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Married priests a possibility says Cardinal Egan [Catholic Caucus]
Florida Catholic ^ | March 11, 2009 | GREG SHEMITZ

Posted on 03/12/2009 6:09:59 AM PDT by NYer

ALBANY, N.Y. (CNS) | The possibility the Catholic Church will allow married priests shouldn’t be dismissed, New York Cardinal Edward M. Egan said March 10 during a radio interview.

“It’s a perfectly legitimate discussion,” he said during a talk radio program in Albany hosted by Fred Dicker. “I think it has to be looked at.”

Cardinal Egan was in the state capital as part of a legislative lobbying visit. He also discussed various New York legislative issues as well as the broader picture of the church’s public policy on topics such as same–sex marriage and access to abortion for minors.

Cardinal Egan’s resignation as head of the New York Archdiocese was accepted by the pope Feb. 23. He will serve as apostolic administrator of the archdiocese until April 15 when Archbishop Timothy M. Dolan of Milwaukee will be installed as his successor.

In the radio show’s final minutes, when asked about priestly celibacy by Dicker, who also is state editor of the New York Post newspaper, Cardinal Egan said he thought the subject would be coming up for discussion by the church’s hierarchy.

“I’m not so sure it wouldn’t be a good idea to decide (whether priests can be married) on the basis of geography and culture, not to make an across–the–board determination,” the cardinal said. He noted that priests in the Eastern Catholic churches –– such as the Romanian, Maronite or Melkite churches –– are allowed to be married with “no problem at all.”

The Eastern Catholic churches often admit married men to the priesthood in their regions of origin but do not permit marriage after ordination. Outside their regions of origin, the Eastern churches may not admit married men to ordained ministry without a dispensation from the Vatican.

Some married clergymen from other Christian faiths who have joined the Catholic Church have later been ordained as Catholic priests.

In 1980 the Vatican approved special provisions under which former Episcopal priests who had become Catholics could apply for ordination in the Catholic priesthood. Since then several dozen married former Episcopal priests have become Catholic priests. In addition, a few married former Methodist and Lutheran ministers have been ordained Catholic priests.

Frederick J. Luhmann, an author and researcher who has kept track of the ordinations of married men for more than a decade, told Catholic News Service March 11 he counted 93 former Episcopal, Lutheran, Presbyterian, Methodist and Baptist clergymen among U.S. Catholic priests currently serving the church.

In 2002 Luhmann wrote a book titled “Call and Response: Ordaining Married Men as Catholic Priests.”

In a 2006 interview with the Brazilian newspaper O Estado de Sao Paolo, Brazilian Cardinal Claudio Hummes, who had just been named head of the Vatican’s Congregation for Clergy, said that “even though celibacy is part of Catholic history and culture, the church could review this question, because celibacy is not a dogma but a disciplinary question.”

The newspaper went on to quote Cardinal Hummes as saying the shortage of priests in some areas of the world was a challenge, and the church was not “immobile” but “changes when it should change.”

However, a couple of days later he issued a statement to clarify his remarks, saying priestly celibacy was not currently up for discussion by church authorities. He emphasized it was a long and valuable tradition in the Latin–rite church, based on strong theological and pastoral arguments.


TOPICS: Catholic; History; Ministry/Outreach; Religion & Culture
KEYWORDS: celibacy; egan
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1 posted on 03/12/2009 6:09:59 AM PDT by NYer
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To: Salvation; narses; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...
“It’s a perfectly legitimate discussion,” he said during a talk radio program in Albany hosted by Fred Dicker. “I think it has to be looked at.”

Perhaps he did not follow the Vatican Synod of October 2005 - Catholic bishops reaffirm priestly celibacy

2 posted on 03/12/2009 6:12:07 AM PDT by NYer ("Run from places of sin as from a plague." - St. John Climacus)
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To: NYer

Egan was very unpopular with his priests during his stay in NYC. Perhaps confusing statements like this are one of the reasons why.


3 posted on 03/12/2009 6:16:31 AM PDT by livius
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To: NYer

While the possiblity of married priests is an interesting one I wonder who will be supporting the priest’s family? Many people aren’t all that generous when it comes to giving. I could just hear some of they griping now, “why do I have to support his family?”


4 posted on 03/12/2009 6:17:04 AM PDT by LottieDah (If only those who speak so eloquently on the rights of animals would do so on behalf the unborn)
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To: All
“I’m not so sure it wouldn’t be a good idea to decide (whether priests can be married) on the basis of geography and culture, not to make an across–the–board determination,” the cardinal said. He noted that priests in the Eastern Catholic churches –– such as the Romanian, Maronite or Melkite churches –– are allowed to be married with “no problem at all.”

Mar Nasrallah Peter Cardinal Sfeir, Patriarch of the Maronite Catholic Church, specifically addressed the topic of married priests at the Vatican Synod.

Sfeir warned the 245 bishops attending the synod's eighth daily session that marriage causes "just as many problems as it resolves," according to the text released by the Vatican. A married priest must care for his wife and children as well as look after his flock, said Sfeir. A bishop also has more difficulty in relocating a married priest than an unmarried one, the patriarch said. The cardinal, like many prelates at the synod, linked the lack of priestly vocations to the question of celibacy. "Celibacy is the most precious jewel in the treasure of the Catholic Church. But how do you conserve it in an atmosphere full of eroticism: newspapers, internet, advertising posters, shows, all shameless and always wounding the virtue of chastity," he said.
Full Text

5 posted on 03/12/2009 6:17:49 AM PDT by NYer ("Run from places of sin as from a plague." - St. John Climacus)
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To: NYer

Sex is a snare, isn’t it? I can’t help but think that sex was a pretty strong thought in the back of Martin Luther’s mind too. Some day all Christians will be united, but it’ll be little more than a social club if they keep forsaking doctrine a paragraph at a time.


6 posted on 03/12/2009 6:18:46 AM PDT by CanaGuy (Go Harper!)
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To: NYer

It seems in every area that many conservatives hold dear there is no escape. Not in the church, the state, the country, the world. Conservatives are being squeezed in every direction, trying to change them, conform them, and silence them. The pressure is building under the surface, like a huge magma chamber. The frustration I feel is becoming overwhelming.There is no place in this country it would seem for MY viewpoint to be accepted. My question is, are we deluding ourselves on this website? Are we really the majority? Are there enough of us to effect any change? If so, when? How? At what cost? and Why hasn’t it made a difference? Where is the outrage, besides on a few websites and conservative bloggers? Is there any hope of turning around this ship, or is it truly too late? You know, it would not have mattered if the rudder of the Titanic could reverse the direction of the ship once it struck the iceberg; it was still going to sink no matter the direction it was pointed. I guess my question is, have we already struck the iceberg?


7 posted on 03/12/2009 6:19:01 AM PDT by wombtotomb (Since it is above his paygrade, why can't we err on the side of caution about when life begins?)
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To: NYer

Married priests are a reality if you happen to be a married protestant minister who converts and is subsequently ordained a Catholic priest.


8 posted on 03/12/2009 6:19:47 AM PDT by Ozone34 ("There are only two philosophies: Thomism and bullshitism!" -Leon Bloy)
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To: LottieDah
While the possiblity of married priests is an interesting one I wonder who will be supporting the priest’s family?

That is precisely the problematic situation in some of the Eastern Catholic Churches (see my post #5). As Cardinal Sfeir commented at the Synod, he must be very selective in assigning a married priest to a parish; they will need the financial resources to support him, his wife, children, their medical, dental and educational needs, provide them with a home, and salary to sustain the family. If for any reason there is conflict in that parish, the cost of relocating the married priest is much greater than a celibate one.

My pastor is Maronite and celibate. His grandfather, on the other hand, was a married priest.

9 posted on 03/12/2009 6:22:12 AM PDT by NYer ("Run from places of sin as from a plague." - St. John Climacus)
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To: NYer
Up until 1139 Catholic Priest COULD marry.

Celibacy is not Cannon from the lips of Christ and can be changed.

accepting married priest might bring more priests into the fold and more mentally stable priests at that.

10 posted on 03/12/2009 6:23:56 AM PDT by Vaquero ( "an armed society is a polite society" Robert A. Heinlein)
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Why can’t a priests wife work and support the family?


11 posted on 03/12/2009 6:24:10 AM PDT by TerP26
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To: NYer
... they will need the financial resources to support him, his wife, children, their medical, dental and educational needs, provide them with a home, and salary to sustain the family.

And then (one might reasonably expect based on the experiences of other denominations with married clergy), the church would somehow have to pay for his-and-hers divorce attorneys, separate maintenance, child support, the new wife and children, etc. A general case for married clergy is very difficult to make in a culture of instant divorce.

It doesn't appear this is the usual experience in Eastern churches (Catholic and Orthodox) with married clergy. However, it would be interesting to know what percentages of divorce or marital estrangement those churches' clergy have, and whether there's a trend to more or less marital disruption.

12 posted on 03/12/2009 6:29:08 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("There are more enjoyable ways of going to Hell." ~ St. Bernard)
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To: NYer
He also discussed various New York legislative issues as well as the broader picture of the church’s public policy on topics such as same–sex marriage and access to abortion for minors.

I wonder what he had to say about these other topics, too.

13 posted on 03/12/2009 6:37:18 AM PDT by Heartland Mom ("Government's first duty is to protect the people, not run their lives." - Ronald Reagan)
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To: CanaGuy
I can’t help but think that sex was a pretty strong thought in the back of Martin Luther’s mind too.

Luther's libido resided, prominently, in his frontal lobe. Right alongside his paranoia, schizophrenia and alcoholism.

14 posted on 03/12/2009 6:39:39 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: TerP26

“Why can’t a priests wife work and support the family?”

In the Orthodox Church here in America, most priests’ wives do indeed work.

Supporting a priest and his family is not such a big deal. The parish simply has to commit to pay a reasonable wage and provide reasonable benefits. The overwhelming majority of Orthodox parishes in the world are staffed by married priests.

One shouldn’t second guess +Sfeir, however. Given the context within which the Maronite Church operates in the West, which is to say, as a comparatively tiny sui juris church along side the truly huge Latin Church with its own practices like celibacy, the politics of the situation militates against the assignment of substantial numbers of married priests to parishes here. Beyond that, as the cardinal points out, married priests bring with them their own set of problems.

Personally, I’ll take a married priest over a celibate (and we’ve had both in our parish) for parish work any day, but that’s as cultural for me as a celibate priest is for my Irish Catholic cousins.


15 posted on 03/12/2009 6:40:07 AM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: LottieDah
While the possiblity of married priests is an interesting one I wonder who will be supporting the priest’s family? Many people aren’t all that generous when it comes to giving. I could just hear some of they griping now, “why do I have to support his family?”

My pastor is a convert from the Episcopal Church. He is married and has grown kids. He has grandkids as well. As far as I know, he receives the same amount from the diocese as any other priest.

16 posted on 03/12/2009 6:43:01 AM PDT by al_c (Avoid the consequences of erudite vernacular utilized irrespective of necessity)
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To: wombtotomb

Why would god care if priests marry?


17 posted on 03/12/2009 6:44:20 AM PDT by PurpleMan
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To: Tax-chick

“However, it would be interesting to know what percentages of divorce or marital estrangement those churches’ clergy have, and whether there’s a trend to more or less marital disruption.”

For the Orthodox its rather lower than the general population but in part that may be explained by the fact that all priests must marry, if at all, before ordination and cannot be married after so the skewing of divorce rates in the general population by serial divorce and remarriage won’t occur among clerical marriages.


18 posted on 03/12/2009 6:45:35 AM PDT by Kolokotronis (Christ is Risen, and you, o death, are annihilated!)
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To: wombtotomb; All
The pressure is building under the surface, like a huge magma chamber. The frustration I feel is becoming overwhelming.

Have you seen this?

Heed Wilkerson's warning

19 posted on 03/12/2009 6:46:34 AM PDT by NYer ("Run from places of sin as from a plague." - St. John Climacus)
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To: Vaquero
Up until 1139 Catholic Priest COULD marry.

Incorrect. Married men could be ordained but they were required to adopt the discipline of lex continentiae. Once ordained a single Priest was not allowed to marry, although many thumbed their noses at their vows and did anyway.

Celibacy is not Cannon(sic) from the lips of Christ and can be changed.

Celibacy is a discipline highly praised by Christ and St. Paul and practiced by the Apostles.

accepting married priest might bring more priests into the fold and more mentally stable priests at that.

A specious argument at best. You might want to enlighten yourself as to the shortage of Priests in the Eastern Rites as well as the Greek Orthodox Church. Some of the most unbalanced men in this world are married, many repeatedly.

20 posted on 03/12/2009 6:47:01 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: NYer

Egan needs to be quiet and fade away.


21 posted on 03/12/2009 6:47:32 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: Religion Moderator
Some married clergymen from other Christian faiths who have joined the Catholic Church have later been ordained as Catholic priests.

In 1980 the Vatican approved special provisions under which former Episcopal priests who had become Catholics could apply for ordination in the Catholic priesthood. Since then several dozen married former Episcopal priests have become Catholic priests. In addition, a few married former Methodist and Lutheran ministers have been ordained Catholic priests.

Frederick J. Luhmann, an author and researcher who has kept track of the ordinations of married men for more than a decade, told Catholic News Service March 11 he counted 93 former Episcopal, Lutheran, Presbyterian, Methodist and Baptist clergymen among U.S. Catholic priests currently serving the church.

Catholic Caucus?

22 posted on 03/12/2009 6:48:36 AM PDT by Alex Murphy ( "Every country has the government it deserves" - Joseph Marie de Maistre)
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To: Kolokotronis

Good point. One might also expect fewer divorces absolutely, vs. a random group of first-marriages, in a population where remarriage is not option. Most people don’t seem to get divorced just in order to live alone the rest of their lives!


23 posted on 03/12/2009 6:55:42 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("There are more enjoyable ways of going to Hell." ~ St. Bernard)
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To: NYer
While I certainly see the value of a celibate priesthood. one must wonder if the hypocrisy and dishonesty is worth the continued pretense that we have celibate priests.

Look at some of the other reports, such as the one below on Austria, and the almost daily news items about priests stealing money to support their girlfriends and lavish lifestyles.

Most priests today probably oppose marriage, unless Gay marriages were allowed, then there would be great support, though allowing heterosexual married priests in some rectories would stop some activity.

Were not the priests who choose marriage and left the more honest ones. These were the committed, and no one ever asked why they choose to leave - it was not always marriage, I think, but when they did get married they were honest about it. Had they been allowed to continue in some capacity things might have been quite different. We probably would not have half the problems we have today. There is something to be said for honesty.

24 posted on 03/12/2009 6:59:02 AM PDT by VidMihi ("In fide, unitas; in dubiis, libertas; in omnibus, caritas.")
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To: NYer

Wilkerson is a false prophet. IMO. Do we give him a year? Two?


25 posted on 03/12/2009 7:12:02 AM PDT by Dutchboy88
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To: Alex Murphy

Hit the road.


26 posted on 03/12/2009 7:14:19 AM PDT by A.A. Cunningham
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To: NYer

Another one who’s been a great disappointment. Can’t retire fast enough.


27 posted on 03/12/2009 7:15:39 AM PDT by Antoninus (Every time Obama speaks, I buy more silver.)
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To: PurpleMan
Why would god care if priests marry?

Are you Catholic? If not, why do you care?

And it's God, by the way
28 posted on 03/12/2009 7:18:29 AM PDT by Antoninus (Every time Obama speaks, I buy more silver.)
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To: Antoninus

Cardinal Egan has the eyes and smile of a wolf in shepherd’s clothing.


29 posted on 03/12/2009 7:49:33 AM PDT by nanetteclaret (The Fourth Estate is the Fifth Column)
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To: Alex Murphy

It appears to be merely a statement of historical fact. If you see a discussion of the beliefs of others, or a comparison - let me know.


30 posted on 03/12/2009 7:52:47 AM PDT by Religion Moderator
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To: Alex Murphy
Catholic Caucus?

In your response:

Some married clergymen from other Christian faiths who have joined the Catholic Church have later been ordained as Catholic priests.

you highlighted the wrong words. That's better.

31 posted on 03/12/2009 8:07:08 AM PDT by NYer ("Run from places of sin as from a plague." - St. John Climacus)
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To: Vaquero
Up until 1139 Catholic Priest COULD marry.

The Council of Elvira in Spain (310) dealt with priestly chastity (canon 33), and presented perfect continence as a norm that must be maintained and observed and not as an innovation. The lack of any revolt or surprise attested to its widespread practice.

At the Council of the Church of Africa (390) and above all at the Council of Carthage, (419), which St. Augustine attended, similar norms were adopted. These councils recalled the ecclesiastical praxis of the obligation of perfect chastity, affirming that such praxis is of apostolic tradition.

What St. Gregory VII, and later the Second Lateran Council (1139) did was not to “introduce” the law of celibacy but simply confirm that it was in force and issue regulations for its observance. Since most recruiting for the priesthood was already among the unmarried, the Second Lateran Council forbade priestly marriage, declaring it null and void in the case of priests, deacons or anyone with a solemn vow of religion. Source.

Celibacy is not Cannon from the lips of Christ and can be changed.

You are correct. It is a discipline, not a doctrine. Jesus Christ did not marry. The Catholic priest models his life on that of Christ.

accepting married priest might bring more priests into the fold and more mentally stable priests at that.

There are actually plenty of vocations today in faithful dioceses: Denver, Northern Virginia, and Lincoln, Nebraska, have great numbers of men entering the priesthood. If other dioceses, such as Milwaukee or Albany, want to answer the question of why they have so few vocations, the answer is simple: Challenge young men to a religious life that is demanding, countercultural, sacrificial, and loyal to the Holy Father and Catholic teaching. This is the surest way to guarantee a greater number of vocations.

32 posted on 03/12/2009 8:19:23 AM PDT by NYer ("Run from places of sin as from a plague." - St. John Climacus)
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Comment #33 Removed by Moderator

To: Tax-chick
It doesn't appear this is the usual experience in Eastern churches (Catholic and Orthodox) with married clergy. However, it would be interesting to know what percentages of divorce or marital estrangement those churches' clergy have, and whether there's a trend to more or less marital disruption.

Divorce is rare in the East. In the Maronite (and I presume this is true in other churches) Church, when a married man applies for ordination, he and his family undergo an exhaustive investigation. Their marriage is scrutinized to be certain it can withstand the rigors of parish life. Only then does the candidate begin his studies for the deaconate.

34 posted on 03/12/2009 8:32:01 AM PDT by NYer ("Run from places of sin as from a plague." - St. John Climacus)
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To: NYer
There are actually plenty of vocations today in faithful dioceses: Denver, Northern Virginia, and Lincoln, Nebraska, have great numbers of men entering the priesthood.

90% of the priests around here (NY Metro area) are imported from 3rd world nations....you just don't see many priests from the area.

When I was a kid in Catholic grade school, our parish had a large number of priests and nuns, all American or western European born. My HS was manned by Marist Brothers...all American or European. I just don't see this anymore, at least around here.

35 posted on 03/12/2009 8:41:53 AM PDT by Vaquero ( "an armed society is a polite society" Robert A. Heinlein)
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To: CanaGuy

Clerical celibacy is not a doctrine. It is not a divinely revealed Truth. Rather, it is a policy of the Roman Church. If it were a doctrine, then how could Rome consider itself in Communion with churches that allow married men to become priests?

Because clerical celibacy is not a doctrine, but rather a policy, it is subject to modification should the circumstances require it. Whether or not those circumstances are present today is another question.


36 posted on 03/12/2009 9:09:56 AM PDT by bobjam
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To: Vaquero
90% of the priests around here (NY Metro area) are imported from 3rd world nations

Vocations are blossoming in those dioceses where solid, orthodox catholicism is taught. Archbishop Burke had a waiting list for his seminary. Here in New York State, when is the last time you heard a bishop preach on the perils of sin? Albany and Rochester are counting down the remaining years until their 'progressive' bishops retire. It is like a wasteland up here. The good news in NY is the new bishop for the Diocese of Rockville Centre. It is a slow process but he is turning things around down there. Long Island was my home up until 16 years ago. Perhaps under Archbishop Dolan, you will see a change in NYC.

37 posted on 03/12/2009 9:15:20 AM PDT by NYer ("Run from places of sin as from a plague." - St. John Climacus)
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To: PurpleMan

You have to understand the difference between a job and a vocation.

Marriage is a vocation-it is who we are. A job or career is what we do.

Becoming a priest is a vocation. It is not possible to have 2 vocations. Celibacy in the priesthood is necessary because of this.

While many people do not believe this way, that is their perogative, and they are free to belong to a church that teaches otherwise. If marriage was a part of the example that Jesus gave us as the head of the church, I am pretty sure he would have married, since it was an extremely common practice for Jews to marry very young (under 18 yrs old). Seeing as he did not begin his ministry until the age of 30, he had more than ample time to do so prior to his ministry beginning. He did not, even though that would mean he would remain celibate and never experience the most initmate form of the human condition- sexuality. If it had been imperative or even necessary to his ministry, I doubt he would have chosen this path.

Also, it is true that some of his apostles were married. This was also addressed in scripture by the exhortation that it would be better to remain single if possible, and the discourse about some being made Eunics for the kingdom by choice (not in the literal sense, but by remaining celibate). The married apostles were converted after their marriage, and none of them married after becoming apostles.

While I hope that sheds some light on the catholic position, it oftentimes causes arguments even within the church, such as abortion and gay marriage does. Just because some folks want it, doesn’t make it ok or subject to change.

The last thing I will say on this is that there is a difference between a disipline and a dogma of faith. Dogmas are non negotiable. They are the absolutes. Disciplines are a way of helping us more fully practice the faith. Priestly celibacy is a discipline. There have been, and will be exceptions, just as Jesus made to apostles who had married prior to his ministry. Celibacy has served the church well these many millenia, and it is not going anywhere anytime soon; however, should a need arise or some grave situation that makes it necessary to allow priests to marry (which I cannot forsee but life is crazy so you never know) it will not negate the priesthood or the church as it will be only that a discipline has changed.

The church DOES allow married priests, it just does not allow priests to marry. There is a difference, it is just hard to see for someone without the proper understanding (not to impune you, just trying to fully answer a question, and yours was not taken with any malice at all) I welcome the chance to answer others when they pose a question. Thank you for yours :)


38 posted on 03/12/2009 9:16:28 AM PDT by wombtotomb (Since it is above his paygrade, why can't we err on the side of caution about when life begins?)
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To: wombtotomb

Vocation v. career— Interesting, insightful and informative. I hadn’t considered it in that context. I now understand the perspective. (”Ya wanna join? Here are the rules”)

Dogma v discipline; Ditto. Unfortunately, it appears that others have the two confused as they see a change in the “discipline” as an heretical end to their religion (and civilization as we know it).

As for me (thinking of Hawkey’s response to Fr. Mulcahy about becoming a priest): “I like my weekends free.”

Thanks.


39 posted on 03/12/2009 9:31:59 AM PDT by PurpleMan
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To: PurpleMan

No problem. I have a bit more insight than many, my son is going to seminary next year :)


40 posted on 03/12/2009 9:34:56 AM PDT by wombtotomb (Since it is above his paygrade, why can't we err on the side of caution about when life begins?)
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To: wombtotomb

From what I’ve read “The few, The proud, The seminarians.” :~)


41 posted on 03/12/2009 9:39:03 AM PDT by PurpleMan
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To: CanaGuy

You don’t need to be married to have sex. Haven’t you been following church news for the last 15 years?


42 posted on 03/12/2009 9:41:19 AM PDT by nufsed
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To: wombtotomb

Excellent post! If more married people recognized that *marriage* was their vocation, and that everything else they did was subsidiary, in support of the vocation, there would be fewer divorces, more children ... and more priests, too!


43 posted on 03/12/2009 9:41:49 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("There are more enjoyable ways of going to Hell." ~ St. Bernard)
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To: PurpleMan

Ya just gotta be today. Talk about a career looked down upon in the secular world. Its almost as bad as choosing to be a stay at home mom ;)

Not for nothing, I can’t tell you how many people told him to wait, he will grow out of it, and why does he want to be a priest.

He has wanted this since he was 8 years old. He is now 17. Still wants it more than life itself. Oh, he has his days, but God always lets him know he has been chosen. There have been many many things that have happened over the years, but one that sticks out in his mind was the following:

He was in school and there was a substitute in the class so they weren’t doing much. A couple of kids they never talked to because they were “goth” kids came over and they were all chatting. These were hardcore goth kids, vampire types, with all the trimmings.The goth kid decided to guess what each of the kids would be when they grew up. He went around from kid to kid and said things like lawyer, doctor, garbage man, etc, til he got to my son. He looked him straight in the eye and said you will be a priest. Ya could have knocked my son over with a feather LOL. There have been dozens of incidents like this, and they always seem to happen when he doubts himself.

He goes for a retreat tomorrow, one of his final for discernment before entering the seminary. I gave him to God when he was born; I guess He decided to take him :)


44 posted on 03/12/2009 9:50:29 AM PDT by wombtotomb (Since it is above his paygrade, why can't we err on the side of caution about when life begins?)
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To: A.A. Cunningham; NYer

Excellent answers!


45 posted on 03/12/2009 9:51:14 AM PDT by Salvation ( †With God all things are possible.†)
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To: Tax-chick

Thank you tax-chick. I also believe that if more would realize their vocation, and lived it, there would be more priests.

Our fidelity to our vocation is sending one to seminary next year :)


46 posted on 03/12/2009 9:52:46 AM PDT by wombtotomb (Since it is above his paygrade, why can't we err on the side of caution about when life begins?)
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To: wombtotomb

I saw that in your previous post. Excellent efforts, and best wishes to your son. One of my boys is interested in priesthood, but also wants to have ten children (and a prime-time herpetology show on “Animal Planet” ;-). I mentioned that women who have both the gumption and the stamina to produce ten children, and also like snakes, are pretty rare, and he said, “Well, there’s you!”

But anyway, Tom is only 12, and I’m sure God will provide more guidance when it becomes necessary. The education he’ll need to get a biology scholarship will also be useful if he decides to enter the seminary!


47 posted on 03/12/2009 9:59:48 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("There are more enjoyable ways of going to Hell." ~ St. Bernard)
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To: Tax-chick

excellent. It is really up to God to call, He just uses us to guide. All the best to you and your brood, in whatever endeavors they choose to take to make our world a more sane place :)

I would have loved to have had more than 3, “plumbing” problems played havoc there....

And your son is correct. I would not have been able to handle the snakes, although we did have lab rats as pets LOL.


48 posted on 03/12/2009 10:04:21 AM PDT by wombtotomb (Since it is above his paygrade, why can't we err on the side of caution about when life begins?)
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To: wombtotomb

He’s been asking for a rat, too ...

I once imagined having a normal life, but what would be fun about that!


49 posted on 03/12/2009 10:11:06 AM PDT by Tax-chick ("There are more enjoyable ways of going to Hell." ~ St. Bernard)
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To: Tax-chick

they make excellent pets! Just don’t feed it to the snake LOL.

You do have a normal life, for you. It ends much to quickly so cherish every moment,as I am sure you know and do from the sounds of it! My youngest is 16 this year and my oldest is getting married in Jan..... Cheers!


50 posted on 03/12/2009 10:14:51 AM PDT by wombtotomb (Since it is above his paygrade, why can't we err on the side of caution about when life begins?)
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