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Cur Deus Homo Book Second I-IV: Holy, Happy Man (Cath-Orth caucus)
Internet Medieval Source Book ^ | A.D. 1097-1100 | Saint Anselm of Canterbury

Posted on 06/28/2007 2:58:01 PM PDT by annalex

 

BOOK SECOND.

CHAPTER I.

How man was made holy by God, so as to be happy in the enjoyment of God.

Anselm.. It ought not to be disputed that rational nature was made holy by God, in order to be happy in enjoying Him. For to this end is it rational, in order to discern justice and injustice, good and evil, and between the greater and the lesser good. Otherwise it was made rational in vain. But God made it not rational in vain. Wherefore, doubtless, it was made rational for this end. In like manner is it proved that the intelligent creature received the power of discernment for this purpose, that he might hate and shun evil, and love and choose good, and especially the greater good. For else in vain would God have given him that power of discernment, since man's discretion would be useless unless he loved and avoided according to it. But it does not befit God to give such power in vain. It is, therefore, established that rational nature was created for this end, viz., to love and choose the highest good supremely, for its own sake and nothing else; for if the highest good were chosen for any other reason, then something else and not itself would be the thing loved. But intelligent nature cannot fulfil this purpose without being holy. Therefore that it might not in vain be made rational, it was made, in order to fulfil this purpose, both rational and holy. Now, if it was made holy in order to choose and love the highest good, then it was made such in order to follow sometimes what it loved and chose, or else it was not. But if it were not made holy for this end, that it might follow what it loves and chooses, then in vain was it made to love and choose holiness; and there can be no reason why it should be ever bound to follow holiness. Therefore, as long as it will be holy in loving and choosing the supreme good, for which it was made, it will be miserable; because it will be impotent despite of its will, inasmuch as it does not have what it desires. But this is utterly absurd. Wherefore rational nature was made holy, in order to be happy in enjoying the supreme good, which is God. Therefore man, whose nature is rational, was made holy for this end, that he might be happy in enjoying God.

 

CHAPTER II.

How man would never have died, unless he had sinned.

Anselm.. Moreover, it is easily proved that man was so made as not to be necessarily subject to death; for, as we have already said, it is inconsistent with God's wisdom and justice to compel man to suffer death without fault, when he made him holy to enjoy eternal blessedness. It therefore follows that had man never sinned he never would have died.

 

CHAPTER III.

How man will rise with the same body which he has in this world.

Anselm.. From this the future resurrection of the dead is clearly proved. For if man is to be perfectly restored, the restoration should make him such as he would have been had he never sinned.

Boso. It must be so.

Anselm.. Therefore, as man, had he not sinned, was to have been transferred with the same body to an immortal state, so when he shall be restored, it must properly be with his own body as he lived in this world.

Boso. But what shall we say to one who tells us that this is right enough with regard to those in whom humanity shall be perfectly restored, but is not necessary as respects the reprobate?

Anselm.. We know of nothing more just or proper than this, that as man, had he continued in holiness, would have been perfectly happy for eternity, both in body and in soul; so, if he persevere in wickedness, he sball be likewise completely miserable forever.

Boso. You have promptly satisfied me in these matters.

 

CHAPTER IV.

How God will complete, in respect to human nature, what he has begun.

Anselm.. From these things, we can easily see that God will either complete what he has begun with regard to human nature, or else he has made to no end so lofty a nature, capable of so great good. Now if it be understood that God has made nothing more valuable than rational existence capable of enjoying him; it is altogether foreign from his character to suppose that he will suffer that rational existence utterly to perish.

Boso. No reasonable being can think otherwise.

Anselm.. Therefore is it necessary for him to perfect in human nature what he has begun. But this, as we have already said, cannot be accomplished save by a complete expiation of sin, which no sinner can effect for himself.

Boso. I now understand it to be necessary for God to complete what he has begun, lest there be an unseemly falling off from his design.

 


Source.

St. Anselm: Proslogium; Monologium: An Appendix In Behalf Of The Fool By Gaunilo; And Cur Deus Homo, Translated From The Latin By Sidney Norton Deane, B. A. With An Introduction, Bibliography, And Reprints Of The Opinions Of Leading Philosophers And Writers On The Ontological Argument, (Chicago, The Open Court Publishing Company, 1903, reprinted 1926)




TOPICS: Apologetics; Catholic; Orthodox Christian; Theology
KEYWORDS:
Cur Deus Homo (Why God Became Man) is the first major theological work in the West that followed the Great Schism of 1054. This book is a major contribution to the theology of Atonement.

I plan to publish it for discussion in short installments as Catholic-Orthodox caucus threads. All Christians as well as non-Christians are very welcome, but I ask all to maintain the caucus discipline: no interconfessional attacks, no personal attacks, and no off-topic posts. Avoid mentioning confessions outside of the caucus for any reason.

Previous:

Cur Deus Homo I-III
Cur Deus Homo III-V
Cur Deus Homo VI-VIII: Is God Omnipotent and Wise?
Cur Deus Homo IX-X: Did The Father Wish Christ To Die?
Cur Deus Homo XI-XIV: God's Honor, Compassion, and Justice
Cur Deus Homo XV-XVIII: Men and Angels, Perfection and Election
Cur Deus Homo XIX-XX: No Satisfaction
Cur Deus Homo XXI-XXIII: Enormity of Sin
Cur Deus Homo XXIV-XXV: Unhappiness of Man

1 posted on 06/28/2007 2:58:07 PM PDT by annalex
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To: Andrew Byler; Blogger; Forest Keeper; fr maximilian mary; Huber; jo kus; Kolokotronis; kosta50; ...
Write to me if you want in or out on this St. Anselm ping list.

The summary:

***

Man was made a rational, happy and holy by God:

man, whose nature is rational, was made holy for this end, that he might be happy in enjoying God.

He was also made immortal:

it is inconsistent with God's wisdom and justice to compel man to suffer death without fault

He will, therefore, be restored as designed, or else be eternally miserable:

as man, had he continued in holiness, would have been perfectly happy for eternity, both in body and in soul; so, if he persevere in wickedness, he sball be likewise completely miserable forever.

[...]

[It is] necessary for [God] to perfect in human nature what he has begun


2 posted on 06/28/2007 3:04:42 PM PDT by annalex
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To: annalex
I wonder if man was made, so to speak, intrinsically immortal, or if God just intended to keep him, ah, well supplied with the Spirit of Life. Certainly either view would suggest that Man was not intended to age, at least if my joints and forgetfulness are anything to ..uh what were we talking about?

I always have trouble with this because it seems to me to be so close to a meaningless question in the sense that if God wants something to stop being it'll stop, and if He wants it to go on being, it'll go on. So is it meaningful to talk about anything being intrinsically immortal?

Anyway, thanks for persisting with the thread.

3 posted on 06/29/2007 1:20:48 PM PDT by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin, pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
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To: Mad Dawg
God created man to his own image
(Genesis 1:27)

God made not death, neither hath he pleasure in the destruction of the living
(Wisdom 1:13)

by the envy of the devil, death came into the world
(Wisdom 2:24)

sin, when it is completed, begetteth death.
(James 1:15)

by one man sin entered into this world, and by sin death; and so death passed upon all men, in whom all have sinned.
(Romans 5:12)

It would seem that mortality was acquired through sin, and so, the immortality was intrinsic and not conditional on God breathing new supply of life in.
4 posted on 07/06/2007 2:48:54 PM PDT by annalex
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To: annalex
Next installment:

Cur Deus Homo Book Second V-VII: The Necessity of God-Man

5 posted on 07/06/2007 3:20:19 PM PDT by annalex
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