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Catholic Caucus: Sunday Mass Readings, 10-02-11, Twenty-Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
USCCB.org/New American Bible ^ | 10-02-11 | New American Bible

Posted on 09/29/2011 9:14:48 PM PDT by Salvation

October 2, 2011

 

Twenty-Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time

 

Reading 1 Is 5:1-7

Let me now sing of my friend,
my friend's song concerning his vineyard.
My friend had a vineyard
on a fertile hillside;
he spaded it, cleared it of stones,
and planted the choicest vines;
within it he built a watchtower,
and hewed out a wine press.
Then he looked for the crop of grapes,
but what it yielded was wild grapes.

Now, inhabitants of Jerusalem and people of Judah,
judge between me and my vineyard:
What more was there to do for my vineyard
that I had not done?
Why, when I looked for the crop of grapes,
did it bring forth wild grapes?
Now, I will let you know
what I mean to do with my vineyard:
take away its hedge, give it to grazing,
break through its wall, let it be trampled!
Yes, I will make it a ruin:
it shall not be pruned or hoed,
but overgrown with thorns and briers;
I will command the clouds
not to send rain upon it.
The vineyard of the LORD of hosts is the house of Israel,
and the people of Judah are his cherished plant;
he looked for judgment, but see, bloodshed!
for justice, but hark, the outcry!

Responsorial Psalm Ps 80:9, 12, 13-14, 15-16, 19-20

R. (Is 5:7a) The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.
A vine from Egypt you transplanted;
you drove away the nations and planted it.
It put forth its foliage to the Sea,
its shoots as far as the River.
R. The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.
Why have you broken down its walls,
so that every passer-by plucks its fruit,
The boar from the forest lays it waste,
and the beasts of the field feed upon it?
R. The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.
Once again, O LORD of hosts,
look down from heaven, and see;
take care of this vine,
and protect what your right hand has planted
the son of man whom you yourself made strong.
R. The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.
Then we will no more withdraw from you;
give us new life, and we will call upon your name.
O LORD, God of hosts, restore us;
if your face shine upon us, then we shall be saved.
R. The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.

Reading 2 Phil 4:6-9

Brothers and sisters:
Have no anxiety at all, but in everything,
by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving,
make your requests known to God.
Then the peace of God that surpasses all understanding
will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.

Finally, brothers and sisters,
whatever is true, whatever is honorable,
whatever is just, whatever is pure,
whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious,
if there is any excellence
and if there is anything worthy of praise,
think about these things.
Keep on doing what you have learned and received
and heard and seen in me.
Then the God of peace will be with you.

Gospel Mt 21:33-43

Jesus said to the chief priests and the elders of the people:
"Hear another parable.
There was a landowner who planted a vineyard,
put a hedge around it, dug a wine press in it, and built a tower.
Then he leased it to tenants and went on a journey.
When vintage time drew near,
he sent his servants to the tenants to obtain his produce.
But the tenants seized the servants and one they beat,
another they killed, and a third they stoned.
Again he sent other servants, more numerous than the first ones,
but they treated them in the same way.
Finally, he sent his son to them, thinking,
'They will respect my son.'
But when the tenants saw the son, they said to one another,
'This is the heir.
Come, let us kill him and acquire his inheritance.'
They seized him, threw him out of the vineyard, and killed him.
What will the owner of the vineyard do to those tenants when he comes?"
They answered him,
"He will put those wretched men to a wretched death
and lease his vineyard to other tenants
who will give him the produce at the proper times."
Jesus said to them, "Did you never read in the Scriptures:
The stone that the builders rejected
has become the cornerstone;
by the Lord has this been done,
and it is wonderful in our eyes?
Therefore, I say to you,
the kingdom of God will be taken away from you
and given to a people that will produce its fruit."


TOPICS: Catholic; General Discusssion; Prayer; Worship
KEYWORDS: catholic; ordinarytime; prayer
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For your reading, reflection, faith-sharing, comments, questions, discussion.

1 posted on 09/29/2011 9:14:59 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...
Posting Saturday's and Sunday's threads tonight since I will be gone over the weekend. (Serra Club Conference)

Alleluia Ping!
 
If you aren’t on this ping list NOW and would like to be, 
please Freepmail me.

2 posted on 09/29/2011 9:16:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Scripture readings taken from the Jerusalem Bible, published and copyright © 1966, 1967 and 1968 by Darton, Longman & Todd

Mass Readings


First reading Isaiah 5:1-7 ©
Let me sing to my friend
the song of his love for his vineyard.
My friend had a vineyard
on a fertile hillside.
He dug the soil, cleared it of stones
and planted choice vines in it.
In the middle he built a tower,
he dug a press there too.
He expected it to yield grapes,
but sour grapes were all that it gave.
And now, inhabitants of Jerusalem
and men of Judah,
I ask you to judge
between my vineyard and me.
What could I have done for my vineyard
that I have not done?
I expected it to yield grapes.
Why did it yield sour grapes instead?
Very well, I will tell you
what I am going to do to my vineyard:
I will take away its hedge for it to be grazed on,
and knock down its wall for it to be trampled on.
I will lay it waste, unpruned, undug;
overgrown by the briar and the thorn.
I will command the clouds
to rain no rain on it.
Yes, the vineyard of the Lord of Hosts
is the House of Israel,
and the men of Judah
that chosen plant.
He expected justice, but found bloodshed,
integrity, but only a cry of distress.

Psalm Psalm 79:9,12-16,19-20

Second reading Philippians 4:6-9 ©
There is no need to worry; but if there is anything you need, pray for it, asking God for it with prayer and thanksgiving, and that peace of God, which is so much greater than we can understand, will guard your hearts and your thoughts, in Christ Jesus. Finally, brothers, fill your minds with everything that is true, everything that is noble, everything that is good and pure, everything that we love and honour, and everything that can be thought virtuous or worthy of praise. Keep doing all the things that you learnt from me and have been taught by me and have heard or seen that I do. Then the God of peace will be with you.

Gospel Matthew 21:33-43 ©
Jesus said to the chief priests and the elders of the people, ‘Listen to another parable. There was a man, a landowner, who planted a vineyard; he fenced it round, dug a winepress in it and built a tower; then he leased it to tenants and went abroad. When vintage time drew near he sent his servants to the tenants to collect his produce. But the tenants seized his servants, thrashed one, killed another and stoned a third. Next he sent some more servants, this time a larger number, and they dealt with them in the same way. Finally he sent his son to them. “They will respect my son” he said. But when the tenants saw the son, they said to each other, “This is the heir. Come on, let us kill him and take over his inheritance.” So they seized him and threw him out of the vineyard and killed him. Now when the owner of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those tenants?’ They answered, ‘He will bring those wretches to a wretched end and lease the vineyard to other tenants who will deliver the produce to him when the season arrives.’ Jesus said to them, ‘Have you never read in the scriptures:
It was the stone rejected by the builders
that became the keystone.
This was the Lord’s doing
and it is wonderful to see?
‘I tell you, then, that the kingdom of God will be taken from you and given to a people who will produce its fruit.’

3 posted on 09/29/2011 9:26:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Largest 40 Days for Life ever! September 28 – November 6 (301 locations, 46 for the first time)
4 posted on 09/29/2011 10:27:22 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Prayers for The Religion Forum (Ecumenical)
5 posted on 09/29/2011 10:28:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Continue to Pray for Pope Benedict [Ecumenical]
6 posted on 09/29/2011 10:29:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Jesus, High Priest
 

We thank you, God our Father, for those who have responded to your call to priestly ministry.

Accept this prayer we offer on their behalf: Fill your priests with the sure knowledge of your love.

Open their hearts to the power and consolation of the Holy Spirit.

Lead them to new depths of union with your Son.

Increase in them profound faith in the Sacraments they celebrate as they nourish, strengthen and heal us.

Lord Jesus Christ, grant that these, your priests, may inspire us to strive for holiness by the power of their example, as men of prayer who ponder your word and follow your will.

O Mary, Mother of Christ and our mother, guard with your maternal care these chosen ones, so dear to the Heart of your Son.

Intercede for our priests, that offering the Sacrifice of your Son, they may be conformed more each day to the image of your Son, our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ. Amen.

Saint John Vianney, universal patron of priests, pray for us and our priests

This icon shows Jesus Christ, our eternal high priest.

The gold pelican over His heart represents self-sacrifice.

The border contains an altar and grapevines, representing the Mass, and icons of Melchizedek and St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney.

Melchizedek: king of righteousness (left icon) was priest and king of Jerusalem.  He blessed Abraham and has been considered an ideal priest-king.

St. Jean-Baptiste Vianney is the patron saint of parish priests.

7 posted on 09/29/2011 10:30:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Pray a Rosary each day for our nation.

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

 

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.


The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


8 posted on 09/29/2011 10:32:23 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



~ PRAYER ~

St. Michael, the Archangel, defend us in battle
 Be our protection against the wickedness
and snares of the devil;
May God rebuke him, we  humbly pray,
 and do thou, O Prince of the heavenly host,
 by the power of God,
 Cast into hell Satan and all the evil spirits
who prowl through the world seeking the ruin of souls.
 Amen
+

9 posted on 09/29/2011 10:33:24 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
God Save Our Country web site (prayer warriors)
Prayer Chain Request for the United States of America
Pray for Nancy Pelosi
Prayer and fasting will help defeat health care reform (Freeper Prayer Thread)
Prayer Campaign Started to Convert Pro-Abortion Catholic Politicians to Pro-Life
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
Non-stop Rosary vigil to defeat ObamaCare

From an Obama bumper sticker on a car:

"Pray for Obama.  Psalm 109:8"

Psalm 109:8

    "Let his days be few; and let another take his place of leadership."

PLEASE JOIN US -

Evening Prayer
Someone has said that if people really understood the full extent of the power we have available through prayer, we might be speechless.
Did you know that during WWII there was an advisor to Churchill who organized a group of people who dropped what they were doing every day at a prescribed hour for one minute to collectively pray for the safety of England, its people and peace?  


There is now a group of people organizing the same thing here in America. If you would like to participate: Every evening at 9:00 PM Eastern Time (8:00 PM Central) (7:00 PM Mountain) (6:00 PM Pacific), stop whatever you are doing and spend one minute praying for the safety of the United States, our troops, our citizens, and for a return to a Godly nation. If you know anyone else who would like to participate, please pass this along. Our prayers are the most powerful asset we have.    Please forward this to your praying friends.


10 posted on 09/29/2011 10:34:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Image Detail
 
 
 
October Devotion: The Holy Rosary

Since the 16th century Catholic piety has assigned entire months to special devotions. Pope Leo XIII personally started the practice of devoting October to the Rosary devotion. In a letter of September 1, 1883, mindful of the Rosary's power to strengthen faith and foster a life of virtue, he outlined the triumphs of the Rosary in past times and admonished the faithful to dedicate the month of October to the Blessed Virgin through the daily recitation of her Rosary in the presence of the Blessed Sacrament, in order to obtain through her intercession the grace that God would console and defend His Church in her sufferings.

We highly recommend that you read Pope John Paul II's Apostolic Letter Rosarium Virginis Mariae, or "On the Most Holy Rosary." It explains even further this wonderful devotion, and introduces the optional mysteries of light, or Luminous mysteries.

INVOCATION
Queen of the most holy Rosary, pray for us.

TO THE QUEEN OF THE HOLY ROSARY
Queen of the most holy Rosary, in these times of such brazen impiety, manifest thy power with the signs of thine ancient victories, and from thy throne, whence thou dost dispense pardon and graces, mercifully regard the Church of thy Son, His Vicar on earth, and every order of clergy and laity, who are sore oppressed in the mighty conflict. Do thou, who art the powerful vanquisher of all heresies, hasten the hour of mercy, even though the hour of God's justice is every day provoked by the countless sins of men. For me who am the least of men, kneeling before thee in supplication, do thou obtain the grace I need to live righteously upon earth and to reign among the just in heaven, the while in company with all faithful Christians throughout the world, I salute thee and acclaim thee as Queen of the most holy Rosary:

Queen of the most holy Rosary, pray for us.

TO OUR LADY OF THE ROSARY
O Virgin Mary, grant that the recitation of thy Rosary may be for me each day, in the midst of my manifold duties, a bond of unity in my actions, a tribute of filial piety, a sweet refreshment, an encouragement to walk joyfully along the path of duty. Grant, above all, O Virgin Mary, that the study of thy fifteen mysteries may form in my soul, little by little, a luminous atmosphere, pure, strengthening, and fragrant, which may penetrate my understanding, my will, my heart, my memory, my imagination, my whole being. So shall I acquire the habit of praying while I work, without the aid of formal prayers, by interior acts of admiration and of supplication, or by aspirations of love. I ask this of thee, O Queen of the holy Rosary, through Saint Dominic, thy son of predilection, the renowned preacher of thy mysteries, and the faithful imitator of thy virtues. Amen.

FOR THE CRUSADE OF THE FAMILY ROSARY
The Family Rosary Crusade, organized and directed by Father Patrick Peyton, C.S.C., sought to revive the practice of families reciting the Rosary daily within their homes. The Crusade has the encouragement and support of Pope Pius XII and it is succeeding admirably in realizing the desire of the Pope that no family would allow a day to pass without the recitation of the Rosary. This prayer was composed by Cardinal Spellman when the Crusade visited his Archdiocese.

O Queen of the most holy Rosary: with hearts full of confidence we earnestly beseech you to bless the Crusade of the Family Rosary. From you came the grace to begin it. >From you must come the grace to win souls to it. We beg you to bless this Crusade so that from every home the incense of this prayer will daily rise before you, O admirable Mother.

O Queen of Homes: by the power of the Rosary we beseech you to embrace all the members of our family in the love of your Immaculate Heart. May you abide with us and we with you, praying to you while you pray for us. May you preside in our homes as once you did at Nazareth with Jesus and Joseph, filling them with the holiness of your presence and inspiration.

O Queen of Peace: it is you who have placed the Rosary in our hands. It is you who bid us to recite it daily. By the power of the Family Rosary we beseech you to obtain peace for uspeace within our hearts, our homes, our country and throughout the world. Through the daily recitation of the Family Rosary we beg you to keep sin from our souls, enmities from our hearts and war from our shores. By the graces received from the devotion of the Family Rosary we pray to be made helpful to one another in following the paths of virtue so that we may be found worthy to be called children of your family, children of your home. Amen.

Cardinal Spellman

Prayer Source: Prayer Book, The by Reverend John P. O'Connell, M.A., S.T.D. and Jex Martin, M.A., The Catholic Press, Inc., Chicago, Illinois, 1954

Pray the Rosary

1.  Sign of the Cross:  In the name of the Father, and of the Son, and of the Holy Spirit.  Amen.

2.  The Apostles Creed:  I BELIEVE in God, the Father almighty, Creator of heaven and earth. I believe in Jesus Christ, His only Son, our Lord. He was conceived by the power of the Holy Spirit and born of the Virgin Mary. He suffered under Pontius Pilate, was crucified, died, and was buried. He descended to the dead. On the third day He rose again. He ascended into heaven and sits at the right hand of God, the Father Almighty. From thence He shall come to judge the living and the dead. I believe in the Holy Spirit, the holy catholic Church, the communion of saints, the forgiveness of sins, the resurrection of the body, and the life everlasting. Amen.

3.  The Lord's Prayer:  OUR Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name. Thy kingdom come. Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us. And lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

4. (3) Hail Mary:  HAIL Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now, and in the hour of our death. Amen. (Three times)

5. Glory Be:  GLORY be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit. As it was in the beginning, is now, and will be forever. Amen.

Fatima Prayer: Oh, my Jesus, forgive us our sins, save us from the fires of hell, lead all souls to heaven, especially those in most need of your mercy.

Announce each mystery, then say 1 Our Father, 10 Hail Marys, 1 Glory Be and 1 Fatima prayer.  Repeat the process with each mystery.

End with the Hail Holy Queen:

Hail, Holy Queen, Mother of Mercy, our life, our sweetness and our hope! To thee do we cry, poor banished children of Eve! To thee do we send up our sighs, mourning and weeping in this vale of tears! Turn then, most gracious advocate, thine eyes of mercy towards us; and after this, our exile, show unto us the blessed fruit of thy womb, Jesus!

O clement, O loving, O sweet Virgin Mary! Pray for us, O holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ.

Final step -- The Sign of the Cross

The Mysteries of the Rosary

By tradition, Catholics meditate on these Mysteries during prayers of the Rosary.
The biblical references follow each of the Mysteries below.
 

The Joyful Mysteries
(Mondays and Saturdays)
1. The Annunciation (Luke 1:26-38) [Spiritual fruit - Humility]
2. The Visitation (Luke 1: 39-56) [Spiritual fruit - Love of Neighbor]
3. The Nativity (Luke 2:1-20) [Spiritual fruit - Poverty of Spirit]
4. The Presentation (Luke 2:21-38) [Spiritual fruit - Purity of mind & body]
5. The Finding of Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52) [Spiritual fruit - Obedience ]

The Luminous Mysteries or Mysteries of Light
(Thursdays) see Rosarium Virginis Mariae
1. Jesus' Baptism in the Jordan (II Corinthians 5:21, Matthew 3:17 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Gratitude for the gift of Faith]
2. Jesus' self-manifestation at the wedding of Cana (John 2:1- 12) [Spiritual fruit - Fidelity]
3. Jesus' proclamation of the Kingdom of God, with His call to conversion (Mark 1:15, Mark 2:3-13; Luke 7:47- 48, John 20:22-23) [Spiritual fruit - Desire for Holiness]
4. Jesus' Transfiguration (Luke 9:35 and parallels) [Spiritual fruit - Spiritual Courage]
5. Jesus' institution of the Eucharist, as the sacramental expression of the Paschal Mystery. (Luke 24:13-35 and parallels, 1 Corinthians 11:24-25) [Spiritual fruit - Love of our Eucharistic Lord]

The Sorrowful Mysteries
(Tuesdays and Fridays)
1. The Agony in the Garden (Matthew 26:36-46, Luke 22:39-46) [Spiritual fruit - God's will be done]
2. The Scourging at the Pillar (Matthew 27:26, Mark 15:15, John 19:1) [Spiritual fruit - Mortification of the senses]
3. The Crowning with Thorns (Matthew 27:27-30, Mark 15:16-20, John 19:2) [Spiritual fruit - Reign of Christ in our heart]
4. The Carrying of the Cross (Matthew 27:31-32, Mark 15:21, Luke 23:26-32, John 19:17) [Spiritual fruit - Patient bearing of trials]
5. The Crucifixion (Matthew 27:33-56, Mark 15:22-39, Luke 23:33-49, John 19:17-37) [Spiritual fruit - Pardoning of Injuries]

The Glorious Mysteries
(Wednesdays and Sundays)
1.The Resurrection (Matthew 28:1-8, Mark 16:1-18, Luke 24:1-12, John 20:1-29) [Spiritual fruit - Faith]
2. The Ascension (Mark 16:19-20, Luke 24:50-53, Acts 1:6-11) [Spiritual fruit - Christian Hope]
3. The Descent of the Holy Ghost (Acts 2:1-13) [Spiritual fruit - Gifts of the Holy Spirit]
4. The Assumption [Spiritual fruit - To Jesus through Mary]
5. The Coronation [Spiritual fruit - Grace of Final Perseverance]


The Rosary-a tool for evangelization [Catholic Caucus]
OUR LADY AND ISLAM: HEAVEN’S PEACE PLAN (Say the Rosary) [Ecumenical]
Praying the Holy Rosary in October
[[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] On the Rosary
Lists Every Catholic Should be Familiar With: 15 [20] Mysteries of the Holy Rosary & When They Are Prayed
It Was the Rosary: Mainz Priest Talks About His Vocation

Rosary to Halt Construction of NYC Mosque (Catholic Caucus)
British Soldier Shot in Afghanistan is Saved by His ROSARY...Like His Great-Grandfather in WWII
Catholic Caucus: Rosary Beads Saved My Life, British Soldier Says
British soldier shot in Afghanistan is saved my his ROSARY
Rosary returned to Vietnam vet as pledged 44 years ago
Rosary for the Bishop celebrates six months of prayer, global expansion
Rosary Rallies for Priests Give Final Flourish to Their Special Year (ECUMENICAL)
The Unseen Power of the Rosary
Worldwide Rosary Relay to Offer Prayer for Priests
Boy Suspended For Rosary -- Reinstated

No-contact order over a student's rosary
After rosary campaign, Florida sheriff abruptly shuts down abortion clinic on Marian feast
Public Rosary in San Francisco to draw thousands [Catholic Caucus]
Chicago's Incredible Floating Rosary
Enourmous Rosary floats over Chicago
Surprised by the Joyful Mysteries (of the Rosary) [Catholic Caucus]
HISTORY OF THE ROSARY [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]

[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 5th Joyful Mystery: The Finding in the Temple (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 4th Joyful Mystery: The Presentation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 3rd Joyful Mystery: The Nativity (Patristic Rosary)
Praying the Holy Rosary in October
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 2nd Joyful Mystery: The Visitation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC/ORTHODOX CAUCUS] 1st Joyful Mystery: The Annuniciation (Patristic Rosary)
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] On the Rosary
Lists Every Catholic Should be Familiar With: 15 [20] Mysteries of the Holy Rosary & When They Are Prayed
It Was the Rosary: Mainz Priest Talks About His Vocation
Rosary to Halt Construction of NYC Mosque (Catholic Caucus)

British Soldier Shot in Afghanistan is Saved by His ROSARY...Like His Great-Grandfather in WWII
Catholic Caucus: Rosary Beads Saved My Life, British Soldier Says
British soldier shot in Afghanistan is saved my his ROSARY
Rosary returned to Vietnam vet as pledged 44 years ago
Rosary for the Bishop celebrates six months of prayer, global expansion
Rosary Rallies for Priests Give Final Flourish to Their Special Year (ECUMENICAL)
The Unseen Power of the Rosary
Worldwide Rosary Relay to Offer Prayer for Priests
Boy Suspended For Rosary -- Reinstated
NY school sued after teen suspended over rosary

Student Suspended for Wearing Rosary Beads
[CATHOLIC CAUCUS] The 3:30 Beads!
Catholic Biblical Apologetics: Private Devotions to Mary: The Rosary
Benedict XVI Promotes Rosary in Fatima [Catholic Caucus]
Archbishop Naumann, Bishop Finn Lead Mother's Day Rosary at Planned Parenthood
Did the Apostles Pray the Rosary? (First Novena to the Holy Spirit?) [Catholic Caucus]
The Importance of the Meditated Holy Rosary -- What the Popes have to say [Catholic Caucus]
A Ladder from Earth to Heaven: The Rosary for All Christians
Jesus is in the Holy Rosary
The Rosary, a powerful weapon against the devil

History of The Scriptural Rosary [Ecumenical]
The Lord Is with Thee
Rosary of Our Lady's Tears(Catholic Prayer Thread)
The Rosary and Me - Catholic/Orthodox Caucus
Rosary promoted as path to Christ and peace [at third annual Rosary Bowl NW]
The Efficacy and Power of One Hail Mary [Ecumenical]
“ Let Us Do It!“ (Sunday: Rosary to be simultaneously prayed on five continents)
The Fruits of the Mysteries of the Rosary
[Catholic Caucus] One Million Rosaries
The Family Rosary [Try it for Lent!] (Catholic Caucus)

History of the Scriptural Rosary - Meditating on The Word
Rosary Resurgence [Ecumenical]
Beginning Catholic: How to Pray the Rosary: Contemplating Christ With Mary [Ecumenical]
[Oregon] Rosary Bowl focuses on links between prayer, evangelization
Praying the Rosary By Bishop Fulton J. Sheen(Catholic Caucus)
Rosary-Prayers Aiming to Break Record [Catholic Caucus]
Rosary vs. Repetitious Prayer [Ecumenical]
The Luminous Mysteries [of the Rosary]: Knowing Jesus in His Public Ministry Rosary Is a School of Mary, Says Pope: Encourages Recitation [Catholic/Orthodox Caucus]
New campaign launched to promote family rosary

The Rosary and the Republic
Chant the Rosary... in Latin!
Protestants and the rosary
Estimated 50,000 recite rosary in event at Rose Bowl
Our Lady of Victory (HLI Page)
Rosary to Mark St. Martha's Feast
Pray the Rosary
Rosary Aids Spiritual Growth, Says Pope
Sri LANKA CATHOLICS START ROSARY CHAIN FOR PEACE
Tips on Praying a Family Rosary

October: Month of the Holy Rosary
THE ORIGIN OF THE ROSARY
Very simple guide to praying/learning the Rosary
The Rosary and Orthodoxy
Father Benedict Groeschel on the Rosary
THE HOLY ROSARY
Catholic Caucus: The Holy Rosary
The Power of the Rosary - A Weapon Against Terrorism
Rosary May Contribute to Unity Says Protestant Theologian
Papal Address on the Rosary as a Weapon of Peace

____________________________________________________________

Pray the Rosary. 
Pray without ceasing.


How Europe Escaped Speaking Arabic
The Battle of Lepanto
Civilization in the Balance: The Battle of Lepanto and Election ‘08

LEPANTO
A Call To Prayer: This Lepanto Moment [Repost]
Lepanto, 1571: The Battle That Saved Europe
Celebrating the Battle of Lepanto
Clash of civilizations: Battle of Lepanto revisited
Lepanto, Bertone e Battesimo, Oh My!
Lepanto Sunday
Our Lady of the Rosary of La Naval (A Mini-Lepanto in the Philippines)
Swiss Guards at the Battle of Lepanto, 7 October 1571
Battle of Lepanto

LEPANTO, 7 OCTOBER 1571: The Defense of Europe
Battle of Lepanto
Remember Lepanto!
The Battle of Lepanto
On This Day In History, The Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto
Chesterton's Lepanto
The Miracle At Lepanto...
Lepanto
The Naval Battle of Lepanto
The Battle of Lepanto


 
 

11 posted on 09/29/2011 10:39:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All

October 2011

Pope Benedict XVI's Intentions

General Intention: For the terminally ill, that in their sufferings they may be sustained by faith in God and by the love of others.

Missionary Intention: That the celebration of World Mission Sunday may increase in the People of God the passion for evangelization and the support of missionary activity through prayer and economic aid for the poorest Churches.


12 posted on 09/29/2011 10:46:27 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday, October 02, 2011
Twenty-Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time
First Reading:
Psalm:
Second Reading:
Gospel:
Isaiah 5:1-7
Psalm 80:9, 12-16, 19-20
Philippians 4:6-9
Matthew 21:33-43

Know that the experience of pain is something so noble and precious that the Divine Word, who enjoyed the abundant riches of Paradise, yet, because He was not clothed with this ornament of sorrow, came down from Heaven to seek it upon the earth.

-- St Mary Magdalen de' Pazzi


13 posted on 09/29/2011 10:49:54 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All



The Angelus 

The Angel of the Lord declared to Mary: 
And she conceived of the Holy Spirit. 

Hail Mary, full of grace, the Lord is with thee; blessed art thou among women and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus.
Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen. 

Behold the handmaid of the Lord: Be it done unto me according to Thy word. 

Hail Mary . . . 

And the Word was made Flesh: And dwelt among us. 

Hail Mary . . . 


Pray for us, O Holy Mother of God, that we may be made worthy of the promises of Christ. 

Let us pray: 

Pour forth, we beseech Thee, O Lord, Thy grace into our hearts; that we, to whom the incarnation of Christ, Thy Son, was made known by the message of an angel, may by His Passion and Cross be brought to the glory of His Resurrection, through the same Christ Our Lord.

Amen. 


14 posted on 09/29/2011 10:50:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Oct 02, Invitatory for Twenty-Seventh Sunday of Ordinary Time

Lord, open my lips.
And my mouth will proclaim your praise.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the rock who saves us.

Psalm 95

Come, let us sing to the Lord
and shout with joy to the Rock who saves us.
Let us approach him with praise and thanksgiving
and sing joyful songs to the Lord.

Ant.

The Lord is God, the mighty God,
the great king over all the gods.
He holds in his hands the depths of the earth
and the highest mountains as well
He made the sea; it belongs to him,
the dry land, too, for it was formed by his hands.

Ant.

Come, then, let us bow down and worship,
bending the knee before the Lord, our maker,
For he is our God and we are his people,
the flock he shepherds.

Ant.

Today, listen to the voice of the Lord:
Do not grow stubborn, as your fathers did in the wilderness,
when at Meriba and Massah they challenged me and provoked me,
Although they had seen all of my works.

Ant.

Forty years I endured that generation.
I said, “They are a people whose hearts go astray
and they do not know my ways.”
So I swore in my anger,
“They shall not enter into my rest.”

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Come, let us sing to the Lord and shout with joy to the rock who saves us.

15 posted on 09/30/2011 3:30:36 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Oct 02, Office of Readings for Sunday of the 27th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: Page 615
Proper of Seasons: Page 340
Psalter: Sunday, Week III, Page 942

Christian Prayer:
Does not contain Office of Readings.

Office of Readings for Sunday of the 27th Week in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

HYMN

King of glory, King of peace,
I will love Thee;
And that love may never cease,
I will move Thee.
Thou hast granted my request,
Thou hast heard me;
Thou didst note my working breast,
Thou hast spared me.

Wherefore with my utmost art
I will sing Thee,
And the cream of all my heart
I will bring Thee.
Though my sins against me cried,
Thou alone didst clear me;
And alone, when they replied,
Thou didst hear me.

Seven whole days, not one in seven,
I will praise Thee;
In my heart, though not in Heaven,
I can raise Thee.
Small it is, in this poor sort
To enroll Thee:
E’en eternity’s too short
To extol Thee.

King Of Glory, King Of Peace by The Jubilate Singers
“King Of Glory, King Of Peace” performed by The Jubilate Singers is available from Amazon.com.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

Psalm 145
Praise of God’s majesty

Lord, you are the Just One, who was and who is (Revelation 16:5).

I

I will give you glory, O God my King,
I will bless your name forever.

Ant.

I will bless you day after day
and praise your name forever.
The Lord is great, highly to be praised,
his greatness cannot be measured.

Ant.

Age to age shall proclaim your works,
shall declare your mighty deeds,
shall speak of your splendor and glory,
tell the tale of your wonderful works.

Ant.

They will speak of your terrible deeds,
recount your greatness and might.
They will recall your abundant goodness;
age to age shall ring out your justice.

Ant.

The Lord is kind and full of compassion,
slow to anger, abounding in love.
How good is the Lord to all,
compassionate to all his creatures.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Day by day I shall bless you, Lord, alleluia.

Ant. 2 Your kingdom, Lord, is an everlasting kingdom, alleluia.

II

All your creatures shall thank you, O Lord,
and your friends shall repeat their blessing.
They shall speak of the glory of your reign
and declare your might, O God,
to make known to men your mighty deeds
and the glorious splendor of your reign.
Yours is an everlasting kingdom;
your rule lasts from age to age.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Your kingdom, Lord, is an everlasting kingdom, alleluia.

Ant. 3 The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

III

The Lord is faithful in all his words
and loving in all his deeds.
The Lord supports all who fall
and raises all who are bowed down.

Ant.

The eyes of all creatures look to you
and you give them their food in due time.
You open wide your hand,
grant the desires of all who live.

Ant.

The Lord is just in all his ways
and loving in all his deeds.
He is close to all who call him,
who call on him from their hearts.

Ant.

He grants the desires of those who fear him,
he hears their cry and he saves them.
The Lord protects all who love him;
but the wicked he will utterly destroy.

Ant.

Let me speak the praise of the Lord,
let all mankind bless his holy name
for ever, for ages unending.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Lord, be near to all who call upon you in truth and increase the dedication of those who revere you. Hear their prayers and save them, that they may always love you and praise your holy name.

Ant. The Lord is faithful in all his words and loving in all his deeds, alleluia.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

Listen to my words.
Give ear to my precepts.

READINGS

First reading
From the beginning of the first letter of the apostle Paul to Timothy 1:1-20
The mission of Timothy. Paul, a preacher of the Gospel

Paul, an apostle of Christ Jesus by command of God our savior and Christ Jesus our hope, to Timothy, my own true child in faith. May grace, mercy, and peace be yours from God the Father and Christ Jesus our Lord.

I repeat the directions I gave you when I was on my way to Macedonia: stay on in Ephesus in order to warn certain people there against teaching false doctrines and busying themselves with interminable myths and genealogies, which promote idle speculations rather than that training in faith which God requires.

What we are aiming at in this warning is the love that springs from a pure heart, a good conscience, and sincere faith. Some people have neglected these and instead have turned to meaningless talk, wanting to be teachers of the law but actually not understanding the words they are using, much less the matters they discuss with such assurance.

We know that the law is good, provided one uses it in the way law is supposed to be used—that is, with the understanding that it is aimed, not at good men but at the lawless and unruly, the irreligious and the sinful, the wicked and the godless, men who kill their fathers or mothers, murderers, fornicators, sexual perverts, kidnapers, liars, perjurers, and those who in other ways flout the sound teaching that pertains to the glorious gospel of God—blessed be he—with which I have been entrusted.

I thank Christ Jesus our Lord, who has strengthened me, that he has made me his servant and judged me faithful. I was once a blasphemer, a persecutor, a man filled with arrogance; but because I did not know what I was doing in my unbelief, I have been treated mercifully, and the grace of our Lord has been granted me in overflowing measure, along with the faith and love which are in Christ Jesus.

You can depend on this as worthy of full acceptance: that Christ Jesus came into the world to save sinners. Of these I myself am the worst. But on that very account I was dealt with mercifully, so that in me, as an extreme case, Jesus Christ might display all his patience, and that I might become an example to those who would later have faith in him and gain everlasting life. To the King of ages, the immortal, the invisible, the only God, be honor and glory forever and ever! Amen.

I have a solemn charge to give you, Timothy, my child. This charge is in accordance with the prophecies made in your regard, and I give it to you so that under the inspiration of these prophecies you may fight the good fight, and hold fast to faith and a good conscience. Some men, by rejecting the guidance of conscience, have made shipwreck of their faith, among them Hymenaeus and Alexander; these I have turned over to Satan so that they may learn not to blaspheme.

RESPONSORY 1 Timothy 1;14, 15; Romans 3:23

The grace of the Lord has been poured forth upon me in great abundance, and has filled me with faith and love.
Christ Jesus came into this world to save sinners.

All men have sinned and are deprived of God’s glory.
Christ Jesus came into this world to save sinners.

Second reading
From the Pastoral Guide by Saint Gregory the Great, pope
Let the pastor be discreetly silent, and to the point when he speaks

A spiritual guide should be silent when discretion requires and speak when words are of service. Otherwise he may say what he should not or be silent when he should speak. Indiscreet speech may lead men into error and an imprudent silence may leave in error those who could have been taught. Pastors who lack foresight hesitate to say openly what is right because they fear losing the favor of men. As the voice of truth tells us, such leaders are not zealous pastors who protect their flocks, rather they are like mercenaries who flee by taking refuge in silence when the wolf appears.

The Lord reproaches them through the prophet: They are dumb dogs that cannot bark. On another occasion he complains: You did not advance against the foe or set up a wall in front of the house of Israel, so that you might stand fast in battle on the day of the Lord. To advance against the foe involves a bold resistance to the powers of this world in defense of the flock. To stand fast in battle on the day of the Lord means to oppose the wicked enemy out of love for what is right.

When a pastor has been afraid to assert what is right, has he not turned his back and fled by remaining silent? Whereas if he intervenes on behalf of the flock, he sets up a wall against the enemy in front of the house of Israel. Therefore, the Lord again says to his unfaithful people: Your prophets saw false and foolish visions and did not point out your wickedness, that you might repent of your sins. The name of the prophet is sometimes given in the sacred writings to teachers who both declare the present to be fleeting and reveal what is to come. The word of God accuses them of seeing false visions because they are afraid to reproach men for their faults and thereby lull the evildoer with an empty promise of safety. Because they fear reproach, they keep silent and fail to point out the sinner’s wrongdoing.

The word of reproach is a key that unlocks a door, because reproach reveals a fault of which the evildoer is himself often unaware. That is why Paul says of the bishop: He must be able to encourage men in sound doctrine and refute those who oppose it. For the same reason God tells us through Malachi: The lips of the priest are to preserve knowledge, and men shall look to him for the law, for he is the messenger of the Lord of hosts. Finally, that is also the reason why the Lord warns us through Isaiah: Cry out and be not still; raise your voice in a trumpet call.

Anyone ordained a priest undertakes the task of preaching, so that with a loud cry he may go on ahead of the terrible judge who follows. If, then, a priest does not know how to preach, what kind of cry can such a dumb herald utter? It was to bring this home that the Holy Spirit descended in the form of tongues on the first pastors, for he causes those whom he has filled, to speak out spontaneously.

RESPONSORY Psalm 51:15, 16-17

I will teach transgressors your ways and sinners shall return to you.
My tongue shall sing of your justice.

Open my lips, O Lord, and my mouth shall proclaim your praise.
My tongue shall sing of your justice.

TE DEUM

You are God: we praise you;
You are the Lord: we acclaim you;
You are the eternal Father:
All creation worships you.

To you all angels, all the powers of heaven,
Cherubim and Seraphim, sing in endless praise:
Holy, holy, holy, Lord, God of power and might,
heaven and earth are full of your glory.

The glorious company of apostles praise you.
The noble fellowship of prophets praise you.
The white-robed army of martyrs praise you.

Throughout the world the holy Church acclaims you:
Father, of majesty unbounded,
your true and only Son, worthy of all worship,
and the Holy Spirit, advocate and guide.

You, Christ, are the King of glory,
the eternal Son of the Father.

When you became man to set us free
you did not spurn the Virgin’s womb.

You overcame the sting of death,
and opened the kingdom of heaven to all believers.

You are seated at God’s right hand in glory.
We believe that you will come, and be our judge.

Come then, Lord, and help your people,
bought with the price of your own blood,
and bring us with your saints
to glory everlasting.

CONCLUDING PRAYER

Father
your love for us
surpasses all our hopes and desires.
Forgive our failings,
keep us in your peace
and lead us in the way of salvation.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

ACCLAMATION (only added when praying in community)

Let us praise the Lord.
And give him thanks.

16 posted on 09/30/2011 3:31:07 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Oct 02, Morning Prayer – Memorial for Twenty-Seventh Sunday of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Ordinary: 618
Proper of Saints: 1455
Psalms and canticle from Sunday, Week I, 652

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: 689
Proper of Saints: 1277
Psalms and canticle from Sunday, Week I, 707

Morning Prayer for the Memorial of Guardian Angels

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

HYMN

Praise the Lord: ye heavens, adore Him;
Praise Him, angels, in the height;
Sun and moon, rejoice before Him;
Praise Him, all ye stars and light.
Praise the Lord, for He hath spoken;
Worlds His mighty voice obeyed.
Laws which never shall be broken
For their guidance He hath made.

Praise the Lord, for He is glorious;
Never shall His promise fail.
God hath made His saints victorious;
Sin and death shall not prevail.
Praise the God of our salvation;
Hosts on high, His power proclaim.
Heaven and earth and all creation,
Laud and magnify His Name.

Praise the Lord! Ye Heavens Adore Him by the Choirs of Cathedral of St. Philip in Atlanta; Words: Foundling Hospital Collection, 1801 St. 3 Edward Osler; Music: Austria, Daniel’s Tune, Praise, Rex Gloriae Meter: 87 87 D
“Praise the Lord! Ye Heavens Adore Him” by the Choirs of Cathedral of St. Philip in Atlanta is available from Amazon.com

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 The Lord will send his angel to accompany you and to guide you safely on your way.

Psalm 63:2-9
A soul thirsting for God
Whoever has left the darkness of sin yearns for God.

O God, you are my God, for you I long;
for you my soul is thirsting.
My body pines for you
like a dry, weary land without water.
So I gaze on you in the sanctuary
to see your strength and your glory.

For your love is better than life,
my lips will speak your praise.
So I will bless you all my life,
in your name I will lift up my hands.
My soul shall be filled as with a banquet,
my mouth shall praise you with joy.

On my bed I remember you.
On you I muse through the night
for your have been my help;
in the shadow of your wings I rejoice.
My soul clings to you;
your right hand holds me fast.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. The Lord will send his angel to accompany you and to guide you safely on your way.

Ant. 2 Blessed be God who sent his angels to rescue his faithful servants.

Canticle — Daniel 3:57-88, 56
Let all creatures praise the Lord
All you servants of the Lord, sing praise to him (Revelation 19:5).

Bless the Lord, all you works of the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Angels of the Lord, bless the Lord.
You heavens, bless the Lord.
All you waters above the heavens, bless the Lord.
All you hosts of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Sun and moon, bless the Lord.
Stars of heaven, bless the Lord.

Every shower and dew, bless the Lord.
All you winds, bless the Lord.
Fire and heat, bless the Lord.
Cold and chill, bless the Lord.
Dew and rain, bless the Lord.
Frost and chill, bless the Lord.
Ice and snow, bless the Lord.
Nights and days, bless the Lord.
Light and darkness, bless the Lord.
Lightnings and clouds, bless the Lord.

Let the earth bless the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Mountains and hills, bless the Lord.
Everything growing from the earth, bless the Lord.
You springs, bless the Lord.
Seas and rivers, bless the Lord.
You dolphins and all water creatures, bless the Lord.
All you birds of the air, bless the Lord.
All you beasts, wild and tame, bless the Lord.
You sons of men, bless the Lord.

O Israel, bless the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.
Priests of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Servants of the Lord, bless the Lord.
Spirits and souls of the just, bless the Lord.
Holy men of humble heart, bless the Lord.
Hananiah, Azariah, Mishael, bless the Lord.
Praise and exalt him above all forever.

Let us bless the Father, and the Son, and the Holy Spirit.
Let us praise and exalt him above all forever.
Blessed are you, Lord, in the firmament of heaven.
Praiseworthy and glorious and exalted above all forever.

Ant. Blessed be God who sent his angels to rescue his faithful servants.

Ant. 3 Praise the Lord, all you heavenly hosts of angels.

Psalm 149
The joy of God’s holy people.
Let the sons of the Church, the children of the new people, rejoice in Christ, their King (Hesychius).

Sing a new song to the Lord,
his praise in the assembly of the faithful.
Let Israel rejoice in its Maker,
let Zion’s sons exult in their king.
Let them praise his name with dancing
and make music with timbrel and harp.

For the Lord takes delight in his people.
He crowns the poor with salvation.
Let the faithful rejoice in their glory,
shout for joy and take their rest.
Let the praise of God be on their lips
and a two-edged sword in their hand,

to deal out vengeance to the nations
and punishment on all the peoples;
to bind their kings in chains
and their nobles in fetters of iron;
to carry out the sentence pre-ordained:
this honor is for all his faithful.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Praise the Lord, all you heavenly hosts of angels.

READING Exodus 23:20-21a

See, I am sending an angel before you, to guard you on the way and bring you to the place I have prepared. Be attentive to him and heed his voice.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

In the presence of the angels, I will sing to you, my God.
In the presence of the angels, I will sing to you, my God.

I will praise your name.
I will sing to you, my God.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
In the presence of the angels, I will sing to you, my God.

CANTICLE OF ZECHARIAH

Ant. They are all ministering spirits, sent to care for those on the way to salvation.

Luke 1:68 – 79
The Messiah and his forerunner

Blessed be the Lord, the God of Israel;
he has come to his people and set them free.
He has raised up for us a mighty savior,
born of the house of his servant David.

Through his holy prophets he promised of old
that he would save us from our enemies,
from the hands of all who hate us.
He promised to show mercy to our fathers
and to remember his holy covenant.

This was the oath he swore to our father Abraham:
to set us free from the hands of our enemies,
free to worship him without fear,
holy and righteous in his sight all the days of our life.

You, my child, shall be called the prophet of the Most High;
for you will go before the Lord to prepare his way,
to give his people knowledge of salvation
by the forgiveness of their sins.

In the tender compassion of our God
the dawn from on high shall break upon us,
to shine on those who dwell in darkness and the shadow of death,
and to guide our feet into the way of peace.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. They are all ministering spirits, sent to care for those on the way to salvation.

INTERCESSIONS

With one voice the choirs of angels sing their unceasing praise of the Lord. Let us join in their worship as we proclaim:
Angels of the Lord, bless the Lord.

You commanded your angels to guard us in all our ways,
keep us from sin as you lead us in your path this day.
Angels of the Lord, bless the Lord.

Father, the angels stand for ever before your face,
nourish in us a never-failing hope of coming at last into your presence.
Angels of the Lord, bless the Lord.

Your children will be like the angels in heaven,
grant us chastity in both mind and body.
Angels of the Lord, bless the Lord.

Send Michael, the prince of the heavenly hosts, to the aid of your people,
may he defend them against Satan and his angels on the day of battle.
Angels of the Lord, bless the Lord.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

God our Father,
in your loving providence
you send your holy angels to watch over us.
Hear our prayers,
defend us always by their protection
and let us share your life with them for ever.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

17 posted on 09/30/2011 3:31:18 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Note that there was no midday prayer uploaded on the divineoffice.org site for Sunday, 2 October (that may change, however, cloaser to the actual date)


18 posted on 09/30/2011 3:32:08 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Oct 02, Evening Prayer for Sunday of the 27th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours Vol. IV:
Ordinary: Page 632
Proper of Seasons: Page 345
Psalter: Sunday, Week III, Page 956

Christian Prayer:
Ordinary: Page 694
Proper of Seasons: Page 633
Psalter: Sunday, Week III, Page 861

Evening Prayer II for Sunday in Ordinary Time

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

HYMN

O God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Our shelter from the stormy blast,
And our eternal home.

Under the shadow of Thy throne
Thy saints have dwelt secure;
Sufficient is Thine arm alone,
And our defense is sure.

Before the hills in order stood,
Or earth received her frame,
From everlasting Thou art God,
To endless years the same.

Thy Word commands our flesh to dust,
“Return, ye sons of men:”
All nations rose from earth at first,
And turn to earth again.

A thousand ages in Thy sight
Are like an evening gone;
Short as the watch that ends the night
Before the rising sun.

The busy tribes of flesh and blood,
With all their lives and cares,
Are carried downwards by the flood,
And lost in following years.

Time, like an ever rolling stream,
Bears all its sons away;
They fly, forgotten, as a dream
Dies at the opening day.

Like flowery fields the nations stand
Pleased with the morning light;
The flowers beneath the mower’s hand
Lie withering ere ‘tis night.

O God, our help in ages past,
Our hope for years to come,
Be Thou our guard while troubles last,
And our eternal home.

O God, Our Help in Ages Past by Sheffield Cathedral Choir; Words: Isaac Watts, 1719. Music: William Croft, 1708
“O God, Our Help in Ages Past” by Sheffield Cathedral Choir is available from Amazon.com

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

Psalm 110:1-5, 7
The Messiah, king and priest

Christ’s reign will last until all his enemies are made subject to him (1 Corinthians 15:25).

The Lord’s revelation to my Master:
“Sit on my right:
your foes I will put beneath your feet.”

Ant.

The Lord will wield from Zion
your scepter of power:
rule in the midst of all your foes.

Ant.

A prince from the day of your birth
on the holy mountains;
from the womb before the dawn I begot you.

Ant.

The Lord has sworn an oath he will not change.
“You are a priest for ever,
a priest like Melchizedek of old.”

Ant.

The Master standing at your right hand
will shatter kings in the day of his great wrath.

Ant.

He shall drink from the stream by the wayside
and therefore he shall lift up his head.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Father, we ask you to give us victory and peace. In Jesus Christ, our Lord and King, we are already seated at your right hand. We look forward to praising you in the fellowship of all your saints in our heavenly homeland.

Ant. The Lord said to my Master: Sit at my right hand, alleluia.

Ant. 2 Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

Psalm 111
God’s marvelous works

We are lost in wonder at all that you have done for us, our Lord and mighty God (Revelation 15:3).

I will thank the Lord with all my heart
in the meeting of the just and their assembly.
Great are the works of the Lord;
to be pondered by all who love them.

Ant.

Majestic and glorious his work,
his justice stands firm for ever.
He makes us remember his wonders.
The Lord is compassion and love.

Ant.

He gives food to those who fear him;
keeps his covenant ever in mind.
He has shown his might to his people
by giving them the lands of the nations.

Ant.

His works are justice and truth:
his precepts are all of them sure,
standing firm for ever and ever:
they are made in uprightness and truth.

Ant.

He has sent deliverance to his people
and established his covenant for ever.
Holy his name, to be feared.

Ant.

To fear the Lord is the first stage of wisdom;
all who do so prove themselves wise.
His praise shall last for ever!

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Psalm-prayer

Merciful and gentle Lord, you are the crowning glory of all the saints. Give us, your children, the gift of obedience which is the beginning of wisdom, so that we may do what you command and be filled with your mercy.

Ant. Our compassionate Lord has left us a memorial of his wonderful work, alleluia.

Ant. 3 All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

Canticle – See Revelation 19:1-7
The wedding of the Lamb

Alleluia.
Salvation, glory, and power to our God:
Alleluia.
his judgments are honest and true.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant.

Alleluia.
Sing praise to our God, all you his servants,
Alleluia.
all who worship him reverently, great and small.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant.

Alleluia.
The Lord our all-powerful God is King,
Alleluia.
let us rejoice, sing praise, and give him glory.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant.

Alleluia.
The wedding feast of the Lamb has begun,
Alleluia.
and his bride is prepared to welcome him.
Alleluia. Alleluia.

Ant.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. All power is yours, Lord God, our mighty King, alleluia.

READING 1 Peter 1:3-5

Praised be the God and Father
of our Lord Jesus Christ,
he who in his great mercy
gave us new birth;
a birth unto hope which draws its life
from the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead;
a birth to an imperishable inheritance,
incapable of fading or defilement,
which is kept in heaven for you
who are guarded with God’s power through faith;
a birth to a salvation which stands ready
to be revealed in the last days.
There is cause for rejoicing here. You may for a time have to suffer the distress of many trials; but this is so that your faith, which is more precious than the passing splendor of fire-tried gold, may by its genuineness lead to praise, glory, and honor when Jesus Christ appears.

Sacred Silence (indicated by a bell) – a moment to reflect and receive in our hearts the full resonance of the voice of the Holy Spirit and to unite our personal prayer more closely with the word of God and public voice of the Church.

RESPONSORY

The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.
The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.

Eternal ages praise
the greatness of your glory.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
The whole creation proclaims the greatness of your glory.

CANTICLE OF MARY

Ant. Tell yourselves: We are useless servants, for we did only what we should have done.

Luke 1:46-55
The soul rejoices in the Lord

My soul proclaims the greatness of the Lord,
my spirit rejoices in God my Savior
for he has looked with favor on his lowly servant.

From this day all generations will call me blessed:
the Almighty has done great things for me,
and holy is his Name.

He has mercy on those who fear him
in every generation.

He has shown the strength of his arm,
he has scattered the proud in their conceit.

He has cast down the mighty from their thrones,
and has lifted up the lowly.

He has filled the hungry with good things,
and the rich he has sent away empty.

He has come to the help of his servant Israel
for he has remembered his promise of mercy,
the promise he made to our fathers,
to Abraham and his children for ever.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Tell yourselves: We are useless servants, for we did only what we should have done.

INTERCESSIONS

The world was created by the Word of God, re-created by his redemption, and it is continually renewed by his love. Rejoicing in him we call out:
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

We give thanks to God whose power is revealed in nature,
and whose providence is revealed in history.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

Through your Son, the herald of reconciliation, the victor of the cross,
free us from empty fear and hopelessness.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

May all those who love and pursue justice,
work together without deceit to build a world of true peace.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

Be with the oppressed, free the captives, console the sorrowing, feed the hungry, strengthen the weak,
in all people reveal the victory of your cross.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

After your Son’s death and burial you raised him up again in glory,
grant that the faithful departed may live with him.
Renew the wonders of your love, Lord.

Our Father who art in heaven,
hallowed be thy name.
Thy kingdom come.
Thy will be done on earth,
as it is in heaven.
Give us this day our daily bread,
and forgive us our trespasses,
as we forgive those who trespass against us,
and lead us not into temptation,
but deliver us from evil.

Concluding Prayer

Father
your love for us
surpasses all our hopes and desires.
Forgive our failings,
keep us in your peace
and lead us in the way of salvation.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever.
Amen.

DISMISSAL

May the Lord bless us,
protect us from all evil and bring us to everlasting life.
Amen.

19 posted on 09/30/2011 3:32:21 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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Oct 02, Night Prayer for Sunday of the 27th week of Ordinary Time

Ribbon Placement:
Liturgy of the Hours:
Vol I, page 1172
Vol II, Page 1628
Vol III, Page 1272
Vol IV, Page 1236

Christian Prayer:
Page 1037

Night Prayer after Evening Prayer II on Sundays and Solemnities

God, come to my assistance.
Lord, make haste to help me.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now, and will be for ever. Amen. Alleluia.

Examination of conscience:

We are called to have a clear conscience toward God and toward men, in our hearts and in our minds, in our actions and inactions. To do so, it is vital that we examine our conscience daily and to ask for God’s mercy as we fall short and to ask for His strength to do better.

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

Christé, eléison
Christé, eléison

Kýrie, eléison
Kýrie, eléison

HYMN

O radiant Light, O Son divine
Of God the Father’s deathless face
O image of the light sublime
That fills the heavenly dwelling-place

Lord Jesus Christ, as daylight fades
As shine the lights of eventide
We praise the Father with the Son
The spirit blest and with them one.

O Son of God, the source of life
Praise is your due by night and day
Unsullied lips must raise the strain
Of your proclaimed and splendid name.

O Radiant Light by Choir of The Cathedral of the Madeleine & The Madeleine Choir School; Lyrics copyright 1973, Fides Publishers, Inc. Notre Dame, Indiana from “Morning Praise and Evensong”. Used by permission of the publisher for non-profit or devotional purposes.

PSALMODY

Ant. 1 Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

Psalm 91
Safe in God’s sheltering care

I have given you the power to tread upon serpents and scorpions (Luke 10:19).

He who dwells in the shelter of the Most High
and abides in the shade of the Almighty
says to the Lord: “My refuge,
my stronghold, my God in whom I trust!”

It is he who will free you from the snare
of the fowler who seeks to destroy you;
he will conceal you with his pinions
and under his wings you will find refuge.

You will not fear the terror of the night
nor the arrow that flies by day,
nor the plague that prowls in the darkness
nor the scourge that lays waste at noon.

A thousand may fall at your side,
ten thousand fall at your right,
you, it will never approach;
his faithfulness is buckler and shield.

Your eyes have only to look
to see how the wicked are repaid,
you who have said: “Lord, my refuge!”
and have made the Most High your dwelling.

Upon you no evil shall fall,
no plague approach where you dwell.
For you has he commanded his angels,
to keep you in all your ways.

They shall bear you upon their hands
lest you strike your foot against a stone.
On the lion and the viper you will tread
and trample the young lion and the dragon.

Since he clings to me in love, I will free him;
protect him for he knows my name.
When he calls I shall answer: “I am with you,”
I will save him in distress and give him glory.

With length of life I will content him;
I shall let him see my saving power.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Night holds no terrors for me sleeping under God’s wings.

READING Revelation 22:4-5

They shall see the Lord face to face and bear his name on their foreheads. The night shall be no more. They will need no light from lamps or the sun, for the Lord God shall give them light, and they shall reign forever.

RESPONSORY

Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

You have redeemed us, Lord God of truth.
I commend my spirit.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit,
Into your hands, Lord, I commend my spirit.

GOSPEL CANTICLE

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Luke 2:29-32
Christ is the light of the nations and the glory of Israel

Lord, now you let your servant go in peace;
your word has been fulfilled:

my own eyes have seen the salvation
which you have prepared in the sight of every people:

a light to reveal you to the nations
and the glory of your people Israel.

Glory to the Father, and to the Son,
and to the Holy Spirit:
as it was in the beginning, is now,
and will be for ever. Amen.

Ant. Protect us, Lord, as we stay awake; watch over us as we sleep, that awake, we may keep watch with Christ, and asleep, rest in his peace.

Concluding Prayer

Lord,
we have celebrated today
the mystery of the rising of Christ to new life.
May we now rest in your peace,
safe from all that could harm us,
and rise again refreshed and joyful,
to praise you throughout another day.
We ask this through Christ our Lord.
Amen.

Blessing

May the all-powerful Lord grant us a restful night and a peaceful death.
Amen.

Antiphon or song in honor of the Blessed Virgin Mary

20 posted on 09/30/2011 3:32:38 AM PDT by markomalley (Nothing emboldens the wicked so greatly as the lack of courage on the part of the good-Pope Leo XIII)
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To: All
Guardian Angels

Guardian Angels
Memorial
October 2nd



Pietro da Cortona
The Guardian Angel, 1656
Oil on canvas, 225 x 143 cm
Galleria Nazionale d'Arte Antica, Rome

Share77

 

Prayer:
Angel of God, my Guardian dear,
to whom His love commits me here,
ever this day be at my side,
to light and guard, to rule and guide, Amen.

Latin:
Angele Dei

Ángele Dei,
qui custos es mei,
me, tibi commíssum pietáte supérna,
illúmina, custódi,
rege et gubérna.
Amen.

History:
That every individual soul has a guardian angel has never been defined by the Church, and is, consequently, not an article of faith; but it is the "mind of the Church", as St. Jerome expressed it: "how great the dignity of the soul, since each one has from his birth an angel commissioned to guard it."

In the Bible this doctrine is clearly discernible and its development is well marked. In Genesis 28-29, angels not only act as the executors of God's wrath against the cities of the plain, but they deliver Lot from danger; in Exodus 12-13, an angel is the appointed leader of the host of Israel, and in 32:34, God says to Moses: "my angel shall go before thee." At a much later period we have the story of Tobias, which might serve for a commentary on the words of Psalm 90:11: "For he hath given his angels charge over thee; to keep thee in all thy ways." (Cf. Psalm 33:8 and 34:5.) Lastly, in Daniel 10 angels are entrusted with the care of particular districts; one is called "prince of the kingdom of the Persians", and Michael is termed "one of the chief princes"; cf. Deuteronomy 32:8; and Ecclesiasticus 17:17.

This sums up the Old Testament doctrine on the point; it is clear that the Old Testament conceived of God's angels as His ministers who carried out his behests, and who were at times given special commissions, regarding men and mundane affairs. There is no special teaching; the doctrine is rather taken for granted than expressly laid down; cf. 2 Machabees 3:25; 10:29; 11:6; 15:23.

But in the New Testament the doctrine is stated with greater precision. Angels are everywhere the intermediaries between God and man; and Christ set a seal upon the Old Testament teaching: "See that you despise not one of these little ones: for I say to you, that their angels in heaven always see the face of my Father who is in heaven." (Matthew 18:10). A twofold aspect of the doctrine is here put before us: even little children have guardian angels, and these same angels lose not the vision of God by the fact that they have a mission to fulfil on earth.

Without dwelling on the various passages in the New Testament where the doctrine of guardian angels is suggested, it may suffice to mention the angel who succoured Christ in the garden, and the angel who delivered St. Peter from prison. Hebrews 1:14 puts the doctrine in its clearest light: "Are they not all ministering spirits, sent to minister for them, who shall receive the inheritance of salvation?" This is the function of the guardian angels; they are to lead us, if we wish it, to the Kingdom of Heaven.

(Principal source - Catholic Encyclopedia - 1913 edition )

Collect:
God our Father,
in your loving providence
you send your holy angels to watch over us.
Hear our prayers,
defend us always by their protection
and let us share your life with them for ever.
We ask this through our Lord Jesus Christ, your Son,
who lives and reigns with you and the Holy Spirit,
one God, for ever and ever. Amen.

First Reading: Exodus 23: 20-23
"Behold, I send an angel before you, to guard you on the way and to bring you to the place which I have prepared. Give heed to him and hearken to his voice, do not rebel against him, for he will not pardon your transgression; for my name is in him.

"But if you hearken attentively to his voice and do all that I say, then I will be an enemy to your enemies and an adversary to your adversaries.

"When my angel goes before you, and brings you in to the Amorites, and the Hittites, and the Perizzites, and the Canaanites, the Hivites, and the Jebusites, and I blot them out.

Second Reading(places where it is a Solemnity): Revelation 12:7-12
Now war arose in heaven, Michael and his angels fighting against the dragon; and the dragon and his angels fought, but they were defeated and there was no longer any place for them in heaven. And the great dragon was thrown down, that ancient serpent, who is called the Devil and Satan, the deceiver of the whole world--he was thrown down to the earth, and his angels were thrown down with him. And I heard a loud voice in heaven, saying, "Now the salvation and the power and the kingdom of our God and the authority of his Christ have come, for the accuser of our brethren has been thrown down, who accuses them day and night before our God. And they have conquered him by the blood of the Lamb and by the word of their testimony, for they loved not their lives even unto death. Rejoice then, O heaven and you that dwell therein! But woe to you, O earth and sea, for the devil has come down to you in great wrath, because he knows that his time is short!"

Gospel Reading: Matthew 18:1-5, 10
At that time the disciples came to Jesus, saying, "Who is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven?" And calling to him a child, he put him in the midst of them, and said, "Truly, I say to you, unless you turn and become like children, you will never enter the kingdom of heaven. Whoever humbles himself like this child, he is the greatest in the kingdom of heaven.

"Whoever receives one such child in my name receives me.

"See that you do not despise one of these little ones; for I tell you that in heaven their angels always behold the face of my Father who is in heaven.

Related Articles:

The Church and the Holy Angels(Michaelmas 2007 Issue)

Angels and the Liturgy of the Holy Eucharist -- by Father Ben Reese (Adoremus site)


Holy Angels - excerpt from the Directory on Popular Piety and the Liturgy

213. With the clear and sober language of catechesis, the Church teaches that "the existence of the spiritual, non-corporeal beings that Sacred Scripture usually calls 'angels' is a truth of faith. The witness of Scripture is as clear as the unanimity of Tradition"(280).

Tradition regards the angels as messengers of God, "potent executives of his commands, and ready at the sound of his words" (Ps 103, 20. They serve his salvific plan, and are "sent to serve those who will inherit salvation" (Hb 1, 14).

214. The faithful are well aware of the numerous interventions of angels in the New and Old Covenants. They closed the gates of the earthly paradise (cf. Gen 3,24), they saved Hagar and her child Ishmael (cf. Gen 21, 17), they stayed the hand of Abraham as he was about to sacrifice Isaac (cf. gen 22, 7), they announce prodigious births (cf. Jud 13, 3-7), they protect the footsteps of the just (cf. Ps 91, 11), they praise God unceasingly (cf. Is 6, 1-4), and they present the prayer of the Saints to God (cf. Ap 8, 34). The faithful are also aware of the angel's coming to help Elijah, an exhausted fugitive (cf. 1 Kings 19, 4-8), of Azariah and his companions in the fiery furnace (cf. Dan 3, 49-50), and are familiar with the story of Tobias in which Raphael, "one of the seven Angels who stand ever ready to enter the presence of the glory of God" (cf. Tb 12, 15), who renders many services to Tobit, his son Tobias and his wife Sarah.

The faithful are also conscious of the roles played by the Angels in the life of Jesus: the Angel Gabriel declared to Mary that she would conceive and give birth to the Son of the Most High (cf. Lk 1, 26-38), and that an Angel revealed to Joseph the supernatural origin of Mary's conception (cf. Mt 1, 18-25); the Angels appear to the shepherds in Bethlehem with the news of great joy of the Saviour's birth (cf. Lk 2, 8-24); "the Angel of the Lord" protected the infant Jesus when he was threatened by Herod (cf. Mt 2, 13-20); the Angels ministered to Jesus in the desert (cf. Mt 4, 11) and comforted him in his agony (Lk 22, 43), and to the women gathered at the tomb, they announced that he had risen (cf. Mk 16, 1-8), they appear again at the Ascension, revealing its meaning to the disciples and announcing that "Jesus ...will come back in the same way as you have seen him go" (Acts 1, 11).

The faithful will have well grasped the significance of Jesus' admonition not to despise the least of those who believe in him for "their Angels in heaven are continually in the presence of my Father in heaven" (Mt 10, 10), and the consolation of his assurance that "there is rejoicing among the Angels of God over one repentant sinner" (Lk 15, 10). The faithful also realize that "the Son of man will come in his glory with all his Angels" (mt 25, 31) to judge the living and the dead, and bring history to a close.

215. The Church, which at its outset was saved and protected by the ministry of Angels, and which constantly experiences their "mysterious and powerful assistance"(281), venerates these heavenly spirts and has recourse to their prompt intercession.

During the liturgical year, the Church celebrates the role played by the Holy Angels, in the events of salvation(282) and commemorates them on specific days: 29 September (feast of the Archangels Michael, Gabriel and Raphael), 2 October (the Guardian Angels). The Church has a votive Mass dedicated to the Holy Angels whose preface proclaims that "the glory of God is reflected in his Angels"(283). In the celebration of the sacred mysteries, the Church associates herself with the angelic hymn and proclaims the thrice holy God (cf. Isaiah 6, 3)(284) invoking their assistance so that the Eucharistic sacrifice "may be taken [to your] altar in heaven, in the presence of [...] divine majesty"(285). The office of lauds is celebrated in their presence (cf. Ps 137, 1)(286). The Church entrusts to the ministry of the Holy Angels (cf. Aps 5, 8; 8, 3) the prayers of the faithful, the contrition of penitents(287), and the protection of the innocent from the assaults of the Malign One(288). The Church implores God to send his Angels at the end of the day to protect the faithful as they sleep(289), prays that the celestial spirits come to the assistance of the faithful in their last agony(290), and in the rite of obsequies, invokes God to send his Angels to accompany the souls of just into paradise(291) and to watch over their graves.

216. Down through the centuries, the faithful have translated into various devotional exercises the teaching of the faith in relation to the ministry of Angels: the Holy Angels have been adopted as patrons of cities and corporations; great shrines in their honour have developed such as Mont-Saint-Michel in Normandy, San Michele della Chiusa in Piemonte and San Michele Gargano in Apulia, each appointed with specific feast days; hymns and devotions to the Holy Angels have also been composed.

Popular piety encompasses many forms of devotion to the Guardian Angels. St. Basil Great (+378) taught that "each and every member of the faithful has a Guardian Angel to protect, guard and guide them through life"(292). This ancient teaching was consolidated by biblical and patristic sources and lies behind many forms of piety. St. Bernard of Clarivaux (+1153) was a great master and a notable promoter of devotion to the Guardian Angels. For him, they were a proof "that heaven denies us nothing that assists us", and hence, "these celestial spirits have been placed at our sides to protect us, instruct us and to guide us"(293).

Devotion to the Holy Angels gives rise to a certain form of the Christian life which is characterized by:

 

217. Popular devotion to the Holy Angels, which is legitimate and good, can, however, also give rise to possible deviations:

FOOTNOTES


(280) CCC 328.

(281) Ibid., 336.

(282) The same is true, for example in the solemnity of Easter and in the solemnities of the Annunciation (25 march), Christmas (25 December), Ascension, the Immaculate Conception (8 December), St. Joseph (19 March), Sts. Peter and Paul (29 June), Assumption (15 August) and All Saints (1 November).

(283) MISSALE ROMANUM, Praefatio de Angelis.

(284) Cf. ibid., Prex eucharistica, Sanctus.

(285) Ibid., Prex eucharistica I, Supplices te rogamus.

(286) Cf. St. BENEDICT, Regula, 19, 5: CSEL 75, Vindobonae 1960, p. 75.

(287) Cf. RITUALE ROMANUM, Ordo Paenitentiae, Editio Typica, Typis Polyglotis Vatacanis 1974, 54.

(288) Cf. LITURGIA HORARUM, Die 2 Octobris, Ss Angelorum Custodum memoria, Ad Vesperas, Hymnus, "Custodes hominum psallimus angelos".

(289) Cf. ibid., Ad Completorium post II Vesperas Dominicae et Sollemnitatum, Oratio "Visita quaesumus".

(290) Cf. RITUALE ROMANUM, Ordo unctionis informorum eorumque patoralis curae, cit., 147.

(291) Cf. RITUALE ROMANUM, Ordo exsequiarum , Editio Typica, Typis Polyglottis Vaticanis 1969, 50.

21 posted on 09/30/2011 6:56:15 AM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation; All

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Sunday, October 2, 2011

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

From: Isaiah 5:1-7

The song of the vineyard


[1] Let me sing for my beloved
a love song concerning his vineyard:
My beloved had a vineyard
on a very fertile hill.
[2] He [spaded] it and cleared it of stones,
and planted it with choice vines;
he built a watchtower in the midst of it,
and hewed out a wine vat in it;
and he looked for it to yield grapes,
but it yielded wild grapes.

[3] And now, O inhabitants of Jerusalem
and men of Judah,
judge, I pray you, between me
and my vineyard.
[4] What more was there to do for my vineyard,
that I have not done in it?
When I looked or it to yield grapes,
why did it yield wild grapes?

[5] And now I will tell you
what I will do to my vineyard.
I will remove its hedge,
and it shall be devoured;
I will break down its wall,
and it shall be trampled down.
[6] I will make it a waste;
it shall not be pruned or hoed,
and briers and thorns shall grow up;
I will also command the clouds
that they rain no rain upon it.
[7] For the vineyard of the Lord of hosts
is the house of Israel,
and the men of Judah
are his pleasant planting;
and he looked for justice,
but behold, bloodshed;
for righteousness,
but behold, a cry!

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

5:1-7. The “song of the vineyard” is a masterpiece of Hebrew poetry, full of sym-
bolism and carrying an important message. In the figure of heartbroken farmer,
we can see our Lord Jesus Christ and his sorrow at finding that his people yield
such a poor crop of righteousness. In vv. 1-2 the author assumes the role of
God’s friend; in vv. 3-6 the lover speaks, describing all the care he has taken
of his people, and then in v. 7 the author speaks again. It is a simple story that
does not take long to tell; to begin with, the author keeps us in suspense as to
what he is getting at (rather as Nathan does, in the parable he tells David: cf. 2
Sam 12: 1-15), but then he tells us: the vineyard is “the house of Israel” (v. 7);
despite all the care God has taken of it, it failed to yield the expected fruit, gi-
ving “wild grapes” instead. Israel needs to admit its fault. So, the lyrical tone
now ceases, and a series of woes follows. The song contains many plays on
words, impossible to render in translation.

The prophet Hosea, earlier, used the simile of a vine to describe Israel (Hos 10:1).
Isaiah himself will use it again (27:2-5) and it recurs in Jeremiah (2:21; 5:10; 6:9;
12:10) and in Ezekiel (Ezek 15:1-8; 17:3-10; 19:10,14); and there are traces of it
in Psalm 80:8-18 and in the “Song of Moses” (Deut 32:32-33). For his part, Sir-
ach compares divine wisdom to a vine (cf. Sir 24:23-30). Finally, it appears in our
Lord’s parable of the wicked tenants of a vineyard, a parable that is a kind of com-
pendium of salvation history, including his own experiences with the Jewish au-
thorities (Mt 21:33-46; Mk 12:1-12; Lk 20:9-19).

As the heir of ancient Israel, the Church, too, is prefigured in the story of the vine-
yard. The Second Vatican Council remarks on this when it comments on the me-
taphors that the Bible uses for the Church: “The Church is a piece of land to be
cultivated, the field of God (1 Cor 3:9). On that land the ancient olive tree grows
whose holy roots were the patriarchs and in which the reconciliation of Jews and
Gentiles has been brought about and will be brought about (Rom 11: 13-26). That
land, like a choice vineyard, has been planted by the heavenly Husbandman (Mt
21:33-43 and par.: cf. Is 5:1-7). The true vine is Christ who gives life, and the po-
wer to bear abundant fruit, to the branches, that is, to us, who through the Church
remains in Christ, without whom we can do nothing (Jn 15:1-5)” (Lumen Gentium,
6).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.


22 posted on 10/02/2011 7:29:12 AM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: All

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Sunday, October 2, 2011

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

From: Philippians 4:6-9

Exhortation to Perseverance and Joy (Continuation)


[6] Have no anxiety about anything, but in everything by prayer and supplication
with thanksgiving let your requests be made known to God. [7] And the peace of
God, which passes all understanding, will keep your hearts and your minds in
Christ Jesus.

[8] Finally, brethren, whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just,
whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious, if there is any excel-
lence, if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. [9] What
you have learned and received and heard and seen in me, do; and the God of
peace will be with you.

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

5-7. “The Lord is at hand”: the Apostle reminds the faithful of the nearness of
our Lord; he wants to encourage them to rejoice and to be understanding towards
one another. These words must surely have brought to their minds the exclama-
tion “Marana tha” (Come, Lord), which was often in the lips at liturgical celebra-
tions (cf. note on 1 Cor 16:21-24). In the sort of hostile environment that many of
them lived in, they needed to put their hope in their Savior, Jesus Christ, who will
come from heaven to judge the living and the dead (cf. Phil 3:20; 1 Thess 4:16ff;
2 Thess 1:5). St Paul does not mean to specify when the “Parousia” or second
coming of Christ will take place (cf. “Introduction to St Paul’s Epistles to the
Thessalonians” in “The Navarre Bible: Thessalonians; EB”, 414-461; note on Mt
24:36). Like the first Christians, we should make sure it does not catch us un-
prepared.

Besides, the Lord is always near us, always caring for us in his providence (cf.
Ps 119:151). There is no reason for us to feel ill at ease. He is our Father, he is
near to all who call on him (cf. Ps 145:18); he listens to our prayers, ever ready
to instruct us and to give us whatever we need to overcome difficulties that arise.
All that he asks is that we trustingly tell him our situation, speaking to him with
the simplicity of a child.

Constant dialogue with God in prayer is, as St Paul suggests, a good way to
prevent anything robbing us of peace of soul, for prayer “regulates our affections”,
St Bernard teaches, “directs our actions, corrects our faults, guides our conduct,
beautifies and orders our life; it brings with it knowledge of things divine and
things human also. It determines what we ought to do and reflects on what we
have done, in such a way that our heart never becomes wanton or in need of dis-
cipline” (”Book of Consideration”, I, 7).

8-9. The Christians soul is never closed or indifferent to noble human aspirations.
“Redeemed by Christ and made a new creature by the Holy Spirit, man can, in-
deed he must, love the things of God’s creation: it is from God that he has re-
ceived them, and it is as flowing from God’s hand that he looks upon them and
reveres them. Man thanks his divine benefactor for all these things, he uses
them and enjoys them in a spirit of poverty and freedom: thus he is brought to a
true possession of the world, as having nothing yet possessing everything: ‘All
[things] are yours; and you are Christ’s; and Christ is God’s’ (1 Cor 3:22-23)” (Va-
tican II, “Gaudium Et Spes”, 37).

The Second Vatican Council has highlighted the permanent relevance of St Paul’s
teaching in this and in other passages: “In the pursuit of this aim priests will be
helped by cultivating those virtues which are rightly held in high esteem in human
relations. Such qualities are goodness of heart, sincerity, strength and constance
of mind, careful attention to justice, courtesy and others which the apostle Paul
recommends [...] (Phil 4:8)” (”Presbyterorum Ordinis”, 3).

In the same connection, in a passage where it is encouraging the apostolate of
the laity the Council says: “Catholics should strive to cooperate with all men of
good will in the promotion of all that is true, just, holy, all that is worthy of love
(cf. Phil 4:8)” (”Apostolicam Actuositatem”, 14).

Earthly realities and the noble things of this world have a divine value; they are
good; they help man to reach God. For, as St. Irenaeus wrote, “through the Word
of God, everything comes under the influence of the work of Redemption; the Son
of God has been crucified on behalf of all, and has traced the sign of the cross on
all things” (”Proof of the Apostolic Preaching”). “We cannot say that here are
things — good, noble or indifferent — which are exclusively worldly. This cannot be
after the Word of God has lived among the children of men, felt hunger and thirst,
worked with his hands, experienced friendship and obedience and suffering and
death” (St. J. Escriva, “Christ Is Passing By”, 112). Therefore, “your daily encoun-
ter with Christ takes place where your fellow men, your yearnings, your work and
your affections are. It is in the midst of the most material things of the earth that
we must sanctify ourselves, serving God and all mankind” (St. J. Escriva, “Con-
versations”, 113).

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.


23 posted on 10/02/2011 7:31:11 AM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: All

Ad Majorem Dei Gloriam (To the Greater Glory of God)

For: Sunday, October 2, 2011

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

From: Matthew 21:33-43

The Parable of the Wicked Tenants


(Jesus told the chief priests and the elders,) [33] “Hear another parable. There
was a householder who planted a vineyard, and set a hedge around it, dug a wine
press in it, and built a tower, and let it out to tenants, and went into another coun-
try. [34] When the season of fruit drew near, he sent his servants to the tenants,
to get his fruit; [35] and the tenants took his servants and beat one, killed another,
and stoned another. [36] Again he sent other servants, more than the first; and
they did the same to them. [37] Afterward he sent his son to them, saying, ‘They
will respect my son.’ [38] But when the tenants saw the son, they said to them-
selves, ‘This is the heir; come, let us kill him and have his inheritance.’ [39] And
they took him and cast him out of the vineyard, and killed him. [40] When there-
fore the owner of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those tenants?” [41] They
said to Him, “He will put those wretches to a miserable death, and let out the vine-
yard to other tenants who will give him the fruits in their seasons.”

[42] Jesus said to them, “Have you never read in the scriptures: ‘The very stone
which the builders rejected has become the head of the corner; this was the Lord’s
doing, and it is marvellous in our eyes’! [43] Therefore I tell you, the Kingdom of
God will be taken away from you and given to a nation producing the fruits of it.”

*********************************************************************************************
Commentary:

33-46. This very important parable completes the previous one. The parable of
the two sons simply identifies the indocility of Israel; that of the wicked tenants
focuses on the punishment to come.

Our Lord compares Israel to a choice vineyard, specially fenced, with a watch-
tower, where a keeper is on the look-out to protect it from thieves and foxes.
God has spared no effort to cultivate and embellish His vineyard. The vineyard is
in the charge of tenant farmers; the householder is God, and the vineyard, Israel
(Isaiah 5:3-5: Jeremiah 2:21; Joel 1:7).

The tenants to whom God has given the care of His people are the priests,
scribes and elders. The owner’s absence makes it clear that God really did en-
trust Israel to its leaders; hence their responsibility and the account He demands
of them.

The owner used to send his servants from time to time to collect the fruit; this
was the mission of the prophets. The second dispatch of servants to claim what
is owing to the owner — who meet the same fate as the first — refers to the way
God’s prophets were ill-treated by the kings and priests of Israel (Matthew 23:37;
Acts 7:42; Hebrews 11:36-38). Finally he sent his son to them, thinking that they
would have more respect for him; here we can see the difference between Jesus
and the prophets, who were servants, not “the Son”: the parable indicates singu-
lar, transcendental sonship, expressing the divinity of Jesus Christ.

The malicious purpose of the tenants in murdering the son and heir to keep the
inheritance for themselves is the madness of the leaders in expecting to become
undisputed masters of Israel by putting Christ to death (Matthew 12:14; 26:4).
Their ambition blinds them to the punishment that awaits them. Then “they cast
him out of the vineyard, and killed him”: a reference to Christ’s crucifixion, which
took place outside the walls of Jerusalem.

Jesus prophesies the punishment God will inflict on the evildoers: He will put
them to death and rent the vineyard to others. This is a very significant prophecy.
St. Peter later repeats to the Sanhedrin: “This is the stone which was rejected
by you builders, but which has become the head of the corner” (Acts 4:11; 1
Peter 2:4). The stone is Jesus of Nazareth, but the architects of Israel, who build
up and rule the people, have chosen not to use it in the building. Because of their
unfaithfulness the Kingdom of God will be turned over to another people, the Gen-
tiles, who WILL give God the fruit He expects His vineyard to yield (cf. Matthew
3:8-10; Galatians 6:16).

For the building to be well-built, it needs to rest on this stone. Woe to him who
trips over it! (cf. Matthew 12:30; Luke 2:34), as first Jews and later the enemies
of Christ and His Church will discover through bitter experience (cf. Isaiah 8:14-
15).

Christians in all ages should see this parable as exhorting them to build faithfully
upon Christ and make sure they do not fall into the sin of this Jewish generation.
We should also be filled with hope and a sense of security; for, although the buil-
ding — the Church — at some times seem to be breaking up, its sound construc-
tion, with Christ as its cornerstone, is assured.

*********************************************************************************************
Source: “The Navarre Bible: Text and Commentaries”. Biblical text from the
Revised Standard Version and New Vulgate. Commentaries by members of
the Faculty of Theology, University of Navarre, Spain.


24 posted on 10/02/2011 7:32:18 AM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: Salvation
Matthew
  English: Douay-Rheims Latin: Vulgata Clementina Greek NT: Byzantine/Majority Text (2000)
  Matthew 21
33 Hear ye another parable. There was a man an householder, who planted a vineyard, and made a hedge round about it, and dug in it a press, and built a tower, and let it out to husbandmen; and went into a strange country. Aliam parabolam audite : Homo erat paterfamilias, qui plantavit vineam, et sepem circumdedit ei, et fodit in ea torcular, et ædificavit turrim, et locavit eam agricolis, et peregre profectus est. αλλην παραβολην ακουσατε ανθρωπος [τις] ην οικοδεσποτης οστις εφυτευσεν αμπελωνα και φραγμον αυτω περιεθηκεν και ωρυξεν εν αυτω ληνον και ωκοδομησεν πυργον και εξεδοτο αυτον γεωργοις και απεδημησεν
34 And when the time of the fruits drew nigh, he sent his servants to the husbandmen that they might receive the fruits thereof. Cum autem tempus fructuum appropinquasset, misit servos suos ad agricolas, ut acciperent fructus ejus. οτε δε ηγγισεν ο καιρος των καρπων απεστειλεν τους δουλους αυτου προς τους γεωργους λαβειν τους καρπους αυτου
35 And the husbandmen laying hands on his servants, beat one, and killed another, and stoned another. Et agricolæ, apprehensis servis ejus, alium ceciderunt, alium occiderunt, alium vero lapidaverunt. και λαβοντες οι γεωργοι τους δουλους αυτου ον μεν εδειραν ον δε απεκτειναν ον δε ελιθοβολησαν
36 Again he sent other servants more than the former; and they did to them in like manner. Iterum misit alios servos plures prioribus, et fecerunt illis similiter. παλιν απεστειλεν αλλους δουλους πλειονας των πρωτων και εποιησαν αυτοις ωσαυτως
37 And last of all he sent to them his son, saying: They will reverence my son. Novissime autem misit ad eos filium suum, dicens : Verebuntur filium meum. υστερον δε απεστειλεν προς αυτους τον υιον αυτου λεγων εντραπησονται τον υιον μου
38 But the husbandmen seeing the son, said among themselves: This is the heir: come, let us kill him, and we shall have his inheritance. Agricolæ autem videntes filium dixerunt intra se : Hic est hæres, venite, occidamus eum, et habebimus hæreditatem ejus. οι δε γεωργοι ιδοντες τον υιον ειπον εν εαυτοις ουτος εστιν ο κληρονομος δευτε αποκτεινωμεν αυτον και κατασχωμεν την κληρονομιαν αυτου
39 And taking him, they cast him forth out of the vineyard, and killed him. Et apprehensum eum ejecerunt extra vineam, et occiderunt. και λαβοντες αυτον εξεβαλον εξω του αμπελωνος και απεκτειναν
40 When therefore the lord of the vineyard shall come, what will he do to those husbandmen? Cum ergo venerit dominus vineæ, quid faciet agricolis illis ? οταν ουν ελθη ο κυριος του αμπελωνος τι ποιησει τοις γεωργοις εκεινοις
41 They say to him: He will bring those evil men to an evil end; and will let out his vineyard to other husbandmen, that shall render him the fruit in due season. Aiunt illi : Malos male perdet : et vineam suam locabit aliis agricolis, qui reddant ei fructum temporibus suis. λεγουσιν αυτω κακους κακως απολεσει αυτους και τον αμπελωνα εκδωσεται αλλοις γεωργοις οιτινες αποδωσουσιν αυτω τους καρπους εν τοις καιροις αυτων
42 Jesus saith to them: Have you never read in the Scriptures: The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner? By the Lord this has been done; and it is wonderful in our eyes. Dicit illis Jesus : Numquam legistis in Scripturis : Lapidem quem reprobaverunt ædificantes, hic factus est in caput anguli : a Domino factum est istud, et est mirabile in oculis nostris ? λεγει αυτοις ο ιησους ουδεποτε ανεγνωτε εν ταις γραφαις λιθον ον απεδοκιμασαν οι οικοδομουντες ουτος εγενηθη εις κεφαλην γωνιας παρα κυριου εγενετο αυτη και εστιν θαυμαστη εν οφθαλμοις ημων
43 Therefore I say to you, that the kingdom of God shall be taken from you, and shall be given to a nation yielding the fruits thereof. Ideo dico vobis, quia auferetur a vobis regnum Dei, et dabitur genti facienti fructus ejus. δια τουτο λεγω υμιν οτι αρθησεται αφ υμων η βασιλεια του θεου και δοθησεται εθνει ποιουντι τους καρπους αυτης

25 posted on 10/02/2011 9:17:44 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
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To: annalex
33. Hear another parable: There was a certain householder, which planted a vineyard, and hedged it round about, and dug a winepress in it, and built a tower, and let it out to husbandman, and went into a far country:
34. And when the time of the fruit drew near, he sent his servants to the husbandman, that they might receive the fruits of it.
35. And the husbandman took his servants, and beat one, and killed another, and stoned another.
36. Again, he sent other servants more than the first: and they did to them likewise.
37. But last of all he sent to them his son, saying, They will reverence my son.
38. But when the husbandman saw the son, they said among themselves, This is the heir; come, let us kill him, and let us seize on his inheritance.
39. And they caught him, and cast him out of the vineyard, and slew him.
40. When the lord therefore of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those husbandmen?
41. They said to him, He will miserably destroy those wicked men, and will let out his vineyard to other husbandmen, which shall render him the fruits in their seasons.
42. Jesus said to them, Did you never read in the Scriptures, The stone which the builders rejected, the same is become the head of the corner: this is the Lord's doing, and it is marvelous in our eyes?
43. Therefore say I to you, The kingdom of God shall be taken from you, and given to a nation bringing forth the fruits thereof.
44. And whoever shall fall on this stone shall be broken: but on whomever it shall fall, it will grind him to powder.

CHRYS; The design of this further parable is to show that their guilt was heinous, and unworthy to be forgiven.

ORIGEN; The householder is God, who in some parables is represented as a man. As it were a father condescending to the infant lisp of his little child, in order to instruct him.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; He is called man, by title, not by nature ; in a kind of likeness, not in verity. For the Son knowing that by occasion of His human name. He himself should be blasphemed as though he were mere man. Spoke therefore of the Invisible God the Father as man; He who by nature is Lord of Angels and men, but by goodness their Father.

JEROME; He has planted a vine of which Isaiah speaks, The vine of the Lord of Hosts is the house of Israel. And hedged it round about; i.e. either the wall of the city, or the guardianship of Angels.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; Or, by the hedge understand the protection of the holy fathers, who were set as a wall around the people of Israel.

ORIGEN; Or, the hedge which God set round his people was His own Providence; and the winepress was the place of offerings.

JEROME; A winepress, that is to say, An altar; or those winepresses after which the three Psalms, the 8th, the 80th, and the 83rd are entitled, that is to say, the martyrs.

HILARY; Or, he set forth the Prophets as it were winepresses, into which an abundant measure of the Holy Spirit, as of new wine, might flow in a teeming stream.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; Or, the winepress is the word of God, which tortures man when it contradicts his fleshly nature.

JEROME; And built a tower therein, that is, the Temple, of which it is said by Micah, And you, O cloudy tower of the daughter of Sion.

HILARY; Or, The tower is the eminence of the Law, which ascended from earth to heaven, and from which, as from a watch-tower, the coming of Christ might be spied. And let it out to husbandmen.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; When, that is, Priests and Levites were constituted by time Law, and undertook the direction of the people. And as an husbandman, through the offer to his Lord of his own stock, does not please him so much as by giving him the fruit of his own vineyard; so the Priest does not so much please God by his own righteousness, as by teaching the people of God holiness; for his own righteousness is but one, but that of the people manifold. And went into a far country.

JEROME; Not a change of place, for God, by whom all things are filled, cannot be absent from any place; but He seems to be absent from the vineyard, that he may leave the vine-dressers a freedom of acting.

CHRYS; Or, it applies to His long-suffering, in that he did not always bring down immediate punishment on their sins.

ORIGEN; Or, because God who had been with them in the cloud by day, and in the pillar of fire by night, never after showed Himself to them in like manner. In Isaiah the people of the Jews is called time vineyard, and the threats of the householder are against tire vineyard; but in the Gospel not the vineyard but the husbandmen are blamed. For perchance in the Gospel the vineyard is the kingdom of God, that is, the doctrine which is contained in holy Scripture; and a man's blameless life is the fruit of the vineyard. And the letter of Scripture is the hedge set round the vineyard, that the fruits which are hid in it should not be seen by those who are without.

The depth of the oracles of God is the winepress of the vineyard, into which such as have profited in the oracles of God pour out their studies like fruit. The tower built therein is the word concerning God Himself, and concerning Christ's dispensations. This vineyard He committed to husbandman, that is, to the people that was before us, both priests and laity, and went into a far country, by His departure giving opportunity to the husbandman. The time of the vintage drawing near may be taken of individuals, and of nations. The first season of life is in infancy, when the vineyard has nothing to show, but that it has in it the vital power. As soon as it comes to be able to speak, then is the time of putting forth buds. And as the child's soul progresses, so also does the vineyard, that is, the word of God; and after such progress the vineyard brings forth the ripe fruit of love, joy, peace, and the like. Moreover to the nation who received the Law by Moses, the time of fruit draws near.

RABAN; The season of fruit, He says, not of rent-paying, because this stiff-necked nation brings forth no fruit.

CHRYS; He calls the Prophets servants, who as the Lord's Priests offer the fruits of the people, and the proofs of their obedience in their works. But they showed their wickedness not only in refusing the fruits, but in having indignation against those that come to them, as it follows, And the husbandmen took his servants, and beat one, and killed another, and stoned another.

JEROME; Beat them, as Jeremiah, killed them, as Isaiah, stoned them, as Naboth and Zacharias, whom they slew between the temple and the altar.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; At each step of their wickedness the mercy of God was increased, and at each step of the Divine mercy the wickedness of the Jews increased; thus there was a strife between human wickedness and Divine goodness.

HILARY; These more than the first who were sent, denote that time, when, after the preaching of single Prophets, a great number was sent forth together.

RABAN; Or, the first servants who were sent were the Lawgiver Moses himself, and Aaron the first Priest of God; whom, having beaten them with the scourge of their tongue, they sent away empty; by the other servants understand the company of the Prophets.

HILARY; By the Son sent at last, is denoted the advent of our Lord.

CHRYS; Wherefore then did He not send Him immediately? That from what they had done to the others they might accuse themselves, and putting away their madness they might reverence His Son when He came.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; He sent Him not as the bearer of a sentence of punishment against the guilty, but of an offer of repentance; He sent Him to put them to shame, not to punish them.

JEROME; But when He says, They will reverence my Son, He does not speak as in ignorance. For what is there that this householder (by whom in this place God is intended) knows not? But God is thus spoken of as being uncertain, in order that free-will may be reserved for man.

CHRYS; Or He speaks as declaring what ought to be; they ought to reverence Him; thus showing that their sin was great, and void of all excuse.

ORIGEN; Or we may suppose this fulfilled in the case of those Jews who, knowing Christ, believed in Him. But what follows, But when the husbandmen saw the son, they said among themselves, This is the heir, come let us kill him, and let us seize on the inheritance, was fulfilled in those who saw Christ, and knew Him to be the Son of God, yet crucified Him.

JEROME; Let us inquire of Arrius and Eunomius. See here the Father is said not to know somewhat. Whatever answer they make for the Father, let them understand the same of the Son, when He says that He knows not the day of the consummation of all things.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; But some say, that it was after His incarnation, that Christ was called a Son in right of His baptism like the other saints, whom the Lord refutes by this place, saying, I will send my Son. Therefore when He thus meditated sending His Son after the Prophets, He must have been already His Son. Further, if He had been His Son in the same way as all the saints to whom the word of God was sent, He ought to have called the Prophets also His sons, as He calls Christ, or to call Christ His servant, as He calls the Prophets.

RABAN; By what they say, This is the Son, He manifestly proves that the rulers of the Jews crucified the Son of God, not through ignorance, but through jealousy. For they understood that tit was He to whom the Father speaks by the Prophet, Ask of me, and I shall give you the heathen for your inheritance. The inheritance given to the Son is the holy Church; an inheritance not left Him by His Father when crying, but wonderfully purchased by His own death.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; After His entry into the Temple, and having cast out those who sold the animals for the sacrifices, then they took counsel to kill Him, Come, let us kill him. For they reasoned among themselves, It will happen that the people hereby shall disuse the practice of sacrificing, which pertains to our gain, and shall be content to offer the sacrifice of righteousness, which pertains to the glory of God; and so the nation shall no more be our possession, but shall become God's. But if we shall kill Him, then there being none to seek the fruit of righteousness from the people, the practice of offering sacrifice shall continue, and so this people shall become our possession; as it follows, And the inheritance shall be ours. These are the usual thoughts of all worldly Priests, who take no thought how the people shall live without sin, but look to how much is offered in the Church, and esteem that tile profit of their ministry.

RABAN; Or, The Jews endeavored by putting Him to death to seize upon the inheritance, when they strove to overthrow the faith which is through Him, and to substitute their own righteousness which is by the Law, and therewith to imbue the Gentiles. It follows, And they caught him, and cast him out of the vineyard, and slew him.

HILARY; Christ was cast out of Jerusalem, as out of the vineyard, to His sentence of punishment.

ORIGEN; Or, what He says, And cast him out of the vineyard, seems to me to be this; As far as they were concerned they judged Him a stranger both to the vineyard, and the husbandmen When therefore the lord of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those husbandmen?

JEROME; The Lord asks them not as though He did not know what they would answer, but that they might be condemned by their own answer.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; That their answer is true, comes not of any righteous judgment in them, but from the case itself; truth constrained them.

ORIGEN; Like Caiaphas so did they, not from themselves, prophesy against themselves, that the oracles of God were to be taken from them, and given to the Gentiles, who could bring forth fruit in due season.

GLOSS; Or, the Lord whom they killed, came immediately rising from the dead, and brought to an evil end those wicked husbandmen, and gave up His vineyard to other husbandmen, that is, to the Apostles.

AUG; Mark does not give this as their answer, but relates that the Lord after His question put to them, made this answer to Himself. But it may be easily explained, that their words are subjoined in such a way as to show that they spoke them, without putting in 'And they answered'. Or this answer is attributed to the Lord, because, what they said being true, might well be said to have been spoken by Him who is truth.

CHRYS; Or there is no contradiction, because both are right; they first made answer in these words, and then the Lord repeated them.

AUG; This troubles us more, how, it is that Luke not only does not relate this to have been their answer, but attributes to them a contrary answer. His words are, And when they heard it they said, God forbid. The only way that remains for understanding this is, therefore, that of the listening multitudes some answered as Matthew relates, and some as Luke. And let it perplex no one that Matthew says that the Chief Priests and elders of the people came to the Lord, and that he connects the whole of this discourse in one down to this parable of the vineyard, without interposing any other speaker.

For it may be supposed that He spoke all these things with the Chief Priests, but that Matthew for brevity's sake omitted what Luke mentions, namely, that this parable was spoken not to those only who asked Him concerning His authority, but to the populace, among whom were some who said, He shall destroy them, and give the vineyard to others. And at the same time this saying is lightly thought to have been the Lord's, either for its truth, or for the unity of His members with their head. And there were also those who said, God forbid, those namely, who perceived that He spoke this parable against them.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; Otherwise: Luke has given the answer of their lips, Matthew that of their hearts. For some made answer openly contradicting Him, and saying, God forbid, but their consciences took it up with He shall miserably destroy these wicked men. For so when a man is detected in any wickedness, he excuses himself in words, but his conscience within pleads guilty.

CHRYS; Or otherwise: the Lord proposed this parable to them with this intent, that not understanding it they should give sentence against themselves; as was done by Nathan to David. Again, when they perceived the meaning of the things that had been said against them, they said, God forbid.

RABAN; Morally; a vineyard has been let out to each of us to dress, when the mystery of baptism was given us, to be cultivated by action. Servants one, two, and three are sent us when Law, Psalm, and Prophecy are read, after whose instructions we are to work well. He that is sent is beaten and cast out when the word is contemned, or, which is worse, is blasphemed. He kills (as far as in him lies) the heir, who tramples under foot the Son, and does despite to the Spirit of grace. The wicked husbandman is destroyed, and the vineyard is given to another, when the gift of grace which the proud has contemned is given to the lowly.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; When they seemed discontent, He brings forward Scripture testimony; as much as to say, If you understood not My parable, at least acknowledge this Scripture.

JEROME; The same things are treated under various figures; whom above He called laborers and husbandmen, He now calls builders.

CHRYS. Christ is the stone, the builders are the Jewish teachers who rejected Christ, saying, This man is not of God.

RABAN; But despite of their displeasure, the same stone furnished the head stone of the corner, for out of both nations He has joined by faith in Him as many as He would.

HILARY; He is become the head of the corner, because He is the union of both sides between the Law and the Gentiles.

CHRYS; And that they might know that nothing that had been done was against God's will, He adds, It is the Lord's doing.

ORIGEN; That is, the stone is the gift of God to the whole building, and is wonderful in our eyes, who can discern it with the eyes of the mind.

PSEUDO-CHRYS; As much as to say, How do you not understand in what building that stone is to be set, not in yours, seeing it is rejected, but in another; but if the building is to be other, your building will be rejected.

ORIGEN; By the kingdom of God, He means the mysteries of the kingdom of God, that is, the divine Scriptures, which the Lord committed, first to that former people who had the oracles of God, but secondly to the Gentiles who brought forth fruit. For the word of God is given to none but to him who brings fruit thereof, and the kingdom of God is given to none in whom sin reigns. Whence came it then that it was given to them from whom it was afterwards taken away? Remember that whatever is given is given of free gift. To whom then He let out the vineyard, He let it out not as to elect already, and believing; but to whom He gave it, He gave it with a sentence of election.

Catena Aurea Matthew 21
26 posted on 10/02/2011 9:19:18 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
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To: annalex


The Parable of the Wicked Husbandmen

Speculum humanae salvationis. Cologne, frater Nycolaus (scribe); c. 1450 National Library of the Netherlands

27 posted on 10/02/2011 9:20:07 AM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
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To: kellynla; markomalley; annalex

Thanks, Kelly, Mark and Annalex


28 posted on 10/02/2011 5:13:13 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Information:
Guardian Angels

Feast Day: October 2

29 posted on 10/02/2011 5:22:20 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Feast Days are superseded by the Sunday Liturgy

Interactive Saints for Kids

Guardian Angels

Guardian Angels
Feast Day: October 2

Today we celebrate the feast of our Guardian Angels. They are God's messengers who are always by our side to protect us. Angels delivered messages from God, protected people from dangers and rescued them.

They are mentioned in many places in the Bible. " The New Testament Acts of the Apostles tells in chapter 12 how St. Peter was led out of prison by an angel. " Psalm 91:10-12 also beautifully tells us how God's Angels care for us.

The belief that we each have a guardian angel has been common to Christians for hundreds of years. It is very comforting to know and believe that we each have an angel guarding and protecting us.

Our guardian angel is a gift from our loving God. They are given to us to guide our thoughts, words and actions and keep us from all harm and evil.

The picture of a guardian angel that we often see is an angel protecting a little child as he or she walks over a small bridge.

We can say this brief prayer as often as we would like to throughout the day:

Angel of God, my guardian dear
to whom God's love, entrusts me here.
Ever this day, be at my side
to light and guard, to rule and guide.
Amen.


30 posted on 10/02/2011 5:32:14 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Feast of Guardian Angels - to light and guard, to rule and guide
Archangels and Guardian Angels

The True Role of Guardian Angels
Touched by Padre Pio's guardian angels [Catholic Caucus]
Celebrating Guardian Angels - October 2 - Feast of the Guardian Angels [Ecumenical]
Guardian Angels
OF GUARDIAN ANGELS AND THE ROLE THEY PLAY NOT JUST ON EARTH BUT IN PURGATORY [Catholic Caucus]
Our Guardian Angels [Ecumenical]
Her unborn 'guardian angels' inspire pro-life work
Question: “Are there really such things as guardian angels?”
Guardian angels caught on film?
Early Christians Representations of Angels[Feast day Guardian Angels]

31 posted on 10/02/2011 5:47:28 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Lord Will Never Abandon His Vineyard, Biblical Reflection for 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time by Father Thomas Rosica, CSB

The Lord Will Never Abandon His Vineyard


Biblical Reflection for 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time

By Father Thomas Rosica, CSB     

TORONTO, SEPT. 27, 2011 (Zenit.org).- We are back in the vineyard again this week, immersed in another of Matthew's complex Gospel parables. Jesus told these parables in answer to the question: "What is the kingdom of God like?" His parables are short narratives that combine realistic details from first-century Palestinian life in little villages with details that are foreign to the ways that things happen in daily life.

Today's Gospel parable is often called the parable of the wicked tenants. Like last week's parable of the two sons and next week's parable of the royal wedding feast (33-46), today's story is clearly one of judgment at the center of Jesus' threefold response to the religious leaders who are putting his authority to the test (23-27). 

In the Old Testament, "vineyard" or "vine" is often used as a metaphor for God's people. The vineyard figures frequently in Jesus' parables, setting the stage for the Kingdom of God to take root and the drama of salvation to unfold. The work in the vineyard is hard labor; patience is essential, and wages are unpredictable as we saw in a previous gospel parable (Mathew 20). The vineyard can also be a dangerous place to work. Scuffles between workers can erupt (Mark 9:33), and violence may erupt as we see in today's story (Matthew 21:33-43).

A story of violence and want

The combination of a symbol of peace and plenty of today's parable with a story of violence and want is part of what makes today's Gospel story so powerful. A closer look at it helps us understand the harsh reality of people's lives in Jesus' day.

The estate of the landlord would have housed between 50 to 70 people, mostly slaves or servants. The most trusted servants would have had significant responsibilities. The landlord's servants did not hesitate to "lord it over" those in his charge (28). In early fall, when the harvest was ready, the landlord sent out a succession of his workers to collect the rent. The landlord would not go out himself to collect the rent. On the contrary, landlords protected themselves, their families and their considerable possessions in fortified tower-residences. 

The people of Jesus' day were also all too familiar with the violence the story portrays. When the landlord sent his son to collect the rent, the tenants said: "This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours." What remains very odd is that the tenants would repeatedly mistreat and even kill the one sent to them without any reprisal by the vineyard owner. In interpreting parables, the glimpse into the kingdom of God often comes to us through the strange details that are not the way things are in life around us then or now.

The vineyard is Israel and the landowner is God

Today's parable is not just an allegory of hot-headed and greedy servants. Those who listened to this parable from Jesus also heard something underlying the story. Earlier they had asked Jesus about the authority he was claiming for himself. They knew he was telling the story for a reason, and this upset them. The first hearers would have recognized some familiar themes under the surface. 

The vineyard imagery invites us to look at the first reading from Isaiah 5 where the vineyard symbolizes Israel. Since the vineyard has been planted by God, it represents the gift, grace and love of God. Yet the vineyard also demands the labor of the farmer that enables it to produce grapes that yield wine. Thus it symbolizes the human response: personal effort and the fruit of good deeds.

If the vineyard refers to Israel, then the tenant farmers represent Israel's religious leaders, who despite their professed loyalty to Israel's law (Torah), refuse to give God his due by acknowledging and accepting God's mighty presence in the life and mission of John the Baptist and of Jesus of Nazareth.

When successive "prophets" are sent to the "tenants" – and killed – they heard Jesus remind them of the habit leaders had in ignoring many of the warnings the prophets had previously announced. The religious leaders were being criticized for ignoring their own God-sent messengers. This of course would lead to the reaction we see in verse 12: "Then they looked for a way to arrest him because they knew he had spoken the parable against them. But they were afraid of the crowd; so they left him and went away."

Matthew has transformed this allegorical parable into a rich account of salvation history. The vineyard is Israel and the landowner is God. The slaves sent to collect the produce are the prophets sent to Israel. The son whom the tenants throw out of the vineyard and kill is Jesus, who died outside the walls of the city of Jerusalem. 

The fact that the vineyard (41) is to be taken from the wicked tenants and given to others (43) does not refer to Israel but to the kingdom of God. It is not suggested that God will remove Israel's present leadership and provide it with more faithful leaders. Rather, "the kingdom of God" will be taken "from you" and given to a nation that will produce the fruits of the kingdom. The "you" addressed consists not only of the opponents mentioned in the context but of all who follow their leadership in rejecting John and Jesus. The nation to whom the kingdom will be transferred is the church. The reach of the parable extends to include the resurrection when Jesus directs his hearers (42) to the prophecy about the "stone that was rejected" that has become the "corner stone" (Psalm 118:22-23), while the final comment (43) reinforces the sense of the Church as inheritor of the kingdom removed from the original tenants.

Avoiding anti-Semitism

We must avoid an anti-Semitic reading of this parable. The first way is to hear it as a piece of prophetic invective addressed by a Jew to fellow Jews. We must focus attention not so much on what the passage has to say explicitly about Jewish leaders as to what it implies about Christians. The "others" to whom the vineyard is given over in verse 41 are accountable to the owner. They too are charged with the heavy responsibility of producing the fruits of the kingdom (43). 

The vineyard will not be destroyed

In his homily at the mass to mark the opening of the XII Synod of Bishops on "The Word of God in the Life and Mission of the Church" on Oct. 5, 2008, Benedict XVI spoke beautifully of today's parable: "At the end, the owner of the vineyard makes a last attempt: he sends his son, convinced that they will at least listen to him. However the contrary occurs: the tenants kill him because he is the son, the heir, convinced that they can then easily come into possession of the vineyard. Therefore, faced with a jump in quality with respect to the accusation of violating social justice, which emerges from the canticle of Isaiah. Here we can clearly see how contempt for the order given by the owner is changed into scorn for him: this is not simple disobedience to a divine precept, this is the true and actual rejection of God: there appears the mystery of the Cross.

"But there is a promise in the words of Jesus: the vineyard will not be destroyed. While the landowner abandons the unfaithful tenants to their fate, he does not abandon his vineyard and he entrusts it to his faithful tenants. What this demonstrates is that, if in some areas faith weakens to the point of vanishing, there will always be other peoples ready to embrace it. This is why Jesus, as he quotes Psalm 117 (118): "The stone which the builders rejected has become the cornerstone" (v. 22), assures us that his death will not represent the defeat of God. Having been killed, he will not remain in the tomb, but rather that which appears to be a total defeat will mark the start of a definitive victory. His dreadful passion and death on the cross will be followed by the glory of the Resurrection. The vineyard will therefore continue to produce grapes and will be leased by the landowner "to other tenants who will deliver the produce to him at the proper time" (Mt 21:41)."

The vineyard is the house of Israel

The parable of the wicked tenants reminds us once again that we cannot control God's continuous merciful outreach to others. It compels us to look at our lives, our attitudes and actions, in light of whether they are an embrace or rejection of Jesus' saving message. Rather than putting the focus on what the story says about Jewish leaders, we must ask: what does it say about us Christians? What is my vision of the kingdom of God? How am I producing a harvest for God's kingdom, in my private and in our communal lives? What does the parable say to me about my own troubled relationships with family, friends and colleagues? What does the story teach me about my inability to forgive others and forgive myself? Yes, the wicked tenants in today's Gospel do indeed try God's patience. But I do as well! How do I respond to God's boundless mercy and goodness that he offers me each day?

[The readings for the 27th Sunday in Ordinary Time are Isaiah 5:1-7; Philippians 4:6-9; Matthew 21:33-43]

* * *

Basilian Father Thomas Rosica, chief executive officer of the Salt and Light Catholic Media Foundation and Television Network in Canada, is a consultor to the Pontifical Council for Social Communications.


32 posted on 10/02/2011 8:37:40 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Arlington Catholic Herald

GOSPEL COMMENTARY MT 21:33-43
A parable on presumption
By Fr. Jerome Magat

The parable of the vineyard and the tenants effectively encapsulates salvation history. Jesus uses this parable to explain the history of the chosen people and how they (the ancestors of the chief priests and elders) continually rejected prophets (the servants) and eventually, the Son of God (the son of the landowner). It is ironic that the chief priests and elders of the people, to whom this parable is addressed, render a harsh judgment regarding their treatment of the prophets and Jesus Himself.

While the parable was intended for the chief priests and the elders of the Jews, the parable contains a stern warning for Christians in every generation: We should never assume that just because we are the new chosen people by grace that we have a stranglehold on salvation. It is not enough to claim Christ in faith — our lives must reflect interior conversion and produce the fruits of God’s kingdom by our good works, good example and obedience to God’s law of love. Presuming our salvation can be one of the most long-lasting and damaging spiritual pathologies that we can suffer because we can mislead ourselves to think that simply claiming one’s Catholicism without having practiced the Faith faithfully, will somehow be enough to garner eternal life. This is precisely the spiritual danger that confronts those who do not practice the Faith but claim to be practicing Catholics in good standing because they come to Mass at Christmas and Easter. They “practice” the Faith on their own terms and not according to Jesus’ commands.

In addition, we can mislead ourselves to think that as long as we avoid sin, we will be saved. The parable makes is evidently clear that it is not enough to merely avoid sin. The landowner (God the Father) expects us to render fruit. Rendering fruit does not come about by merely avoiding sin. Rather, it is growth in virtue that produces the fruit of God’s vineyard. If we are merely living our lives of faith based on the desire to avoid sin, without a desire to build virtue, we will soon find ourselves ill-equipped to produce the fruit that God expects of us. We should always call to mind the first axiom of the moral life, “Do good and avoid evil.” Working in tandem, the two demands of the axiom require us to focus first on virtue-building and then concentrate on avoiding sin. Yet, many persons spend too much time avoiding evil without giving proportionate attention to doing good. If we are committed to good works, avoiding evil becomes more achievable and eventually, habitual.

It requires vigilance to be productive and faithful tenants, fully aware that the vineyard is on lease to us so long as we render the expected harvest. We are not owners of the vineyard — only tenants of the most merciful and just of landowners.

Fr. Magat is parochial vicar of St. William of York Parish in Stafford.


33 posted on 10/02/2011 8:45:42 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Archdiocese of Washington

There is an urgency and clarity about the Gospel for today that is most often lacking in modern Christians, certainly including the clergy. In this Gospel the message is urgent, provocative and clear: there is a day of judgment coming for every one of us and we simply must be ready. The message is a sobering one for a modern world that is often dismissive of judgement, and certainly of Hell. Yet Jesus says clearly that the Kingdom of God can be taken from us for our refusal to accept its fruits in our life.

Parables and images used by Jesus to teach on judgement and the reality of Hell, are often quite vivid, even shocking in their harsh imagery. The are certainly not stories for the easily offended. And they are also difficult to take for those who have tried to refashion Jesus into a rather pleasant sort of fellow whose job is only to affirm, rather than the uncompromising prophet and Lord that He is.

No one spoke of Hell more than Jesus – How to perfectly reconcile these sorts of teachings presented so bluntly with the God who loves us so, points to the deeper mysteries of justice and mercy, and their interaction with human freedom. But this point must be clear: No one loves us more that Jesus and yet no one spoke of Hell and its certainty more than Jesus; no one warned us of judgment and its inescapable consequences more than Jesus. Hence, out of love for us Jesus speaks of death, judgement, heaven and hell. As one who loves us, he wants none of us to be lost. So he warns, he speaks the truth in love.

Historically this parable had meaning for the ancient Jews that has already come to pass. God had established and cared for his vine, Israel. He gave every blessing, having led them out of slavery and establishing them in the Promised Land. Yet searching for the fruits of righteousness he found little. Then, sending many prophets to warn and call forth those fruits, the prophets were persecuted, rejected, even murdered. Finally, God, sent his Son, but he too was murdered. There comes forth a sentence: He will put those wretched men to a wretched death and lease his vineyard to other tenants who will give him the produce at the proper times….Therefore, I say to you, the Kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people that will produce its fruit. By 70 AD Jerusalem was destroyed, the Temple, never to be rebuilt.

The Jewish people are not singled out in the Scriptures, for we all, like them, are a vineyard, and their story, if we are not careful can be our own story. We like the ancients, have a decision to make. Either we will accept the offer of the Kingdom and thereby yield to the Lord’s work and bring forth a harvest,  or we must face the judgment that we have chosen to reject the offer of the Kingdom. God will not force us to accept his kingship or kingdom. We have a choice to make, and that choice is at the heart of the judgment we will face.

Let’s take a closer look at the Gospel and apply it to the vineyard of our lives.

I. THE SOWING – The text says, There was a landowner who planted a vineyard, put a hedge around it, dug a wine press in it, and built a tower.  Then he leased it to tenants and went on a journey.

Note the care and providence of the Landowner (God) who has given each of us life and every kind of grace. The image of vineyard indicates that we have the capacity to bear fruit, and this signifies the many gifts and talents and abilities that we have been given by God.

The hedge calls to mind the protection of his grace and mercy. Though the world can be a tempting place, he has put a hedge of protection around us which is sufficient for us to remain secure from serious sin, if we accept its power.

But note too a hedge speaks of limits. And thus, God’s protective graces, though sufficient, mean we must live within limits, within the hedge that keeps the wild animals of temptation from devouring the fruits of our vine.

The tower is symbolic the Church, which stands guard like a watchman in a tower warning of dangers for we who live within the hedge. And, the tower which is the Church is also standing forth as a sign of contradiction to the hostile world outside which seeks to devour the fruit of the vineyard.

That the landowner leases the the vineyard is a reminder that we are not our own, we have been purchased and at a price. God and God alone created all these things we call our own. We are but stewards, even of our very lives. We belong to God and must render an account and show forth fruits as we shall next see.

But this point must be emphasized: The care that God has given us, his grace, his mercy, his very own self. As the text from Isaiah says, What more was there to do for my vineyard that I had not done? God loves us and does not want us to be lost. He gives us every grace and mercy we need to make it. The Lord says, As surely as I live, declares the Sovereign LORD, I take no pleasure in the death of the wicked, but rather that they turn from their ways and live. Turn! Turn from your evil ways! Why will you die, O house of Israel? (Ez 33:11). This must be emphasized before we too quickly grumble about the subsequent judgment that comes. God offers every possible grace to save us. It is up to us to accept or reject the help.

II.  THE SEEKING - the text says, When vintage time drew near, he sent his servants to the tenants to obtain his produce.

There come moments in our lives when God looks for fruits. Notice, he is the owner and the fruits are rightfully his. He has done everything to bring forth the fruit and now deserves to see the produce of his grace in the vineyard of our life, which is His own.

And what fruits does the Lord seek? The values and fruits of the Kingdom: faith, justice, love, mercy, peace, forgiveness, chaste lives, love of the poor, generosity, faithfulness, love of one’s family and friends, even love of one’s enemy, kindness, truth, sincerity, courage to speak the truth and witness to the faith, and an evangelical spirit.

Note too the text says he sends servants to obtain the produce. Here also is God’s mercy. Historically God’s “servants” were the prophets. And God sent the prophets not only to bring forth the harvest of justice, but also to remind, clarify, apply God’s Word and warn sinners. God patiently sent many generations of prophets to help Israel.

It is the same for us. God sends us many prophets to remind us, clarify, apply and warn. Perhaps they are priests or religious, parents, catechists, teachers, and role models. But they are part of God’s plan to warn us to bear fruit and to help call forth and obtain some of those very fruits for God. Each in their own way says like St. Paul did in today’s second reading: Whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious, if there is any excellence and if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things. Keep on doing what you have learned and received and heard and seen in me (Phil 4:8-9).

Yes, God seeks fruits, rightfully so, and he sends his servants, the prophets, to help call them forth in us.

III. THE SINNING – The text says, But the tenants seized the servants and one they beat, another they killed, and a third they stoned.  Again he sent other servants, more numerous than the first ones, but they treated them in the same way.  Finally, he sent his son to them, thinking, ‘They will respect my son.’ But when the tenants saw the son, they said to one another, ‘This is the heir. Come, let us kill him and acquire his inheritance.’ They seized him, threw him out of the vineyard, and killed him.

Thus, despite all God has done, despite sending his servants the prophets, they are all rejected with increasing vehemence. Hearts grow harder. The Landowner, God, even goes so far to demonstrate his love, and will to save, by sending his own Son. But they drag him outside the vineyard and kill him. Yes, Jesus died outside the city gates, murdered for seeking the fruit of faith from the tenants of the vineyard.

And what of us? There are too many who reject God’s prophets. They do so with growing vehemence and abusive treatment. Many today despise the Church, despise the Scriptures, despise fathers, mothers, friends and Christians in general who seek to clarify and apply God’s Word, and warn of the need to be ready. It is quite possible that, for any of us, repeated resistance can cause a hardening of the heart to set in. In the end, there are some, many according to Jesus, who effectively kill the life of God in them and utterly reject the Kingdom of God and its values. They do not want to live lives that show forth forgiveness, mercy, love of enemies, chastity, justice, love of the poor, generosity, kindness, witness to the Lord and the truth.

We ought to be very sober of their are many, many today who are like this. Some have merely drifted away and are indifferent. (Some we must say, have been hurt or  are struggling to believe, but at least they remain open). Yet still others are passionate in their hatred for the Church, Scripture and anything to do with God, and they explicitly reject many, if not most of the kingdom values listed above. We must be urgent to continue in our attempt to reach them as we shall see.

IV. THE SENTENCE - The text says, What will the owner of the vineyard do to those tenants when he comes?” They answered him, “He will put those wretched men to a wretched death and lease his vineyard to other tenants who will give him the produce at the proper times.” Therefore, I say to you, the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people that will produce its fruit.

Here then is the sentence – If you Don’t want the Kingdom, you don’t have to have it. At one level, it would seem to us that everyone wants the Kingdom, i.e. everyone who has any faith in God at all, wants to go to heaven. But what is heaven? It is the fullness of the Kingdom of God. It is not just a place of our making, it that place where the will of God, where the Kingdom values are in full flower. But as we have seen, there are many who do not want to live chastely, do not want to forgive, do not want to be generous and love the poor, do not want God or any one else at the center, do not want to worship God.

Self excluded - having rejected the Kingdom values, and having rejected the prophets who warned them, many simply exclude themselves from the Kingdom. God will not force the Kingdom on anyone. If you don’t want it, even after God’s grace and mercy, his pleading through the prophets, you don’t have to have it. It will be taken from you, and given to those who do want it and appreciate its help.

The existence of Hell is rooted essentially in God’s respect for our freedom. For we have been called to love. But love must be free, not compelled. Hence, Hell has to be. It is the “alternative arrangements” that others make in their rejection of the Kingdom of God. At some point God calls the question, and at death our decision is forever fixed.

Yes, Hell, and the judgment that proceeds it, is clearly taught here and in many other places by Jesus (e.g. Matt 23:33; Lk 16:23; Mk 43:47; Matt 5:29; Matt 10:28; Matt 18:9; Matt 5:22; Matt 11:23; Matt 7:23; Matt 25:41; Mk 9:48; Luke 13:23; Rev 22:15; and many, many more). And it is taught by a Lord who loves us and wants to save us, but who is also sober to our stubborn and stiff-necked ways.

What is a healthy response to this teaching? To work earnestly for the salvation of souls, beginning with our own. Nothing has so destroyed evangelization and missionary activity, as the modern notion that everyone goes to heaven. Nothing has so destroyed any zeal for the moral life or hunger for the Sacraments, prayer and Scripture. And nothing is so contrary to Scripture as the dismissal of Hell and the notion of all going to heaven.

But rather than panic or despair, we ought to get to work and be more urgent to win souls for Christ. Who is it that the Lord wants you to work with to drawn them back to him. Pray and ask him, “Who Lord?” The Lord does not want any to be lost. But, as of old, he still sends his prophets (this means you) to draw back whoever will listen. Will you work for the Lord? Will you work for souls?  For there is a day of judgment looming, and we must be made ready by the Lord for it. Will you be urgent about it, for your self and others?

Photo Credit: Jean-Yves Roure

This video features the words of an old spiritual: Sinner please don’t let this harvest pass, and die and lose your soul at last. I made this video more than a year ago and in it there is a picture of Fr. John Corapi preaching. Since I made it long before “the recent troubles” please do not attribute any meaning from me by the inclusion of the photo, it is simply indicative of the “age” of the video.


34 posted on 10/02/2011 8:57:01 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Archdiocese of Washington

I’m going to let you in on a little secret. You’ve heard of “preaching to the choir?” Sometimes we preachers are guilty of that. More often than not, however, the words we

preach are directedprimarily at ourselves- whether we’re conscious of it or not. One of the great preachers of the early church, St. John Chrysostom, said that if a preacher doesn’t practice what he preaches, he shouldn’t be stopped from preaching, because his own words might convince him to change.

I have a suspicion that St. Paul’s words in today’s second reading were intended for himself as much as for the Philippians to whom he was writing. He encouraged his readers not to have anxiety, but instead to pray and think about positive and lovely and true things. Certainly this was advice that the Christians of Philippi needed to hear! But Paul himself had worries too. He admits as much in his first letter to the Corinthians, in which he speaks of his “anxiety for all the churches.” He worried that they would be torn apart by divisions or led astray by false teaching. It’s possible that he was concerned about his own acceptance as an apostle, as he wasn’t part of the original twelve selected by Jesus. And because his was in constant danger of being imprisoned and tortured, we can imagine his sometimes being worried about this too. On one trip, for instance, Paul admits that he and his companions “were utterly weighed down beyond our strength, so that we despaired even of life.”

How Paul dealt with his own anxiety is surely reflected in the advice he gave the Philippians; he was preaching to himself as much as he was preaching to them. Of course, he’s preaching to us too. And we would do well to pay attention, because many of us, in some way or another, struggle with anxiety, worry, and fear- particularly these days. People worry about the economy, their jobs, retirement, house values, terrorism, the conflicts in Iraq and Afghanistan, and the effects of global warming. And let’s not forget worries about health, kids, reputations, the effects of growing older, and the inevitability of death. Such worries can paralyze us, consume our thoughts and energies, ruin our mood, strain our human relationships, and effect our relationship with God too. We get angry with God, forget all the good things he’s done for us, lose sight of his presence in our lives, and worst of all, come to doubt his care and love for us. Yet this doesn’t need to be the case. St. Paul, in spite of everything he might have worried about, never lost his trust in God. He always remained grateful even in the most difficult circumstances, and he never failed to persevere in faith. The inspired advice he gave the Philippians certainly worked for him. Perhaps we should take it to heart too.

To begin with, Paul explains that when we begin to worry, we should lift up prayers and petitions to God. This may sound simple, even naïve. But have you ever been so consumed with worry that you forget to pray? We wring our hands, but forget to fold them. Not praying, however, only makes our worry worse. Yet when we pray, we put the whole matter in God’s hands, ask him to give us the help that only he can give, are reminded that he loves and cares for us, and we allow him to give us direction on how to deal with the things we’re worried about. Have you heard the slogan, “Give your worries to God each evening; he’s going to be up all night anyway?” It’s corny, but true. Whenever we find ourselves worrying, we should turn that into a prayer opportunity. Even if the only prayer we can muster is “Help!”

 

In addition to praying, St. Paul says, we also need to change the way we think. Instead of letting our hearts and minds be filled withanxious thoughts, we should think instead of those things which are true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, gracious, and excellent. Paul knew that we can lose sight of these things when we’re worried, and in so doing, it warps our view of the world. We see only the darkness, and are blinded to the light. Have you ever been so consumed with worry that you failed to notice the sights and smells of a beautiful morning when you stepped outside? However, when we make an intentional effort to think of those things Paul mentioned, we’re reminded of what’s good and beautiful in our world, all of which comes from God’s loving hand. And whenever we remember the good things of God, we remember the goodness of God himself.

It’s important to recall that Paul didn’t make any false promises or create unrealistic expectations. He didn’t say that praying and changing the way we think would take away our difficulties.He wrote his advice, in fact, while he was in prison and in great danger. He knew full well that sufferings and hardships are inevitable for anyone who chooses to follow a crucified Lord. We can’t avoid it. What we can do, however,  is avoid losing sight that God can bring good out of evil, and that Jesus’ victory over evil offers us an eternal life without it. Praying and thinking won’t erase our problems. But they can replace anxiety and despair, with trust and hope.

Paul may very well have been preaching to himself as much as he is to us. But we can be grateful for that, because his advice is so timely and true, and we can see the good fruit that Paul’s practices bore in his life. He is, after all, a saint! However, there is one final thing Paul wrote today that’s intended exclusively for us: his request that we imitate him.  For if we do, “the peace of God that surpasses all understanding will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.”


35 posted on 10/02/2011 8:58:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Sunday Gospel Reflections

27th Sunday in Ordinary Time
Reading I:
Isaiah 5:1-7 II: Philipians 4:6-9
Gospel
Matthew 21:33-43

33 "Hear another parable. There was a householder who planted a vineyard, and set a hedge around it, and dug a wine press in it, and built a tower, and let it out to tenants, and went into another country.
34 When the season of fruit drew near, he sent his servants to the tenants, to get his fruit;
35 and the tenants took his servants and beat one, killed another, and stoned another.
36 Again he sent other servants, more than the first; and they did the same to them.
37 Afterward he sent his son to them, saying, 'They will respect my son.'
38 But when the tenants saw the son, they said to themselves, 'This is the heir; come, let us kill him and have his inheritance.'
39 And they took him and cast him out of the vineyard, and killed him.
40 When therefore the owner of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those tenants?"
41 They said to him, "He will put those wretches to a miserable death, and let out the vineyard to other tenants who will give him the fruits in their seasons."
42 Jesus said to them, "Have you never read in the scriptures: 'The very stone which the builders rejected has become the head of the corner; this was the Lord's doing, and it is marvelous in our eyes'?
43 Therefore I tell you, the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a nation producing the fruits of it."


Interesting Details
  • Context: This is another section in the confrontation between the Jewish leaders and Jesus, not long before Jesus' passion and death.
  • (v.33) The vineyard is Israel. The owner is God. The tenants are the political and religious leaders. The servants are the prophets. The son is Jesus. The other, second set of tenants are the church.
  • The hedge keeps animals away. The winepress has two uneven basins lined with rocks and sealed with plaster; grapes are thrown into the more shallow basin and stepped on, so the juice would flow into the deeper basin where it starts to ferment. The tower is used for both guarding and shelter.
  • The peasants, or tenants, often had a hard time. They have to pay social dues, religious tithes, and taxes, amounting up to 40% of their crop. Another 20% is needed to feed the family and livestock. They need to trade some more for other necessities. So there is little left even before paying rent. (Pilch).
  • (v.38) The tenants erroneously assumed that the father has died, so they killed the son to get the land and avoid the rent.

One Main Point

Bad religious and political leaders, who refuse to do the will of God, will be punished and replaced


Reflections
  1. Has the Lord given me a part of the vineyard? What can I do to produce fruits in that part?
  2. Do I bear fruits for the Lord? What fruits do I bear?
  3. How do I treat the prophets and the Son of God?

36 posted on 10/02/2011 9:02:31 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Work of God

 He will leave the vineyard to other tenants Catholic Gospels - Homilies - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit

Year A

 -  27th Sunday in ordinary time

He will leave the vineyard to other tenants

He will leave the vineyard to other tenants Catholic Gospels - Matthew, Luke, Mark, John - Inspirations of the Holy Spirit Matthew 21:33-43

33 "Listen to another parable. There was a landowner who planted a vineyard, put a fence around it, dug a wine press in it, and built a watchtower. Then he leased it to tenants and went to another country.
34 When the harvest time had come, he sent his slaves to the tenants to collect his produce.
35 But the tenants seized his slaves and beat one, killed another, and stoned another.
36 Again he sent other slaves, more than the first; and they treated them in the same way.
37 Finally he sent his son to them, saying, 'They will respect my son.'
38 But when the tenants saw the son, they said to themselves, 'This is the heir; come, let us kill him and get his inheritance.'
39 So they seized him, threw him out of the vineyard, and killed him.
40 Now when the owner of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those tenants?"
41 They said to him, "He will put those wretches to a miserable death, and lease the vineyard to other tenants who will give him the produce at the harvest time."
42 Jesus said to them, "Have you never read in the scriptures: 'The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone; this was the Lord's doing, and it is amazing in our eyes'?
43 Therefore I tell you, the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people that produces the fruits of the kingdom.
(NRSV)

Inspiration of the Holy Spirit - From the Sacred Heart of Jesus

27th Sunday in ordinary time - He will leave the vineyard to other tenants To explain the kingdom of heaven I have spoken in different parables, this one speaks of investments and profits.

There is no action without a reaction, just as there is no work without a reward. If men have the right to work and obtain their wages, to invest and receive their profits, is it not then appropriate for God to have the same rights and even higher?

I am the Word of God that when planted as a seed in the heart of man is destined to produce fruit and bring glory to my heavenly kingdom. It is because of the action of the evil one, the lures of the world, the pleasures, the worries, the entertainment and all the dissipations of earthly life that my word is not given a chance. In fact it is despised, rejected and eventually destroyed in the same way that I was personally rejected and put to death on the cross.

The Jewish people had waited for thousands of years for the coming of the Messiah, they were waiting for their liberator, but they were so caught up in their religious rituals that they were blind to my coming. I came humbly as one of them, I came to bring light to dissipate their darkness, but they rejected me and put me to death. They failed to produce the fruits that my word was supposed to receive from them; they failed me! They were the chosen ones, but they proved to be unworthy of my gifts, therefore my kingdom has been given now to those who listen to my word and put it into practice, regardless of their background. I have come to forgive sinners and to give to everyone the opportunity to be saved.

On the day of reckoning, every one will have to give an account of their talents. In the wonderful creation of God, man has been lavished with many gifts and talents; the greatest of them is my word, which serves to elevate man to the spiritual heights of salvation. Blessed is the man who listens to my words and puts them into practice, he is producing the fruits that I expect.

My word becomes a curse for those who reject it because I am the word and they are rejecting me, God himself.

Author: Joseph of Jesus and Mary


37 posted on 10/02/2011 9:05:12 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
Catholic
Almanac:
Sunday, October 2
Liturgical Color: White

Today the Church honors the Guardian Angels. Each person is assigned an angel to help protect and guide them through life. Pope Clement X extended this feast day to the Church in the 17th century.

38 posted on 10/02/2011 9:06:39 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Comment #39 Removed by Moderator

To: Salvation

You’re welcome.

And THANK YOU for all you work over the years.


40 posted on 10/02/2011 9:11:00 PM PDT by kellynla ("Ignorance of Scripture is ignorance of Christ." -- St Jerome)
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To: All
The Word Among Us

Meditation: Philippians 4:6-9

“Have no anxiety at all.” (Philippians 4:6)

Is Paul serious? How can any of us live an anxiety-free life? Doesn’t he know how hard life can get? Yes, he does! He even talks about his own anxieties and how his concern for the different churches weighed on him (2 Corinthians 11:28). So why does he tell the Philippians not to be anxious? Because he knows how powerful a force worry can be, and he wants to give them some advice in dealing with it—advice that we can all take to heart.

First, Paul tells us to pray, and then he promises that “the peace of God that surpasses all understanding will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:7). Go ahead and bring your needs to the Lord. Feel free to lay them at his feet, and do your best to leave them there. If you do, you’ll find a new peace that you didn’t know before. You have brought your needs to the best place possible, and you can be assured that your heavenly Father will help you. He may not solve every problem right away, but he will give you his strength and clarity to help you keep working through them.

But Paul doesn’t stop there. He also tells us to fix our minds on “whatever is true, whatever is honorable, whatever is just, whatever is pure, whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious” (Philippians 4:8). If we do, then “the God of peace” will be with us (4:9). Our anxieties will gradually diminish as we gain a bigger, broader perspective on our lives. We will see our lives in the light of a loving Father and an ever present Holy Spirit. And that will give us great confidence whenever anxiety rears its head.

Don’t let anxiety get the better of you today! Remember that God is on your side. Your heavenly Father cares for you. His hand is stretched out to you even now, welcoming you and inviting you to lay your cares at his feet. So come to him, and let his Spirit help you guard your heart and mind today.

“Father, I surrender my anxieties to you today. Your love is unfailing, so I put my hope in you. Holy Spirit, fill my heart and mind with peace.”


Questions for Reflection or Group Discussion

(Isaiah 5:1-7; Psalm 80:9,12-16,19-20; Philippians 4:6-9; Matthew 21:33-43)

1. In today’s first reading, the Lord reminds us of how much he has cared for us, and how he longs for us to bear fruit in our lives. The Lord also invites us to “judge” the fruits of our life and determine what areas need to bear more fruit. What areas (is there one) in your life do you believe the Lord wants you to focus on to bear more fruit? How will you do this?

2. The responsorial psalm continues the metaphor of the vineyard and the vine and prays that the Lord would restore his vineyard and give it new life. As “temples of the Holy Spirit” and “living sacrifices,” perhaps, the Lord is inviting us to the Sacrament of Reconciliation to continue this restoration process? How important is this wonderful sacrament of God’s forgiveness and mercy in your life?

3. After having been asked to consider our lives and its fruit, the second reading reminds us that the grace and power to bear more fruit comes from God. The reading begins by telling us not to be anxious and that, if we pray and petition the Lord, the peace of God will guard our hearts and minds. What are the areas in life where you long for more of God’s peace? How can you integrate these prayers and petitions to God for this peace more fully into your personal times of prayer?

4. In the Gospel, Jesus repeats the story of the vineyard. All these readings are asking us to take very seriously the question of being fruitful. Being fruitful will require us to make sacrifices in our lives. What are the sacrifices you are willing to make to be more fruitful in your life?

5. Jesus also expands on the story by telling us just how far the landowner (God) will go to help the vines produce: he even sends his own son to die! How often during an average day do you turn to the Lord to reflect on his great love and mercy, and what he has done so that you could have eternal life with him? How often should you? What are the obstacles that keep you from doing this? What steps can you take to allow the Lord to have a greater part in your day?

6. In the meditation, we hear these words: “Paul tells us to pray, and then he promises that “the peace of God that surpasses all understanding will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus” (Philippians 4:7).” Why is prayer a way to replace anxieties in our lives with the “peace of God”? Can you give an example from your own life?

7. Take some time now to pray that God the Father would give you the grace to surrender your anxieties to his will and his great love for you, so that you can experience the “peace of God”. Use the prayer at the end of the meditation as the starting point.


41 posted on 10/02/2011 9:12:13 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
A Christian Pilgrim

WE ARE EMPOWERED BY HIM TO BEAR MUCH FRUIT  

(A biblical reflection on the 27th ORDINARY SUNDAY, 2 October 2011) 

Gospel Reading: Mt 21:33-43 

First Reading: Is 5:1-7; Psalms: Ps 80:9,12-16,19-20; Second Reading: Phil 4:6-9 

The Scripture Text

“Hear another parable. There was a householder who planted a vineyard, and set a hedge around it, and dug a wine press in it, and built a tower, and let it out to tenants, and went into another country. When the season of fruit drew near, he sent his servants to the tenants, to get his fruit; and the tenants took his servants and beat one, killed another, and stoned another. Again he sent other servants, more than the first; and they did the same to them. Afterward he sent his son to them, saying, ‘They will respect my son.’ But when the tenants saw the son, they said to themselves, ‘This is the heir; come, let us kill him and have his inheritance.’ And they took him and cast him out of the vineyard, and killed him. When therefore the owner of the vineyard comes, what will he do to those tenants?” They said to Him, “He will put those wretches to a miserable death, and let out the vineyard to other tenants who will give him the fruits in their seasons.”

Jesus said to them, “Have you never read in the scriptures: ‘The very stone which the builders rejected has become the head of the corner; this was the Lord’s doing, and it is marvelous in our eyes’? Therefore I tell you, the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a nation producing the fruits of it.” (Mt 21:33-43 RSV) 

The chief priests and elders ofJerusalemconfronted Jesus and questioned His authority. They were upset because on the previous day Jesus had driven out of the temple those who were selling and buying and began a teaching and healing ministry where the money changers used to be (see Mt 21:10-16).

Confronted by the religious leaders of Jerusalem, Jesus took the opportunity to try to teach them, using two parables about a vineyard (Mt 21:28-32 and Mt 33-43). The priests and the elders would have recognized Jesus’ reference to the “Song of the Vineyard” (see the first reading: Is 5:1-7). Jesus wanted them to understand the connection between God and the master of the vineyard, and between the tenants of the vineyard and the chief priests – those who were responsible for the spiritual direction of the people of Israel: “The vineyard of the LORD of hosts is the house of Israel, and the men of Judah are His pleasant planting; and He looked for justice, but behold, bloodshed; for righteousness, but behold, a cry!” (Is 5:7).

Throughout the Old Testament, images of the vineyard and the vine are used to describe God’s relationship with His people (see Ps 80:8; Jer 12:10; Ezek 19:10-11; Hos 10:1). In the New Testament, the theme continues in Mt 21:33-41, and in Jesus’ words at the Last Supper (Jn 15:1-11). These passages depict a God who lovingly provides for His people. He wants us – His vine – to have all the care we need to live as children of God; he gives us opportunities to produce “fruit” as members of His Church. He even “prunes” us back at times – purifying His Church – so that we can bear even more fruit.

God provides for us in many ways. We may have friends or family who love and care for us. We may be moved during a homily at Mass, as the Holy Spirit quickens the word of God within our hearts. It is especially true as we gather around His altar to receive His Body and Blood. Through all of these precious gifts, we are empowered to bear much fruit and show the world that our God is a gracious and loving Father.

Short Prayer: Lord Jesus Christ, I yield to You and ask You to drive out all that is opposed to Your kingdom. I want to bear the fruit for which You have made me. Amen. 


42 posted on 10/02/2011 9:14:58 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
 
Marriage = One Man and One Woman
Til' Death Do Us Part

Daily Marriage Tip for October 2, 2011:

“Have no anxiety at all…if there is anything worthy of praise, think about these things.” (Philippians 4:6-8) What do you feel anxious about today? Sharing it can lessen its power. Look for a positive thought to balance your anxiety.


43 posted on 10/02/2011 9:18:10 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: All
The Sacred Page

Are We a Fruitful Vineyard? Readings for the Twenty-Seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time


The past several Sundays we have been reading from the vineyard parables of Jesus in Matthew, and this Sunday we reach a climactic point in the hostility between the leaders of the people (chief priests and elders) and Jesus.

The Readings for this Lord’s Day are skillfully chosen to complement the Gospel reading.  Most commentators agree that the vine parables of the Old Testament found in Isaiah 5 and Psalm 80 are the textual background for Jesus’ own vineyard parable in Matt 21:33-43.

The First Reading gives us Isaiah 5:1-7, the key prophetic parable that identifies the “vineyard” as God’s people Israel.  Although we have not read it in the liturgy until this Sunday, this passage of Isaiah has been in the background through Jesus’ other vineyard parables in the last several weeks:

Reading 1 Is 5:1-7
Let me now sing of my friend,
my friend's song concerning his vineyard.
My friend had a vineyard
on a fertile hillside;
he spaded it, cleared it of stones,
and planted the choicest vines;
within it he built a watchtower,
and hewed out a wine press.
Then he looked for the crop of grapes,
but what it yielded was wild grapes.

Now, inhabitants of Jerusalem and people of Judah,
judge between me and my vineyard:
What more was there to do for my vineyard
that I had not done?
Why, when I looked for the crop of grapes,
did it bring forth wild grapes?
Now, I will let you know
what I mean to do with my vineyard:
take away its hedge, give it to grazing,
break through its wall, let it be trampled!
Yes, I will make it a ruin:
it shall not be pruned or hoed,
but overgrown with thorns and briers;
I will command the clouds
not to send rain upon it.
The vineyard of the LORD of hosts is the house of Israel,
and the people of Judah are his cherished plant;
he looked for judgment, but see, bloodshed!
for justice, but hark, the outcry!

The themes of this song from Isaiah have important connections with the Song of Songs.  The word translated “friend” in our Mass version is literally “my beloved,” in Hebrew dowdi or didi, which is the preferred term the bride uses for the royal bridegroom in the Song of Songs.  The Song of Songs is also full of vineyard imagery; in fact, the vineyard/garden is often identified with the bride herself: she is a vineyard/garden.  “A garden enclosed is my sister, my bride; a garden enclosed, a fountain sealed!” (Song 4:12).  “Let my beloved come to his garden and eat its choicest fruit!” (Song 4:16).

Thus, the poem in Isaiah 5:1-7, understood in light of broader Scriptural themes, is a love story.  The vineyard is a metaphor for the spouse of the Lord, his beloved people.  Ultimately it points forward to the Bride of Christ.

The use of the term “beloved” (dowdi) both in Isaiah and Songs lends itself to a Messianic reading of these passages, since “my beloved” (dowdi) sounds virtually the same as “my David.” “David” (dawid) literally means “beloved one.”  Thus one can see how easy it is to understand the “beloved” in these passages as the “David” that Israel is awaiting (Ezek 34:23), that is, the Anointed Son of David who can save them.

The Responsorial Psalm also combines the themes of the vineyard-people of God and the royal Son of David:

Responsorial Psalm Ps 80:9, 12, 13-14, 15-16, 19-20
R. (Is 5:7a) The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.
A vine from Egypt you transplanted;
you drove away the nations and planted it.
It put forth its foliage to the Sea,
its shoots as far as the River.
R. The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.
Why have you broken down its walls,
so that every passer-by plucks its fruit,
The boar from the forest lays it waste,
and the beasts of the field feed upon it?
R. The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.
Once again, O LORD of hosts,
look down from heaven, and see;
take care of this vine,
and protect what your right hand has planted
the son of man whom you yourself made strong.
R. The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.
Then we will no more withdraw from you;
give us new life, and we will call upon your name.
O LORD, God of hosts, restore us;
if your face shine upon us, then we shall be saved.
R. The vineyard of the Lord is the house of Israel.

Here, Israel is again likened to a vine that God transplanted from Egypt to Canaan.  God has then punished vineyard-Israel, but the Psalm implores him to relent and come to their aid. 

Verses 15-16 are key: “Look down from heaven, and see; take care of this vine ... and the son of man whom you made strong for yourself.”

This “Son of Man” is none other that the royal Son of David who sat on the throne of Israel at the time the psalm was composed.  Later in the psalm (verse 18) he is referred to as “the man on your right”: “May your hand be with the man on your right” (v. 18).  This is an apt expression, since the Temple, the throne of God, lay to the north of the royal palace, the throne of David, so that the Son of David literally sat “at the right” (i.e. to the south) of God.  (Directions were expressed facing east: “left” was north, “right” was south.)

Psalm 80 is a prayer for God to protect vineyard-Israel, but also the royal Son of David.  In fact, the fate of Israel and of the royal son are united and inextricable.

In the Second Reading we continue our lectio continua through Philippians:

Reading 2 Phil 4:6-9
Brothers and sisters:
Have no anxiety at all, but in everything,
by prayer and petition, with thanksgiving,
make your requests known to God.
Then the peace of God that surpasses all understanding
will guard your hearts and minds in Christ Jesus.

Finally, brothers and sisters,
whatever is true, whatever is honorable,
whatever is just, whatever is pure,
whatever is lovely, whatever is gracious,
if there is any excellence
and if there is anything worthy of praise,
think about these things.
Keep on doing what you have learned and received
and heard and seen in me.
Then the God of peace will be with you.

St. Paul exhorts us here to ponder “whatever is true, honorable, just, pure, lovely, gracious, etc.”  It is a list similar to the Fruit of the Spirit from Galatians 5:22-23.  Using the vineyard analogy given to us in the other readings, we can say that St. Paul wishes us to envision the Fruit of the Spirit, so that we may also bear these Fruit.  What we contemplate, we will emulate.  

The Gospel passage is the last of the vineyard-themed parables recorded by Matthew:

Gospel Mt 21:33-43
Jesus said to the chief priests and the elders of the people:
"Hear another parable.
There was a landowner who planted a vineyard,
put a hedge around it, dug a wine press in it, and built a tower.
Then he leased it to tenants and went on a journey.
When vintage time drew near,
he sent his servants to the tenants to obtain his produce.
But the tenants seized the servants and one they beat,
another they killed, and a third they stoned.
Again he sent other servants, more numerous than the first ones,
but they treated them in the same way.
Finally, he sent his son to them, thinking,
'They will respect my son.'
But when the tenants saw the son, they said to one another,
'This is the heir.
Come, let us kill him and acquire his inheritance.'
They seized him, threw him out of the vineyard, and killed him.
What will the owner of the vineyard do to those tenants when he comes?"
They answered him,
"He will put those wretched men to a wretched death
and lease his vineyard to other tenants
who will give him the produce at the proper times."
Jesus said to them, "Did you never read in the Scriptures:
The stone that the builders rejected
has become the cornerstone;
by the Lord has this been done,
and it is wonderful in our eyes?
Therefore, I say to you,
the kingdom of God will be taken away from you
and given to a people that will produce its fruit."

The basic meaning of the parable is clear: the tenants are the chief priests and leaders of the people.  The servants sent to the vineyard are the prophets; the son is Jesus himself; the vineyard owner is God the Father.  The judgment on the tenants is a prediction of the destruction of Jerusalem which was to happen within a generation (AD 70).

Jesus cites Psalm 118 concerning “the stone that the builders rejected.”  Clearly this stone is a reference to himself.  He is the foundation stone of the Temple, rejected by the chief priests—who were, in fact, involved in a massive project of rebuilding the Temple initiated by Herod the Great and completed about AD 66.

The chief priests were rebuilding the Temple, but neither they nor Herod who initiated the project were properly authorized to undertake such a sacred task.  Herod was not even a Jew; he was an Edomite who gained the throne of Israel by collaboration with the Romans.  Likewise, the chief priests at this time did not have the proper lineage, and maintained their position and power by manipulation and cooperation with the Roman authorities. 

It was the Son of David who was authorized to build the Temple of God (2 Sam 7:12-13).  So Jesus stands as the true temple-builder over against the false temple-builders. 

The Temple was decorated in its interior with garden imagery, which was intended to evoke the concept of Eden, the original garden-vineyard of God.  In fact, a great vine was carved on the gates of the Temple.  Some scholars surmise that Jesus was passing the Temple gates, with the great vine image, on the way to Gethsemane in John 15, where he begins his “True Vine” discourse: “I am the true vine, and my Father is the vine grower ...”

By identifying Himself as the True Vine, Jesus is claiming to be the personal embodiment of Israel, the people of God.

At the end of today’s reading, Jesus warns the chief priests, “the kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people that will produce its fruit.”

This has sometimes been interpreted as the “Kingdom of God” being taken away from the Jews and given to the Gentiles, but there are serious reasons to doubt that such a meaning is intended here.  Jesus, his Blessed Mother, all the Apostles, and the writer of this Gospel were Jews.  Ethnic Jews have always been part of the New Covenant.  In fact, the New Covenant itself is nothing other than the Body and Blood of Jesus the Jew.

It would be better to understand the “people who will produce its fruit” not as the Gentiles per se, but as all those, whether “Jew or Greek” (cf. Rom 1:16), who partake in the Body and Blood of the True Vine, that is, the True Israel, Jesus the Christ, and by partaking become incorporated into the New Vineyard, the New Israel.  By partaking of the Eucharist, we “abide in him, and he in us”: “I am the vine, you are the branches.  Whoever remains in me and I in him will bear much fruit, because without me you can do nothing” (John 15:5). 
 

44 posted on 10/02/2011 9:28:34 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Sunday Scripture Study

Twenty-seventh Sunday in Ordinary Time - Cycle A

October 2, 2011

Click here for USCCB readings

Opening Prayer  

First Reading: Isaiah 5:1-7

Psalm: 80:9,12-16,19-20

Second Reading: Philippians 4:6-9

Gospel Reading: Matthew 21:33-43

  • We take up this Sunday’s Gospel where we left off last Sunday: Jesus has just finished relating the parable of the two sons in the vineyard. The Jewish leaders he is addressing, knowing Jesus was speaking of them, resolve to destroy him (Matthew 21:45-46). Jesus knows this and thus addresses another parable to them, also about a vineyard.
  • This parable is also an allegory, that is, each person, group and place stands for something else. It is similar to the Nathan’s allegory to King David (2 Samuel 12:1-10).
  • By this allegory, Jesus confronts his listeners with the fact that God has given his people every blessing imaginable and entrusted their leaders to take care of what, ultimately, belongs to him. When he sent his messengers to set them straight when they strayed, they refused to listen. When one greater than all the messengers came to set things right, they recognized his threat to their authority (verse 38; Matthew 12:14; 26:3ff; John 11:47-53).
  • Jesus prophesies that the kingdom will be taken away from them and given to those who give the Lord “produce at the proper time” (verses 41, 43)— i.e., the believing Jews and the Gentiles who will make up the Church and perform the good works expected by God (Matthew 3:8-10; 16:17-19; Galatians 6:16).

 

 

QUESTIONS:

·         In the 1st Reading, who is the prophet's “friend”? How can we tell he owns and cares about the vineyard? Is he within his rights to allow the wild and unproductive field to go it's own way and to start over again?

·         In Jesus' parable, who (or what) is represented as the landowner? The vineyard? The tenants? The servants? The son?

·         In the 2nd Reading, what are the things that St. Paul tells will help us stay focused on God?

·         What corresponds to the son’s death? To the removal of the wretched tenants?

·         At whom does Jesus direct this parable (and those we heard on the previous two Sundays)? Why don’t’ they arrest him (vv 45-46)? Why don’t they repent and follow him?

·         At different times in your life, with what attitude have you received Jesus? Have you ever felt you deserved God’s kingdom?

·         In your life, is Jesus like a cornerstone (the foundation of your building)? Or is he like a millstone (a weight that drags you down)? In what ways?

·         With whom do you identify in this story? Why?

 

Closing Prayer

Catechism of the Catholic Church: §§ 443, 755 - 756

 

If we are trying to have Christ as our king we must be consistent. We must start by giving him our heart. Not to do that and still talk about the kingdom of Christ would be completely hollow.               

                                                                                                               --St Josemaria Escriva


45 posted on 10/02/2011 9:31:36 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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The Tenants Who Killed the Landlord
Pastor’s Column
27th Sunday Ordinary Time
October 2, 2011
 
          In this Sunday’s gospel (Matthew 21:33-43), Jesus offers the parable of a man who takes great care to set up his own business—a vineyard. He made a sizeable investment in time and money, planting a hedge, installing an expensive winepress, and cultivating grapes (this takes time!). After all these extensive preparations, he went out and found tenants to buy a lease and run the business for him.
 
          Well, we all know how this came out! The tenants refuse to pay their rent or a fair share of the profits they are earning on this leased land. Incredibly, they begin to think that the property and all that was set up belongs to them and that they should keep all the profits, so they resort to killing every legitimate debt-collector who shows up. The last straw in the sad tale occurs when these “tenants” even kill the owner’s son, thinking that then the whole operation will then fall to them. Instead, they are turned out and executed for murder!
 
          We live in a world that has (conveniently) forgotten who the landlord is – God – and that we are actually tenants, renters, of property that we do not really own at all. Everything we have is a gift from God.   The earth was here long before we ever showed up. In fact, it was set up by God, very carefully and over a long period of time, ultimately for our benefit. In every generation, the Lord “hires” tenants for his property: we are born into bodies we did not ask for and into a world we did not create. All God asks from us is that we give him a return on his investment – primarily by acknowledging him – thanking him, loving him, and by being generous with what we have received (our time and money).
 
          Some in this world would prefer to kill off “God” and place themselves in that position—as if the very idea of a “Creator” of the world is a threat to them. The fact is that this is God’s world – he is the one who set it up so he sets the rules. We can find them in the Bible – and in our own hearts. We ignore these rules to our own peril. We are creatures who are dependent on him for our very existence!
 
          God is a threat to some because they want no restraints on their “freedom” – freedom to destroy the environment, freedom to ruin lives through corporate greed, freedom to experiment on or kill the unborn with impunity, and they certainly don’t want God or any church telling them what to do! But though we may kill the messengers God sends to us (the Bible, the Church, our conscience, warnings in world events), this does not change the reality that after death there awaits heaven, hell and purgatory; and, whether we agree or not, this really is the Lord’s property we live on and he, the landlord, ultimately sets the rules.
                                                                                      Father Gary    

46 posted on 10/02/2011 9:43:39 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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27th Sunday -- Respect Life in the Vineyard
 
Michelangelo: Creation of Man, Sistine Chapel

Sunday Word: http://usccb.org/bible/readings/100211.cfm
A well-known legend has been told about St. Lawrence,  a third century Deacon of the Roman Church. Lawrence was given responsibility to care for the material goods of the Church, and the distribution of alms to the poor.  When Lawrence knew that he would be arrested, he sought out the poor and gave them all the money he had on hand, selling even the sacred vessels to increase the sum.  When the pagan prefect of Rome heard of this, he imagined that Christians must be very wealthy. 
He sent for Lawrence and said to him:  “Your doctrine says that you must render to Caesar what is Caesar’s.  Bring all these treasures; the emperor needs them to maintain his forces in the empire.” 

So Lawrence replied the Church was indeed very rich but that he would need some time to set everything in order.  “After three days,” he told the prefect, “I will bring you those treasures.”  The prefect agreed and Lawrence left.

Three days later he returned with a great number of the blind, lame, leprous, orphaned and widowed persons and put them in rows for the prefect.  The prefect was incensed at Lawrence’s insult and angrily reminded him that he had asked for the Church’s treasures.
Lawrence looked at him, pointed to the gathering of the poor and sick and simply said, “These are the treasure of the Church.”

It is a wonderful story about the value the Church has always placed on the human person.  Above all the treasures God has created, the human person has the greatest worth. That fundamental belief rooted in both Scripture and the long tradition of the Church, drives the moral framework of the Christian faith. The famed Ten Commandments are a moral framework based upon social relationships in light of God’s law in our life.  
This weekend and for the entire month of October, we mark our respect for human life. Like St. Lawrence, the true worth of the Church is measured by how well the people of God are served and valued above all other needs of the Gospel.  The variety of ministries in parish life exist for the people; to make the Gospel of Christ understandable in the lives of people and to help them come to know what God desires of us and the joy of serving the Lord.

The image of the vineyard is clear again in our readings this weekend in both Isaiah and the Gospel of Matthew.  We hear of fresh grapes and sour grapes and of a vineyard that is the sight of murder and insurrection.  Not the most pleasant biblical imagery for sure.
But, as always, it is a significant image of a God who chose a people but found them rebellious and unfaithful.  Then that same God sends his messengers to the vineyard where those prophets who bear his message find again that the people are not interested.  So much that the prophets are eliminated. Finally, the son of the vineyard owner (Jesus) is sent but he too suffers the same fate as that of the prophets.  One would think after all this uprising that God would just say, “To heck with it all.  I’m finished.” In fact, the end of the Gospel parable implies that is what the owner (God) says: “The kingdom of God will be taken away from you and given to a people that will produce its fruit.”

A narrow understanding would implicate the Jewish people as the ones who rejected the divine offer. But the Word of God is not a word from the ancient past.  It speaks loud and clear to us today. We are the vineyard of the Lord and we too have a responsibility to care for what has been given to us.
The greatest responsibility we have is to care for each other.  Respect Life Sunday and this entire month is a time to take stock of where we are both in our personal lives and in the greater life of the Christian community.  

All human life issues need our attention beginning with the unborn child, the elderly, those in prison, the immigrant, the poor, the terrible scourge of human trafficking, the quality of health care, those living under threat of war. It’s an enormous plateful to say the least.
In the end, though, it seems to come down to that fundamental question about our responsibility to respond to what God has offered each of us – a place in his vineyard.  If we truly believe and lived according to the truth that the human person is central, the deepest reflection of God among us, it would motivate us to seek generosity rather than selfishness. To offer forgiveness rather than retribution.

As we examine the life issues, who is more vulnerable than an unborn child or a terminally ill older person? Do our national laws reflect this?
As parents bring a child(ren) into the world, are they willing to put aside their old way of life and now reorient themselves for the sake of the human treasure before them? Or, do we live with an attitude of entitlement?

Do we believe the criminal on death row deserves any sort of dignified treatment or do we feel that “He/she deserves what they get?” The death penalty, of which the U.S. remains one of the few countries in the world, is not justice – it is unequally applied, based in revenge, and no longer necessary. A life for a life is just two dead people.
What of people living in poverty?  The unemployed, the immigrant who arrives here? Which law governs our actions – that of strict “justice” or that of mercy born of the Gospel?

None of these are easy answers and every life issue has its hot spot buttons.  But this weekend and the month of this seasonal change might be a time to reassess where we stand in the Lord’s vineyard and how much we care about one another.   
As Blessed John Paul II wrote:  “Where life is involved, the service of charity must be profoundly consistent.”  (Gospel of Life, no. 87)

What a treasure we have to offer the world – an alternative to the Gospel of the secular culture which emphasizes the practical and the useful as a measure of worth. 
Fr. Tim

47 posted on 10/02/2011 9:52:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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Insight Scoop



A Scriptural Reflection on the Readings for Sunday, October 2, 2011 | Carl E. Olson

Readings:
• Isa 5:1-7
• Ps 80:9, 12, 13-14, 15-16, 19-20
• Phil 4:6-9
• Mt 21:33-43

What do parables and vineyards have in common? When attended to with care and attention, they both yield fruit and nourishment. Today’s readings contain two of the best-known parables about vineyards in the Bible.

The first, from Isaiah 5, is often called simply “the parable of the vineyard.” The prophet uses the vibrant imagery of the vineyard to describe Israel and her relationship with God. The Lord, Isaiah explains, had demonstrated His love for Israel through His patient work in establishing, caring for, and protecting the vineyard. Today’s responsorial Psalm (80) uses very similar language.

But when God went to see what fruit had been produced by Israel, He found that it had yielded wild grapes, unsuitable for the winepress. The work and God had been ruined by the unfruitful actions of the people.

Although vineyards and wine are common in our modern day culture, we tend to view them as luxuries. We might enjoy drinking wine on occasion, but it is not a necessity. But in the ancient Near East wine often was a necessity, especially when good drinking water was not easily available, as was often the case. Vineyards and wine were therefore obvious images of sustenance and life. This can be seen, for example, in the covenantal curses found in Deuteronomy, which describes what will happen to those who forsake the Law: “You shall plant vineyards and dress them, but you shall neither drink of the wine nor gather the grapes; for the worm shall eat them” (Deut 28:39).

Loss of the vineyard, put simply, was analogous to loss of life, or at the very least the loss of joy and happiness. Abundance of wine, on the other hand, signified the fullness of life. Prophets such as Isaiah, Joel, Amos, Jeremiah, and others used vineyards and wine when speaking about both the curses of God and the future blessings He would eventually impart to His people, when “the mountains shall drip sweet wine, and all the hills shall flow with it” (Amos 9:13).

Isaiah 5 is a lament for the vineyard of Israel, which had become overgrown by sin and ruined by injustice. The parable of the wicked tenants, today’s second parable, is similar; it seems evident that Jesus was pointedly drawing upon Isaiah 5 when He spoke to the chief priests and the elders.

This parable is rather unique among Jesus’ many parables, for it is the most overtly allegorical of any of them—that is, the landowner, tenants, servants, and son all represent specific people. The landowner is God, the tenants are the chief priests and other religious leaders, the servants are the prophets, and the son is Jesus himself.

St. John Chrysostom, in his homily about this parable, reflected on God’s providence, love, and patience. God had done most of the work in establishing the people of Israel. The leaders of Israel had little to do; they were asked to be holy and uphold the Law. But they “made little effort to be productive, even after they had enjoyed such great blessings from him.”

God sent the servants, His prophets, as further evidence of His love and patience. Having been given the covenants and the commandments, the leaders violated both, murdering the Son of God. “While they had time to ask for pardon for their offenses and whereas they ought to have run to him to do so, they persist even more strongly in their former sins.”

The vineyard, Jesus said, would be leased to other tenants. They make up the New Israel, formed by the Son, consisting of both Jews and Gentiles, and bound together by communion in the Holy Spirit. “The Church,” states Lumen Gentium, the Second Vatican Council’s Dogmatic Constitution on the Church, “is a piece of land to be cultivated, the tillage of God. …. That land, like a choice vineyard, has been planted by the heavenly Husbandman.”

Nourished by the True Vine (cf. Jn 15), we should produce good fruit, mindful of the gifts of love and life given to us by the landowner and his son.

(This "Opening the Word" column originally appeared in a slightly different form in the October 5, 2008, edition of Our Sunday Visitor newspaper.)


48 posted on 10/02/2011 10:02:20 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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God Always Forgives, But Time Can Run Out

October 1st, 2011 by Monsignor Dennis Clark, Ph.D.

Is 5:1-7 / Phil 4:6-9 / Mt 21:33-43

Many centuries ago in the days of the desert hermits, a soldier approached a wise old monk with a question: “Father, do you think God really forgives sinners?”

The monk thought for quite a while and then responded with a question: “Tell me,” he said, “if your cloak were torn, would you throw it away?”

“Of course not,” said the soldier. “I’d mend it and wear it again.”

“Yes,” smiled the old monk. “And if YOU care for your CLOAK that well, will not GOD be even more careful with his own CHILDREN?”

Of course he will! Over and over God tries to mend us and put us back together and help us get our lives right. That’s what all those messengers are about in Sunday’s Gospel: God, calling out to us in so many different ways, urging us to stop wandering about, urging us instead to look at the gifts he’s lent us and to start using them— all of them — while there’s still time.

Now there’s a strange thing about our gifts: because they’ve always been there, we tend to take them for granted and in fact may not even notice them. And because they’ve always been there, we tend to think of them as our own and not just a loan — which leads in turn to the ultimate illusion: thinking we’ve got unlimited time and can afford to fool around and squander our gifts. How often our little inner voice whispers, “I’ve got lots more where that came from. Lots more life and all the rest too.”

When we say that out loud, we can hear how foolish and arrogant it is, this illusion of unlimited time. But that IS what’s being said in the fog inside our heads a lot of the time. And that’s what Jesus is trying to help us face up to before it’s too late.

This is what the parable is about: God never gives up on us. Never. He keeps sending us messengers because his love never runs out. But eventually our time runs out. Then we ARE whatever our use of our gifts has made us. We are whatever a lifetime’s worth of daily choices has added up to. And that is what we carry home to our Father. That and nothing else — just our selves.

Jesus is begging us as a brother not to waste another minute worrying about God and whether God will forgive us and give us another chance. He will — he always does, as long as there’s time. He’s begging us instead to look at our gifts, all of them, to pick them up with confidence, to make something with them, and to carry them where they’re needed — while there’s still time. That is Jesus’ urgent plea to us this day. By God’s grace may we say “Yes.”


49 posted on 10/02/2011 10:12:03 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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One Bread, One Body

One Bread, One Body

 


<< Sunday, October 2, 2011 >> 27th Sunday Ordinary Time
Saint of the Day
 
Isaiah 5:1-7
Philippians 4:6-9

View Readings
Psalm 80:9, 12-16, 19-20
Matthew 21:33-43

 

REJECTED!

 
"The Stone Which the builders rejected has become the Keystone of the structure." —Matthew 21:42; Psalm 118:22
 

It is so easy to reject Jesus. Our lives are like houses (see Mt 7:24). If we have the opportunity to make Jesus the Cornerstone of our lives, but do not do so, then we have rejected Him. If we refuse to provide for and protect the poor, the marginalized, babies in the womb, or our enemies, we reject Jesus. He said: "As often as you neglected to do it to one of these least ones, you neglected to do it to Me" (Mt 25:45). If we fall away from a one-hundred percent commitment to the Lord or never give our lives to Him, we reject Jesus, continue to crucify Him, and hold Him up to contempt (Heb 6:6). If we don't accept the Lord's government of His people through the Church, we reject the Lord (1 Sm 8:7). If we don't accept the Pope, bishops, parents, husbands, or leaders, we reject Jesus and the Father. Jesus said: "He who hears you, hears Me. He who rejects you, rejects Me. And he who rejects Me, rejects Him Who sent Me" (Lk 10:16). We can also reject the Lord by ignoring His presence in Holy Communion or in the Sacrament of Reconciliation. If we don't even bother to read the Bible, isn't that rejecting the Lord?

Jesus has never rejected anyone (Jn 6:37), but He has been rejected more than any other person. Love Jesus; don't reject Him. Make reparation to Jesus for the abuse He suffers daily.

 
Prayer: Jesus, to not accept You is to reject You. I don't want to reject You. May I not sin. I accept Your grace.
Promise: "Dismiss all anxiety from your minds. Present your needs to God in every form of prayer and in petitions full of gratitude." —Phil 4:6
Praise: Praise You, Jesus, Lord of hosts. We rejected You, yet You restored us (Ps 80:20). You are infinite Love and Mercy. We will love and praise You forever.

50 posted on 10/02/2011 10:17:06 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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