Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Bringing Harry Potter to Church (barf)
Christianity Astray (oops I mean Today) Blog ^ | July 23, 2007 | Caryn Rivadeneira

Posted on 08/01/2007 1:17:00 PM PDT by Terriergal

I think what’s so enthralling is that what we see happen with Harry is what we’d love for our own lives (though I could do without the Inferi or the Dementors). We all want to be told we’re somehow special, somehow destined for greatness. We all want someone to say, “You, you alone can do this.” Right?

And I hope at some time, we all find that. Frankly, Christians shouldn’t go through life any other way. Without sounding trite, God made us each special, each destined for greatness.

(Excerpt) Read more at blog.christianitytoday.com ...


TOPICS: Apologetics; Ministry/Outreach; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: apostasy; harrypotter; witchcraft
Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-65 next last
We all want to be told we’re somehow special, somehow destined for greatness. We all want someone to say, “You, you alone can do this.” Right?

And I hope at some time, we all find that. Frankly, Christians shouldn’t go through life any other way. Without sounding trite, God made us each special, each destined for greatness.

HE must increase, I must decrease. Any questions?

I’ve got a few reasons why I love the books. But the one I keep coming back to is one my friend Carla summarizes much more eloquently than I do (although I can’t remember how she says it—otherwise I’d quote her!). It has to do with the orphaned boy who sleeps in a closet and thinks he’s nothing (because he’s told that by his cruel guardians) who is suddenly told he’s special—and that he’s destined for greatness.

What a completly anti-Christian message.

1 posted on 08/01/2007 1:17:07 PM PDT by Terriergal
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: Terriergal

bfl


2 posted on 08/01/2007 1:20:50 PM PDT by JamesP81 (Keep your friends close; keep your enemies at optimal engagement range)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal
What a completly anti-Christian message.

You're joking. Right?

3 posted on 08/01/2007 1:29:34 PM PDT by EveningStar
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

Unfortunsately, I’m sure he/she is not. Some Christians actually hold such blighted views.

They’re exactly the type who scare people away from Christianity.


4 posted on 08/01/2007 2:11:12 PM PDT by TBP
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal
It has to do with the orphaned boy who sleeps in a closet and thinks he’s nothing (because he’s told that by his cruel guardians) who is suddenly told he’s special—and that he’s destined for greatness.

What a completly anti-Christian message.

Just like those darn Narnia books, right? Ordinary kids who enter a magical world and discover they're destined for greatness. Lewis was so anti-Christian.

/s

5 posted on 08/01/2007 2:52:08 PM PDT by The Blitherer (What would a Free Man do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: The Blitherer

I never said Lewis’s books were Christian...

He was rather inclusivist too.


6 posted on 08/01/2007 5:00:09 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: EveningStar

I’m dead serious.


7 posted on 08/01/2007 5:11:37 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: TBP; EveningStar

So you think this “you were meant for greatness” stuff is actually Scriptural? I’m glad I scare people with such a mindset away. Jesus scared a lot of them away too, when their reasons for following him were shallow.


8 posted on 08/01/2007 5:13:08 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal
I never said Lewis’s books were Christian...

Then you're definitely on the fringe.

9 posted on 08/01/2007 5:23:54 PM PDT by jude24 (Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: jude24

Then Lewis was on the fringe, himself.


10 posted on 08/01/2007 5:32:07 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal; TBP; EveningStar

Obedience is the key. We are not destined for greatness, in fact we are actually called to humility and deference. We are destined for glory, not popularity - there’s a vast difference.

The Narnia children were obedient, not great.


11 posted on 08/01/2007 5:32:23 PM PDT by ItsOurTimeNow (FR Member ItsOurTimeNow: Declared Anathema by the Council of Trent)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal
Then Lewis was on the fringe, himself.

Must be why he is the most acclaimed 20th-century Christian author amongst pretty much every Christian denomination. His Mere Christianity has influenced several generations of Christians already.

12 posted on 08/01/2007 5:38:24 PM PDT by jude24 (Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: ItsOurTimeNow

That’s true too. But as far as I’ve heard, Lewis was EXTREMELY hesitant to say it was any Christian allegory.

And then we have these people who are even less role models to follow, but churches are ushering them in. Whatever happened to studying Scripture? *sigh*


13 posted on 08/01/2007 6:53:20 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: jude24
His Mere Christianity has influenced several generations of Christians already.

We weren't talking about that book of his, were we?

14 posted on 08/01/2007 6:54:03 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: jude24

And, frankly, there is a lot of inclusivist bent in that book as well. Other parts are good food for thought. But he did not claim to be a theologian.


15 posted on 08/01/2007 6:54:52 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal; The Blitherer
I never said Lewis’s books were Christian... He was rather inclusivist too.

Isn't there something in Christianity about not bearing false witness? You have misrepresented Lewis's statements of Christianity. If you are going to make a proposition, you have to support it with reasons. You haven't given any.

As Lewis states in his preface to The Great Divorce:

Blake wrote the Marriage of Heaven and Hell. If I have written of their Divorce, this is not because I think myself a fit antagonist for so great a genius, not even because I feel at all sure that I know what he meant. But is some sense or other the attempt to make that marriage is perennial. The attempt is based on the belief that reality never presents us with an absolutely unavoidable 'either-or'; that, granted skill and patience and (above all) time enough, some way of embracing both alternatives can always be found; that mere development or adjustment or refinemenbt will somehow turn evil into good without our being called on for a final and total rejection of anything we should like to retain. This belief I take to be a disastrous error.
The point is that not everyone gets into heaven. In this story most of his characters do not.

Then there is his sermon "The Weight of Glory" in which he states:

St. Paul promises to those who love God not, as we should expect, that they will know Him, but they will be known by Him (1 Cor. 8:3). It is a strange promise. Does not God know all things at all times? But it is dreadfully re-echoed in another passage of the New Testament. There we are warned that it may happen to anyone of us to appear at last before the face of God and hear only the appalling words, "I never knew you. Depart from Me." In some sense, as dark to the intellect as it is unendurable to the feelings, we can be both banished from the presence of Him who is present everywhere and erased from the knowledge of Him who knows all. We can be left utterly and absolutely outside--repelled, exiled, estranged, finally and unspeakably ignored. On the other hand, we can be called in, welcomed, received, acknoledged. We walk every day on the razor edge between these two incredible possibilities.
I would not call either description "rather inclusivist." On the contrary, Lewis is quite explicit that any Christian may not be included at all.
16 posted on 08/01/2007 7:40:26 PM PDT by stripes1776
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal

>>Whatever happened to studying Scripture?<<

Well, golly, it’s just not *entertaining* enough for today’s fast-food, drive-thu, on-demand carnality! Churchtainment is much more enticing!

Think of how popular the Jenkins & LaHaye end times fiction series was. Why? Because our sinful nature likes a good mystery. We like being able to see clues and put puzzles together. Which is why reformed eschatology is not widely popular, despite being solidly Biblical. It’s just not entertaining enough to satisfy minds that love titillation and drama.


17 posted on 08/01/2007 7:46:20 PM PDT by ItsOurTimeNow (FR Member ItsOurTimeNow: Declared Anathema by the Council of Trent)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 13 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal

“I’m dead serious.”

And you’re dead right.

Many Christians in our age seem to have lost all sense of discernment - if they ever had any.


18 posted on 08/01/2007 9:06:55 PM PDT by PetroniusMaximus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: ItsOurTimeNow

“It’s just not entertaining enough to satisfy minds that love titillation and drama.”

In addition to being wrong.


19 posted on 08/01/2007 9:07:44 PM PDT by PetroniusMaximus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal
What a completly anti-Christian message.

God gave his life for you. If God did that for you, then wouldn't you think that you just may be something special in His eyes? Woudn't you think that maybe you are destined for greatness?

Methinks thou art overreacting a bit.

BTW, I have heard that JK Rowling is one of the few remaining practicing Presbyterians in all of Great Britan. And we're not talking PCUSA here.

20 posted on 08/01/2007 9:23:56 PM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PetroniusMaximus

Scripture is wrong? Then why are you on this thread? This is about Harry potter in church, which shouldn’t concern you at all then, if Scripture itself is wrong.


21 posted on 08/02/2007 7:41:03 AM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: P-Marlowe
If God did that for you, then wouldn't you think that you just may be something special in His eyes? Woudn't you think that maybe you are destined for greatness?

The whole idea of mercy is the fact that I am NOT deserving of this. He gave his life to save me for his own glory, not mine. I am completely undeserving, and that is what makes his love so immeasurable and amazing. There is nothing in me that cooperated with him for my salvation, I was his enemy, and he reached down and by his sovereign election he made me love him.

Romans 5:8-10 "But God demonstrates His own love toward us, in that while we were yet sinners, Christ died for us. Much more then, having now been justified by His blood, we shall be saved from the wrath of God through Him. For if while we were enemies we were reconciled to God through the death of His Son, much more, having been reconciled, we shall be saved by His life.

The only thing that you might consider 'special' about human beings is that they all bear the image of God, as he created them.

22 posted on 08/02/2007 7:45:09 AM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: PetroniusMaximus

Thank you, that means a lot to me. :-)

You know, if people want to read the Harry Potter books I’m not going to freak out. Read with discernment. That goes for anything.

But this extreme Harry Potter mania makes me think there is something else underneath that drives it, and this idea of getting Bible lessons out of it is preposterous. I wouldn’t approve of bringing the Narnia series in for a ‘book study’ in church either. Not enough time is spent on Scripture in the first place.


23 posted on 08/02/2007 7:49:38 AM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: PetroniusMaximus

I think I misunderstood your post.


24 posted on 08/02/2007 7:50:26 AM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: PetroniusMaximus

I think Itsourtimenow was being sarcastic there — and you were saying that what she said was wrong - not that Scripture was wrong. I think I see now. (am I right now?)


25 posted on 08/02/2007 7:51:15 AM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: P-Marlowe
BTW, I have heard that JK Rowling is one of the few remaining practicing Presbyterians in all of Great Britan. And we're not talking PCUSA here.

Have you read the last book? That should dispel any notions that the series is "antichristian."

26 posted on 08/02/2007 8:02:54 AM PDT by jude24 (Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: jude24; xzins; blue-duncan; Terriergal
Have you read the last book? That should dispel any notions that the series is "antichristian."

Actually I haven't read any of them. I read Tolkien and Lewis and found them to be excellent literature. I doubt that Rowling is in the same league with Lewis or Tolkien from a literary standpoint, but apparently her stories hold their audience interest, which is the principle goal of a professional author.

There is a lot of fundamentalist panic that goes into threads like this one. People somehow believe that if children are exposed to the idea of witches and warlocks and trolls and goblins that somehow their little minds will be so warped that God cannot restore them. Hogwash. Harry Potter may not be a Christian allegory, but in the end all allegories are what you, the reader, make of them.

Lewis admonished the Christian arts and literature community to stop settling for mediocre and to produce works of beauty and greatness and to instill within those works the values upon which Christianity is founded.

I suspect that Rowling has heeded that advice. People flock to read her books. The day the last book came out, I was at Target and a busload of teenage girls ran into the store (apparently still dripping from a swim meet), and gathered up every copy of that book that was still on the shelves. None of them flew in on brooms. None of them said a single expletive. Usually when you get a group of teenagers together they are all cursing and swearing and being mischeivous. These girls were all polite and not one of them had more than 1 tattoo.

Finally, brethren, whatsoever things are true, whatsoever things are honest, whatsoever things are just, whatsoever things are pure, whatsoever things are lovely, whatsoever things are of good report; if there be any virtue, and if there be any praise, think on these things. (Philippians 4:8 KJV)

27 posted on 08/02/2007 9:03:06 AM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 26 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal
It's a shame Lewis's books aren't "Christian" enough for you. As a child, they were instrumental in introducing me to the wonders and joy of following Christ, and the scope of the spiritual world that lies beyond this one.

Of course I studied the Bible to gain a solid Scriptural understanding, but Lewis's books gave me the hunger to learn more.

So you think this “you were meant for greatness” stuff is actually Scriptural? I’m glad I scare people with such a mindset away. Jesus scared a lot of them away too, when their reasons for following him were shallow.

You erroneously assume that anyone who believes that following Christ leads to greatness must have been motivated to follow him for that very reason. That is wrong of you.

You also, to you own detriment, ascribe a worldly definition to "greatness". I want to do great things in Christ, whether that be quietly raising my children to love the Lord, or becoming the next Billy Graham. The former would certainly not be considered "great" by the world, but if it is God's calling for me, then it is the greatest thing possible.

28 posted on 08/02/2007 9:16:06 AM PDT by The Blitherer (What would a Free Man do?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: P-Marlowe
Harry Potter may not be a Christian allegory, but in the end all allegories are what you, the reader, make of them.

I wouldn't call them an "allegory," since that's a specific literary type (like Pilgrim's Progress.) But, even so, I don't fully agree. Allegories (or literary analogies) are always the fruit of the author's understanding.

Consider the Christ parallels of the Matrix trilogy, as opposed to the Christ parallels of Lord of the Rings. The Matrix was far more Gnostic Christian than orthodox Christian - and that was the result of the Wachowski brother's immersion in eastern mysticism, Christian gnosticism, and Greek philosophy. LOTR, on the other hand, was the result of Tolkien's immersion in the Catholic faith - so elements of the Christian myth(*) were borrowed for his LOTR story.

If you read The Deathly Hallows, you find the same sort of thing. It parallels The Lion, the Witch, and the Wardrobe much more than the Matrix (which surprised me - I predicted a Matrix Revolutions-style ending, where Harry Potter would have to allow himself to embrace death to defeat Voldemort.) The ending Rowling puts in the Deathly Hallows is not the sort of result an unbeliever would choose. It even involves a conversation between Harry Potter and Dumbledore that could have been given by Aslan (and earlier, there are two unambiguous Biblical quotations.)

(I'm constrained by the desire not to give any spoilers - so I hope my point is being communicated through the vagueness.)

(*) When I use the term "Christian myth," I do not mean that Christianity is not true, but instead that it has the epic resonance of a mythical story. I use the term in the same sense that C.S. Lewis did.

29 posted on 08/02/2007 9:24:45 AM PDT by jude24 (Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: P-Marlowe

Oh yeah? I would dearly love a citation on that... let’s just say it would mean I’m *not* reading even more into Harry Potter than is there...


30 posted on 08/02/2007 9:27:35 AM PDT by JenB
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal
The whole idea of mercy is the fact that I am NOT deserving of this.

OK. So, since you're contrasting this with Harry Potter, where in the HP books does it suggest that he really IS deserving of greatness? Heck, he had it thrust upon him at one year of age, through no action of his own.

31 posted on 08/02/2007 9:34:59 AM PDT by Sloth (The GOP is to DemonRats in politics as Michael Jackson is to Jeffrey Dahmer in babysitting.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal; ItsOurTimeNow

“Scripture is wrong? Then why are you on this thread? “

No - I was just giving ItsOurTimeNow a little dig about Reformed eschatology.


32 posted on 08/02/2007 11:31:09 AM PDT by PetroniusMaximus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 21 | View Replies]

To: jude24; P-Marlowe
I wouldn't call them an "allegory," since that's a specific literary type (like Pilgrim's Progress.) But, even so, I don't fully agree. Allegories (or literary analogies) are always the fruit of the author's understanding.

I would agree that allegory is a literary type. And if an author has taken the time to write an allegory, the reader should try to understand the author's meaning. But if the author has not provided a key that allows the reader to translate unambiguously from symbol x to definition y , then there will always be a problem of interpretation.

As C.S. Lewis says, there is nothing written by the hand of man that cannot be allegorized. He was often amazed that people read meanings into his works of which he had no conscious idea when he wrote them.

In the afterword to his The Pigrim's Regress, Lewis states

When allegory is at its best, it approaches myth, which must be grasped with the imagination, not with the intellect...It is the sort of thing you cannot learn from definition: you must rather get to know it as you get to know a smell or a taste, the 'atmosphere' of a family or a country town, or the personality of an individual.
In his essay "Tolkien's The Lord of the Rings", he states the following:
What shows that we are reading myth, not allegory, is that there are no pointers to a specifically theological, or political, or psychological application. A myth points, for each reader, to the realm he lives in most. It is a master key; use it on what door you like.
For a simple allegory, there would be a one-to-one correspondense between symbol and meaning. For the best allegory, and here we enter myth, there can never be a single meaning.

The Harry Potter books may not be allegory, even though they may be allegorized by a clever reader. But I do think Rowling has created stories that approach myth. And as myth, every reader will have to enter upon his own path in that enchanted world she has created.

33 posted on 08/02/2007 12:51:33 PM PDT by stripes1776
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal
It has to do with the orphaned boy who sleeps in a closet and thinks he’s nothing (because he’s told that by his cruel guardians) who is suddenly told he’s special—and that he’s destined for greatness. What a completly anti-Christian message.

Really?

Let us see.....

It has to do with the orphaned shepard boy who sleeps in a closet watches sheep and thinks he’s nothing (because he’s told that by his cruel guardians brothers) who is suddenly told he’s special—and that he’s destined for greatness.

It has to do with the orphaned farm boy who sleeps in a closet thrashes wheat behind a winepress and thinks he’s nothing (because he’s told that by his cruel guardians Midianite Overlords) who is suddenly told he’s special—and that he’s destined for greatness.


34 posted on 08/02/2007 1:05:03 PM PDT by Harmless Teddy Bear (A good marriage is like a casserole, only those responsible for it really know what goes into it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: PetroniusMaximus; ItsOurTimeNow

I got it. :-) Sorry for the misunderstanding.

What about reformed eschatology are you speaking of specifically? Or are you saying preterist eschatology? (I know plenty of reformed ppl who aren’t preterists)


35 posted on 08/02/2007 5:39:06 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Harmless Teddy Bear

Yes, and I don’t think either of those examples would say they think they’re special or that they were destined for greatness. In fact, Joseph was really obnoxious the way he taunted his brothers with his dreams (the purpose of which he didn’t understand at the time). God culled the “i’m special” thing out of him by very harsh means.

What fun. Yeah, I’m pretty sure these boys were more convinced that it was God who was special, and not them.


36 posted on 08/02/2007 5:43:47 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 34 | View Replies]

To: Sloth

Um... the lady in the article seems to think “we all want to be told we’re special/destined for greatness.” and that that’s a-ok!


37 posted on 08/02/2007 5:46:26 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: The Blitherer
It's a shame Lewis's books aren't "Christian" enough for you. As a child, they were instrumental in introducing me to the wonders and joy of following Christ, and the scope of the spiritual world that lies beyond this one....Of course I studied the Bible to gain a solid Scriptural understanding, but Lewis's books gave me the hunger to learn more.

It's a shame that Scripture wasn't enough for you to do this.

I've read and thoroughly enjoyed Lewis's books. I love his writing. He is thought provoking. But he is also inclusivist. Lewis is not Scripture and shouldn't be wasted time on in church. However it is certainly worth reading all kinds of stuff (within reason - e.g. not worth reading playboy 'for the articles.') as long as you realize that where it doesn't line up with Scripture, it is just plain false.

38 posted on 08/02/2007 5:49:24 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: P-Marlowe; Cyrano; jude24; xzins; blue-duncan
I agree with your post wholeheartedly.

It is not the end of the world that people should read books like this. I'm not going to go that far. But something about the deep fanaticism for these books bothers me. Just more evidence of humanity's misplaced priorities at best, and an attraction for the supernatural (but not the supernatural one and only God) more likely.

I started to read the Prisoner of Azkaban and about four pages in I was so creeped out by the dark and foreboding fatalistic ... atmosphere... that I quit. My hubby Cyrano has read many of them however and I also agree they are cleverly written. Cyrano? care to add your wisdom?

39 posted on 08/02/2007 5:55:04 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal; P-Marlowe
I started to read the Prisoner of Azkaban and about four pages in I was so creeped out by the dark and foreboding fatalistic ... atmosphere... that I quit.

That explains a lot. It really does.

The setup of Prisoner of Azkaban is very dark and foreboding, because it needs to be. Harry Potter needs to be kept in terror that Sirius Black, the man who went to prison for betraying his parents to Voldemort, has escaped to find Harry. It's supposed to be dark and foreboding, so that when you find out that Sirius Black is indeed HP's godfather and is looking to protect him FROM Voldemort (and that he was imprisoned unjustly), you are surprised. It starts out dark, but there's a flash of light at the end.

But something about the deep fanaticism for these books bothers me.

A lot if it has to do with the fact that there hasn't been a decent epic story written in a long time, so when there is an epic story with a great sense of humor, it resonates with people. The fascination I have for the books, at least, is that I haven't read a good story like them since LOTR.

40 posted on 08/02/2007 6:03:55 PM PDT by jude24 (Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal; P-Marlowe; Cyrano; jude24; xzins; blue-duncan; Corin Stormhands

My take on Harry Potter — I can’t make it through an entire book or an entire movie.

I love fantasy/sci fi. I watch and rewatch the LOTR. Herbert, Heinlein, Clarke, Lawhead, .... loved all of it. Grew up with it.

But I can’t wade through Harry the P. It’s corny. It’s “Wendy the Good Little Witch” and “Caspar the Friendly Ghost” without the animation.

Sorry, but it isn’t interesting. Religious? — Hardly.


41 posted on 08/02/2007 6:07:50 PM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain And Proud of It! Those who support the troops will pray for them to WIN!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 39 | View Replies]

To: xzins
Sorry, but it isn’t interesting. Religious? — Hardly.

HP7 is strongly religious.

42 posted on 08/02/2007 6:17:06 PM PDT by jude24 (Quis custodiet ipsos custodes?)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: jude24

I guarantee you that it’ll be so corny that I can’t get more than a few pages into it.

I’ll be praying for Bugs Bunny to take over from Caspar. Maybe that’ll be religious. :>)


43 posted on 08/02/2007 6:33:09 PM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain And Proud of It! Those who support the troops will pray for them to WIN!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 42 | View Replies]

To: xzins; jude24; Terriergal
I’ll be praying for Bugs Bunny to take over from Caspar. Maybe that’ll be religious. :>)

I just bought season two and season three of Rocky and Bullwinkle -- (85 1/2 hour episodes).

Now that was a great show.

44 posted on 08/02/2007 6:50:53 PM PDT by P-Marlowe (LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o*)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 43 | View Replies]

To: P-Marlowe

Rocky & Bullwinkle had the best grasp of the pun of any show ever.


45 posted on 08/02/2007 6:53:10 PM PDT by xzins (Retired Army Chaplain And Proud of It! Those who support the troops will pray for them to WIN!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 44 | View Replies]

To: xzins; Terriergal; P-Marlowe; Cyrano; jude24; blue-duncan
But I can’t wade through Harry the P. It’s corny.

Could be because it's written for children. Too many people keep forgetting that. No one, Rowling chief amongst them, is calling her Lewis or Tolkien. Keep that in mind.

That said, I don't give a bogart's patootie if folks like/read them or not. I happen to like them and enjoy them.

Sorry, but it isn’t interesting. Religious? — Hardly.

While I likewise have problems with this being a part of any church program/message, there ARE deeply religious (and Christian) themes in Harry Potter.

And, unlike most people who say there aren't, I've actually read all seven books.

That said, I'm not getting involved in ~another~ Potter thread.

But, if you won't read the books at least read this article: Harry Potter and the Fire breathing Fundamentalists

46 posted on 08/02/2007 7:22:58 PM PDT by Corin Stormhands (I drink coffee for your protection.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Corin Stormhands; xzins; Terriergal; P-Marlowe; Cyrano; jude24

“Could be because it’s written for children. ......I happen to like them and enjoy them.”

Dam-, you just let one of the neener secrets out of the bag. I’m going to tell the LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o* on you, I’m going to tell the LPFOKETT GAHCOEEP-w/o* on you! He’ll probably make you spring for the libations at the next annual pig roast.


47 posted on 08/02/2007 7:28:26 PM PDT by blue-duncan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 46 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal

“What about reformed eschatology are you speaking of specifically?”

postmil, amil or preterist.


48 posted on 08/02/2007 8:35:01 PM PDT by PetroniusMaximus
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: xzins

lol


49 posted on 08/02/2007 10:08:41 PM PDT by Terriergal ("I am ashamed that women are so simple To offer war where they should kneel for peace," Shakespeare)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 41 | View Replies]

To: Terriergal

I watched J K Rowling’s interview last Sunday and what struck me was her obsession with death -— the death of her characters. For an entire hour she spoke of “killing off” her characters. It was eerie. She didn’t speak of their lives and living but their deaths and why she had to kill them or wanted to kill them. Though she spoke regretfully of having to “kill them off”, the obsession with the death of her characters stood out in the interview.


50 posted on 08/03/2007 4:53:46 AM PDT by Uncle Chip (TRUTH : Ignore it. Deride it. Allegorize it. Interpret it. But you can't ESCAPE it.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]


Navigation: use the links below to view more comments.
first 1-5051-65 next last

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson