Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Not quite the whole Bible in three years but still a lot of Scripture for a daily Mass attendant.
1 posted on 11/01/2009 3:53:12 AM PST by GonzoII
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies ]


To: Alex Murphy

Okay Murphy, here are the Stats...


2 posted on 11/01/2009 3:58:34 AM PST by GonzoII ("That they may be one...Father")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII

Any way you cut it, just going to Mass will NOT give a functional knowledge of Scripture.


3 posted on 11/01/2009 4:07:54 AM PST by papertyger (A difference that makes no difference is no difference)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII

Totally cool post. Thanks!


5 posted on 11/01/2009 4:36:56 AM PST by Mad Dawg (Oh Mary, conceived without sin: pray for us who have recourse to thee.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII

Nothing from 1 Chronicles, Judith or Obadiah?

Sad.

How could anyone pass up Judith 13 (especially these days)?


8 posted on 11/01/2009 4:49:56 AM PST by vladimir998
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII; Alex Murphy

This drastically understates the coverage of the New Testament in the bible by the mass, because it doesn’t take into account parallel readings. I did a similar study myself, and found that there were only a handful of gospel verses not used in obligatory masses.

Also, it should be noted that those verses which are cited by the New Testament, as well as the context surrounding them, are the portions of the Old Testament used by the New Testament. A well-crafted homily should explore how the New Testament fulfills the selected Old Testament verses, examine the moral doctrine espoused, and provide some guidance in applying it to our lives. Unfortunately, there is a crisis of poorly-crafted homilies in the modern church.

I would be extremely cautious of declaring that the Mass has covers the bible insufficiently. For hundreds of years after Christ, the canon of the bible was simply those books were used in mass. Given that most Christians were illiterate, and that bibles typically cost several years’ wages (picture a two-hundred thousand dollar bible to compare that to modern times!), ancient Christians laymen’s exposure to the bible consisted largely of what they heard in masses. Even priests often could privately access only a “breviary,” which consisted of the gospels, letters, and Old Testament canticles (by which was meant the prayers and songs of the Old Testament, including the Psalms). (They certainly had access to a full bible during their studies.) Yet, I’m sure we should literally be put to shame by their piety.

On the other hand, Satan had not so thoroughly corrupted supposedly Christian society. Christians today require both a childlike faith but also a wisdom of understanding of theologians. So the Catholic Church was quite correct in joining Protestant churches to insist that Christians indepenedently read of the scripture daily.


11 posted on 11/01/2009 6:33:10 AM PST by dangus (Nah, I'm not really Jim Thompson, but I play him on FR.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII; informavoracious; larose; RJR_fan; Prospero; Conservative Vermont Vet; ...
+

Freep-mail me to get on or off my pro-life and Catholic List:

Add me / Remove me

Please ping me to note-worthy Pro-Life or Catholic threads, or other threads of interest.

Obama Says A Baby Is A Punishment

Obama: “If they make a mistake, I don’t want them punished with a baby.”

12 posted on 11/01/2009 6:40:46 AM PST by narses ("These are the days when the Christian is expected to praise every creed except his own.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII; narses; Salamander; Markos33

This is not meant to be combative - simply my honest reaction/observation.

If the Church is including so much in the lectionary, what would be wrong with reading the entire Bible, beginning to end, and putting each reading in context?

Or is there some mystical significance to the jumbled order and selective readings?

That’s not to say you couldn’t read special passages on special days, like Christmas, Good Friday or Easter Sunday. Just that the entire text should be understood by the whole of Christ’s Church.


14 posted on 11/01/2009 6:51:24 AM PST by shibumi (" ..... then we will fight in the shade.")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII

And if you add in the readings from the Liturgy of the Hours, the percentage gets even higher...


15 posted on 11/01/2009 7:00:52 AM PST by markomalley (Extra Ecclesiam nulla salus)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII

I may not be seeing it, but is the three-year cycle for the Old Testament included in the OT numbers.

Great find, BTW.


19 posted on 11/01/2009 7:33:38 AM PST by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII
What I glean from this post is this: People love to toss out the accusation that Catholics don't read the Bible. Your post demonstrates that a Catholic who does nothing to practice his faith except attend weekly Mass (and the few Holy Days) will hear almost half the Bible. That's a far cry from "Catholics don't read the Bible." The Church is apparently formally requiring Catholics to hear at least half the Bible during their required weekly obligation to attend Mass. Correct? Now a really good Catholic may attend Mass during the week. Daily Communicants hear two thirds of the Bible. It's just part of the Mass. The priest, at every Mass, should be conducting his own little Bible Study with the congregation during the homily. This is the basic foundation of Bible knowledge for Catholics. Catholics are encouraged to study the Bible on their own and in groups in addition to this foundation. Now let's be fair about Bible consumption: How many Christians read this much of the Bible? And to be even more fair, what percentage of the Bible would we all throw out because it is just about Jewish battles, lineage, or the intricacies of Jewish tradition and ritual? Is anybody really studying those chapters? If we throw those out, the percentage of the relevant portion of the Bible that Catholics read goes up. Now be super fair: Christian religions have thrown parts of the original Bible out! What percentage? How do their numbers stack up when we calculate them without the sections they threw away? I think we can see that Catholics have nothing to be ashamed of when it comes to consumption of the Bible. It's an integral part of the Mass, which is the most important aspect of our faith. That old "Catholics don't read the Bible" just won't hunt. In fact, it's a lie.
77 posted on 11/01/2009 4:23:28 PM PST by Melian ("frequently in error, rarely in doubt")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII

I think the difference is that Mass scripture reading is part of the greater, a supplement to, and the Mass itself is scripture. Also, the homily on the scripture is not the Mass.

When I attended Protestant churches, the homily, sermon, is the crux of the service, and it is mostly Bible study, since they do not have Mass. They’re gathered to hear someone preach - about the Bible. It’s the sola scriptura thing again.

The majority of my scripture reading is outside Mass, often selected by what was included in the Mass. The value of scripture in Mass, to me, is providing the proper context and interpretation - a guide for my reading outside Mass.


87 posted on 11/02/2009 12:35:29 AM PST by D-fendr (Deus non alligatur sacramentis sed nos alligamur.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII

Quite useful thanks for posting this too.


104 posted on 11/02/2009 7:13:17 AM PST by FourtySeven (47)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII
www.catholicnewsagency.com

Thirty-first Week in Ordinary Time
November 3, 2009
Psalter: Week III
Color: Green


Saints:
Daily Readings:
  • First Reading: Romans 12:5-16a

     5 So we being many, are one body in Christ, and every one members one of another.
    6 And having different gifts, according to the grace that is given us, either prophecy, to be used according to the rule of faith;
    7 Or ministry, in ministering; or he that teacheth, in doctrine;
    8 He that exhorteth, in exhorting; he that giveth, with simplicity; he that ruleth, with carefulness; he that showeth mercy, with cheerfulness.
    9 Let love be without dissimulation. Hating that which is evil, cleaving to that which is good.
    10 Loving one another with the charity of brotherhood, with honour preventing one another.
    11 In carefulness not slothful. In spirit fervent. Serving the Lord.
    12 Rejoicing in hope. Patient in tribulation. Instant in prayer.
    13 Communicating to the necessities of the saints. Pursuing hospitality.
    14 Bless them that persecute you: bless, and curse not.
    15 Rejoice with them that rejoice; weep with them that weep.
    16 Being of one mind one towards another. Not minding high things, but consenting to the humble. Be not wise in your own conceits.

  • Psalm: Psalms 131:1-3

    1 Lord, my heart is not exalted: nor are my eyes lofty. Neither have I walked in great matters, nor in wonderful things above me.
    2 If I was not humbly minded, but exalted my soul: As a child that is weaned is towards his mother, so reward in my soul.
    3 Let Israel hope in the Lord, from henceforth now and for ever.

  • Gospel: Luke 14:15-24

    15 When one of them that sat at table with him, had heard these things, he said to him: Blessed is he that shall eat bread in the kingdom of God.
    16 But he said to him: A certain man made a great supper, and invited many. 17 And he sent his servant at the hour of supper to say to them that were invited, that they should come, for now all things are ready.
    18 And they began all at once to make excuse. The first said to him: I have bought a farm, and I must needs go out and see it: I pray thee, hold me excused.
    19 And another said: I have bought five yoke of oxen, and I go to try them: I pray thee, hold me excused.
    20 And another said: I have married a wife, and therefore I cannot come.
    21 And the servant returning, told these things to his lord. Then the master of the house, being angry, said to his servant: Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the feeble, and the blind, and the lame.
    22 And the servant said: Lord, it is done as thou hast commanded, and yet there is room.
    23 And the Lord said to the servant: Go out into the highways and hedges, and compel them to come in, that my house may be filled.
    24 But I say unto you, that none of those men that were invited, shall taste of my supper.


152 posted on 11/03/2009 9:28:43 AM PST by GonzoII ("That they may be one...Father")
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

To: GonzoII; alphadog; infool7; Heart-Rest; HoosierDammit; red irish; fastrock; NorthernCrunchyCon; ...
+

Freep-mail me to get on or off my pro-life and Catholic List:

Add me / Remove me

Please ping me to note-worthy Pro-Life or Catholic threads, or other threads of general interest.

226 posted on 09/30/2013 8:01:41 PM PDT by narses
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies ]

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article


FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson