Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part V: The Catholics and the Pope
Cor ad cor loquitur ^ | 16 November 2004 | Al Kresta/Dave Armstrong

Posted on 08/30/2007 2:32:41 PM PDT by annalex

Why I Returned to the Catholic Church (Al Kresta)

. . . Including a Searching Examination of Various Flaws and Errors in the Protestant Worldview and Approach to Christian Living

Part V: The Catholics and the Pope





(edited and transcribed by Dave Armstrong; originally uploaded on 16 November 2004).
[Part breakdown and part titles by Annalex]

Operation Rescue was another major turning point for me, because it exposed the papal pretensions of many evangelical leaders. When I saw the obvious biblical justification for Operation Rescue, and yet the resistance it got from major evangelical leaders, I said to myself, "there's really no hope for this community. In fact, it isn't a community; it's a bunch of disparate fiefdoms, kingdoms that these people have built. These are sheep without a shepherd. There's nobody here that can bring this together." If an issue like abortion cannot bring the community together, in this way, and if civil disobedience of this sort . . . if people like Norman Geisler and Bill Gothard can't simply let their brothers and sisters go about this work (they may think it's foolish, unwise, or that pragmatically it's not gonna work), but let 'em do it. Don't try to argue from the Bible against Operation Rescue, because you can't do it. It's an impossible job. Norm Geisler was on my show. A question was posed to Geisler [by another guest]: "are you telling me that if there were four-year-olds being slaughtered at governmentally-approved slaughter clinics, that you wouldn't trespass in order to save one of those four-year-old's lives?" He said "I would only do it if it was my kid." It was pathetic. I couldn't believe he said it. It was a reductio ad absurdum. And then I read Bill Gothard's material against Operation Rescue and it was sinful, it was a caricature of the position, and a twisting of Scripture like I've rarely seen from a major evangelical leader; and I had read papal statements, too, not on Operation Rescue, but on civil disobedience, and I knew there was a rich tradition in the Roman Catholic Church, dealing with social crises of this form, and what a conscientious conscience should do. Operation Rescue was one of the fional nails in the coffin of my evangelical experience. I was so terribly disillusioned by the response. I just couldn't believe it. I think you can construct a good argument against Operation Rescue, but not from the Scripture; rather, on pragmatic grounds. These guys wouldn't do that; they wanted to argue from the Scripture on it, and I said "there's no hope." That was a turning point for me. I could go on; many other reasons.

So I resigned [the pastorate] in December of 1990. I had wanted to a year before, but I had commitments. The church wasn't ready. These were good people. I didn't want to enter into battle. I didn't know where I was going, and I knew I wasn't fit to be a pastor, because you don't need the blind leading the blind. I shared with them about the Real Presence because by that time it was no longer speculative for me. I was thoroughly convinced on biblical authority. I told people that I was tired, fatigued. I had been working full-time at WMUZ [radio station; his talk show] and the church for over a year. I told them that I was thinking of becoming Catholic or Eastern Orthodox. I couldn't really stay at the church. I just felt bad. If you don't know where you're going, you shouldn't be taking people with you. I was on my own journey. I wasn't fit to lead them on it. So I keft the church and began pursuing Catholicism and Orthodoxy.

During the previous year, I'd had Fr. Peter Stravinskas on [the radio show], and during the course of some of his discussion, as he was describing the Mass as a re-presentation of Christ, I recognized the doctrine that I held in a diluted form. It was a doctrine that I used to call "memorial consciousness." I used to teach that at Shalom: that past saving events could be re-presented in the present. The Jews tried to do it with Passover. The same thing with the Lord's Supper. So when Fr. Peter said that, I had this rush of adrenaline while I was on the air, and I said to myself, "my God, I'm a Catholic" [understanding laughter in the room].

I was still pastoring at Shalom at the time. It was an exhilarating experience but disturbing at the same time. It was as though I had been walking in the dark for a long time and getting along pretty well, and then all of a sudden the light gets turned on, and you realize that you're perched on a tightrope about 100 feet above the ground. You were doing fine, as long as you didn't know where you were. But here you are: mid-way out, and on the one hand, you can take heart that you made it so far, but on the other hand, you're trembling because you can see how far you gotta go, and you're not quite certain you're gonna get to the other side. So I had this subjective experience, and yet I hadn't really settled the Marian dogmas, or a lot of things, and I honestly didn't like most of the Catholics I've met. Now you guys are pretty good; I like you [great laughter], . . . once I left Shalom I began going to Masses at various places. I'd read on a Saturday books on Catholicism and Orthodoxy and sacramental thinking. Then I'd go to Mass, and every time I'd think I was ready to come back in, based on my study, all I'd have to do was go to Mass to get cold water thrown on me: thoroughly disillusioning. Part of that was that I wasn't connected to a community . . . it wasn't a happy time because I was really feeling left in the lurch; intellectually persuaded of many things, but not any community life at all.

So I kept getting these Catholics on the air and debating. I thought it was good programming, too. I had Karl Keating on once debating Harold O.J. Brown. And I remember, Karl was good, but I was much more impressed with Harold: at how non-victorious his Protestant arguments were. I really thought that he'd be able to push Karl around a little bit, but he couldn't. Karl made some great points. Then I had Fr. Pater Stravinskas on, on Reformation Day, to talk about the Reformation with this Church history professor from Dallas Seminary, and again I was impressed with Fr. Peter, but I was very impressed at how the Dallas prof really couldn't justify the Reformation. When all was said and done, that guy had no reason to be a Protestant. He agreed with Fr. Peter that the real reasons for the Reformation were not theological, they were economical and political [he chuckles] . . .

Another major turning point was when I came across Matthew 16. I knew the Protestant arguments, and I had taught them myself. To be honest with you, I really thought that the Catholic argument was a justification of the status quo. I thought it was a rationalization of the papal office. I didn't think it was exegetically sound at all. There was such unanimity. All the preachers I'd ever heard on Matthew 16 said that the rock was Peter's faith, or it was a play on words, and I just assumed that. And I figured that evangelicals are known for exegesis; Catholics aren't, so evangelicals are probably right on this. So I went and picked up two commentaries in my library, by two noted evangelical New Testament scholars: Donald [D.A.] Carson, who is among the top ten brightest people I'd ever had on the air, and another fellow, R.T. France, whom I know is an excellent exegete. And I brought them up to my bed. And both of them, the same night (before I had ever heard Scott Hahn tapes); I read Carson, and he wrote "had it not been for Protestant overreaction to exaggerated papal claims, virtually nobody would have ever thought that the rock referred to Peter's faith. It's clearly a reference to Peter." And I said, "I've never heard that before!" Then I went over to R.T. France, and I read that, and I said, "is he quoting Carson?" He said virtually the same thing! And I was stunned. And I began to make some phone calls, and I found out that in New Testament scholarship, this is becoming the consensus position! Peter is the rock, not Peter's confession. It's straightforward.


TOPICS: Catholic; Evangelical Christian; Religion & Culture; Religion & Politics
KEYWORDS: alkresta; converion; faith; reversion; thejourneyhome

1 posted on 08/30/2007 2:32:47 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: annalex

bump


2 posted on 08/30/2007 2:35:09 PM PDT by VOA
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Salvation; NYer; Romulus; jo kus; Kolokotronis; kosta50; Forest Keeper; Alex Murphy; HarleyD; ...

Thank you for your comments last week.


3 posted on 08/30/2007 2:35:39 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: annalex

I’m sure I’ll hate myself for asking, but what is “the” Protestant worldview?


4 posted on 08/30/2007 2:42:16 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: annalex
I read Carson, and he wrote "had it not been for Protestant overreaction to exaggerated papal claims, virtually nobody would have ever thought that the rock referred to Peter's faith. It's clearly a reference to Peter." And I said, "I've never heard that before!" Then I went over to R.T. France, and I read that, and I said, "is he quoting Carson?" He said virtually the same thing! And I was stunned. And I began to make some phone calls, and I found out that in New Testament scholarship, this is becoming the consensus position! Peter is the rock, not Peter's confession. It's straightforward.

How interesting! It's remarkable how "scholarly" positions can change, but it can take forever to filter down to the average person in a congregation ... if it ever does.

I'm reminded of the way the theory of evolution keeps spawning new concepts and propositions, while the average person on the street still remembers learning how the giraffe streeeettched its neck, in the 4th grade.

5 posted on 08/30/2007 2:42:41 PM PDT by Tax-chick (Gravity! It's not just a good idea, it's the law!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: annalex
"had it not been for Protestant overreaction to exaggerated papal claims, virtually nobody would have ever thought that the rock referred to Peter's faith. It's clearly a reference to Peter." And I said, "I've never heard that before!" Then I went over to R.T. France, and I read that, and I said, "is he quoting Carson?" He said virtually the same thing! And I was stunned. And I began to make some phone calls, and I found out that in New Testament scholarship, this is becoming the consensus position! Peter is the rock, not Peter's confession. It's straightforward.

Hmmmmm, there may be a lot of people coming Home soon.

Seriously, I see people seeking truth, the mainline churches are barely limping along. People are searching and many of them are finding designer churches that teach what they want to believe or churches full of emotion with a charismatic leader but many of them are finding their home in the church of Our Lord, it is good.

6 posted on 08/30/2007 2:51:29 PM PDT by tiki
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Mr. Lucky
Heck if I know .

A it is euphenism he made up so he could create division ??

He can be Catholic if he wants, good for him.

Why does he focus so much effort on critiquing Protestants?

Why is he so focused on “issues” rather than The Messiah?

7 posted on 08/30/2007 2:57:20 PM PDT by biscuit jane
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: annalex
Thank you for your comments last week.

That's odd - I don't recall making any comments on one of your threads.

8 posted on 08/30/2007 3:00:01 PM PDT by Alex Murphy (As heard on the Amish Radio Network! http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-religion/1675029/posts)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane

he:

“These are sheep without a shepherd. There’s nobody here that can bring this together.” If an issue like abortion cannot bring the community together, in this way, and if civil disobedience of this sort . . . “

ME:

Uh, ‘scuse me I/WE do have a Shepard — his name is Jesus Christ.

And yes we are united in our stance on abortion.

You are correct, no earthly voice/personality/pastor speaks for the Christian community. We strive toward the goal, sometimes falling short, but we press on. We don’t need or want a figure head/central leader other than Christ himself.

In fact I’d say better to set the problems of the Catholic church in order before you try turning attention to the personal issues you have with the greater CHristian community.


9 posted on 08/30/2007 3:08:54 PM PDT by biscuit jane
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane

None of us are saved by how well we denigrate someone else’s faith.


10 posted on 08/30/2007 3:09:22 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Mr. Lucky
From the perspective of this segment, the absence of a coherent Protestant view is what Al Kresta found lacking:
there's really no hope for this community. In fact, it isn't a community; it's a bunch of disparate fiefdoms, kingdoms that these people have built. These are sheep without a shepherd

...

Peter is the rock, not Peter's confession. It's straightforward.


11 posted on 08/30/2007 3:15:58 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: annalex

OK, but what do you think that has to do with my worldview?


12 posted on 08/30/2007 3:20:41 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane
Why does he focus so much effort on critiquing Protestants?

I don't think he does. The only place I coud find his reversion story is on this fellow convert blog. Al's Kresta in the Afternoon radio program is typically about civic involvement, events of the day form the Catholic perspective, etc.

If you want a show that concentrates on conversions, it would be Marcus Grodi's Journey Home Program.

13 posted on 08/30/2007 3:20:56 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 7 | View Replies]

To: Alex Murphy

You are correct. My devious plan has just worked.


14 posted on 08/30/2007 3:21:48 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 8 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane
In fact I’d say better to set the problems of the Catholic church in order before you try turning attention to the personal issues you have with the greater CHristian community.

You don't understand. They don't believe in a greater Christian community, unless it submits to their perceived authority.

15 posted on 08/30/2007 3:24:05 PM PDT by wmfights (LUKE 9:49-50 , MARK 9:38-41)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane
better to set the problems of the Catholic church in order before you try turning attention to the personal issues you have with the greater CHristian community.

On this I agree. However, one of the internal problems of Catholics in the West has been not knowing the treasure they have in their Church:

I honestly didn't like most of the Catholics I've met.

16 posted on 08/30/2007 3:25:44 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane

quote:

“...ever thought that the rock referred to Peter’s faith. It’s clearly a reference to Peter.” And I said, “I’ve never heard that before!” Then I went over to R.T. France, and I read that, and I said, “is he quoting Carson?” He said virtually the same thing! And I was stunned. And I began to make some phone calls, and I found out that in New Testament scholarship, this is becoming the consensus position! Peter is the rock, not Peter’s confession. It’s straightforward.”

Is that the fulcrum that Mr. based his Catholic conversion on ?

Yes it could be Peter (also could be reference to Christ)
and if so, how does that translate into
the Catholic faith being the only faith ,
and the Vatican II church of today ??

And if the VII modern Catholic church is the one true church
then what about the previous incarnations of the Catholic church ?? (First Vatican council and the Council of Trent).

Were those Catholic churches wrong ??

Where do I write Mr. to ask him these questions ??


17 posted on 08/30/2007 3:25:48 PM PDT by biscuit jane
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Mr. Lucky

How would I know?


18 posted on 08/30/2007 3:26:42 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 12 | View Replies]

To: annalex

My point exactly.


19 posted on 08/30/2007 3:28:38 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: annalex
With apologies to all, these are the preceding installments in the series:

Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part I: Darkness
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part II: Doubts
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part III: Tradition and Church
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part IV: Crucifix and Altar

I forgot to post them in the flag post.

20 posted on 08/30/2007 3:29:21 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: annalex

What a great read; thanks for posting this!


21 posted on 08/30/2007 3:30:00 PM PDT by diamond6 (Everyone who is for abortion has been born. Ronald Reagan)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane
Is that the fulcrum

No it is not; see my post #20.

Where do I write Mr. to ask him these questions ??

You can see a reference to al Kresta's call-in program in my #13, and perhaps find a contact method that suits you there.

From myself, I can say that the Vatican II did not form a new church any more that Nice, Trent, or Vatican I did.

22 posted on 08/30/2007 3:32:38 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 17 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane

I get the impression this fella never had a relationship with Jesus Christ...He appears to be hunting for Him...He knows ABOUT Jesus but he doesn’t know Jesus...

One can see the conversation and conviction is all about ‘church’, not Jesus...


23 posted on 08/30/2007 3:34:06 PM PDT by Iscool (OK, I'm Back...Now what were your other two wishes???)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: annalex
With apologies to all, these are the preceding installments in the series

If you're having to apologize for them, maybe you shouldn't post any more of them :P

24 posted on 08/30/2007 3:36:44 PM PDT by Alex Murphy (As heard on the Amish Radio Network! http://www.freerepublic.com/focus/f-religion/1675029/posts)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 20 | View Replies]

To: Mr. Lucky

I agree that there is not single comprehensive Protestnat theology or practice to get away from. If that is your point, it is a correct one. However, Kresta’s journey home was not away from anything but toward the Catholic Church. Naturally, he could have fashioned himself his own brand of Protestantism easily, as he was already a pastor and had a divinity degree. In fact, for a while this is exactly what he was doing, — till it occurred to him that this is what sheep do when the shepherd is not there.


25 posted on 08/30/2007 3:38:27 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Alex Murphy

Bump.


26 posted on 08/30/2007 3:40:10 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

To: Iscool
the conversation and conviction is all about ‘church’, not Jesus

That is because Evangelical Protestants are Christian too.

27 posted on 08/30/2007 3:41:17 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 23 | View Replies]

To: annalex
I don’t know which denomination he belonged to while he was a Protestant. If his church has no confession, it certainly would seem easy for the sheep to wander out of the pasture. My church, for what it’s worth, is confessional in nature and it’s the adherence to our confessions which shepherds us. (If you'll forgive me for torturing your analogy so)
28 posted on 08/30/2007 4:02:15 PM PDT by Mr. Lucky
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 25 | View Replies]

To: Mr. Lucky
He was nondenominational Evangelical.

I pretty much adopted the Bible Alone as my authority. Baptists were in. Lutherans were kind of out, because they had robes and believed in baptismal regeneration. Reformed people and Presbyterians were pretty good, but you couldn't figure out why they baptized infants and they didn't believe in the Millennium. They were good for a lot of things, but not for everything. And pentecostals were puzzling, too, because they believed the Bible a lot but they seemed to get too much into this experiential thing, and you couldn't make out what they were saying, half the time -this tongues-speaking. Reformed and Presbyterian people provided the best scholars for the Bible-believing movement, but they baptized infants and they didn't believe in the Millennium. So I guess I was a fundamentalist in the early years because it was a narrow focus. But my pastor had a great heart and embraced many many people. That was a good spirit.

I never chose a theological tradition. I really couldn't sum myself up as a Lutheran, or a Reformed, even a Baptist. I never found a systematic theology that I was comfortable with. I was more practically and evangelistically-oriented. I didn't have time to work through all this. In fact, it's only been since I got out of the pastorate, that I began thinking systematically; theologically. Most of my theology has always been task-oriented. I went to churches, but I was never a member of a church until I pastored one.

Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part I: Darkness

Also

I got this call to pastor a church (Shalom Ministry) in 1985: a job that eventually would lead me to the Catholic Church. I didn't know it at the time. I was looking for this church and I figured that since it wasn't out there, I'd make it myself. And that's what ended up happening. Since there was no church that I felt conformed to a biblical shape, that I might as well use this opportunity to experiment a bit. I really did believe when I entered pastoral work, that you had only two choices: it seemed to me that you could go the independent church route, where every pastor is their own pope, and they've got the Bible alone to work with, or you ought to get honest with yourself, and go ahead and become Orthodox or Catholic, and accept an authoritative teaching church. I really didn't like all the mediating positions in between. Why do you want denominations? Why not -- if you're going to accept the authority of a tradition -- accept the authority of the Orthodox or Catholic traditions, which at least have a developed theology of tradition. Tradition is inevitable

...

By 1987 I was pastoring a church and hosting an evangelical talk show.

Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part II: Doubts


29 posted on 08/30/2007 4:14:24 PM PDT by annalex
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 28 | View Replies]

To: tiki; annalex
many of them are finding designer churches that teach what they want to believe ...

Bingo! We will believe and worship you, Lord, as "we" choose, not as you asked.

30 posted on 08/30/2007 4:44:31 PM PDT by NYer ("Where the bishop is present, there is the Catholic Church" - Ignatius of Antioch)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 6 | View Replies]

To: annalex
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part V: The Catholics and the Pope(Al Kresta)
The Hail Mary of a Protestant (A true story)
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part IV: Crucifix and Altar(Al Kresta)

Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part III: Tradition and Church (Al Kresta)
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part II: Doubts (Al Kresta)
Why I Returned to the Catholic Church. Part I: Darkness(Al Kresta)
Conversion Story - Matt Enloe (former Baptist) [prepare to be amazed!]
THE ORTHODOX REVIVAL IN RUSSIA

Conversion Story - David Finkelstein (former Jew)
Conversion Story - John Weidner (former Evangelical)
12 Reasons I Joined the Catholic Church
Conversion Story - Tom Hunt
The Tide Is Turning Toward Catholicism: The Converts

John Calvin Made Me Catholic
Journey Home - May 21 - Neil Babcox (former Presbyterian) - A minister encounters Mary
Going Catholic - Six journeys to Rome
My (Imminent) Reception into the Roman Catholic Church
From Calvinist to Catholic

A Convert's Pilgrimage [Christopher Cuddy]
From Pastor to Parishioner: My Love for Christ Led Me Home (to the Catholic Church) [Drake McCalister]
Lutheran professor of philosophy prepares to enter Catholic Church
Patty Bonds (former Baptist and sister of Dr. James White) to appear on The Journey Home - May 7
Pastor and Flock Become Catholics

The journey back - Dr. Beckwith explains his reasons for returning to the Catholic Church
Famous Homosexual Italian Author Returned to the Church Before Dying of AIDS
Dr. Francis Beckwith Returns To Full Communion With The Church
Catholic Converts - Stephen K. Ray (former Evangelical)
Catholic Converts - Malcolm Muggeridge

Catholic Converts - Richard John Neuhaus
Catholic Converts - Avery Cardinal Dulles
Catholic Converts - Israel (Eugenio) Zolli - Chief Rabbi of Rome
Catholic Converts - Robert H. Bork , American Jurist (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Converts - Marcus Grodi

Why Converts Choose Catholicism
The Scott Hahn Conversion Story
FORMER PENTECOSTAL RELATES MIRACLE THAT OCCURRED WITH THE PRECIOUS BLOOD
John Calvin Made Me Catholic
Journey Home - May 21 - Neil Babcox (former Presbyterian) - A minister encounters Mary

Going Catholic - Six journeys to Rome
My (Imminent) Reception into the Roman Catholic Church
From Calvinist to Catholic
A Convert's Pilgrimage [Christopher Cuddy]
From Pastor to Parishioner: My Love for Christ Led Me Home (to the Catholic Church) [Drake McCalister]
Lutheran professor of philosophy prepares to enter Catholic Church

Patty Bonds (former Baptist and sister of Dr. James White) to appear on The Journey Home - May 7
Pastor and Flock Become Catholics
The journey back - Dr. Beckwith explains his reasons for returning to the Catholic Church
Famous Homosexual Italian Author Returned to the Church Before Dying of AIDS
Dr. Francis Beckwith Returns To Full Communion With The Church

Catholic Converts - Stephen K. Ray (former Evangelical)
Catholic Converts - Malcolm Muggeridge
Catholic Converts - Richard John Neuhaus
Catholic Converts - Avery Cardinal Dulles
Catholic Converts - Israel (Eugenio) Zolli - Chief Rabbi of Rome

Catholic Converts - Robert H. Bork , American Jurist (Catholic Caucus)
Catholic Converts - Marcus Grodi
Why Converts Choose Catholicism
How I led Catholics Out of the Church [Steve Wood]
The Scott Hahn Conversion Story
FORMER PENTECOSTAL RELATES MIRACLE THAT OCCURRED WITH THE PRECIOUS BLOOD

Conversion Story - Rusty Tisdale (former Pentecostal)

31 posted on 08/30/2007 4:49:42 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane

**no earthly voice/personality/pastor speaks for the Christian community. **

Hmmm.

You don’t believe the Gospels when Christ consecrated the Apostles and then the 72, telling them to go forth and spread the good news, baptizing them in the Name of the Father and of the Son and of the Holy Spirit?? Were not these apostles and 72 men that wnet out two by two human beings? Just like Christ?

Were not they the voice for the Early Church, the Catholic Church?

May I direct you back to your Bible, please.

Or do you Protestants only read St. Paul and not the Gospels?

Guess I am puzzled.


32 posted on 08/30/2007 4:55:25 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

**72 men that wnet out two by two **

72 men that went out two by two


33 posted on 08/30/2007 4:57:06 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
Thanks for the post.

I never noticed it was seventy two men.

Numbers do not happen by accident in the bible.

Two thousand times seventy two equals one hundred forty four thousand, the number of the elect .

34 posted on 08/31/2007 7:17:16 AM PDT by perseid 67 (God is great!)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: Salvation

Refering to the guy that wrote the article — he is not the voice for the Christian community.

Yes the apostles were humans- are you trying to be sarcastic?


And which early Catholic church are you refering to ?

Which council period ??

And as for your saracasm regarding what gospel Christians study, we (myself and my peers in bible group etc) study the
whole bible . Not as you claim only St. Paul.

In fact none of my Catholic friends and family study the bible. They ignore scripture and live their lives according to the world’s mold, however they do spend time doing “works”.
They do attend church and allege the righteousness
of the faith however.

My CHristian peers make negative comments about the Catholic faith and I defend the Catholics. But reading some of these articles and some of the posts I can see it is not a 2 way street.

When will the Catholic church clean itself up ? Why spend time critiquing the greater CHristian community when
the Catholic church is such a shambles ?


35 posted on 08/31/2007 12:19:58 PM PDT by biscuit jane
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 32 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane

I was not trying to be sarcastic. I am very good at marking it with </sarcasm.

The fact that you are not aware, seemingly of the one, holy, catholic, and apostolic Church instituted by Christ through the apostles gives me pasue.

Secondly, Christ gave the keys of the kingdom to Peter. Peter’s primacy is discussed on number other threads.

Thirdly, the Coucil period is the Council of Jerusalem. It is refrerenced and Peter is quoted in Acts.

Thus, we have the one, holy, catholic and apostolic Church.


36 posted on 08/31/2007 8:28:59 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

To: biscuit jane

**When will the Catholic church clean itself up ? **

I consider that you might be slamming the Catholic Church here.

Just because some priests made mistakes does not make the entire Catholic Church is bad.

Just because some teachers in public schools make mistakes of molesting children does not mean that all public schools are bad.

And, likewise, just because some Protestant ministers make mistakes of molesting children does not mean that all Protestant ministers or churches are bad.

We really can’t be general like that and slam the entire Catholic Church now, can we?

Argument finished.


37 posted on 08/31/2007 8:32:26 PM PDT by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson