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The Deformed Theology of Seeker Sensitivity
Operation Rock Steady ^ | Don Matzat

Posted on 10/15/2005 6:20:32 AM PDT by Gamecock

We are living in a society permeated with the concept of self-esteem. The gurus of humanistic psychology have convinced us that feeling good about ourselves is one of our basic felt needs. A positive self-image has become the sine qua non of human growth and success.

Many evangelical churches, including many who find their roots in the Reformation, have attempted to Christianize such thought. They have adopted the concept of seeker sensitivity in the desire to grow their churches. The gurus of the Church Growth movement have convinced many pastors and church leaders that we must be sensitive to the felt needs of the culture. Thus seeker sensitivity has become the sine qua non of church growth and success.

When you join a culture permeated with the desire for self-esteem and a church seduced by the concept of seeker sensitivity, you create a diabolical mix. Such a combination demands that the Christian message be adjusted. The felt need for self-esteem is not compatible with the biblical concept of human sin and depravity. The concept of human sin, or what has been called the church's "worm theology", is actually detrimental to the sensitive human psyche. Dr. Robert Schuller, a self-esteem advocate and pioneer in developing the concept of seeker sensitivity, put it this way:

I don't think that anything has been done in the name of Christ and under the banner of Christianity that has proven more destructive to human personality, and hence counterproductive to the evangelistic enterprise, than the unchristian uncouth strategy of attempting to make people aware of their lost and sinful condition.

Since the central Christian message offers the death of Jesus Christ on the cross as the divine solution to the human sin dilemma, the elimination of the clear proclamation of human sin and depravity demands a major adjustment in the preaching of Christ. The basic, central message of the Gospel must be redefined. To claim that our sins caused the death of Jesus can be potentially debilitating to the impressionable human psyche pursuing a sense of self-worth. The pitiable inner child may become hopelessly bruised and beaten by such an insensitive message. This is how Dr. Ray Anders, a professor at Fuller Theological Seminary, put it:

If our sin is viewed as causing the death of Jesus on the cross, then we ourselves become victims of a 'psychological battering' produced by the cross. When I am led to feel that the pain and torment of Jesus' death on the cross is due to my sin, I inflict upon myself spiritual and psychological torment.

For those seduced by the concept of seeker sensitivity, Jesus can no longer be the suffering servant bearing the sins of fallen humanity to a bloody cross. Such a message is irrelevant. One highly successful seeker sensitive center in Chicago has chosen not to display a cross in their sanctuary. To this group's way of thinking, Jesus is not primarily our Savior who died to forgive our sins; rather, he is our friend who helps us make it through the day. He is our example for living. He meets our felt needs. He wants us to become better people and in order to do that, gives us principles whereby we can improve our family relationships, put our finances in order, and live more productive and successful lives. "Oh, how we love Jesus!"

To illustrate how far this way of thinking deviates from the understanding that characterized the sixteenth-century Reformation, compare the statements of Schuller and Anderson with statements of the two great Reformers: Martin Luther and John Calvin.

In defining the purpose of mediating upon the passion of our Lord Jesus, Luther wrote:

The main benefit of Christ's passion is that man sees into his own true self and that he be terrified and crushed by this. Unless we seek that knowledge, we do not derive much benefit from Christ's passion.... He who is so hardhearted and callous as not to be terrified by Christ's passion and led to a knowledge of self has reason to fear.

If John Calvin were alive today, this is the assessment he would make of those who eliminate the message of human depravity under the guise of appealing to the culture:

I am not unaware how much more plausible the view is, which invites us rather to ponder on our good qualities than to contemplate what must overwhelm us with shame, our miserable destitution and ignominy. There is nothing more acceptable to the human mind that flattery.... Whoever, therefore, gives heed to those teachers who merely employ us in contemplating our good qualities... will be plunged into the most pernicious ignorance. Sin Has Never Been Popular

It is a gross fallacy to suggest that this culture, in its quest for self-esteem, is unique. The Christian Church has always been confronted with unbelievers who want to feel good about themselves and who work very hard at avoiding any personal guilt or blame. This is certainly not new to this culture. Being victimized and playing the "blame game" is as old as Adam getting out from under his guilt by blaming the woman, and, of course, Eve blaming the snake. Being born "in Adam," such a defense mechanism is natural to fallen humanity. Swiss therapist Paul Tournier writes: "In a healthy person...this defense mechanism has the precision and universality of a law of nature.... We defend ourselves against criticism with the same energy we employ in defending ourselves against hunger, cold, or wild beasts, for it is a mortal threat."

For this reason, the thinking of those who are willing to jettison the truth of human sin and depravity in favor of seeker sensitivity is inane. They act as if they have discovered some new technique for reaching people. It is obvious that people do not want to be confronted with their sin and failure. If you can create a "religious" environment in which they can be made to feel good about themselves, you will gain a crowd. To stand in awe of the crowds who frequent casinos or buy lottery tickets. Having more money is also a felt need.

Appealing to the felt needs of a fallen culture is not appealing to their real needs. French philosopher Blaise Pascal explained:

As soon as we venture out along the pathway of self-knowledge, what we discover is that man is desperately trying to avoid self-knowledge. The need to escape oneself explains why many people are miserable when they are not preoccupied with work, or amusement, or vices. They are afraid to be alone lest they get a glimpse of their own emptiness.... For if we could face ourselves, with all our faults, we would then be so shaken out of complacency, triviality, indifference, and pretense that a deep longing for strength and truth would be aroused within us. Not until man is aware of his deepest need is he ready to discern and grasp what can meet his deepest need.

This diabolical combination of self-esteem and seeker sensitivity produces a "religion" that is no longer Christianity. Since proclaiming the message of sin and grace, or Law and Gospel, is the very essence of the faith, eliminating or subordinating that proclamation causes a departure from historic Christianity. But more than that, the forgiveness and eternal salvation of the people who are seduced by the appealing seeker sensitive message are put in jeopardy. The success of a Christian congregation is not determined by how many dill the pews on a Sunday morning but rather how many will eventually gather around the table to celebrate eternally the marriage feast of the Lamb who was slain for the forgiveness of sins. The Right Combination of Guilt and Grace

To stand in awe of the numbers who flock to seeker sensitive congregations is similar to standing in awe of the crowds who frequent casinos or buy lottery tickets. Having more money is also a felt need.

It is the Holy Spirit's central purpose to bring every person to a knowledge of sin through the proclamation of the divine Law so that the message of God's grace in Christ Jesus (the Gospel) can be applied to those suffering the pangs of guilt. The Apostle Paul writes in Romans 3:19: "Now we know that whatever the law says, it says to those who are under the law, so that every mouth may be silenced and the whole world held accountable to God." Again he writes in Romans 5:20: "The law was added so that the trespass might increase. But where sin increased, grace increased all the more." The proclamation of the Good News of what God has done for us in Christ Jesus is, so to speak, "set up" by the knowledge of our own sinful condition. Martin Luther wrote:

A doctor must first diagnose the sickness for his patient; other wise he will give him poison instead of medicine. First he must say: this is your sickness; secondly; this medicine serves to fight it.... If you want to engage profitably in study of Holy Scripture and do not want to run head-on into a Scripture closed and sealed, then learn, above all things, to understand sin aright.

The message of the divine Law is intended to set before us the demand of Almighty God for moral perfection. God demands perfect holiness. The preaching of the Law, which is intended to show us the depth of our sin, presents us with an impossible plight. What God demands, we cannot accomplish. The Good News of the Gospel tells us that what God demands he has provided in the blood and righteousness of Jesus Christ. The proper preaching of sin and grace of Law and Gospel should turn us away from ourselves so that we embrace the perfect righteousness of Jesus Christ as the divine solution to the human dilemma. This is the central truth of justification by grace through faith because of Christ alone. Werner Elert defines Luther's understanding of the knowledge of sin as being a necessary precondition for justification.

The righteousness imparted through justification presupposes, of course, the 'self-accusation" of the sinner. Accordingly, Luther counts it among the effects of Christ's suffering "that man comes to a knowledge of himself and is terrified of himself, and is crushed. To have Christ as Savior is to need him"....The necessity for self-accusation, without which there is no justification, holds true of the whole natural and moral "inwardness".... Faith however clings constantly only to the other Person—the Person who I am not—to Christ." Good Intention/Faulty Diagnosis

I do not question the intentions of those who have adopted the seeker sensitive agenda. I believe that these church growth advocates honestly desire to reach people and to positively affect lives. They desire to make the Christian message relevant. They want to see the Church of Jesus Christ become a dynamic force for moral change in the midst of a perverted generation. Yet, "the road to hell is paved with good intentions."

There is no doubt that the quality of life that exists in many Christian congregations is not what it ought to be. The problem is not that we have been too bold in our proclamation of sin and grace, Law and Gospel, but rather that we have not been bold enough. If those in the pew do not see the extent of their sin and the perversion of their human nature, they will not seek the life- changing grace of God. Even though the Bible says to "pursue" spiritual growth and sanctification, to be engaged in "fighting" the fight of faith, and , like newborn babes, "crave" the pure milk of the Word of God, those admonitions will fall on deaf ears if the reality of our condition is not faced.

In the Book of Revelation, our Lord Jesus addresses and warns the various churches of that day. One of those churches, the Church at Laodicea, was guilty of spiritual apathy. Jesus describes their "lack of need" as being lukewarmness. In addressing this church, Jesus minces no words. "You say 'I am rich...and do not need a thing', but you do not realize that your wretched, pitiful, poor, blind and naked" (Rev. 3:18)

The dynamic of the Christian life is fueled by the combination of a deep sense of sin together with a deep appreciation for divine grace. If you read of the experiences of Christians who progressed in their relationship with the Lord Jesus beyond the norm you see their deep sense of sin and failure coupled with a deep appreciation for what God accomplished in Christ Jesus. Men like Martin Luther, John Calvin, C. S. Lewis and Francis Schaeffer were not afraid to speak of their sinful natures and even boast of their weaknesses, because they recognized the reality of divine grace. They knew their sin, but they also knew the Gospel. The profound level of spiritual depth and biblical insight of such men causes the theology of seeker sensitivity to look feeble indeed.

Martin Luther's discovery of the great doctrine of justification by grace was not an isolated incident. A great deal led up to the day when his eyes were opened and he was able to clearly understand that God had forgiven him and actually declared him to be righteous through Jesus Christ. His very keen sense of sin and failure was the driving force behind his discovery. In fact, he stated that when he was at the point of despair over his sin, he was then actually the closest to grace.

John Calvin, for example, was referred to by his friends as "the accusative case" because of his intense spiritual introspection. He was aware of his guilt.

This necessary combination of sin and grace is not difficult to understand. A person who is not willing to face his sickness will not desire the services of a physician. If something isn't broken, you don't fix it. If you do not see your sin, you will have no desire for God's grace. And, if you don't know the brokenness of your human condition, you obviously do not require the provision that God offers. Dr. Paul Tournier wrote,

This can be seen in history; for believers who are the most desperate about themselves are the ones who express most forcefully their confidence in Grace.... Those who are the most pessimistic about man are the most optimistic about God; those who are the most severe with themselves are the ones who have the most serene confidence in divine forgiveness.... By degrees the awareness of our guilt and of God's love increase side by side.

Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard pointed out that a man who is remote from his own guilt and failure is also remote from God, because he is remote from himself.

The Bible is very clear in revealing the divine estimate of human nature. Being born out of the root of Adam, we are the children of wrath (Eph.2:3), totally unable by nature to grasp the things of the Spirit of God (I Cor. 2:14). The Bible tells us that we were shaped in iniquity and born in sin (Ps. 51:5) and that the imaginations of our hearts are evil (Gen. 8:21). Within our human flesh, there dwells absolutely no good thing. Even though we may desire to do good and to be good, we are unable to accomplish our lofty ideals because our nature is wrong (Rom. 7:18-19) we are in to the law of sin and death. (Rom. 7:21)

Put simply, from God's perspective, our lives are a mess! Our real need is for self-accusation, not self-esteem. We need grace, not acceptance and understanding. We need a crucified Savior, not a support group.


TOPICS: Evangelical Christian; Mainline Protestant; Religion & Culture; Theology; Worship
KEYWORDS: seekersensitive; selfesteem

1 posted on 10/15/2005 6:20:37 AM PDT by Gamecock
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To: drstevej; OrthodoxPresbyterian; CCWoody; Wrigley; Gamecock; Jean Chauvin; jboot; AZhardliner; ...

2 posted on 10/15/2005 6:23:37 AM PDT by Gamecock (Crystal meth is not a fruit of the Spirit.)
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To: Gamecock
Nice read. Our pastor was just preaching on this very thing. He asked the congregation to show him where Christ says anything about self esteem.
My brother who is a pastor calls these churches "the feel good ministries" or "the name it and claim it crew".
We are to be humble for Christ.
3 posted on 10/15/2005 6:31:51 AM PDT by svcw
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To: Gamecock

So true, thank you for posting this.


4 posted on 10/15/2005 6:37:36 AM PDT by walden
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To: Gamecock; Goodgirlinred; LaineyDee; day10; Blurblogger; PoorMuttly; DollyCali; FreedomHasACost; ...
Danish philosopher Soren Kierkegaard pointed out that a man who is remote from his own guilt and failure is also remote from God, because he is remote from himself.

Or the one who is painfully aware is closer to God.
Thank goodness for the Holy Spirit who leads all that are willing into the the Truth and to the great grace of our heavenly "Abba " Father

Wonderful article, thanks

5 posted on 10/15/2005 6:42:05 AM PDT by apackof2 (There's two theories to arguin' with a woman. Neither one works. Will Rogers)
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To: walden
investment research. For more details, see my homepage.

Investment research? Sounds interesting but where does one find your homepage?

6 posted on 10/15/2005 6:45:29 AM PDT by apackof2 (There's two theories to arguin' with a woman. Neither one works. Will Rogers)
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To: apackof2

Thanks for the ping - that was good stuff.


7 posted on 10/15/2005 6:59:53 AM PDT by day10 (Rules cannot substitute for character.)
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To: Gamecock

BTTT!


8 posted on 10/15/2005 7:48:10 AM PDT by The Ghost of FReepers Past (The sacrifices of God are a broken and contrite heart. Ps. 51:17)
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To: Gamecock

read later bump


9 posted on 10/15/2005 9:45:12 AM PDT by Kevin OMalley (No, not Freeper#95235, Freeper #1165: Charter member, What Was My Login Club.)
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To: Gamecock
We are living in a society permeated with the concept of self-esteem. The gurus of humanistic psychology have convinced us that feeling good about ourselves is one of our basic felt needs. A positive self-image has become the sine qua non of human growth and success. Many evangelical churches, including many who find their roots in the Reformation, have attempted to Christianize such thought.

If that is "seeker sensitivity" then I am against it. Any Church which tells sinners that they ought to feel good about themselves is doing those sinners no good.

On the other hand, if by "seeker sensitivity" you mean that a Church goes out of its way to bring people to a place where they can be confronted by their sin, where they can be presented with a well preached gospel message and where they can be given the opportunity to respond to the gospel and exercise saving faith in Christ and where they can grow spiritually through the teaching of the whole counsel of God, then I'm all for it.

I think that one of the problems in the critique of "seeker sensitive" churches is that authors such as the one above do not clarify what the term means. They just lump all churches that might be viewed as having an open door to those who are not yet saved as being "seeker sensitive" and then slander those churches by claiming that they do not preach the gospel.

Well I dare say that if a lot of those who are critical of "seeker sensitive" churches were to think back, they'd realize that they came to Christ when they did because someone had been sensitive to their condition and went out of their way to be sensitive to their spiritual quest and to point them in the right direction and to bring them to the place where they had to confront the risen Lord.

Carry on.

10 posted on 10/15/2005 10:19:32 AM PDT by P-Marlowe
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To: apackof2; Gamecock
Danish Philosopher Soren Kierkegaard also said that God does not exist.

Kierkegaard philosophies of confusion is being used in today,s "New Age" Church Growth Movement
The Fuller theological seminary seems to have adopted many of his ideas.
Kierkegaard only could understand God from what he called a "leap of faith" and not from being Born Again.
In fact it is the opposite
11 posted on 10/15/2005 10:20:23 AM PDT by pro610 (Faith the size of a mustard seed can move mountains.Praise Jesus Christ!)
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To: Gamecock

These accusations are true of many numbers-obsessed congregations, but not every large church is a health-and-wealth, grace without repentance church. The church I attended until very recently is huge, and considered "seeker sensitive," but the reason it is "seeker sensitive" is that it preaches the basics, over and over again, for those who have never heard them before: 1. You are a sinner (like EVERYONE else). 2. Christ died to forgive your sins. 3. Believe this, and you shall be saved and have eternal life.

It gets to be repetitive after a while for those of us who are longtime believers (hence my looking for a new church), but it attracts thousands of people weekly who want to hear the Truth. The pastor is not touchy-feely or humanistic -- in fact, I have many times witnessed people get up and leave in the middle of the sermon because what he said was "offensive" to them (regarding homosexuality or abortion being sinful, or the idea that those who have been given much have much responsibility, etc.). He doesn't sugar coat the Truth, He just preaches it in a way that's easy for anyone to understand. And as a result, 10,000 people show up every week.

I ust wanted to point out that while it's trendy to bash "mega churches," not every huge church is a sham.


12 posted on 10/15/2005 10:27:12 AM PDT by LibertyGirl77
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To: LibertyGirl77

I did not mean to capitalize "He" when talking about the pastor. Oops. How I long for an edit function!


13 posted on 10/15/2005 10:29:25 AM PDT by LibertyGirl77
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To: day10

You have a beautiful family. Our great comfort is knowing we'll all be together again one day.


14 posted on 10/15/2005 10:52:04 AM PDT by Dr. Eckleburg ('Deserves' got nothing to do with it.)
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To: Gamecock
A person who is not willing to face his sickness will not desire the services of a physician.

Amen, Gamecock. Great article.

15 posted on 10/15/2005 10:53:09 AM PDT by Dr. Eckleburg ('Deserves' got nothing to do with it.)
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To: LibertyGirl77; Gamecock

I think a good answer to the problems inherent in mega churches is simply to build lots more smaller churches rather than one, monolithic church.

Centralized power is rarely a good thing. Checks and balances are always desirable.


16 posted on 10/15/2005 10:58:59 AM PDT by Dr. Eckleburg ('Deserves' got nothing to do with it.)
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To: Gamecock

Seeker-Sensitivity / Church Growth Movement is the new Liberalism.

Just wait and see.


17 posted on 10/15/2005 1:51:17 PM PDT by PetroniusMaximus
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To: Gamecock

This describes Willow Creek and Rick Warren. I think the "Purpose-Driven" movement is one of the worst things to happen to the church in a long time!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!


18 posted on 10/15/2005 2:24:20 PM PDT by LiteKeeper (Beware the secularization of America)
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To: PetroniusMaximus; Dr. Eckleburg; Gamecock
There was an article in my local paper on Fuller Theological Seminary by associated press writer
Richard Ostling Titled:
"Fuller opens a window on emerging Christianity
( I tried to find it on the net but had no luck)

Here are a few excerpts
***"its clear the older emphasis of soul-winning alone is fading these younger evangelicals intend to combine evangelism and social action".***

***"To reach young adults evangelicals are creating"postmodern" fellowships that shed most traditional forms of organized religions"***


They boast of their 4,900 students from many denominations and their 3500 graduates round the World.

Just imagine, We now have thousands of Little Soren Kierkegaard and Peter Drucker existentialists out there not trying to win souls but teaching them to take a
"Leap of Faith"
19 posted on 10/15/2005 2:48:50 PM PDT by pro610 (Faith the size of a mustard seed can move mountains.Praise Jesus Christ!)
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To: Gamecock

The secular humanists of the West laid this self-esteem/positive self-image crap on Eastern philosophies and spiritual traditions too where it has no true basis. It should be no surprise that "New-Agism" has been found to be a deep infection in Western religions.


20 posted on 10/15/2005 2:50:03 PM PDT by TigersEye (I made my Covenant with God and God will keep or break it. The State can go to hell!)
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To: svcw; Gamecock
My brother who is a pastor calls these churches "the feel good ministries" or "the name it and claim it crew".

The "the name it and claim it crew" are simply the religious variant of the mentality of "entitlement".

21 posted on 10/15/2005 3:33:33 PM PDT by lightman (The Office of the Keys should be exercised as some ministry needs to be exorcised.)
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To: Gamecock

Thanks for posting this, Brother - much appreciated!


22 posted on 10/15/2005 5:02:28 PM PDT by ItsOurTimeNow ("Heart of my own heart, whatever befall")
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To: Gamecock

http://msn.foxsports.com/cfb/team?categoryId=86107


23 posted on 10/15/2005 6:48:17 PM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain and Proud of It!)
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To: pro610
"We now have thousands of Little Soren Kierkegaard"

You throw Kierkegaard's name around like you knew what you were talking about. Kierkegaard wrote against the sterile rationalistic Enlightenment thinking that permeated the Danish state church with its Deist theology. His writings put transcendence back into the state theology. His concept of "leap of faith" was meant to move people from thinking you could be born into Christianity. Just because you were baptized as a child did not make you a Christian, there had to be a crises; a distance between one's present state and the "saved" state. That's why he proposed that it was easier for a pagan to be saved than for a "christian". Here is a quote from a review of a biography of Kierkegaard that might peak your curiosity to learn more about his thinking before you use him in a negative sense.

"The larger problem with Kierkegaard’s work was its severity: he offered a stern rebuke and an even sterner challenge to an entire religious establishment. In Denmark, baptism in the state church had become a matter-of-course rite of citizenship. Indeed, for Kierkegaard, “Christendom” had become a mistaken baptizing of nearly everything: Where real Christianity called for a transformation of one’s whole life, Christendom simply “christened” everything—giving it a new name and leaving it otherwise unchanged. “What Christianity wanted was chastity—to do away with the whorehouse. The change is this, that the whorehouse remains exactly what it was in paganism, lewdness in the same proportion, but it has become a ‘Christian’ whorehouse
24 posted on 10/15/2005 8:14:19 PM PDT by blue-duncan
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To: P-Marlowe
Well I dare say that if a lot of those who are critical of "seeker sensitive" churches were to think back, they'd realize that they came to Christ when they did because someone had been sensitive to their condition and went out of their way to be sensitive to their spiritual quest and to point them in the right direction and to bring them to the place where they had to confront the risen Lord.

I don't think that is the way tht seeker sensitive is being used in this context.

25 posted on 10/16/2005 5:36:38 AM PDT by Gamecock (Crystal meth is not a fruit of the Spirit.)
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To: blue-duncan
Dont take this as an insult but your knowledge of Kierkegaard seems to be limited.
If you are going to research Kierkegaard from a Christian viewpoint you must come to the conclusion that Kierkegaard,s existentialist philosophy is unChristian and negative.

Here is a better example of what Kierkegaard says.
He says "After all the world is absurd,and everything we do is absurd anyway,why not do the most absurd thing imaginable? and what can be more absurd than believe in God?So why not? The atheist don,t have any reason to believe in anything else,or really disbelieve in that.
So we may as well Go for It!

According to Kierkegaard since there is no objective reality upon which we can rely we must make a "leap of faith" and in this leap of faith there is a personal experience which is valid because the truth is the truth as it relates to me.

It,s obvious that Kierkegaard did not believe in being Born Again as in John 3:3 and John 3:7 because he replaced it with his "leap of faith" philosophy.
John3:3
Jesus answered him,
Truly,truly,I say to you
unless one is born anew,
he cannot see the kingdom of Heaven

John 3:7
Do not marvel that I said to you,
You musy be born anew.

So when I see certain Church Growth Movement leaders using the words Leap of faith it concerns me as it should anyone.

Peter Drucker,s influence on the CGM is easily exposed and Peter Drucker is on record calling Soren Kierkegaard his mentor.
Robert Schuller Bill Hybels and Rick Warren all praise Drucker and call him their mentor or very influential person in their life.

I,m not necessarily claiming guilt by association but
there are certain pattern,s here and it,s foolish not be on guard.
26 posted on 10/16/2005 9:52:39 AM PDT by pro610 (Faith the size of a mustard seed can move mountains.Praise Jesus Christ!)
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To: pro610; blue-duncan
So when I see certain Church Growth Movement leaders using the words Leap of faith it concerns me as it should anyone.

Everybody uses the term "leap of faith".

Surrendering to Christ is a leap of faith. Heck, driving in the snow is a leap of faith.

Of all the silly turns of phrases to latch onto as evidence new age thinking, that has to be the silliest.

Give it up, pro610.

Find a new cause.

Join a protestant church.

27 posted on 10/16/2005 10:55:54 AM PDT by P-Marlowe
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To: pro610; P-Marlowe

"and what can be more absurd than believe in God?"

And if you were arguing with a rationalist what would be more absurd to him than a belief in a transcendant God? You are critiquing a man from a 21st century mindset, not the context in which he wrote and thought. His existentialism is a 20th century construct. He was a devout Christian who was almost singlehandedly fighting the smug Deist complacency of his state church.

Have you read any of his devotional or theological writings or are you just quoting excerpts and opinions from his critics?


28 posted on 10/16/2005 11:46:17 AM PDT by blue-duncan
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To: LibertyGirl77

I am in the same situation, LibertyGirl, as you. I am a member of a Seeker church that does not preach prosperity doctrine but believes that the Bible is to be taken as the word of God. We do not believe that beating people up will get them to listen to the Gospel and we try to have fun in our church. Why is it that the Good News of the Gospel should be nothing but doom and gloom?
Our church is close to 12,000 and people enjoy going there to hear the word of God presented as it should be at the foot of the cross. That we are all sinners and without the saving grace of Christ there is no hope.
Maybe you go to the same church as me. Did you ever have a pastor named Gene Appel who is now at Willow Creek?
When I lived in Los Angeles I was approached by street-preaching Christians who would threaten people with the statement, "Get right with God or burn in hell!!!"
What better way to alienate people from the Gospel or turn them off from wanting to hear more?


29 posted on 10/16/2005 1:12:16 PM PDT by waltprobush
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To: blue-duncan; P-Marlowe
BD,I have read many of Kierkegaard,s theological writings and The fact is the man made many absurd statements.
Here is one for example
Kierkegaard says "The Christianity of the New Testament does not exist"
He was an advocate of "leap of faith" way of life" which is full or risks.It was the only commitment he believed could save someone from despair.

Although different from someone like Swedenborg (who did not believe Satan existed) He is much the same since He really did not believe everything written in the Bible to be true, so he felt the need to add his own Psychology to analyze Gods true word.
This is a mistake too many Philosophers often make,so I would be careful to elevate people like Kierkegaard and Swedenborg as devout Christian examples.
One can only hope that they found the truth before they died.

Peter Drucker thinks of Kierkegaard as a prophet
http://www.peterdrucker.at/en/texts/kierke_02.html
30 posted on 10/17/2005 6:21:47 AM PDT by pro610 (Faith the size of a mustard seed can move mountains.Praise Jesus Christ!)
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To: Gamecock

So we shouldn't look to this man as we would our early church leaders?


31 posted on 10/17/2005 7:07:11 AM PDT by sheltonmac (QUIS CUSTODIET IPSOS CUSTODES)
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To: sheltonmac

Now that's funny


32 posted on 10/17/2005 10:49:36 AM PDT by Gamecock (Crystal meth is not a fruit of the Spirit.)
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