely to bring peace to Chechnya. The candidates already in the field are hardly able to venture out without an escort of Russian tanks and helicopter gunships.

Chechnya's legitimate president, Mashahadov, is not expected to put his stamp of approval on a fraudulent election in which a few thousand armed men will cast ballots for half a million dead or exiled Chechens.

The absence of international observers, who were present when Mashhadov was elected, will deprive the exercise of real legitimacy.

While there can be no democracy without elections, it is perfectly possible to have elections without democracy. This was the case throughout the Soviet era and is the case in Russian-occupied Chechnya today. Some Europeans and Americans have been hoodwinked into seeing the Chechen conflict through Moscow's eyes.

They see the Chechens as a nation of hard line "Wahhabists" bent on winning independence through violence and terror. A majority of Chehens, however, belong to the Malekite school of Sunni Islam and have a strong Sufi tradition that dates back to the early stages of Islamisation in the region.

Nor do most Chechens want a complete break from Russia. They know that, landlocked as their country is, they cannot survive as a self-contained enclave in the Caucasus. All they want is the implementation of the accords signed by Mashahdov and former Russian President Boris Yeltsin more than five years ago.

The Russian Federation is a mosaic of over 100 small, medium and big nations. There are the Tatars, the Bashkir, the Udmurt, the Koumi, the Chuvache, the Morve, the Mari, the Yaqut, the Nenet, the Premen, the Ossete, the Ingush, the Daghestani, the Charkess, the Koriak, the Kalmuk and many more. Most of these minority nationalities are Muslim. And almost all have succeeded in working out a modus vivendi within the Russian federation. So, why should Chechnya be the exception?

Personal honour

The answer is that Putin has turned the crushing of Chechnya into a matter of personal honour. He believes that he would win a second presidential term only if he offers the head of Chechnya on a silver platter.

On a number of occasions he has said that the war in Chechnya has become "a personal matter" for him.

There is no doubt that Russia must be allowed to play a leading role in international politics.

But this should not come at the expense of a small and brave nation that is asking for nothing more than is enjoyed by so many other constituent nations of the federation.

The U.S. and the European Union, along with the UN and the Organisation for Security and Co-operation in Europe (OSCE) must stop the forthcoming election farce in Chechnya and, instead, offer a forum for talks between Moscow and the true representatives of the Chechen people, to seek a peaceful solution to this most savage of wars.

The writer is an Iranian journalist based in Europe and author of 10 books on the Middle East and Islam. He can be reached at: amirtaheri@benadorassociates.com

http://www.gulf-news.com/Articles/Opinion.asp?ArticleID=96678
4 posted on 09/04/2003 12:17:39 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Amir Taheri: Russia should stop its unjust suppression of Chechnya

Gulf News Online 03-09-2003

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/975692/posts?page=4#4

Another interesting piece to the puzzle which is the middle-east. -- DoctorZin
5 posted on 09/04/2003 12:20:29 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; piasa; Valin; nuconvert; Texas_Dawg; kattracks; RaceBannon; seamole; ..
Russia May Supply Air Defense Systems to Iran
09/03/2003 19:31

What does Washington think about it?

Russia may start supplies of modern anti-missile defense systems to Iran, the information became known from an interview of Radjab Safarov, the director general of the Russian Center for Modern Iran Studies, with the Japanese newspaper Sankei Shimbun.

According to Radjab Safarov, a sensational proposition was first voiced by former chairman of the Duma Defense Committee, now late Lev Rokhlin during his meeting with Iran Defense Minister Ali Shamkhani that took place in the framework of an official visit of the RF Duma delegation to Iran at the end of February 1997. Radjab Safarov himself was member of the delegation as one of the deputies of Russia's defense minister.

The Japanese newspaper reports that the proposition voiced by Lev Rokhlin was as follows: as soon as Iran launches military satellites it will have a chance not only to trace all movements inside the country, at the borders and in the whole of the region within 24 hours; what is more Iran could ensure its security in the air with the help of different anti-missile and air defense facilities. The general said then: "As far as Iran has made a decision to build a nuclear power plant it is important to protect it from numerous enemies. Russia from its side is ready to supply modern air defense systems to Iran."

Radjab Safarov says that the top-authorities of Iran evinced great interest toward the proposition; they asked Russia to provide information about the price and performance specification of the system as the proposition hadn't been mentioned in the program of the visit originally. The Russian side claimed that the system cost $3-4 billion; construction of the system might take up to 3 years.

Iranian representatives participating in the talks told the general that they needed time to coordinate the proposition with the top leaders of the country. However, experts say that no official inquiry followed from Iran; the issue still remains unsettled.

Meanwhile, a Russian delegation headed by 2000 Nobel Prize winner, Duma deputy Professor Zhores Alferov is leaving for Teheran on September 19, 2003. The delegation is expected to stay in Iran for 5 days. It is not ruled out that supplies of the air defense system will be once again touched upon during the visit.

It should be mentioned that a regular session of the International Atomic Energy Agency devoted to Iran's nuclear programs is to open in Vienna on September 8. Having allowed the leakage of information about secret negotiations with Iran, Russia is raising its rates at the negotiations with the USA. After the end of the Iraqi war the whole of the world is experiencing waves of anti-American attitudes. Against this background the popularity of Russian air defense and anti-missile defense systems is gaining force.


Read the original in Russian: http://news.pravda.ru/abroad/2003/09/03/54440.html (Translated by: Maria Gousseva)

http://english.pravda.ru/accidents/21/93/375/10829_iran.html
6 posted on 09/04/2003 12:25:53 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; AdmSmith; dixiechick2000; nuconvert; onyx; Pro-Bush; Valin; Ronin; ...
"Israel to redirect search for missing airman toward Iran"

Thursday, September 04, 2003

JERUSALEM ,Sep 3, (AFP) - Israel is redirecting its search toward Iran for an airman who was shot down over southern Lebanon and has become a folk hero in the Jewish state, television reports said Israeli investigators have asked the United States to question -- or allow them to question -- Iraqi former prisoners of war in the Islamic republic on whether any of them saw Ron Arad, whose jet was downed on October 16, 1986.

Israeli troops rescued the plane's pilot but the navigator, Arad, fell into the hands of the pro-Syrian Shiite militia Amal.
An Israeli defense ministry commission recently concluded it was impossible to establish Arad was dead and said he should be considered still alive.

Israel has repeatedly demanded the release of Arad, or of his remains, from Lebanon. But the speaker of the Lebanese parliament, Nabih Berri, who is also head of Amal, said the group that was holding him had broken up and that Arad had been sent to Iran.

Tehran has always denied this, although the former head of Amal's intelligence wing, Mustapha Dirani, gave the same story after he was captured and jailed in Israel.

In July 2001, a freed human rights activist told the French weekly Le Point he had seen Arad in a Syrian jail seven years after he was shot down.

Arad has become a folk hero in Israel, with regular demonstrations demanding his release, a website created in his honour and even a song dedicated to him, called "Ron".

Iraq (news - web sites) and Iran have exchanged a total of 97,000 prisoners under the supervision of the International Committee of the Red Cross following their brutal 1980-1988 war that left more than one million dead on both sides.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=17774&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
7 posted on 09/04/2003 12:31:57 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: RaceBannon; yonif
Israel's President Addresses Iran

President Moshe Katsav Is Iranian-Born

Sep 3, 2003 11:17 am US/Central
JERUSALEM, Israel (AP) Israel's Iranian-born president has hosted an emotional radio talk show with listeners from his native country, even as Israeli and Iranian leaders have traded barbs in recent days over Tehran's nuclear program.

The broadcast earlier this week on the Persian service of Israel Radio linked President Moshe Katsav with listeners from all over Iran, service director Menashe Amir said Wednesday.

It was the first time Katsav has addressed Iranians on the radio since assuming the largely ceremonial presidency in 2000.

Katsav chatted in a mix of Hebrew and Farsi with Iranian listeners who called in during Monday's program, recalling his fondness of the country he left as a boy.

"My family lived in Iran for over 2,500 years," he said. "We absorbed the Persian culture and mentality, and we nurture in our hearts very warm feelings for Iran's history and culture."

Katsav's comments and those of listeners, reported in the Israeli newspaper Yediot Ahronot, were confirmed by radio officials.

Israel and Iran have been bitter enemies since Iran's 1979 Islamic revolution. Iran regards Israel as a consistent violator of Palestinian rights and has called for its destruction; Israel says Iran supports terrorists and is pursuing a nuclear weapons program that threatens world peace.

Israel Radio reaches more than 1 million listeners in Iran and can be heard over the radios of shopkeepers in Tehran's markets, said Amir, who translated for Katsav.

The phone connection was routed through Europe for the president's 45-minute appearance because the two countries have no direct link.

A caller from Yazed, where Katsav was born, asked for help for a sick relative, saying he believes Israel has the best medical system in the world. Katsav said he would do his best, noting that many of his relatives are buried in Yazed and that the city remains close to his heart.

Another listener praised Israel for giving international aid but chided it for being selective.

"I am very proud of the fact that a native Iranian has become the president of Israel," the listener said. "Tell me: How is it that when there is an earthquake at the other end of the world, Israel mobilizes to help, whereas you will not help us -- the Iranian people -- go free?"

Katsav said Israel does not want to intervene in Iran's "internal affairs."

"This is a matter that is subject to the people of Iran. I am saying clearly that we are interested in rebuilding relations," he said. However, he said, "the Iranian leaders speak about the destruction of Israel."

The president "was clearly moved" by speaking to the Iranians, who showed great interest in developments in Israel, Amir said.

The broadcast came just one day after Israeli Foreign Minister Israeli Foreign Minister Silvan Shalom told EU foreign policy chief Javier Solana -- fresh from talks in Tehran -- that Iran's nuclear program constitutes a "grave threat" to the world.

Iran insists it is not seeking to make atomic weapons and that its nuclear program is only for generating electricity. Israel has never confirmed being a nuclear power, but it is widely believed to have nuclear weapons.

Last month, the Iranian government warned Israel against attacking its nuclear installations, saying any such attempt would be a serious mistake.

http://wcco.com/topstories/topstories_story_246151950.html
8 posted on 09/04/2003 12:42:25 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
Lets hope they find em'..Prayer BUMP!
9 posted on 09/04/2003 12:43:07 AM PDT by Pro-Bush (Awareness is what you know before you know anything else.)
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To: All
Motorbike gunmen fire shots at British embassy in Iran

04 September 2003

The British embassy in Tehran came under fire yesterday in an incident that threatens to turn an already charged atmosphere into the most serious crisis in relations with Iran since the Salman Rushdie affair.

The shooting caused limited damage and injured nobody. But it came on a day when the Iranian ambassador to Britain was recalled to Tehran over the arrest of an Iranian diplomat in Britain.

Shortly before midday in Tehran, shots rang out, hitting windows in upper storeys of the embassy compound. Witnesses said two men on motorbikes stopped in front of the embassy to fire the shots with a handgun before riding away at high speed.

The embassy building is protected by a high perimeter wall that stretches two hundred yards along Ferdowsi street, one of central Tehran's busiest thoroughfares. Bullet holes could later be seen in windows facing the street.

Richard Dalton, Britain's ambassador in Tehran, said: "This was a serious incident. Six shots were fired at the embassy building. Several of them entered offices on the second floor."

The embassy had been on high alert since relations with Iran soured last month over the arrest in Britain of Hade Soleimanpour, an Iranian diplomat. Argentina is seeking his extradition in connection with the bombing of a Jewish centre in Buenos Aires in 1994 which killed 85 people. After failing to secure his release through political channels, Morteza Sarmadi, the Iranian ambassador to Britain, flew to Iran yesterday "for consultations". He is not expected to return.

There was speculation that the embassy attack was the work of Iranians angry with the British and Americans after the assassination in Najaf last week of the Iranian-backed Shia cleric Ayatollah Mohammad Bakr al-Hakim. Ayatollah Hakim had been exiled in Iran and only returned to Iraq in May. His death caused widespread grief in Iran.

But it is more likely that the shootings reflect the struggle for power in Iran and were ordered by hardline religious conservatives eager to provoke the moderate President Mohammad Khatami into tougher action against Britain.

Iran has been incensed by the arrest of Mr Soleimanpour, which it says was politically motivated. Hardliners maintain that Britain is mimicking American policy in the Middle East.

Britain insists that the police had no choice but to respond to an international extradition request. A government spokesman said the matter was purely judicial. He said the former Iranian ambassador to Argentina did not enjoy diplomatic immunity because he was studying at a British university.

With Iranian hardliners calling for the expulsion of Mr Dalton, the British Government has been braced for reprisals. Mr Dalton cut short his holiday to fly back to Tehran after Mr Soleimanpour was refused bail.

The effect of the row, compounded by yesterday's shooting, is to undermine the strategy of constructive engagement in which Jack Straw the Foreign Secretary, has invested considerable energy. The Government has been working to repair links with Iran which were severed in 1989 after the fatwa calling for the murder of Salman Rushdie, author of The Satanic Verses. Diplomatic relations were restored in 1999. Mr Straw has been to Iran four times to urge Tehran's support for the "war on terror".

A rupture with Britain would leave Iran with few friends in the international community.

There is mounting concern that Tehran may be secretly developing a nuclear weapon. The IAEA, the UN's nuclear watchdog, revealed last week that its inspectors found enriched uranium at a power plant south of Tehran. The finding appeared to confirm the suspicions of those in the Bush administration who regard Iran as a member of the "axis of evil". Mr Blair has expressed concern about Iran's nuclear ambitions and the EU may postpone a valuable trade deal when it considers the IAEA inspectors' conclusions.

The Foreign Office said diplomatic ties had not been downgraded and discussions with Iran were continuing.

Source: The Independent

http://www.belfasttelegraph.co.uk/news/story.jsp?story=440046
10 posted on 09/04/2003 1:52:49 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: Pro-Bush; yonif; DoctorZIn; seamole; McGavin999; Valin; nuconvert; dixiechick2000; RaceBannon; ...
Report: Sharon orders Mossad to lead efforts to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons

04-09-2003, 07:26

Israel's Prime Minister Ariel Sharon intends to hand over
responsibility for coordinating and leading his country's effort to prevent Iran from acquiring nuclear weapons to Mossad head, Meir Dagan.

The Premier's office decided it was "right" for the mission to move to the Mossad, Israel's secret security intelligence agency, which can gather intelligence, analyze and assess it and, in the future, perhaps conduct operations, Haaretz newspaper reported on Thursday.

Israel perceives the "emerging Iranian nuclear threat" as the most crucial to its national security interests.

According to Israeli military intelligence assessments, Tehran will cross the point of no return in another year,
at which time it will be able to create fissionable material for bombs. By the year 2006, it will have operational nuclear weapons, according to the Israeli assessments.

Sharon's plan is to have Dagan coordinate the interministry forum, while other bodies will operate according to his instructions and their expertise. (Albawaba.com)

http://www.albawaba.com/news/index.php3?sid=257762&lang=e&dir=news
11 posted on 09/04/2003 1:56:21 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: F14 Pilot
Sure must be tantalizingly frustrating to have the American military just next door in Iraq.

I'll bet there's lots of praying to Allah that the Iranian government collapses!

12 posted on 09/04/2003 1:56:53 AM PDT by CROSSHIGHWAYMAN
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To: F14 Pilot
Iraqi former prisoners of war in the Islamic republic on whether any of them saw Ron Arad, whose jet was downed on October 16, 1986.

A slight hope. I don't think that he would be kept by the Iranians, or with Arab prisoners.

13 posted on 09/04/2003 2:45:23 AM PDT by BlackVeil
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To: BlackVeil; Pro-Bush; seamole; AdmSmith; DoctorZIn; nuconvert; onyx; Texas_Dawg; McGavin999; ...
Good reasons for implicating Pak in Iran nuke link: US expert

Washington, September 4

A leading expert of a US-based security think tank feels there are genuine reasons why Pakistan is being implicated by the international community for assisting in Iran's nuclear capability build-up.

"There are reasons why Pakistan is implicated. One is that the design of the centrifuge appears to be similar to that kind of centrifuge that we know Pakistan had in the late eighties, and which they (Iran) know they (Pakistan) actually acquired designs and information on how to build from Europe," Corey Hinderstein of the Institute for Science and International Security told ANI in an exclusive interview.

"There are some footsteps that would point to Pakistan. But, it's certainly not a completed investigation, and there are other countries from which this technology could also have arrived," Hinderstein added.

"I have not seen any evidence that they (Iran) have actually made the decision to go forward and actually build nuclear weapons, one, many, hundreds. But, what I am seeing, is that they are developing such a large infrastructure that if that decision was ever made, that they would be able to turn around, almost overnight, and have a tremendous nuclear capability," the expert told ANI.

Pakistan, Hinderstein said, has taken great strides in the field of nuclear technology, but it is difficult for such countries to maintain control or a cap on proliferation.

"I think that Pakistan has taken great strides, but unfortunately, it's almost impossible to put a lid on this sort of technology," he said.

His reactions assume significance in the wake of a Los Angeles Times report that suggests that Iran obtained key nuclear information and technology from Pakistan early last month, a charged rejected by Pakistan President Pervez Musharraf.

On the dilemma faced by Washington vis-a-vis Islamabad's growing nuclear potential and its ability to help friendly countries in this sector, Hinderstein said: "I think they're (US) in quite a dilemma. They really rely on Pakistan to be a partner in the war on terrorism. Pakistan also has very few legal restrictions in the sense that they are not members of the NPT. They do not have International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) safeguards in place."

"So, while the IAEA is asking for their cooperation in researching what may have happened with regard to Iran, they have very little leverage on Pakistan, and it's up to Pakistan to come forward and maybe reveal some things that may be embarrassing to them.

This embarrassment is one that many countries have felt and we've already noted European countries, particularly Germany, were highly embarassed in the early nineties over revelations about the technology that got to Iraq. And, they had many more controls in place at that time than Pakistan had," he adds.

The reality is that the basics of building a nuclear bomb are fairly easily obtained in this Internet and global age. For now, the Bush Administration appears have put the war on terrorism higher on the agenda than the proliferation of nuclear weapons. Washington does not have many options when it comes to confronting Pakistan, Hinderstein opines.

He also believed that rather than focussing on Pakistan and India's nuclear capabilities, which had been openly announced in 1998, it would be more prudent to pay attention to other countries like Iran in the Asian region seeking to acquire these capabilities and to prevent them from reaching uncontrollable limits.

"Well, certainly, any active country has the potential to proliferate. And certainly we're worried about North Korea right now being able to export some of their technology right now. The nature of information and technology is very hard to regulate and hard to control," he said.

"Well, Pakistan and India have have been very open about the fact that they have nuclear weapons. Neither of them are members of the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT)."

http://www.hindustantimes.com/news/181_361996,00050002.htm
14 posted on 09/04/2003 4:01:51 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; AdmSmith; dixiechick2000; nuconvert; onyx; Pro-Bush; Valin; Tamsey; ...
THURSDAY 04/09/2003 13:25:21
Blair warning to Iran

Tony Blair today issued a fresh warning to Iran to comply with international demands on nuclear weapons and cease support for terrorist groups.

The Prime Minister said Britain would remain critical of Tehran until it signed up to the nuclear non-proliferation treaty, and said his Government was under ``no illusions`` about their relationship.

The International Atomic Energy Agency is due to report next Monday on whether Iran is in breach of its international obligations. It has faced calls to open up its civil nuclear programme to international inspections amid fears that it is developing a bomb.

Mr Blair, speaking at his monthly Downing Street press conference, said: ``We have a policy of, I would describe it actually, as critical engagement (with Iran).

``We are engaged with Iran, we have a dialogue with their leadership, but we are under no illusions.

``It is important both that they adhere completely to the demands of the international community in respect of nuclear weapons and that they cease all support of terrorist groups.

``Until those two things are done, that engagement is going to remain critical.``

The Prime Minister`s warning is set to further sour relations between the two countries, already cooled by the recall of Iran`s ambassador to London this week over the detention of a diplomat wanted in connection with the 1994 bombing of a Jewish centre in Argentina.

Yesterday shots were fired at the British embassy in Tehran in an incident which could be related to the row.

Morteza Sarmadi was recalled to Tehran after he failed to secure the release of Hade Soleimanpour during a meeting with Foreign Secretary Jack Straw on Monday.

Although the Foreign Office has insisted Mr Sarmadi`s return to Iran did not amount to a downgrading of relations, the move is a severe disappointment to Mr Straw, who has been cultivating ties with his Iranian counterpart for the past two years.

Soleimanpour was detained following an extradition request from Argentina over the bombing of a Jewish centre in Buenos Aires in 1994 when he was ambassador to the country.

Last week the career diplomat, who is still employed by the Iranian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, was refused bail despite his government offering £500,000 for his surety.

The extradition hearing at Bow Street Magistrates Court had heard how Iranian President Ali Mohammed Khatami had demanded the release of Soleimanpour, 47, and an apology from the Government.

http://u.tv/newsroom/indepth.asp?id=36766&pt=n
15 posted on 09/04/2003 6:33:41 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; AdmSmith; dixiechick2000; nuconvert; onyx; Pro-Bush; Valin; Tamsey; ...
U.S. refuses to question Iraqi pilots held in Iran for information on Ron Arad

By Ellis Shuman September 4, 2003

The United States refused an official Israeli request to ask Iraqi pilots who had been held as prisoners of war in Iran if they know anything about missing IAF navigator Ron Arad, who may have been held at some time there, Channel Two television reported. The request came after an IDF panel concluded that there is no available information that can refute the defense establishment's working assumption that Arad is still alive.

After the United States refused to ask the Iraqi pilots they were interrogating about Ron Arad, Israel asked if Israelis could be given the opportunity to talk with the pilots directly. The Americans refused this request as well, Channel Two reported.

Israel turned to the Americans in Iraq at the recommendation of the Winograd Committee, a special IDF panel headed by retired judge Eliyahu Winograd. The committee was established over a year ago by then-IDF Chief of Staff Shaul Mofaz with the goal of reevaluating ways to handle the case of Ron Arad, who was captured in southern Lebanon after his jet was downed on October 16, 1986.

The committee reportedly examined thousands of documents collected in the seventeen years since Arad's capture and concluded that there was no evidence to change the assumption that he is still alive. The committee presented its findings to IDF Chief of Staff Lt.-Gen. Moshe Yaalon three weeks ago, but no conclusions or decisions have been made by the army, the army spokesman's office said.

"We have always said that we are certain that Ron is alive, although recently we have received unconfirmed reports that he might be very sick," said Yoske Harari, head of the Fellowship for Ron Arad's Release.

"Next Friday [September 12], we will gather some 5,000 students together near the Tel Aviv Museum to press the government not to forget Ron Arad," he said yesterday.

Dudu Arad, Ron's brother, said he was please to hear the committee's conclusion. "We were glad to hear that we are not crazy, that there is a committee, set up by the person who was IDF chief of staff and today is defense minister, that has determined that Ron is still alive."

The committee's report came as Israel and Hizbullah are negotiating a possible prisoner exchange deal. According to media reports, Israel would release former Hizbullah leader Sheikh Abdul Karim Obeid and Believers Resistance head Mustafa Dirani in exchange for Israeli citizen Elchanan Tannenbaum and the bodies of the three IDF soldiers, who were presumably killed by Hizbullah. After Israel dropped its demand for information about Ron Arad's fate, progress was made in the talks, the reports indicated.

"As part of the proposed deal it is, apparently, planned to release two important figures, Sheikh Abdul Karim Obeid and Mustafa Dirani, who were brought to Israel against their will specifically to help bring about the release and return of Ron," Harari said.

"We are sure that with patience, a deal can be concluded that would ensure the return of the missing Israelis and would include Ron or information about him. Not doing this would be a big mistake and the government still has the time to change its mind and plans," he added.

Military sources said that publication of the Winograd Committee report might complicate the prisoner exchange deal being brokered by German negotiator Ernst Uhrlau, Haaretz reported.

http://web.israelinsider.com/bin/en.jsp?enPage=ArticlePage&enDisplay=view&enDispWhat=object&enDispWho=Article%5El2711&enZone=Diplomacy&enVersion=0&
16 posted on 09/04/2003 6:35:05 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: AdmSmith; seamole; nuconvert; DoctorZIn
BP, Royalutch Shell ready to continue activity in Iran

Tehran, Sept 3, IRNA -- British Petroleum (BP) and Anglo-Dutch conglomerate, Royal/Dutch Shell, will continue activity in Iran despite closure of British Embassy in Tehran as a result of a shooting incident on Tuesday.

Informed sources say BP and Royal/Dutch Shell, two well-credited oil companies that started activity in Iran in recent years, would go on with their mission despite temporary closure of British Embassy in Tehran. The embassy was closed late Wednesday morning until further notice after being hit by gunfire from two motorcyclists.

Iranian police is investigating the case. BP has started activity in Iran since 1997 after setting up its representative office and is now a major purchaser of the country`s crude oil and oil derivatives.

The company is one of the two winners of a tender for development of Bangestan oil field, still awaiting National Iranian Oil Company`s (NIOC) decision to announce it as the final winner.

BP has also taken part in the tender for development of phase 11 of South Pars gas field and is currently cooperating with the NIOC to implement the first LNG project in Iran. The company is also cooperating with the NIOC and other international companies in the Output Expansion Consortium.

Meanwhile, Shell is busy with the project for development of Sorush and Norouz oil fields and is keen to contribute to development of phases 13 and 14 of South Pars gas field as well as implementation of the LNG projects in Iran.

The company signed a contract with Iran`s Oil Industry Research Center early this year for research and exploratory operations. Negotiations are underway between the Iranian party and the two British companies for implementation of GTL projects.

http://www.iranmania.com/News/ArticleView/Default.asp?NewsCode=17780&NewsKind=Current%20Affairs
17 posted on 09/04/2003 6:36:29 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
Timeline: UK-Iran relations

BBC News Online looks at the chequered history of Britain-Iranian ties in recent decades.
1951: The Iranian Government nationalises the Anglo-Iranian Oil Company, triggering a dispute with Britain.

1953: Iranian Prime Minister Mohammad Mossadeq is deposed in a coup backed by Britain and the US.

1979: Britain closes its embassy in Tehran following the Islamic revolution, and transfers its diplomats to a British interests section at the Swedish embassy.

1988: The British embassy in Tehran re-opens.

February 1989: Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini issues a religious edict (fatwa) ordering Muslims to kill British author Salman Rushdie, accused of blasphemy against Islam. Diplomatic ties with London are broken off.

September 1990: Relations are restored, but they are limited to the level of charge d'affaires.

May 1997: Mohammad Khatami, a reformer, becomes Iranian president, leading to efforts to normalise ties between the two countries.

September 1998: Relations with Britain are upgraded to ambassador level, after the Khatami government agrees to stop encouraging Muslims to carry out the death sentence against Salman Rushdie.

January 2000: Iranian Foreign Minister Kamal Kharrazi visits London.

September 2001: Jack Straw becomes the first UK foreign secretary to travel to Iran since 1979 - as part of efforts to forge a coalition against the Taleban in Afghanistan.

February 2002: Britain's improving relations with Iran suffer a major setback when Tehran rejects David Reddaway as London's new ambassador, calling him a spy.

June 2003: The UK urges Iran to open up its nuclear sites to tougher inspections, amid growing international concern that Tehran might be developing nuclear weapons.

21 August: The UK authorities arrest Iranian diplomat Hade Soleimanpour, who is wanted by Argentina on terror charges, triggering a fresh row. Tehran demands the immediate release of Mr Soleimanpour and an apology from the British.

27 August : Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Ali Ahani travels to London to meet Jack Straw, who says the cannot interfere with a judicial matter. Tehran says it hopes the dispute will not come to the withdrawal of ambassadors, but adds that all legal and diplomatic options are open.

3 September: Iran recalls its ambassador to London "for consultations" and shots are fired at the UK embassy in Tehran.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/world/middle_east/3077540.stm
18 posted on 09/04/2003 6:39:30 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: All
What is going on in Iraq is the outcome of the big mistake the occupying forces made.

Tehran, Sept 3, IRNA -- President Mohammad Khatami said on Wednesday
that instability in Iraq serves the interests of the Zionist regime
and that evidences available show escalation of Israeli activities in
Iraq in the past several days.
Speaking in an interview with Dubai-based Al-Arabiya television
network, President Khatami said that the terrorist acts are aimed at
disrupting peace and security in Iraq.
"I express grief over martyrdom of the great religious and
political leader from the household of the Hakim," he said.
"He was a personality who could usher in democracy, solidarity and
progress in Iraq. I believe that his assassination was engineered to
hamper establishment of stability and justice in Iraq," President
Khatami said.
"What is going on in Iraq is the outcome of the big mistake the
occupying forces made. They thought that the Iraq crisis will be
resolved through occupation of the country," he said.
"The occupying forces invaded Iraq while there had been logical
solutions to the Iraq problem. They could have established security
in Iraq without occupation," President Khatami said.
"The first step ahead is that the occupying powers should hand
over the country`s affairs to the Iraqi people by establishing a
democratic government in Iraq without ethnic affiliations," the
president said.
"I don`t think the terrorist operations in Iraq are launched by an
ordinary group. Absolutely, a state terrorism is going on with a state
behind it," President Khatami said citing the extensive bombing in
Najaf, destruction of the United Nations Office in Baghdad and
bombing of Jordan`s Embassy in baghdad.
"The occupying powers are responsible for security of the Iraqi
people. They should fulfill their responsibility in this respect."

http://www.irna.ir/
19 posted on 09/04/2003 6:44:41 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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To: DoctorZIn
Argentina Urges Iran's Cooperation in Jewish Center Bombing Probe

September 04, 2003
AFP
TerraNet

Argentina has urged the Iranian government to fully cooperate with its investigation of a 1994 bombing of a local Jewish community center that killed 85 people, the foreign ministry said.

The appeal came as Argentine Foreing Minister Rafael Bielsa and Judge Juan Jose Galeano met with an Iranian delegation led by Moshen Baharvand, deputy director of the Iranian Foreign Ministry's legal department.

Iran is suspected of helping mastermind the attack that also injured 300 people.

Tensions between the two countries reached a new high when Iran's former ambassador to Argentina, Hadi Soleimanpur, was arrested in Britain last month on an extradition request from Argentina, which charged him with involvement in the bombing.

Soleimanpur is to appear in court September 19.

In response, Tehran said it was ending economic and cultural cooperation with Argentina and hinted it might expel British ambassador Richard Dalton over the matter.

Galeano, who is investigating the attack, has issued a dozen arrest warrants for Iranians implicated in the attack without receiving any response from the Iranian side.

British attorney Richard Halsal, who represents the detained Iranian, also took part in the talks.

The affair has also strained relations between Britain and Iran with shots fired at the British embassy Wednesday just hours after Iran's ambassador to Britain was recalled.

The shooting, which caused no injuries, came after Iran confirmed that it had recalled its ambassador from London for consultations following Britain's arrest of the former Iranian diplomat.

The embassy was closed late Wednesday morning "until further notice" after being hit by gunfire, according to an embassy spokesman.

In London, a Foreign Office spokesman confirmed the shooting. "The bullets hit offices on the first and second floors of the building," he said. Three bullet holes could be seen in the reinforced windows on the second floor.

Witnesses quoted by the official IRNA news agency said the shots were fired from two motorcycles.

Following the incident, some 20 Iranian police officers were deployed in front of the building.

The Foreign Office said earlier Wednesday that Iranian ambassador Morteza Sarmadi had returned to his country amid worsening diplomatic relations between the two countries, but added: "This is not a downgrading of relations."

Iranian foreign ministry spokesman Hamid-Reza Asefi said: "Sarmadi is here for some consultations" without specifying how long he would remain in Iran.

A diplomat in London, quoted by The Guardian newspaper, said Sarmadi had officially returned for consultations following a hastily arranged meeting with British Foreign Secretary Jack Straw on Monday.

The source said Sarmadi "may not return" after failing to win any compromise from Straw over the detention of Soleimanpour, who was ordered by a British judge on Friday to remain in custody until his court appearance on September 19.

Iranian Deputy Foreign Minister Ali Ahani, who flew to London to discuss Soleimanpour's arrest with Straw last week, on Tuesday summoned the British ambassador to Tehran, Richard Dalton, and criticized the British judge and prosecution, IRNA reported.

The spokesman for parliament's national security and foreign policy committee, Jafar Golbaz, was quoted as saying after a meeting with Ahani: "We will not accept under any circumstance that the London court hands over Soleimanpour to Argentina."

Iran has repeatedly denied links to the Jewish centre bombing and that of the Israeli embassy in Argentina in March 1992 which killed 29 and injured 200, and has denounced "conspiracies" against it by the "Zionist regime".

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=09&d=04&a=4
20 posted on 09/04/2003 8:11:15 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
U.S.-Europe Spat: Worst May Be Over

September 04, 2003
The Wall Street Journal
Marc Champion and David S. Cloud

Contrary to the popular image, Europeans aren't interested in competing with U.S. power and Americans don't want to run the world alone, according to a multinational survey to be released Thursday.

While the poll also confirms a dramatic loss of faith in U.S. leadership among Europeans -- and showed even previously ambivalent Germans support creation of a European superpower -- the survey suggests the worst of the trans-Atlantic bust-up that preceded the U.S.-led war in Iraq may be over.

For example, the German Marshall Fund's annual trans-Atlantic survey of 8,000 people in the U.S. and seven European countries took "thermometer" readings of how warmly people in different countries feel about each other. There was a chilling of European feelings toward the U.S. to 57 from 64 a year ago on a scale of 1 to 100, with one representing the iciest feeling. But that represented a significant improvement from similar measures in polls by other companies in January and April.

Perhaps most surprising, support in the U.S. for partnership with a stronger European Union has grown since June 2002, despite all the angry talk about boycotting French products. Asked how desirable it was that Europe should exert strong leadership in world affairs, 80% of Americans answered positively. That was about the same as 79% last year, but within that result, significantly more -- 43% compared with 31% in 2002 -- thought European leadership was "very" desirable.

"That's fascinating after all the huge row over Iraq and the talk of European treason, and of France no longer being an ally," says Timothy Garton Ash, head of European studies at St. Anthony's College, Oxford. "It demonstrates first that the news from Iraq shows you every day you cannot run the world on your own, and secondly that there is a trans-Atlantic community."

Indeed, the survey showed just 20% of Europeans who said they wanted the EU to be a superpower also said it should counterbalance the U.S. That compared with 74% who wanted it to cooperate with the U.S in dealing with international problems.

The sense of a thaw in relations extends to governments. German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder is heading to the United Nations in New York later this month, and U.S. officials said he is expected to meet with President George W. Bush. The last time the two men sat down for a substantive meeting was in Berlin in May 2002.

"Not so long ago, Condoleezza Rice called U.S.-German relations icy. I think it's now springtime," says Karsten Voigt, the German government's coordinator for trans-Atlantic affairs, referring to Mr. Bush's national-security adviser. He cited Germany's recent plan to expand its peacekeepers in Afghanistan to a city outside the capital Kabul for the first time as a gesture of Berlin's willingness to support the U.S. in the war against international terrorism.

The Bush administration has plenty of reasons to want to repair the damaged U.S.-European relationship. Most urgently, as the security situation has worsened in Iraq, Washington wants European backing for a new resolution at the U.N. that will encourage other countries to contribute peacekeeping troops. The U.S. also needs European support for taking on Iran , which the U.S. contends is hiding a secret nuclear program.

For these reasons and more, there has been an effort by the Bush administration in recent months to eliminate the slights directed at Europe from U.S. officials that even some U.S. officials concede unnecessarily soured relations. The deteriorating situation in Iraq "has to take the edge off the U.S. arrogance. We were so sure of ourselves, and now you have to acknowledge that the Europeans had a point -- this wasn't as easy as we said it was going to be," says Brookings Institution scholar Philip Gordon, a former U.S. National Security Council aide specializing in European relations.

U.S. State Department officials say they hope an expanded U.N. mandate for Iraq can be agreed upon by the time Messrs. Bush and Schroeder meet at the U.N. in New York. But big divisions remain. Negotiating a new U.N. resolution that would persuade German, French and other allies who opposed the war to send troops to help stabilize the country, while retaining U.S. command, won't be easy.

Thursday's survey does show many of the differences exposed by the Iraq war still run deep, reflecting a greater U.S. than European willingness to use force to deal with common threats. Asked whether they would support a U.N.-led attack on North Korea if it were shown to have acquired weapons of mass destruction, 72% of Americans said they would, compared with 41% of Europeans. The same discrepancy emerged when Iran was the target.

More broadly, 84% of Americans say they believe war can be necessary to achieve justice, compared with 48% of Europeans. Big majorities on both sides of the Atlantic say Americans and Europeans have different values.

Germans in particular have responded to the Iraq war by rejecting strong U.S. leadership, with 50% describing it as undesirable, compared with 27% a year earlier. The number of Germans who said the U.S. should remain the world's only superpower dropped to 8% from 22% last year, while the number who want to turn the EU into a superpower rose to 70% from 48%.

"The developments of the last year have strengthened a kind of Euro-Gaullism," Mr. Voigt said, referring to the French tradition of favoring a self-reliant Europe acting independently of the U.S. To avoid that hardening into a permanent trend would require much greater care from leaders on both sides of the Atlantic, Mr. Voigt said.

The survey could indicate volatile trends, cautioned Bill Drozdiak, head of the German Marshall Fund's trans-Atlantic center in Brussels. It was conducted in mid-June by TNS Sofres for the American policy group named in honor of post-World War II Marshall Plan assistance, and other sponsors. Mr. Drozdiak noted that, if taken today, the survey might show less U.S. enthusiasm for foreign engagements as the security situation in Iraq has deteriorated.

That is supported by more recent polling data showing that most Americans want help in running Iraq, even if that means ceding control. An Aug. 24-28 poll by Greenberg Quinlan Rosner Research Inc. found that 63% of American voters agreed that getting "the UN and our allies to contribute more of the troops and money for the reconstruction in Iraq" was preferable to retaining U.S. control over the Iraq occupation.

-- Christopher Rhoads in Berlin contributed to this article.

Write to Marc Champion at marc.champion.com and David S. Cloud at david.cloud@wsj.com

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=09&d=04&a=6
21 posted on 09/04/2003 8:13:56 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
U.S.-Europe Spat: Worst May Be Over

September 04, 2003
The Wall Street Journal
Marc Champion and David S. Cloud

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/975692/posts?page=21#21

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
22 posted on 09/04/2003 8:15:07 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
IRI Intimidating Israel

September 04, 2003
Iranscope
Sam Ghandchi

Islamic Republic of Iran (IRI) since its inception has been intimidating Israel, beginning with Khomeini's announcement of the Ghods Day in Tehran after the establishment of IRI, supposedly to defend the Palestinian people, but in reality to export Shi'a Islamism all over the Middle East. In the recent years, IRI boasting of having long range missiles reaching Israel, is doing the same kind of rhetoric Saddam initiated against Israel, that ended up in Israel's preemptive strikes on Iraq's nuclear facilities.

The IRI anti-Israeli intimidations is also reminiscent of rhetoric of IRI leaders against Iraq which ended up in Iraq's invasion of Iran with 8 years of suffering and devastation with no positive outcome for Iran. Of course Saddam's Iraq invaded Iran and it was rightly condemned and Iranians had every right and duty to resist the invaders and push them out of Iran.

Why is IRI doing all the rhetoric of Shahab Missiles to get Iran into a war situation with Israel? Haven't we learned that these intimidations can only hurt Iran and Iranians by isolating Iran more and more and putting Iran at the risk of an Israeli attack?

What is all the point of anti-Israeli nonsense? In the last 20 years, Iran has suffered in the hands of Islamists and not Zionists. Why do the Islamists and leftists always try to make Israeli-Palestinian conflict our issue? IRI tries to start a war with Israel to keep itself afloat, the same way Saddam and many Arab states including most of the Palestinian leadership have done all these years, to keep the tension with Israel to justify their own incompetence to form democratic and modern states in their own countries.

Can anybody name one state in the Middle East to be more modern and democratic for its *own* citizens than Israel? Oh please do not jump and say Palestinians are treated as second degree citizens in Israel. I know that and I condemn it. But blacks were treated as second degree citizens in law of the land not only till 1864 but even till the Civil Rights Movement in the U.S., but the United State was still a democracy for the rest of the population for hundreds of years despite the ugly part of apartheid during that history.

Let's remember that in contrast, the Arab countries do not just treat their "second" degree citizens below democratic and human rights standards, they treat all their citizens as such, and also they are all backward states which even allow the killing of heretics, or practice beheading and other cruel punishments like in Saudi Arabia, and stoning and other crimes against Iran's own citizens in the case of IRI even sanctioned in its constitution, whereas all these countries having oil are a lot richer than Israel and could have modernized and democratized a lot if they had the right leadership.

Israel has been one of the most successful countries in the Middle East, which has been able to become way more modern and democratic than all the other countries in the Middle East even without having oil revenues. The superiority of the state apparatus of Israel in the independence of its parliament and checks and balances, having real elections and not sham elections, and the social welfare and independent media and other human rights, are undeniable and their advanced state in technologies and health care are known even to Iranian people who wish medical attendance in Israeli hospitals for their loved ones, and if anybody says it is all because of dependence on the U.S., I would respond that Saudi has also been dependent on the U.S. but is a symbol of backwardness in the world and not advancement.

I have written before that "I do not approve the attacks of Israeli state against the Palestinians and if some Israel’s officials still imagine they have legitimacy of owning a piece of land in the Middle East based on whatever has been the case some thousands of years ago are wrong and the same way the Palestinians and Arabs who also imagine that because of whatever has been owned by Arabs over half a century ago to have the right to that land, are also dreaming. This is as if one keeps saying white population has no right to the U.S. land, because it belonged to Native Americans. The reality is that there is a country of Israel because of whatever historical reasons, just like all those Arab countries that exist because of some historical reasons and one better see the reality and plan on that rather than having a self-serving version of dream of history to try to solve today’s problems."

Thus basically I do not care for either side of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict and I have already written in details my views of the historical issues raised, and do not need to repeat here and frankly I see it waste of time to argue these historical discussions and I prefer to focus on practical reality of the Middle East than to get drowned in history.

Iranians want good relations with Israel and it is to our advantage to learn about technical and social advancements of Israel and looking at Israel from the angle of Israel-Palestinian conflict has been a wrong approach to Israel for over 20 years. The majority of leftists who have been helping IRI all these years in continuing their lopsided view of Israel are doing a disservice to Iran and Iranians and if their so-called anti-imperialism ended up supporting an Islamist reactionary revolution in 1979, their condoning and supporting anti-Israeli rhetoric of IRI will put Iran at a situation worse than the Iran-Iraq War.

Iranians do not want a war with Israel and if IRI leaders cause a war with Israel, they are the ones who are causing another disaster for Iran and Iranians, which can hurt us like the Iran-Iraq War, and Islamists and leftists should answer for all the devastations that will follow such an outcome. They better come to grips with the new realities of the Middle East rather than putting Iran and Iranians at risk.

http://www.ghandchi.com/252-IRI-Israel.htm
23 posted on 09/04/2003 8:16:27 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Tracks of Terror

August 28, 2003
The Economist
Beunos Aires and Tehran

The explosive arrest of an ambassador

IN 1994, a car bomb outside a Jewish welfare centre in Buenos Aires killed 85 people and injured more than 200. The investigation, led by Judge Juan José Galeano, has dragged on for years and achieved little—until now. Last week, Britain acted on an international arrest warrant issued by Mr Galeano, and detained Iran's former ambassador to Argentina, triggering a diplomatic kerfuffle. On August 27th Belgian police briefly detained a second Iranian wanted by Judge Galeano; he was released after claiming diplomatic immunity.

The Argentine intelligence service, with its Israeli and American counterparts, has long accused Hizbullah, the Lebanon-based “Party of God”, of carrying out the bombing with help from the Iranian embassy. The same alliance is also suspected in a similar attack in 1992 on the Israeli embassy in Buenos Aires, which killed 29.

Iran's government denies the claims. It has reacted with fury to the arrest of Hadi Soleimanpour, who is studying for a PhD at Durham University. Britain's government, which has tried hard to improve its relations with Iran, insists that the arrest is a purely judicial matter. The British courts will now decide whether there is sufficient evidence to extradite Mr Soleimanpour. But Iran sees the hand of the United States in the affair. Facing pressure to abandon its nuclear ambitions (see article), it wants the matter solved quickly, and has hinted that it may expel the British ambassador.

Certainly, the timing of Judge Galeano's request for the arrest is interesting. Argentina's spies were already tapping the Iranian embassy's phones before the 1994 bomb. Yet it was not until March this year that the judge requested the arrest of four Iranian officials (who had all returned home). Having been advised of Mr Soleimanpour's presence in Britain, and having received no co-operation from Iran in his quest for the four, this month the judge added him (and two others) to his list.

Mr Galeano is himself under investigation. He is accused not only of being dilatory, but of destroying evidence (he says he had nowhere to store it). This month an Argentine spy testified that Mr Galeano had paid one of a score of locals accused of involvement in the bombing $400,000 to incriminate police chiefs. Néstor Kirchner, Argentina's new president, has criticised the failure to solve the case. He has opened intelligence files to the courts, and allowed 14 intelligence officers to testify. He has also launched a crusade to clean up Argentina's judiciary, many of whose members are cronies of Carlos Menem, Argentina's president from 1989-99. So a high-profile arrest was useful to Mr Galeano.

Mr Menem is alleged to have taken a $10m bribe from Iran to cover up its involvement. He denies this. The interior minister at the time of the bombing has said that the government did not want to antagonise Iran out of fear of provoking a third attack. Argentina's trade surplus with Iran may also have played a part: Iran this week banned all imports from Argentina, which last year totalled m.

Mr Kirchner is said to be considering throwing his weight behind moves by relatives of the victims to remove Judge Galeano from the case. That may happen later this year, when another set of judges is due to complete the formal hearings in the case. They are expected to criticise Mr Galeano's work.

Sooner or later, the investigation in Buenos Aires might shed some light on claims that Iran operates two diplomatic services, one through the foreign ministry and another parallel apparatus, with ties to terrorist outfits and answerable to the regime's hardline clerics. But if so, which one did Mr Soleimanpour work for?

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=09&d=04&a=8
24 posted on 09/04/2003 9:46:32 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
"How Jihad Made Its Way to Chechnya
Secular Separatist Movement Transformed by Militant Vanguard

By Sharon LaFraniere
Washington Post Foreign Service
Saturday, April 26, 2003;

KARAMAKHI, Dagestan -- This isolated southwest Russian village of dirt roads and one-story clay brick houses was profoundly peaceful, its residents say, until a Jordanian cleric named Khabib Abdurrakhman arrived in the early 1990s with a seemingly irresistible deal.

To a hamlet made destitute by the collapse of the Soviet Union, Abdurrakhman brought a slaughtered cow and a free feast every week. In a place where many people were left jobless by the demise of the local collective farm, he handed out $30 to every convert who came to his simple mosque. And to those adrift in the social chaos of the Soviet breakdown, he offered a new purpose in life -- a form of their traditional Islam rooted in fundamentalism and militancy.

Few questioned where his money came from, or who were the other Arabs who began to drift into the community. By the time questions did arise, it was too late.

By 1999, Abdurrakhman's growing band of followers had transformed the little settlement into an armed enclave, crisscrossed by tunnels and trenches and stockpiled with weapons for Abdurrakhman's true mission: severing Dagestan from Russian control and merging it into an Islamic state with neighboring Chechnya.

"They tried to lure people in a friendly way at first," according to Magomed Makhdiyev, the village imam, who says he tried to withstand the fundamentalists' influence. "But by 1999, they were saying, 'Join us or we'll cut your head off.' "

Those scruples faded in the mid-1990s, as more and more Arab missionaries and fighters flocked to the republic, proclaiming Islamic law, or sharia, and promoting Wahhabist traditions. Warlords had come to dominate Chechen society, and some of them embraced the fundamentalist cause.

The article goes into detail on the funding…

The Arabs' goal went beyond preserving Chechnya's freedom: They wanted to merge Chechnya and Dagestan to create an Islamic state. Chechnya and Dagestan were poorer than the rest of Russia, and Dagestan, though home to a mosaic of ethnic groups, was predominantly Muslim. Its access to the Caspian Sea and its oil and gas reserves gave it a strategic importance to Russia that Chechnya did not share.

One of the new leaders was Khattab, who fought with bin Laden in Afghanistan as a teenager and who had publicly praised the al Qaeda leader as the "main commander of the mujaheddin worldwide." Khattab's position in the rebel movement was assured when he won over Shamil Basayev, Chechnya's best-known militant."

http://www.gabriellereillyweekly.com/full/st072803.htm
(For extented story. Please excuse my swimsuit, I target a different market).

Saudi Arabia is trying to manipulate our economy removing oil from the market to remove supply and push up prices.
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/972693/posts

This last week they have done this.

"Russia and Saudi Arabia have agreed to jointly control raw material prices on the international market, Russian Fuel and Energy Minister Igor Yusufov told reporters.

According to him, the Russian government and the Saudi Arabian government signed an agreement on gas and oil cooperation, which envisages bilateral cooperation on key issues in this sphere."
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-news/974827/posts

And agreed to help Russia with terrorism.

"Russia, Saudi Arabia to Combat Terrorism Russian, Saudi Arabian Officials Agree to Coordinate Anti-Terrorism Efforts"
http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/975196/posts?page=2






25 posted on 09/04/2003 10:48:53 AM PDT by Gabrielle Reilly
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To: Gabrielle Reilly
Thanks for the post.
26 posted on 09/04/2003 2:42:22 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Non-essential UK Staff to Leave Iran Embassy

September 04, 2003
BBC News
BBCi

The Foreign Office is to allow non-essential staff and their families to leave the British embassy in Tehran, Iran, following a gun attack on the building.

But the department made it clear in Thursday's announcement that there is no threat to Britons travelling to Iran or to the British community in the country. They are not being advised to leave.

A Foreign Office spokeswoman said authorisation to leave had been given because of an "increased threat" to the embassy following the attack.

She added: "We are not advising the British community to leave, nor are we advising against non-essential travel to Iran as we believe the threat is against the embassy and not private individuals.

"This is a straightforward security measure. We are not downgrading diplomatic relations."

The announcement follows the closure of the embassy after shots were fired at the building from a nearby street on Wednesday. Five shots hit the embassy, but nobody was hurt in the attack.

Diplomatic tension

Foreign Ministry spokesman Hamid Reza said police had put in place special surveillance and security measures around the embassy and were following up very seriously "these irresponsible actions".

The shooting followed an announcement that Iran had temporarily recalled its ambassador to Britain amid an escalating dispute between the two countries.

Iran's ambassador to Britain, Morteza Sarmadi, was recalled after allegedly failing to win concessions following the arrest of another Iranian diplomat in Britain, Hade Soleimanpour.

Mr Soleimanpour's extradition is being sought by Argentina in connection with the bombing of a Jewish centre in Buenos Aires in 1994, when he was Iranian ambassador there. The blast killed 85 people.

Relations between Britain and Iran have been strained since Mr Soleimanpour's arrest on 21 August.

Iranian President Mohammad Khatami has demanded Mr Soleimanpour's release and an apology from Britain.

But the British Government says it cannot intervene in what it calls a purely judicial, and not political, process.

Britain and Iran resumed full diplomatic relations at ambassadorial level in 1999 after a long break following the overthrow of the shah in the 1979 Islamic revolution.

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/3081870.stm
27 posted on 09/04/2003 2:43:20 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Rumsfeld Says Unhappy with Iran, Syria

September 04, 2003
Reuters
MSNBC News

BAGHDAD -- U.S. Defence Secretary Donald Rumsfeld arrived in Baghdad on Thursday, saying neighbouring Syria and Iran were not doing enough to stop an influx of anti-American fighters into Iraq.

Rumsfeld, on an unannounced visit to the occupied country, will meet military commanders and soldiers and have a closer look at a deteriorating security situation in Iraq.

''We are unhappy about the fact that people come across the Syrian and Iranian border. They know we are unhappy about it,'' Rumsfeld told reporters on the plane that flew him in to Baghdad.

Asked if Syria and Iran were exerting efforts to stop the infiltrations, Rumsfeld said: ''It's intermittent, uneven.''

U.S. officials blame supporters of ousted President Saddam Hussein and foreign Islamist fighters for a guerrilla campaign that has killed 67 American soldiers since Washington declared an end to major combat on May 1.

Rumsfeld said the U.S. forces did not know exactly where the threat to American forces was coming from.

''The U.S. intelligence community has imperfect visibility,'' he said.

Four car bombings that have killed more than 120 people including the U.N. representative and a top Shi'ite Muslim cleric in the last month have highlighted the lack of security in the country of 26 million since Saddam was deposed five months ago.

Rumsfeld said the United States was working with Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Jordan and Turkey -- Iraq's other neighbours apart from Syria and Iran -- to guard their borders.

''Is it possible to make those borders not porous?...It's tough,'' he said.

Shortly after his arrival, Rumsfeld met Paul Bremer, the head of the U.S.-led administration in Iraq.

http://famulus.msnbc.com/FamulusIntl/reuters09-04-063626.asp?reg=MIDEAST
28 posted on 09/04/2003 2:44:09 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Rumsfeld Says Unhappy with Iran, Syria

September 04, 2003
Reuters
MSNBC News

http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/news/975692/posts?page=28#28

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
29 posted on 09/04/2003 2:46:22 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Poll: Opposition to U.S. Policy Grows in Europe

September 04, 2003
The Washington Post
Glenn Frankel

LONDON -- European disapproval of U.S. foreign policy has soared during the past year, with strong majorities in France, Germany, Italy and Britain condemning the Bush administration's handling of foreign affairs, while support within the United States for those policies has increased, according to a public opinion survey released today.

The poll, which surveyed a total of 8,000 people on both sides of the Atlantic, also found that large majorities -- 83 percent in the United States and 79 percent in Europe -- agreed that Europeans and Americans have different social and cultural values.

Majorities in six of the seven European countries surveyed, which also included the Netherlands, Poland and Portugal, said they disapproved of the way President Bush was handling international policy. The exception was Poland, where 58 percent of those surveyed supported Bush's policies. Overall, 64 percent of Europeans disapproved, up from 56 percent a year ago.

A similar percentage of Europeans condemned the war in Iraq as not worth the loss of life and other associated costs, while 55 percent of Americans said it was worth it. Just 45 percent of Europeans believe that it is desirable for the United States to exert strong leadership in world affairs, down from 64 percent a year ago.

The results capped a traumatic year for U.S.-European relations in which the leaders of France, Germany and Russia took a high-profile stance in opposing the U.S.-led campaign against Iraq and thwarted American and British efforts to win a U.N. Security Council resolution authorizing military action.

"Americans and Europeans are still friends, but Europeans are more likely to be critical both of Bush administration foreign policy in general, and of the Iraq war in particular," concluded the authors of the survey, which was conducted in June and was sponsored by the German Marshall Fund of the United States, a nonprofit group seeking to foster U.S.-European cooperation, and the Compagnia di San Paolo, a private law foundation based in Turin, Italy.

The poll found that Europeans and Americans shared similar views in identifying the biggest threats to global security: international terrorism, North Korea's and Iran's access to weapons of mass destruction , Islamic fundamentalism and the Arab-Israeli conflict. But they sharply disagreed over the use of military force to deal with global threats. About 84 percent of Americans said war may be used to achieve justice, while only 48 percent of Europeans agreed.

And 78 percent of Europeans and 67 percent of Americans said U.S. unilateralism posed a possible international threat over the next 10 years.

Both sides supported strengthening the United Nations, but 57 percent of Americans were prepared to bypass the world organization when vital interests were at stake, while only about 40 percent of Europeans said they would do so.

Craig Kennedy, president of the German Marshall Fund, said the results suggested that European anger, while focused on the Bush administration, went deeper. "There is a Bush style that really does drive Europeans up a wall," Kennedy said. "But would it go away if a Democrat took over the White House tomorrow? Frankly I don't think so. The poll suggests that Bush's policies are pretty well in sync with American public opinion. If you had a Democrat, they would still have to work basically within those kinds of public constraints. The policies that annoy most Europeans would still be there."

The poll reported that Europeans want to see the European Union become a superpower but said they wanted it to cooperate with, rather than compete against, the United States. At the same time, a sizeable majority of Europeans do not want the EU to drastically increase defense spending.

Public opinion in the seven European countries was less favorable toward the United States than it was a year ago, according to the poll, which used a "thermometer index" of 0 (very cold) to 100 (very warm). It found that France had the largest drop in warmth toward the United States -- down from 60 degrees a year ago to 50. The decline was reciprocated across the Atlantic, with a drop from 55 to 45 toward France among Americans.

At the same time, the poll reported, 77 percent of Americans said they wanted their country to be engaged in the world -- a 50-year high.

Even in Britain, where Prime Minister Tony Blair persuaded a reluctant public and House of Commons to participate in the war in Iraq, 57 percent said they disapproved of Bush's foreign policy.

The biggest internal change from last year's survey occurred in Germany, the poll found. A year ago Germans seemed uncertain about their global role and about whether Europe or the United States was their natural partner. That ambiguity has faded, with 82 percent of those surveyed saying that Germany must play an active part in world affairs, and 70 percent believing that the EU should become a superpower -- sizeable increases in both figures.

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/articles/A22434-2003Sep3.html
30 posted on 09/04/2003 2:47:32 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
US Wants IAEA To Ask UN To Pressure Iran

September 04, 2003
The Associated Press
Dow Jones Newswires

VIENNA -- Washington, which accuses Iran of covering up a nuclear weapons program, will seek approval of a resolution at an upcoming meeting of the U.N. atomic agency that asks the Security Council to pressure Tehran for full transparency, diplomats said Thursday.

One of the diplomats, who is familiar with U.S. strategy at next week's meeting of the International Atomic Energy Agency's board of governors, said the language of the resolution is in flux.

"At this point, there is no mentions of sanctions on Iran," said the diplomat, speaking on condition of anonymity. "But that doesn't mean that the final resolutions won't ask for them."

The diplomat said the U.S. was threading carefully because it was seeking consensus from the 35-member board, but was ready to toughen up the language of the resolution if it found support for it.

"As it stands now, the resolution finds Iran guilty of noncompliance" with its obligations to be open to the IAEA about its nuclear activities, he said. The diplomat added that the Americans were building their case on two IAEA reports - one of them to be discussed by the board starting Monday - finding troubling indications that Iran had not been transparent about the nature of its nuclear activities, which include evidence pointing to potential attempts to make weapons-grade nuclear fuel,

Iran certainly has "a program of concern," said IAEA spokesman Mark Gwozdecky. "We need to urgently resolve our outstanding questions around their nuclear program."

Gwozdecky declined to comment on the meeting's possible outcome. But a diplomat familiar with the agency said the U.S. and its allies - Canada, Britain and Australia - were pushing a "hard line."

At the same time, other diplomats suggested the U.S. needed to go slowly because most members of the board of governors favored moderate action short of Security Council involvement. They wanted its language not to extend beyond expressing concern about Iran's nuclear activities and urging it to open its program to unfettered IAEA inspection.

The latest confidential board report obtained by the AP ahead of the board meeting, which opens Monday, says that agency inspectors found traces of weapons-grade highly enriched uranium at a facility at Natanz, about 500 kilometers south of Tehran, as well as other inconsistencies with what Tehran has reported.

Iran, which says its nuclear program is only to generate electricity, asserts the centrifuge components were "contaminated" with enriched uranium before they were purchased by Tehran and that the origin of the components cannot be determined because they were purchased from intermediaries.

Suspicion about Iran's nuclear program prompted Mohamed ElBaradei, the director-general of the Vienna-based IAEA, to tour Iran's nuclear facilities in February, including the incomplete nuclear plant in Natanz. At the time, diplomats said he was taken aback by the advanced stage of a project using hundreds of centrifuges to enrich uranium.

http://iranvajahan.net/cgi-bin/news.pl?l=en&y=2003&m=09&d=04&a=12
31 posted on 09/04/2003 2:48:36 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran - Time for Europe to Lead

Washington Post - By Robert M. Kimmitt
Sep 4, 2003

As the second anniversary of Sept. 11 draws near, Europe and the United States remain at odds on a common approach toward Iraq, both because Europe has not developed a unified position and because the United States insists on a position of continuing primacy. By contrast, with regard to nearby Iran, there is already a common and urgent objective both within Europe and between Europe and the United States to halt Tehran's effort to acquire a nuclear capability. To achieve that objective, Europe should now step forward, and the United States should step back, even though neither side is instinctively inclined to do so.

While there is debate between Europe and the United States about the nature of Iran's leadership and its brutal repression of its own people, there is no debate about the fact that Iran is embarked on a path toward obtaining nuclear weapons. In contrast to its efforts in Iraq, the U.N.'s International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) has been widely viewed as effective in detailing Iranian efforts to develop a nuclear capability. Just recently IAEA inspectors reported finding evidence of highly enriched uranium at a nuclear facility south of Tehran. This finding prompted Iran's foreign minister to declare that Iran was prepared to "enter negotiations on the additional protocol," which would permit broader IAEA access to Iranian facilities, though it would also buy time for Iran to accelerate its clandestine program.

Though its interests are directly implicated, the ability of the United States to influence events in Iran is more limited than ever. Not only has the United States had little contact with Iran in nearly a quarter-century, it is also still the "Great Satan," opposition to which provides the radical theocracy with both a major element of its claimed legitimacy and a major weapon to use against any true reformer who would suggest an opening to the United States.

Europe, on the other hand, has had diplomatic relations with the leadership in Tehran for over two decades, and there is a growing trade relationship of importance to both sides, but especially to Iran. For some European countries, especially Germany, ties with Iran and, earlier, Persia go back centuries, especially in the area of academic exchange.

To the surprise of many of its detractors in the United States, Europe's policy of "critical dialogue" with Iran has recently become more keenly focused on the dangers posed by Iran's nuclear activities and aspirations. This sharpening of approach has been hastened by Europe's growing concern about the parallel acceleration of Iran's missile development program.

Led by Germany, and on its own initiative rather than in response to U.S. pressure, Europe should publicly announce a policy under which it will not allow its companies to trade with a nuclear Iran, will not provide other than humanitarian financial support to a nuclear Iran and, in the World Bank and other international financial institutions, will vote against all but basic-needs projects for a nuclear Iran.

If Europe goes this route, it should also take the lead in securing consensus for a similar G-8 statement, thus bringing Japan and Russia, both important trading partners for Iran, into the fold. Given his country's unique ties to both Israel and Iran, this initiative presents a special opportunity for German Chancellor Gerhard Schroeder when he speaks at the United Nations later this month on the occasion of Germany's 30th anniversary as a U.N. member.

Visible American support for this European leadership initiative could also help encourage Europe to respond more positively to current U.S. requests regarding Iraq and on blacklisting Hamas. Politically, it is always easier to respond positively in one area if one's initiative in another area is taken seriously.

Regarding Hamas and Mideast peace, the United States and Europe should move beyond yet another disagreement on the merits of Israeli and Palestinian positions and agree instead that there is no real chance for peace without strong actions against supporters of regional terrorism. Europe could play a decisive role in making clear to Iran (and Syria) that Europe cannot have normal relations with countries that sponsor and harbor groups dedicated to undermining the search for peace between Israelis and Palestinians. In return for this public declaration and subsequent actions by Europe, the United States should consider a closer consultative relationship with Europe on its road map and other plans and activities in the Mideast.

This series of steps on both sides could help ease transatlantic frictions, reinvigorate the common war against terrorism, and produce Europe's first comprehensive (Levant to Gulf) Mideast initiative, including more active support of the peace process, expanded participation in Iraq and a strong, proactive role on Iran. Most important, the initiative would be based on European leadership, which is an essential -- yet now missing -- element of a healthy transatlantic relationship.

The writer was undersecretary of state and ambassador to Germany in the first Bush administration.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2153.shtml
32 posted on 09/04/2003 2:50:26 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
I hope Rumsfeld continues to be unhappy with Iran and Syria. We cannot allow them to slip off of the radar.
33 posted on 09/04/2003 2:52:57 PM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife ("Life isn't fair. It's fairer than death, is all.")
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To: F14 Pilot
"President Khatami said that the terrorist acts are aimed at disrupting peace and security in Iraq."

And he ought to know....
34 posted on 09/04/2003 4:33:59 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
"Asked if Syria and Iran were exerting efforts to stop the infiltrations, Rumsfeld said: ''It's intermittent, uneven.''

Translation: "No. Not much."
35 posted on 09/04/2003 4:58:04 PM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
A bump, just in case someone in Iran can read this board. And if they can, may they read uncensored, what the free world has to say.

5.56mm

36 posted on 09/04/2003 5:08:15 PM PDT by M Kehoe
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To: DoctorZIn
Iran Weighs Options Against Britain

September 05, 2003
Agence France Presse
Laurent Lozano

TEHRAN -- Iran must be careful in pressing its dispute with Britain over the arrest of a former Iranian diplomat against a backdrop of international calls led by Washington and London that it open up its nuclear facilities to snap inspections.

Tension between Tehran and London has been on the rise since Aug. 21, when British police arrested Iran’s former ambassador to Argentina on an extradition warrant issued by an Argentine judge who accused the ex-diplomat of involvement in planning and executing a 1994 bomb attack on a Jewish center in Buenos Aires which killed 85 people.

The Iranians have made it clear to the British that they would not accept that Hadi Soleimanpur be extradited to Argentina, with whom they have already cut diplomatic and cultural ties, and that they might go as far as to expel the British ambassador in Tehran if Soleimanpour is not let go.

The strain in relations escalated Wednesday with Tehran recalling its ambassador to London “for consultations” and the British Embassy in Tehran coming under gunfire attack by a man on a motorbike, according to eye witnesses.

The embassy on Ferdossi Street has been the target of similar attacks in the past. The question on many people’s minds regarding the lastest attack is whether it was an isolated incident or part of a concerted effort by radical and conservative elements in Iran that want to inflame the situation.

Both sides have attempted to minimize the potential fallout from the attack with the Iranian foreign minister calling it an “irresponsible” act and the Foreign Office refraining from lodging an official complaint.

But a segment of the Iranian population has become a lot more hostile towards Britain with this being fueled by official talk of a “Zionist conspiracy” agaisnt Iran and calls by conservatives for the British Ambassador to Iran Richard Dalton to be expelled. The Islamist daily Jumhuri-Eslami called yesterday for the shut down of the British Embassy in Tehran.

“This would be slap in the face of the British. Tony Blair and the liars that serve him, would understand, before leaving 10 Downing Street in humiliation, that they are unworthy of Iran’s goodwill,” said the paper. The paper echoes the position of many hard-liners who believe that in the Soleimanpour affair and in other instances Iran must demonstrate to the West that “they are mistaken to confuse Iran’s goodwill as a sign of weakness”.

The same argument is used by Iranians who are against the country acquiescing to pressure by the United States, Britain and the European Union that it agree to snap UN inspections of its nuclear power sites.

Britain has been in the forefront of an international chorus urging Iran to sign an additional protocol to the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, which would allow unannounced checks of its nuclear facilities to insure that they were not being used for military purposes.

Iran said Wednesday that it had not made up its mind whether to sign the additional protocol.

http://www.arabnews.com/?page=7&section=0&article=31416&d=5&m=9&y=2003


37 posted on 09/04/2003 9:35:25 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pan_Yans Wife; fat city; freedom44; Tamsey; Grampa Dave; PhiKapMom; McGavin999; Hinoki Cypress; ...
Body of another dissident student found near detention center

SMCCDI (Information Service)
Sep 4, 2003

The body of "Payam Dadkhah" one of the released dissident student has been found in the "Darake River" flowing in north Tehran. The river is located near the infamous Evin Political jail where the murdered student was held during his captivity.

The official report is stating about an "act of suicide".

Dadkhah was an outspoken student of Tehran University and full of hope of the future freedom of Iran.

He was last time seen as going back to report based on the official request of the Evin branch of Islamic Revolution Court.

The Islamic regime is known for using the "suicided" label in order to hide the physical elimination of its opponents.

http://www.daneshjoo.org/generalnews/article/publish/article_2160.shtml

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”
38 posted on 09/04/2003 9:39:55 PM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn
The official report is stating about an "act of suicide".

This was not suicide..We need to liberate the freedom loving Iranians from this tyranny.
39 posted on 09/04/2003 10:22:47 PM PDT by Pro-Bush (Awareness is what you know before you know anything else.)
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To: DoctorZIn
This thread is now closed.

Join Us At Today's Iranian Alert Thread

Live Thread Ping List | DoctorZin

"If you want on or off this Iran ping list, Freepmail me”


40 posted on 09/05/2003 12:18:21 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: Pro-Bush
Notice how the students are all in "DETENTION".
Like they had to stay after school for chewing gum in class or not handing in their homework.
They don't like referring to the students as prisoners.
And they think they're fooling people with this word substitution game they play. The families and neighbors of the thousands of missing students know the truth. Word gets around ....and they know "detention" is a misnomer.
41 posted on 09/05/2003 4:12:47 AM PDT by nuconvert
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To: DoctorZIn
May God bring comfort to this student's loved ones.
42 posted on 09/05/2003 5:23:31 AM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife ("Life isn't fair. It's fairer than death, is all.")
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To: nuconvert
They could use a good thesaurus, that will help them use the descriptive words necessary to convey the true story.
43 posted on 09/05/2003 5:25:06 AM PDT by Pan_Yans Wife ("Life isn't fair. It's fairer than death, is all.")
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To: Pan_Yans Wife
I think they use a special thesaurus they made up themselves. That's why torture in prison = detention, - and 2 or 3 friends hanging out together = "creating a gang", which of course leads to prison or worse.
They carry their own thesauruses around in case they have to explain to Westerners what the hell's going on in Iran.
(sarcasm)
44 posted on 09/05/2003 5:48:52 AM PDT by nuconvert
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