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Lenten Stations -- Stational Churches - visit each with us during Lent {Catholic Caucus}
Vatican.va ^ | not given | Vatican

Posted on 02/21/2007 9:44:31 AM PST by Salvation

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Catholic Culture

 


Stational churches are the churches that are appointed for special morning and evening services during Lent, Easter and some other important days. The tradition started in order to strengthen the sense of community within the Church in Rome, as this system meant that the Holy Father would visit each part of the city and celebrate Mass with the congregation.

The first stational church during Lent is St. Sabina at the Aventine. It was built in the 5th century, presumably at the site of the original Titulus Sabinae, a church in the home of Sabina who had been martyred c. 114. The tituli were the first parish churches in Rome. St Dominic lived in the adjacent monastery for a period soon before his death in 1221. Among other residents of the monastery were St Thomas Aquinas.

Visit Churches of Rome and "Station Churches", a Lenten Journey by Fr. Bill for more information about stational churches.


1 posted on 02/21/2007 9:44:35 AM PST by Salvation
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To: All
Interior of St. Sabina

Day I - Ash Wednesday
Remember, O man, you are dust and unto dust you shall return” (Prayer for the Deposition of Ashes). 

From as early as the third century, the Church of Rome observed the season of Lent by journey each day to a "Station Church" or one of the ancient and prominent churches of Rome.  Here the Bishop of Rome, the Holy Father, would lead the people in prayer.  It is a symbol of unity as well as a pilgrimage of faith.  Unfortunately, the custom ceased during the Avignon papacy in 1305 but interest was revived by Saint Leo XIII at the turn of the 20th century.  Blessed John XXIII fully was restored the custom in 1959.

Today, from the earliest times, the Mass is celebrated in the Santa Sabina, "The gem of the Aventine" and home of the Dominicans. Tradition holds that Santa Sabina was a widow who was converted to Christianity by her servant. She was martyred during the persecutions by Hadrian (117-138). The Basilica was built over a house which was thought to be owned by Santa Sabina between 422-432. From the apse mosaic, we know that Celestine I was serving as Pope.

At 5:00 in the evening on Ash Wednesday, the Holy Father will come here to participate at an Ecumenical penance service where he will receive ashes.

Santa Sabina

2 posted on 02/21/2007 9:49:22 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
The Stational Church

The Stational Church

In older missals, each day in Lent and other feasts refer to a "Station" in some church of Rome. Although this practice is not highlighted in our present missals, the Church still honors this tradition of Stational Churches, particularly during the Lenten season (see the Vatican website for the list of the stational churches for Lent).

DIRECTIONS
History of the Station
Stational or station churches are churches in Rome designated to be the special location for worship on a particular day. This practice dates back to the early centuries of the Church. The Pope (or his legate) would celebrate solemn Mass in one after another of the four greater and the three minor basilicas during the 4th and 5th centuries (the seven churches or Sette Chiese — St. John Lateran, St. Peter, St. Paul Outside the Walls, St. Mary Major, the Holy Cross in Jerusalem, St. Lawrence, and the Twelve Apostles). Other churches were added to list as needed for various liturgical occasions, bringing the total number of churches to 45, with the last two (Santa Agatha and Santa Maria Nuova, called Santa Franciscan Romana) added by Pope Pius XI on March 5, 1934. When the popes started residing in Avignon, France in 1305, the popularity of this devotion declined until recently.

On the day of the station, the faithful would gather in one church (church of the collecta or gathering) and in procession singing the Litany of the Saints or psalms, they would go to the church where the Mass was to be celebrated: there they met the Pope and his clergy, coming in state from his Patriarchal Palace of the Lateran. This was called "making the station." Such a Mass was a "conventual mass" (or community Mass) of the City and the world, Urbis et Orbis (the visible congregation in Rome and the invisible audience of the entire world). This old custom reminds us that Rome is the center of Christian worship, from which we received our faith and our liturgy.

Present Practice of the Stational Church
There is not always a Papal Mass in the stational church, but the stational procession and Mass have been restored at Rome, especially in Lent when each day has its proper Station and Mass. On Ash Wednesday the station at Santa Sabina Church is the most important of all, because the Pope still gathers there and distributes ashes to the people. In the 1968 Enchiridion of Indulgences states "[a] partial indulgence is granted to the faithful, who on the day indicated in the Roman Missal devoutly visit the Stational Church of Rome (Stationalium Ecclesiarum Urbis visitatio) named for that day; but if they also assist at the sacred functions celebrated in the morning or evening, a plenary indulgence is granted."

There are 86 stations of the year (great feasts and during Lent), and on Christmas, three, and on Easter, two "stational Masses" are mentioned, bringing the number of these stations to 89. Most of the stations are named after saints. In gathering for the Mass, the saint was so vividly in the minds of the people, that the saint seemed present among them. This explains why the missal states "Statio ad sanctum Paulum." The service is, as Pius Parsch states: "not merely in the church of St. Paul, but rather in his very presence. In the stational liturgy, then, St. Paul was considered as actually present and acting in his capacity as head and pattern for the liturgical worshipers. Yes, even more, the assembled congregation entered into a mystical union with the saint by sharing in his glory and by seeing him beforehand the Lord's advent in the Mass."

The processing from church to church demonstrates our earthly pilgrimage to our eternal home. This universal Christian practice also reminds of our Roman heritage, and helps us pray as one body, encouraging and praying for one another, worshipping together as a universal community. Let us use this old custom for "interior transformation and transmutation through the Lenten Eucharist under the leadership of our stational saint in holy fellowship." (M. Hellriegel).
Jennifer Gregory Miller Jennifer G. Miller

Activity Source: Original Text (JGM) by Jennifer Gregory Miller, © Copyright 2003, 2004, 2005 by Jennifer Gregory Miller


3 posted on 02/21/2007 9:51:20 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: nickcarraway; sandyeggo; Lady In Blue; NYer; american colleen; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ...
Catholic Discussion Ping!

Please notify me via FReepmail if you would like to be added to or taken off the Catholic Discussion Ping List.

4 posted on 02/21/2007 9:53:06 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

ping to read later


5 posted on 02/21/2007 9:53:30 AM PST by kevinm13 (The Main Stream Media is dead! Fox News Channel and Freerepublic Rocks!)
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To: All

Let us know if you have visited any of these churches in person!


6 posted on 02/21/2007 9:55:47 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

great post, Salvation. Thank you.


7 posted on 02/21/2007 9:56:06 AM PST by Nihil Obstat
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To: Salvation

I can't seem to find an English translation for the original post, sorry.


8 posted on 02/21/2007 10:01:48 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

yeah, but the sketches are cool


9 posted on 02/21/2007 10:12:34 AM PST by Nihil Obstat
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To: Salvation
Does anyone know why St. John Lateran is on the list five times?

Salvation didn't know.

Garde la Foi, mes amis! Nous nous sommes les sauveurs de la République! Maintenant et Toujours!
(Keep the Faith, my friends! We are the saviors of the Republic! Now and Forever!)

LonePalm, le Républicain du verre cassé (The Broken Glass Republican)

10 posted on 02/21/2007 10:20:03 AM PST by LonePalm (Commander and Chef)
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To: LonePalm

I think because it is actually the cathedral church of Rome.


11 posted on 02/21/2007 10:22:10 AM PST by Nihil Obstat
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To: Salvation

WooHoo! Thanks Salvation.


12 posted on 02/21/2007 10:25:01 AM PST by AliVeritas (Stop Global Dhimming. Demand testicular fortitude from the hill. Call the crusade.)
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To: Salvation

~from Cantius.org

Remember man that thou art dust, and into dust thou shalt return.

If there is any place in Rome where Lent, with its atmosphere of penitential solitude mixes with the reawakening of spring, then it must be along this path which climbs up from the Circus Maximus towards the Aventine, on the top of which stands the Church of St. Sabina.

In God's name then let us go up to the holy mount. Is it not significant that the first Lenten mystery is celebrated on a mount, the Aventine? Already in pre-Christian days this hill was an asylum for refugees, a post of security. To St. Sabina—a martyr, converted to the faith by the prayers, fasts and example of her Christian servant—we entrust ourselves today. To her we have recourse in our sinfulness. She will present her martyrdom and her prayers to God on our behalf and obtain His blessing upon our Christian warfare, so that "we may be converted to God with our whole heart, in fasting and in weeping and in mourning, and rend our hearts and not our garments, and turn to the Lord, our God."

Let us pray: Grant, O Lord, to Thy faithful people that they may begin the venerable solemnities of fasting with becoming piety, and may persevere to the end with steadfast devotion. Through Christ, Our Lord. Amen.

13 posted on 02/21/2007 11:08:33 AM PST by Carolina
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Comment #14 Removed by Moderator

To: Salvation

Cool!


15 posted on 02/21/2007 8:33:05 PM PST by Ciexyz (Amazing Grace the film, in theaters Feb 23rd, about abolishing slave trade in Britain.)
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To: Carolina

Lovely photo, thanx for posting.


16 posted on 02/21/2007 8:36:51 PM PST by Ciexyz (Amazing Grace the film, in theaters Feb 23rd, about abolishing slave trade in Britain.)
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To: Nihil Obstat

Thanks, have a blessed Lent.


17 posted on 02/21/2007 8:38:38 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Nihil Obstat

Yes, they are.


18 posted on 02/21/2007 8:39:13 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: AliVeritas

You're welcome. May the Season of Lent provide you with stepping stones to holiness.


19 posted on 02/21/2007 8:39:57 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Carolina

**Let us pray: Grant, O Lord, to Thy faithful people that they may begin the venerable solemnities of fasting with becoming piety, and may persevere to the end with steadfast devotion. Through Christ, Our Lord. Amen.**

Thanks for coming to the thread.


20 posted on 02/21/2007 8:41:09 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: sandyeggo

I thought it was a great idea too. Each day we will add the Stational Church of that day.


21 posted on 02/21/2007 8:41:50 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Ciexyz

Have a fruitful Lent.


22 posted on 02/21/2007 8:42:20 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Thank you, Salvation, for your Lenten wishes. Here's wishing the same to you, and to all FReeping on this board.

I enjoyed the online visit to the first church "station" in la bella Roma.

23 posted on 02/21/2007 8:46:00 PM PST by Ciexyz (Amazing Grace the film, in theaters Feb 23rd, about abolishing slave trade in Britain.)
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To: Salvation

Great post, great idea! Thanks.


24 posted on 02/22/2007 7:06:58 AM PST by livius
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To: livius
Catholic Culture

Today's station is at St. George's. Pope St. Gregory established a diaconia, an institution that cared for the poor, at the site of this church. The area has a special place in the history of Rome, as an ancient tradition claims that it was here that Romulus killed his brother Remus before founding the city.

 


25 posted on 02/22/2007 9:23:54 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Interior of St. George

Day II. Thursday after Ash Wednesday.

"May everything we do begin with your inspiration, continue with your help, and reach perfection under your guidance" (Collect for today).

Today's Station Church is San Giorgio in Velabro. The ancient church already existed in the 5th century. In the 7th century, it was dedicated to Saint Sebastian, the Roman soldier who was martyred by Diocletian (297-305). It was made a Station Church by Pope Gregory II (715-731). Pope Saint Zachary (741-752) brought the head of Saint George here and made him a co-patron of the church. The relic is now under the altar. Saint George, the famed "dragon slayer", like Saint Sebastian, was a soldier martyred during the Diocletian persecution (284-305). He died in Cappadocia (Turkey). The fresco in the apse is of Christ in the center flanked by the Blessed Mother and Saint George on his right and Saints Peter and Sebastian on his left. The Church was once under the patronage of Cardinal Newman. It was bombed in 1993 by the Mafia after the Holy Father spoke out against them. It was then restored.

San Giorgio in Velabro

26 posted on 02/22/2007 9:28:55 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
from St. Cantius

THURSDAY AFTER ASH WEDNESDAY
Station—St. George

Just a short distance from St. Sabina stands our second stational church, St. George in Velabro. The church dates back to the year 500, but was reconstructed under Leo II (682-683). This church is one of the original 25 diaconal seats of the Roman church. The head of this warrior Saint is preserved under the high altar.
The purpose of Holy Lent is to bring about a spiritual renovation. This work of renovation is accomplished by both God and man; by God, principally through the holy Eucharist; by man, mainly by fasting, prayer, and almsgiving.
May our stational patron, St. George, helps us to overcome the dragon of inertia in our prayer life and to cast again with new fervor our cares upon the Lord.
Let us pray: O God, who by sin art offended and by penance appeased, mercifully regard the prayers of Thy suppliant people, and turn away the scourges of Thy wrath, which we deserve for our sins. Through Christ, Our Lord.
Amen.


27 posted on 02/22/2007 9:35:03 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

The station for today is on Mt. Coelius in the basilica which the Christian Senator Pammachius built over the home of the martyrs Sts. John and Paul and which is dedicated to them. Near the church was a hospice where Pammachius dispensed his fortune in charity to the poor.


28 posted on 02/23/2007 9:03:34 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Interior of Ss. Giovanni e Paolo al Celio

Day III.  Friday after Ash Wednesday

Lord, through this Lenten Eucharist may we grow in your love and service and become an acceptable sacrifice to you. We ask this through Christ our Lord" (Prayer Over Gifts for today).

Santi Giovanni e Paulo. Saints John and Paul were officers of the Imperial Court in Constantinople but returned home to serve Julian "The Apostate" (emperor 331-363). They were asked to prove their fidelity to the empire by renouncing their God in favor of the deities of the State. They refused and were beheaded in their home on 26 June 362.

A church was built over the site of their home in 398. It was rebuilt several times and is now one of the finest baroque churches in Rome and home to the Passionists. In fact, St. Paul of the Cross (1694-1755) is buried here. It was the titular church of Pius XII and New York Cardinals Spellman, Cooke, O'Connor, and now has Cardinal Egan as protector.

Santi Giovanni e Paolo


29 posted on 02/23/2007 9:08:02 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Santi Giovanni e Paolo has the Passionist monastery next to it. St. Paul of the Cross is buried there. Several Popes used to make their annual retreats at the monastery. Also, this basilica has had American cardinals serve as titulars, currently held by Cardinal Egan.

It is a gorgeous basilica inside. The monastery gardens are very peaceful to stroll around.

Today, Pope Benedict announced the canonization of one of the Passionists. So it's a special day for that order.


30 posted on 02/23/2007 9:10:06 AM PST by Carolina
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To: All
from St. Cantius

FRIDAY AFTER ASH WEDNESDAY
Station—Sts. John and Paul

The third Lenten Station takes us up to a high hill of ancient Rome—the Celian Hill, which stands in front of the Palatine and which dominates the valley of the Circus Maximus. The church was built upon the house where Saints John and Paul were martyred and buried. Martyred in the year 361, by Julian the Apostate, they were two imperial officers in Constantine's court.
We celebrate the divine mysteries today in the light of the "two candelabras shining before the Lord," as the Church calls the two brothers John and Paul. There can be no fruitful lent without practical charity. Practical charity means that we must come to our brother's rescue sincerely, unselfishly and supernaturally.
As children of the God of charity, let us so approach today's Eucharist that it may enkindle in us the spirit of true Christian charity, and thus to "be perfect, as our heavenly Father is perfect."
Let us pray: Regard with Thy loving care, we beseech Thee, O Lord, the fast which we have begun; that the abstinence, which we keep with our body may be exercised with sincerity of mind. We ask this Through Christ, Our Lord.
Amen.


31 posted on 02/23/2007 9:10:39 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

Io non parlo molto italiano ma e interesante in tutti casi. (Hope I got that right.)


32 posted on 02/23/2007 7:54:07 PM PST by Ciexyz (Amazing Grace the film, in theaters Feb 23rd, about abolishing slave trade in Britain.)
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To: Carolina

It sounds like you have been to Rome. Oh, I would love to make that trip! But I understand that with any tour there is a lot of walking in Rome.


33 posted on 02/23/2007 8:49:36 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
 

The station for today is at the church dedicated to St. Augustine of Hippo. Michalangelo was one of the artists commissioned for the decoration of the church. The Renaissance façade, one of the first in this style, is built of travertine marble said to be from the ruins of the Colosseum.


34 posted on 02/24/2007 10:36:33 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Interiot of St. Augustine

Sant'Agostino - The Church of St. Augustine

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Day IV.   Saturday after Ash Wednesday

"Teach me your way, O Lord, that I may be faithful in your sight"
(Responsorial Psalm for today - Ps. 86)

Sant' Agostino. The Church of Saint Augustine is one of my favorites. It is located a stone's throw from Piazza Navona. It was the first church built in the Renaissance style in Rome although as soon as you walk in, you are struck by its present extraordinary Baroque ornamentation.

Above the altar is an icon of our Lady, which was once in the Hagia Sophia in Constantinople (now Istanbul). It was brought here after the city fell to the Moslems. In this church is one of my favorite statues, our Lord with his mother and grandmother by Sansovino (1512). The look shared between Saint Anne and our Lord is extremely touching (see photo). Above this is a beautiful fresco of Isaiah by Raphael (1512). In a side chapel near the back of the Church there is the famous picture of Our Lady of Loreto or Our Lady of the Pilgrims by Caravaggio (1604).

Day 4 continued....next page


35 posted on 02/24/2007 10:40:42 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

Remember that if you click on the Vatican site (first post) you can read about the Stational Church of the Day -- but it's in Latin!


36 posted on 02/24/2007 10:42:09 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation

The ceiling and dome at Sant'Agostino. The blues and golds are much more vivid in person than in this picture. Sant'Agostino is one of my favorite churches in Rome partly because of my affinity for St. Augustine and for his saintly mother who is buried there. The Caravaggio Madonna of the Pilgrims and Raphael's Isaiah are there. Here's the high altar designed by Bernini:


37 posted on 02/24/2007 3:47:20 PM PST by Carolina
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To: Carolina

Thank you for these wonderful photos. Truly gorgeous.


38 posted on 02/24/2007 10:31:54 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Carolina

 

from St. Cantius

SATURDAY AFTER ASH WEDNESDAY
Station—St. Augustine/St. Tryphon

Pope Pasquale II (1099-1118) laid the relics of St. Tryphon to rest under the present church of St. Augustine.
Health of body and, above all, health of soul are precious gifts from God—gifts for which we must be grateful. The Church is particularly concerned about the health of our soul, the well being in us of the life of Christ. She knows our spiritual shortsightedness, she knows, the unsteadiness of our will, she knows the power of our passions, all of them—infirmities caused by Original Sin, as well as by our personal sins. She sees her children make resolutions and break them. She knows how often the fuller unfolding of the sacramental life is impeded because her sons and daughters are lacking in purity of intention and proper appreciation of God's gifts.
For that very reason she instituted this holy season as a time of great healing. Lent is God's hospital. Serious operations are to be performed during this time. And blessed are they who gladly submit to them. Vitia comprimis, mentem elevas—vices are to be curbed, spiritual cancers to be removed, the mind is to be renewed, elevated, so that, after our stay in His hospital, the same mind may be in us, which is also in Christ Jesus.
We humbly implore our dual Saints to guide us to the Divine Physician, the Healer of our soul and body.
Let us pray: Be mindful, O Lord, of our supplications, and grant that we may keep with devout service this solemn fast, which thou has wholesomely ordained for the healing of our souls and bodies. Through Christ, Our Lord.
Amen.


39 posted on 02/24/2007 10:34:37 PM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Salvation
Catholic Culture

 

The Station today is at St. John Lateran. The Lateran is comprised of the Basilica, the Pontifical Palace and the Baptistry. The church is dedicated to the Christ the Savior. In the fifth century the titles of St. John Baptist and St. John the Evangelist were added. The Papal altar contains the wooden altar on which St. Peter is said to have celebrated Mass. This basilica is the mother of all churches and is the only church which has the title of Archbasilica.


40 posted on 02/25/2007 8:54:38 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Carolina
Moew from St. Augustine:

Tomb of St. Monica

<< STATION CHURCHES HOME  >>

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Day IV.   Saturday after Ash Wednesday

 

 

Day 4 Photo:  The tomb of Saint Monica - a model of
 faithful perseverance  in prayer (332-387)

 
 

 

 

 

 

 

Jesus, His Mother Mary and Grandmother St. Anne

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Day IV.   Saturday after Ash Wednesday

continued......

There is also a statue by Sansovino of the Madonna of Birth where all of the Roman women come and pray for safe deliveries (1516). But the highlight is the tomb of Saint Monica - a model of faithful perseverance in prayer (332-387). Through her intercession, her wayward son, Augustine, converted and became a Doctor of the Church. There I offered a prayer for my mother, in thanksgiving for her prayers, and for all mothers.  

Day 4 continued...more photos ...

(Photo:  Our Lord with his mother and
grandmother by Sansovino (1512))


41 posted on 02/25/2007 9:03:08 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Interior of St. John Lateran

Day V.   Sunday, Week I.

"Man does not live on bread alone, but on every word that comes from the mouth of God" (Communion Antiphon for today - Mt 4:4)

San Giovanni in Laterano. Saint John Lateran is the Cathedral of Rome, one of the four major basilicas, site of five ecumenical councils, home of the popes until 1304 when they left for Avignon, and the first church to be dedicated to the Holy Redeemer (324). The Lateran family property was given to Pope Merchiades (311-314) by Constantine shortly after his conversion (10/28/312). Pope Sylvester I (314-335) built and consecrated the basilica in 324. During the consecration, a bust of the Lord appeared in the apse for all to see. Centuries later, it was placed under the additional patronage of Saints John the Baptist (10th C) and John the Evangelist (12th C).

The papal altar contains the relic of the original altar said to have been used by Saint Peter and the early Popes. Above it is the relics of the heads of both Saints Peter and Paul. It is no wonder it is considered "the Mother and Head of all the churches in the City and in the World (omnium urbis et orbis ecclesiarum mater et caput).

San Giovanni in Laterano


42 posted on 02/25/2007 9:08:49 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All

from St. Cantius

FIRST SUNDAY OF LENT
Station—Our Most Holy Savior in the Lateran

The Cathedral Basilica of Rome—caput et mater omnium ecclesiarum Urbis et Orbis—triumphantly celebrates the first solemn day of Lent.
Today, the faithful pilgrim in spirit to the Lateran Basilica of the Most Holy Savior, "head and mother of all the churches of the City and the World," the cathedral of the Bishop of Rome. In this basilica Lent officially begins, in this church also, it is concluded.
The acceptable time is at hand. "We exhort that you receive not the grace of God in vain." "It is true," says St. Leo, "there is no season, which is not rich with God' gifts. His grace does ever give us an entry to His mercy, yet at this time the minds of all should be urged with greater earnestness towards spiritual progress, and should be animated by a trust in God stronger than ever, for now the anniversary of that day on which we were redeemed is drawing near. Therefore, let us be moved to perform every work of godliness, to the end that we may be able to celebrate, with clean minds and bodies, that mystery, which excels all others—the mystery of the Lord's passion." (Matins, Second Nocturne)
This holy fast (Quadragesima) will open unto us the gates of Paradise. We must embrace it with prayer and supplication, so that we may rejoice with the Lord on the day of Resurrection.
Let us pray: O God, who does purify Thy Church by the yearly observance of forty days; grant to Thy household that what we strive to obtain from Thee by self-denial, we may secure by good works. Through Christ, Our Lord.
Amen.

 
 

43 posted on 02/25/2007 9:10:40 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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To: All
Catholic Culture

The Station today is at St. Peter in Chains. The church was one of the tituli, Rome's first parish churches, known as the Titulus Eudoxiae or the Eudoxiana. It was built over the ruins of an Imperial villa in 442 (or possibly 439), to house the chains that had bound St. Peter in prison in Jerusalem.


44 posted on 02/26/2007 9:50:36 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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Interior of St. Peter in Chains.

Day VI.   Monday, Week I.

"Lord, may this offering of our love be acceptable to you. Let it transform our lives and bring us your mercy. We ask this through Christ our Lord" (Pray over the Gifts for today).

San Pietro in Vincoli. Saint Peter in Chains. This basilica in 109 by Theodora, a pious Roman lady, to house the chains which bound Saint Peter in the Mamertine prison. In 436, Eudocia, who husband was Theodocius II, Emperor of the East (408-450), sent the chains which bound Saint Peter in Jerusalem to her daughter, Euxodia Zicinia, in Rome. When Sixtus III (432-440) placed these two chains side by side, they miraculously united to form one chain. The chains are located in the confessio before the high altar for the faithful to venerate (see photo). Also under the altar are the remains of the seven Maccabee brothers (2 Macc 7). Also in this church is the famed Moses, sculpted by Michelangelo (1515), as part of a tomb for the famed Renaissance pope, Julius II, 1503-1513).

San Pietro in Vincoli

45 posted on 02/26/2007 9:54:14 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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from St. Cantius

MONDAY IN THE FIRST WEEK OF LENT
Station—St. Peter in Chains

From the heart of the Roman Forum, the penitential procession climbed up the road winding up towards the Esquiline Hill and came to the church of St. Peter in Chains, also called the "Eudossian Basilica" (as it had been built in the place of another church by Eurdossia, wife of the emperor Valentinian III, to preserve in it the chains of St. Peter).
The Station of this day is at St. Peter in Chains and the Church takes us today to the divinely appointed watchman of "the lambs and sheep of Christ"—St. Peter.
The Chains, which held the shepherd of the lambs and sheep consist of forty-four links. Forty-four days separate us from Holy Thursday, the beginning of the Paschal solemnities when our "Lenten" work must be an accomplished fact.
How many links has that chain from which Christ, our good Shepherd, desires to free us in this acceptable time? We are fully aware that during this season of salvation this chain must be broken and the links thrown out—the big ones in particular. Which are your principal faults? Are you working against them?
Let us pray: Convert us, O God our salvation, that the Lenten fast may be of profit to us. Instruct our minds with heavenly discipline. Through Christ, Our Lord.
Amen.


46 posted on 02/26/2007 9:56:50 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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Catholic Culture

At Rome, the Station is in the church of St. Anastasia, where, formerly, the Mass of the Aurora on Christmas Day was celebrated. The first church was built in the late 3rd or early 4th century, and was one of the first parish churches of ancient Rome. It was given by a woman called Anastasia and called titulus Anastasiae after her. Later, it was dedicated to a martyr of the same name.


47 posted on 02/27/2007 7:01:06 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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Interior of St. Anastasia

Day VII.   Tuesday, Week I.

"Forgive us the wrong we have done as we forgive those who wrong us" (Gospel for today - Mt 6:12).

Sant' Anastasia. Saint Anastasia was the daughter of a Roman noble. She cared for those in prison. As a result of her charity, she was accused of being a Christian during the Diocletian persecution (284-305). She was condemned to die by starvation by setting her adrift in a small boat in the sea. She miraculously survived. She was then condemned to be burnt alive in 304 (see photo of her sculpture under the main altar). A church was later built over her home. Once one of the 25 most beautiful churches in Rome, it has recently been restored.

 

Sant' Anastasia


48 posted on 02/27/2007 7:04:45 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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from St. Cantius

TUESDAY IN THE FIRST WEEK OF LENT
Station—St. Anastasia

Linked to this church is the tradition of the "first-light" Mass—Mass at dawn—which is celebrated in the first hours of the Christmas morning.
We keep this day in company with the widow-martyr, whose heavenly birthday the Church observes on the very birthday of the Light of the world. In the Christmas Mass "at dawn" St. Anastasia, whose name means "dawn"—the new light—is commemorated. In that "aurora Mass" and again today, the words fulgebit, fulgeat—"shine, radiate—occur.
A holy "radiating" is the fruit of a holy Lent. Everyone is called to be an "Anastasia", a new light, replenished by the light of Christ—Lumen Christi.
Let us pray: Look down upon Thy household, Lord, and grant that our souls, chastened by the mortification of the flesh, may radiate in Thy sight with the desire for Thee. Through Christ, Our Lord.
Amen.


49 posted on 02/27/2007 7:07:35 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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Catholic Culture

Today's Station is at St. Mary Major. The spring Ember Week consecrated the new season to God and by prayer and fasting sought to obtain abundant graces for those who on Saturday were to receive Holy Orders. The Station was fittingly held in the church, which witnessed the first scrutinies for the coming ordinations, and which was dedicated to the mother of the great High Priest.


50 posted on 02/28/2007 10:09:09 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
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