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To: DoctorZIn
US wants Iran to respond to IAEA questions

Mon Sep 15, 7:04 PM ET Add Politics - AFP to My Yahoo!

WASHINGTON (AFP) - The United States called for Iran to honestly answer questions about its nuclear program posed by the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), amid contradictory statements from Iranian officials about whether it would.

"Confusion is a good word," deputy State Department spokesman Adam Ereli said of the mixed messages emanating from Tehran. "They're saying different things, we're saying the same thing."

"We hope that Iran will see this resolution as an opportunity to respond to straightforward questions in a clear, concise manner, and to take the other steps needed to comply with the (IAEA) resolution," he told reporters.

"Actions speak louder than words," Ereli said. "Let's see them take the actions that are called for."

Last week, the IAEA's governing board gave Iran an October 31 deadline to address concerns about its nuclear program prompting angry responses from Tehran, whose delegation walked out of the meeting in protest.

By that date, the IAEA called for Iran disprove US allegations that it is secretly developing nuclear weapons.

If it does not, US officials have suggested that the IAEA refer the matter to the UN Security Council which could impose sanctions on Tehran.

Iran's ambassador to the IAEA, who led the walkout at Friday's meeting, said afterward that Iran was reconsidering its cooperation with the UN watchdog and might even withdraw from the nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty (NPT).

But his comments were contradicted on Monday when Iranian vice president and atomic energy agency chief Gholamreza Aghazadeh said that Tehran remained fully committed to the NPT despite its objections to the deadline.

http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/afp/20030915/pl_afp/us_iran_iaea_nuclear_030915230422
8 posted on 09/16/2003 12:30:19 AM PDT by DoctorZIn
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To: DoctorZIn; McGavin999; Eala; piasa; Valin; nuconvert; Texas_Dawg; kattracks; RaceBannon; seamole; ..
Iran backs off threat to quit nuclear treaty

Tehran accuses U.S. of 'heavy' tactics

VIENNA Iran made it clear Monday it would not withdraw from an international treaty intended to halt the spread of nuclear weapons, but it accused the United States of strong-arming other nations into setting a deadline for Tehran to clarify its nuclear situation.
.
The Iranian president, Muhammad Khatami, said that his country had no intention of building nuclear bombs, but that it was determined to continue its policy of developing nuclear energy.
.
"We don't need atomic bombs, and based on our religious teaching we will not pursue them," Khatami said in a speech in Tehran.
.
"But at the same time we want to be strong, and being strong means having knowledge and technology."
.
Over the past weeks, Iran had suggested that it might sever its ties with the International Atomic Energy Agency if pressured too hard to increase access to its nuclear programs.
.
Those threats increased after the agency's board of governors adopted a U.S.-backed resolution Friday setting an October deadline for Iran to essentially disprove it is running a covert nuclear weapons program.
.
The board will decide in November whether Iran has met that demand. If it rules Tehran in violation of the treaty banning the spread of nuclear weapons it will ask the UN Security Council to get involved.
.
The Iranian vice president, Gholamreza Aghazadeh, accused "partisan politics in the United States" of being behind the "heavy-handed" resolution accepted by the board.
.
But he said his country remained "fully committed" to preventing the proliferation of nuclear arms.
.
Iran's "cooperation" with the agency "shall continue as before," Aghazadeh told the IAEA's general assembly. He also said Iran would start "negotiations with the agency about the additional protocol," that would allow the IAEA thorough and unfettered inspections of all of its nuclear activities.
.
During negotiations that led to passage of a resolution setting the October deadline by the IAEA board, Iran had suggested that it would scrap plans to accept that protocol.
.
Although Aghazadeh's statements eased immediate concerns that Iran would cut ties with the agency, the Iranian vice president suggested his country still could turn more hard-line. He said that a final response was still being discussed by his government.
.
"We are studying the resolution carefully and will respond to it officially in a few days," he told delegates at the 135-nation conference.
.
Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham, heading the U.S. delegation, welcomed Iran's decision to remain within the agency fold - at least for now.
.
"I hope it represents a decision to fully comply" with the resolution, he told reporters, describing Iran's statement as a "more hopeful comment" than previous threats out of Tehran.
.
The onus was on Iran to prove the world wrong, he suggested because "all of the pattern of action and conduct we've seen is totally understandable," only in the context of a weapons program. If unchecked, Iran could go the way of North Korea, which used its IAEA membership to gain access to nuclear technology only to quit the Nonproliferation Treaty and declare it was making atomic arms, he said.
.
"One cannot let that precedent be repeated," Abraham said.
.
The agency, nuclear watchdog of the United Nations, seeks to ensure compliance with the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, which aims to ban the spread of nuclear weapons. It monitors the status of nuclear materials in dozens of countries and promotes the peaceful use of nuclear technology.
.
Abraham told delegates attempts to stop the spread of nuclear weapons were challenged by "a few rogue states seeking the capacity to attain weapons of mass destruction."
.
Indirectly linking North Korea and Iran, he urged IAEA member states to "take firm and necessary action" to stop new nuclear weapons states from emerging.(AP, Reuters) Tehran accuses U.S. of 'heavy' tactics

VIENNA Iran made it clear Monday it would not withdraw from an international treaty intended to halt the spread of nuclear weapons, but it accused the United States of strong-arming other nations into setting a deadline for Tehran to clarify its nuclear situation.
.
The Iranian president, Muhammad Khatami, said that his country had no intention of building nuclear bombs, but that it was determined to continue its policy of developing nuclear energy.
.
"We don't need atomic bombs, and based on our religious teaching we will not pursue them," Khatami said in a speech in Tehran.

"But at the same time we want to be strong, and being strong means having knowledge and technology."
.
Over the past weeks, Iran had suggested that it might sever its ties with the International Atomic Energy Agency if pressured too hard to increase access to its nuclear programs.
.
Those threats increased after the agency's board of governors adopted a U.S.-backed resolution Friday setting an October deadline for Iran to essentially disprove it is running a covert nuclear weapons program.
.
The board will decide in November whether Iran has met that demand. If it rules Tehran in violation of the treaty banning the spread of nuclear weapons it will ask the UN Security Council to get involved.
.
The Iranian vice president, Gholamreza Aghazadeh, accused "partisan politics in the United States" of being behind the "heavy-handed" resolution accepted by the board.
.
But he said his country remained "fully committed" to preventing the proliferation of nuclear arms.
.
Iran's "cooperation" with the agency "shall continue as before," Aghazadeh told the IAEA's general assembly. He also said Iran would start "negotiations with the agency about the additional protocol," that would allow the IAEA thorough and unfettered inspections of all of its nuclear activities.
.
During negotiations that led to passage of a resolution setting the October deadline by the IAEA board, Iran had suggested that it would scrap plans to accept that protocol.
.
Although Aghazadeh's statements eased immediate concerns that Iran would cut ties with the agency, the Iranian vice president suggested his country still could turn more hard-line. He said that a final response was still being discussed by his government.
.
"We are studying the resolution carefully and will respond to it officially in a few days," he told delegates at the 135-nation conference.
.
Energy Secretary Spencer Abraham, heading the U.S. delegation, welcomed Iran's decision to remain within the agency fold - at least for now.
.
"I hope it represents a decision to fully comply" with the resolution, he told reporters, describing Iran's statement as a "more hopeful comment" than previous threats out of Tehran.
.
The onus was on Iran to prove the world wrong, he suggested because "all of the pattern of action and conduct we've seen is totally understandable," only in the context of a weapons program. If unchecked, Iran could go the way of North Korea, which used its IAEA membership to gain access to nuclear technology only to quit the Nonproliferation Treaty and declare it was making atomic arms, he said.
.
"One cannot let that precedent be repeated," Abraham said.
.
The agency, nuclear watchdog of the United Nations, seeks to ensure compliance with the Nuclear Nonproliferation Treaty, which aims to ban the spread of nuclear weapons. It monitors the status of nuclear materials in dozens of countries and promotes the peaceful use of nuclear technology.
.
Abraham told delegates attempts to stop the spread of nuclear weapons were challenged by "a few rogue states seeking the capacity to attain weapons of mass destruction."
.
Indirectly linking North Korea and Iran, he urged IAEA member states to "take firm and necessary action" to stop new nuclear weapons states from emerging.(AP, Reuters)

http://www.iht.com/articles/110062.html
9 posted on 09/16/2003 2:19:17 AM PDT by F14 Pilot
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