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Evangelicals Becoming Catholic, why?
CatholicConvert.com ^ | May 10, 2011 | Steve Ray

Posted on 05/17/2012 4:18:46 PM PDT by Salvation

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I've had this for awhile. Time to post it.

Link to the video

http://www.catholic-convert.com/2011/05/10/evangelicals-becoming-catholic-why/

1 posted on 05/17/2012 4:18:51 PM PDT by Salvation
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To: Salvation

mental illness?


2 posted on 05/17/2012 4:19:50 PM PDT by GeronL (The Right to Life came before the Right to Pursue Happiness)
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Comment #3 Removed by Moderator

To: Salvation
Maybe because the Catholic Church is putting its foot down and demanding Catholics be Catholic again, and this is appealing since the Evangelical movement seems to be slowly drifting to the same place the mainstream denominations have gone. In the past ten years, the evangelicals churches have started to embrace all kinds of lunacy: environmentalism, encouraging illegal immigration, etc.
4 posted on 05/17/2012 4:25:17 PM PDT by DesScorp
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To: Salvation

Lots of Catholics leave the RCs to join Protestant churches, too.


5 posted on 05/17/2012 4:28:02 PM PDT by Persevero (Homeschooling for Excellence since 1992)
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To: DesScorp

[ Maybe because the Catholic Church is putting its foot down and demanding Catholics be Catholic again, and this is appealing since the Evangelical movement seems to be slowly drifting to the same place the mainstream denominations have gone. In the past ten years, the evangelicals churches have started to embrace all kinds of lunacy: environmentalism, encouraging illegal immigration, etc. ]

NAILED IT!

Also the new Evangelicals re-joining the catholic church should also put pressure on the bishops to embrace the new “tone from rome”!

Some of the Evangelical non-denoms are turning into “Unitarian lite” with a sorta “Jesus was a Hippie” vibe.

Jesus was more of a Paladin Knight than he was a Hippie.


6 posted on 05/17/2012 4:28:08 PM PDT by GraceG
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To: DesScorp

You may have the answer there. It’s hard to tell for each has an individual tale to tell.


7 posted on 05/17/2012 4:32:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Persevero

Those aren’t REAL Catholics, they are the CINOs like Pelosi, Biden, Sebelius (who BTW has been excommunicated by her Kansas Bishop) etc.

You can have them.


8 posted on 05/17/2012 4:33:21 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
Evangelical protestants have given it a good try but the absence of a bottom line is always their Achilles Heel. As we see now in the broad spectrum of reformation/protestant denominations, there is no end to the splintering, creating heterodoxy instead of unity.

Eventually, it only makes sense to return to the source.

9 posted on 05/17/2012 4:33:21 PM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: Persevero

“Lots of Catholics leave the RCs to join Protestant churches, too.”

Yeah, I see lots of migration back-and-forth.

Pretty standard, I think.

I don’t care about poaching other denominations. I care about non-Christians.


10 posted on 05/17/2012 4:39:03 PM PDT by TheThirdRuffian (I will never vote for Romney. Ever.)
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To: Persevero
Lots of Catholics leave the RCs to join Protestant churches, too.

Only the ones who have already left the Faith

Look at the stories even here on FR. The exCatholics leave for personal reasons (I have seen their stories over and over, which they will often either deny or minimalize during ongoing threads addressing such matters). Protestants who join the Faith do so for theological reasons, often leaving behind much if not most of their lives.

I suspect that there may be further discussion on this...

11 posted on 05/17/2012 4:42:33 PM PDT by MarkBsnr (I would not believe in the Gospel, if the authority of the Catholic Church did not move me to do so.)
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To: TheThirdRuffian

Excellent point. However, if I find out that they are a baptized Catholic, I will always invite them to the next Mass, evening with Faith Formation 101, Sctiputre Study, or whatever.

Our church is growing so much that we are in the beginning — nearing the middle of a capital campaign to building a new church building and to modernize the old church building into classrooms.


12 posted on 05/17/2012 4:45:53 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: DesScorp
A friend of mine just returned from a visit to South Carolina, where they attended Mass presided by a priest who had declared that Obama voters needed to go to Confession! She said the service was very conservative; very solemn; and packed with families and young children out the door.
13 posted on 05/17/2012 4:46:10 PM PDT by hinckley buzzard
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To: Salvation

Just my two cents: From the outside looking in, the Catholic church always seemed to have a sense of holiness that protestants lacked. Note that I say this knowing full well and good that since I’ve been married to my second wife (and I her second husband) for well over 20 years, that I’ll never be asked to set foot in a Catholic church.


14 posted on 05/17/2012 5:13:14 PM PDT by Melas (u)
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To: Salvation

It’s because many evangelical churches have abandoned the authority of schripture while the Catholic church still has some standards albeit not often enforced.


15 posted on 05/17/2012 5:23:31 PM PDT by freedomfiter2 (Brutal acts of commission and yawning acts of omission both strengthen the hand of the devil.)
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To: Melas

I have attended Alliance, Lutheran, Evangelical services, and I believe you are right — the holiness is missing.

The Anglican Church that I attended, though, did have that sense of holiness.


16 posted on 05/17/2012 5:25:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation
"Our church is growing so much that we are in the beginning...."

We are experiencing an interesting phenomenon in our parish. We have seen a significant increase in the number of first Communion candidates in our Faith Formation (CCD) program, nearly doubling previous years. The interesting thing is that over half are what we call late bloomers, kids well beyond 2nd grade. It tells me that many lapsed Catholics are returning to the Church or at least making sure that their kids get the basics.

17 posted on 05/17/2012 5:25:43 PM PDT by Natural Law (Mary was the face that God chose for Himself.)
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To: freedomfiter2

The Catholic Church has scripture every day during the Mass.

Weekly Bible studies too.

I agree with you on the enforcement — but I think we are seeing that begin to turn around.

Is the Catholic pendulum swinging slowly to the right?


18 posted on 05/17/2012 5:28:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Natural Law

Wow! I think you are in a big parish, but our numbers were larger this year too.

Doubling for the Anglo kids and tripling for the Hispanic kids.

The largest church here in little ole Oregon capital had (Are you ready?) 360 First Communicants.


19 posted on 05/17/2012 5:31:02 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Melas
Phooey, go to church.
You may not be ‘invited’ by the parishioner's, but go anyway.
You may not feel you should take the sacraments, go to church, anyway.

Christ will forgive this ‘transgression’ as there are many more and many worse that you (and I) have committed.

Melas, I am talking (lecturing?) you as much as myself. My wife was raised Catholic, I was not and never formally converted. We are both in our second marriages, and together now 29 years. This marriage, I think, is what is my life's mission. For me, marrying this woman and raising her child, by her first husband, is my mission in this life.

We all need to go to church, for our own good.

20 posted on 05/17/2012 5:36:02 PM PDT by Tahoe3002
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To: Persevero

“Lots of Catholics leave the RCs to join Protestant churches, too.”

You’re right, especially when they want to move on to the second husband/wife.


21 posted on 05/17/2012 5:40:06 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: Salvation
Pageantry.

I've seen enough great Cathedrals in Europe to understand that inspiring awe has quite a lot to do with attracting followers to your religion.

22 posted on 05/17/2012 5:40:11 PM PDT by The KG9 Kid (Semper Fi)
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To: Tahoe3002

Good advice on the going to church.

We never know who will step into our path that can help us with something.

Or we never know what the priest will say that will set our world aright again.


23 posted on 05/17/2012 5:41:19 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Melas

“the Catholic church always seemed to have a sense of holiness that protestants lacked.”

That might stem from the fact that we believe Christ is present in the Eucharist, while others often say it is a symbol or reminder.


24 posted on 05/17/2012 5:43:03 PM PDT by kearnyirish2
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To: Salvation

This, my friend, is a load of crap. I have attended a few very conservative Evangelical/Baptist/unaffiliated churches over 40+ years. In that time I would guess that up to 10% of the congregation originally came from a Catholic background. Many went through Catholic school and their local parish and ultimately found something lacking. They subsequently found Christ elsewhere. With the pablum that many of the mainline Protestant denominations push the inverse is also happening.

Lest you think so, I am not a Catholic basher. While I can find a number of things that I will not agree with the Catholic Church about, I still have a great deal of respect for the Church. It has frequently stood in the gap where many of the Protestant denominations have not. Even though I do not acknowledge the Pope as THE Vicar of Christ, he is a true model for all believers and a great man. This Pope especially. In these difficult times I believe that believing Christians of all stripes should prepare for tribulation. At the same time I believe that there will be an outpouring of the Holy Spirit on both Catholic and Protestant believers alike.

I would suggest that believers on both sides quit trying to run down the other and recognize that there’s “rotten timber” who have little to do with Christ on both sides of the fence.


25 posted on 05/17/2012 5:54:52 PM PDT by Scoutdad
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To: nickcarraway; NYer; ELS; Pyro7480; livius; ArrogantBustard; Catholicguy; RobbyS; marshmallow; ...

Any comments on people who are coming back to the church?

Catholic Ping!


26 posted on 05/17/2012 5:55:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Scoutdad

You mentioned 40 plus years.

This is occurring now. Large First Communion Classes. Large RCIA classes. We have 15 adults in our Catholics Can Come Home class this year.

I appreciate your kind words about Pope Benedict XVI. He is a very good man, please pray for him.

Did you think the author was slamming evangelicals? I didn’t. I have some good evangelical friends, and although I disagree with their conepts, they are good people doing good things.


27 posted on 05/17/2012 6:00:16 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

I wish them luck and, selfishly, pray that they are conservatives coming to reinvigorate God’s Church


28 posted on 05/17/2012 6:02:29 PM PDT by Cronos (**Marriage is about commitment, cohabitation is about convenience.**)
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To: Melas

I attended Mass for eight years waiting for my husband to agree to having our marriage blessed in the Church. It’s hard to go and not receive the Eucharist, but I knew the Lord would open my husband’s heart eventually.

Everyone is welcome at Mass.


29 posted on 05/17/2012 6:08:52 PM PDT by Jvette
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To: Natural Law

Yep, we’ve seen that in our parish too.

My own kids were 13 and 10 when they were baptized and received 1st Communion.


30 posted on 05/17/2012 6:11:24 PM PDT by Jvette
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To: Salvation
Any comments on people who are coming back to the church?

To my shame, I am one of them.

31 posted on 05/17/2012 6:20:02 PM PDT by MarkBsnr (I would not believe in the Gospel, if the authority of the Catholic Church did not move me to do so.)
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To: DesScorp

Just look at the vote to see what is what, Evangelicals voting pro-life, anti homosexual agenda, anti-Obama, the Catholics voting the opposite, voting is a good measure of reality.


32 posted on 05/17/2012 6:21:58 PM PDT by ansel12 (When immutable definition of Bible marriage of One Man, One Woman, is in jeopardy, call the Mormon.)
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To: Jvette
I attended Mass for eight years waiting for my husband to agree to having our marriage blessed in the Church. It’s hard to go and not receive the Eucharist, but I knew the Lord would open my husband’s heart eventually.

My heart goes out to you. I know of what you speak.

33 posted on 05/17/2012 6:21:58 PM PDT by MarkBsnr (I would not believe in the Gospel, if the authority of the Catholic Church did not move me to do so.)
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To: Cronos

I think many of them are very conservative.


34 posted on 05/17/2012 6:23:18 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation; Persevero



I've had this for awhile. Time to post it.

I heard this hype years ago (though some more likely leave now due to the present compromise in evangelical churches, which Rome has as well) but I have had this for a while also, which has actual stats from many known sources. See more and notes here. Before you cry bias. The reality is that Roman Catholic churches covet evangelical converts in order enliven there overall dead pewsl My old priests used to exhorts us, “sing like Protestants.”

  • The Catholic population of the United States had fallen by nearly 400,000 in 2007, and suffered a slight membership loss in 2009 but increased 1.49 percent in 2010. [U.S. population growth rate in 2008 was 0.9 percent, and 0.57 percent in 2011.]. From 2007 to 2008 Roman Catholics grew from 17.33 percent of the global population to 17.4 percent in 2008. http://www.catholicculture.org/news/headlines/index.cfm?storyid=5753 http://www.ncccusa.org/news/100204yearbook2010.html; http://www.ncccusa.org/news/110210yearbook2011.html

  • 2002 Statistics compiled by the U.S. bishops' Secretariat for Hispanic Affairs reported that 71 percent of the U.S. Catholic population growth since 1960 was due to Hispanics. The statistics are taken from U.S. Census reports and recent surveys of Hispanics. http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m1141/is_15_36/ai_59607715/pg_3/

  • 68% of those raised Roman Catholic still are Catholic (comparable with or better than the retention rates of other religious groups). 15% are now Protestant (9% evangelical); 14% are unaffiliated. Pew forum, Faith in Flux (April 27, 2009) http://pewforum.org/uploadedfiles/Topics/Religious_Affiliation/fullreport.pdf

  • 80% of adults who were raised Protestant are still Protestant. ^

  • Those who have left Catholicism outnumber those who have joined the Catholic Church by nearly a four-to-one margin. 10.1% have left the Catholic Church after having been raised Catholic, while only 2.6% of adults have become Catholic after having been raised in a different faith. ^

  • 4% of Americans raised Catholic are now unaffiliated; 5% are now Protestant. ^

  • Regarding reasons for leaving Catholicism, less than 30% of former Catholics agreed that the clergy sexual abuse scandal played a role in their departure. ^

  • 71% of Protestants converts from Catholicism said that their spiritual needs were not being met in Catholicism, with 78% of Evangelical Protestants concurring, versus 43% of those now unaffiliated. ^

  • 50% of all Protestants converts from Catholicism said they stooped believing in Catholicism's teachings overall. Only 23% (20% now evangelical) were unhappy about Catholicism's teachings on abortion/homosexuality (versus 46% of those now unaffiliated); 23% also expressed disagreement with teaching on divorce/remarriage; 16% (12% now evangelical) were dissatisfied with teachings on birth control, 70% said they found a religion the liked more in Protestantism.

  • 55% of evangelical converts from Catholicism cited dissatisfaction with Catholic teachings about the Bible was a reason for leaving Catholicism, with 46% saying the Catholic Church did not view the Bible literally enough.

  • 81% of all Protestant converts from Catholicism said they enjoyed the service and worship of Protestant faith as a reason for joining a Protestant denomination, with 62% of all Protestants and 74% Evangelicals also saying that they felt God's call to do so. ^

  • 42% of those now unaffiliated stated they do not believe in God, or most religious teaching. ^

  • 54% of “millennial generation” Catholics (born in 1982 or later) are Hispanics, while 39% are non-Hispanic whites. On the other hand, 76% of “pre-Vatican II generation” Catholics (born 1943 or earlier) are non-Hispanic whites, while 15% are Hispanics. Center for Applied Research in the Apostolate (CARA) at Georgetown University, September, 2010 . http://www.osv.com/tabid/7621/itemid/6850/Openers-More-evidence-of-the-browning-of-US-Cat.aspx

  • 1,000 Mexicans left the Catholic Church every day between 2000 and 2010, a decline that has continued uninterrupted over the past 60 years, from 98.21 of the population to 83.9 percent today. Latin American Herald Tribune, March 10, 2011, based upon census data and study by sociologist and historian Roberto Blancarte of Colegio de Mexico and the National Autonomous University of Mexico

  • The percentage of of Protestants and Evangelicals rose from 1.28% in 1950 to close to 8% of the total population in 2010, (excluding so-called Jehovah’s Witnesses or Mormons). 5.2 million say they profess no religion. ^

  • This decline is seen as extending across the region (Catholics represent between 55% to 73% in Central America, 70% in Brazil, 50% in Cuba and Uruguay).^

  • Almost 20% of all Latino American Catholics have left the Roman Catholicism, with 23 percent of second-generation Latino Americans doing so. http://www.baylor.edu/content/services/document.php/33304.pdf

  • 51% of Hispanic Evangelicals are converts, and 43% are former Catholics. 82% of Hispanics cite the desire for a more direct, personal experience with God as the main reason for adopting a new faith. Among those who have become evangelicals, 90% say it was a spiritual search for a more direct, personal experience with God was the main reason that drove their conversion. Negative views of Catholicism do not appear to be a major reason for their conversion. ^

  • The highest percentage of those who strongly agree they have a personal responsibility to share their faith was found among believers in Pentecostal/Foursquare churches (73%) http://www.barna.org/barna-update/article/5-barna-update/53

  • 81% of Pentecostal/Foursquare believers strongly agree that the Bible is totally accurate in all that it teaches , followed by 77% of Assemblies of God believers, and ending with 26% of Catholics and 22% of Episcopalians. ^

  • The percentage of Catholics who believed the Bible is totally accurate in all of the principles it teaches declined from 34% in 1991 to 26% in 2011 http://www.barna.org/faith-spirituality/514-barna-study-of-religious-change-since-1991-shows-significant-changes-by-faith-group.

  • The typical Catholic person was 38% less likely than the average American to read the Bible; 67% less likely to attend a Sunday school class; 20% less likely to share their faith in Christ with someone who had different beliefs, donated about 17% less money to churches, and were 36% less likely to have an "active faith," defined as reading the Bible, praying and attending a church service during the prior week. Catholics were also significantly less likely to believe that the Bible is totally accurate in all of the principles it teaches. 44% of Catholics claimed to be "absolutely committed" to their faith, compared to 54% of the entire adult population. However, Catholics were 16% more likely to attend a church service and 8% more likely to have prayed to God during the prior week than the average American. Barna Reaearch, 2007, “Catholics Have Become Mainstream America” http://www.barna.org/barna-update/article/12-faithspirituality/100

  • 40% Roman Catholics vs. 41% Non-R.C. see abortion as "morally acceptable"; Sex between unmarried couples: 67% vs. 57%; Baby out of wedlock: 61% vs. 52%; Homosexual relations: 54% vs. 45%; Gambling: 72% vs. 59% http://www.gallup.com/poll/117154/Catholics-Similar-Mainstream-Abortion-Stem-Cells.aspx

  • Committed Roman Catholics (church attendance weekly or almost) versus Non-R.C. faithful church goers (see the below as as morally acceptable): Abortion: 24% R.C. vs. 19% Non-R.C.; Sex between unmarried couples: 53% vs. 30%; Baby out of wedlock: 48% vs. 29%; Homosexual relations: 44% vs. 21%; Gambling: 67% vs. 40%; Divorce: 63 vs. 46% ^

  • 82% of Mainline Churches, 77% of Catholics and 53% of Evangelical Churches affirmed, "There is MORE than one true way to interpret the teachings of my religion." U.S. Religious landscape survey; Copyright © 2008 The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. http://religions.pewforum.org/comparisons#

  • Orthodox (29%), Mainline Churches (28%), and Catholics (27%) led Christian Churches in affirming that the Scriptures were written by men and were not the word of God, versus Historically Black Churches (9%), and Evangelical Churches (7%) who rightly affirm its full inspiration of God. ^

  • Catholics broke with their Church's teachings more than most other groups, with just six out of 10 Catholics affirming that God is "a person with whom people can have a relationship", and three in 10 describing God as an "impersonal force." 2008 The Pew Forum on Religion & Public Life. http://religions.pewforum.org/comparisons#

  • Only 33% of Catholics strongly affirmed that Christ was sinless on earth. http://www.barna.org/barna-update/article/5-barna-update/53

  • 88% of Catholics believe that they can practice artificial means of birth control and still be considered good Catholics. New York Times/CBS News poll, Apr. 21-23, 1994, subsample of 446 Catholics, MOE ± 5%



35 posted on 05/17/2012 6:26:23 PM PDT by daniel1212 (Come to the Lord Jesus as a damned+morally destitute sinner,+trust Him to forgive+save you,+live....)
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To: kearnyirish2

While Catholic immigration is massive, many of them become Evangelicals or at least Protestant and as a result, switch to voting for life and traditional marriage, the pro-life movement does pretty good with them and gets about 50% of the vote of Hispanics that become Protestants.


36 posted on 05/17/2012 6:27:30 PM PDT by ansel12 (When immutable definition of Bible marriage of One Man, One Woman, is in jeopardy, call the Mormon.)
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To: Salvation

The reply originated because of the insinuation that the individuals moving toward the Protestant side were of the timber of Pelosi, Biden and Sibelius. The people that I know that have come from the Catholic side were nothing like them. What you are seeing is a movement of people toward Christ and away from phony spiritualism. This has become more pronounced in the Protestant churches in the last 20 or so years. Where it used to be mainly in the mainline denominations, it has now crept into hitherto Evangelical type organizations as well. Guys like Benny Hinn and Joel Osteen, among others, don’t reflect well on this side of the fence. People are looking for something better and many are drawn to Christ where He is preached. I’ve seen it here and you’re seeing it there as well.


37 posted on 05/17/2012 6:27:52 PM PDT by Scoutdad
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To: Salvation

That is hardly the case, and you should know it. The reality is that while the vast majority of western RCs are liberal, and become conservative if they join evangelical churches.

Meanwhile, the fastest growing faith in America is actually Islam (39% by immigration), and Mormonism, and “Nones.”


38 posted on 05/17/2012 6:32:42 PM PDT by daniel1212 (Come to the Lord Jesus as a damned+morally destitute sinner,+trust Him to forgive+save you,+live....)
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To: Salvation

Independent of Protestant professional mind-shapers reading of the Holy Scripture ALONE will lead anyone to either the Catholic Church or an Eastern Orthodox one. It is therefore inevitable that serious seekers of the company of Our Savior Jesus Christ shall leave the error of Protestantism precisely if they take the Bible seriously.


39 posted on 05/17/2012 6:33:15 PM PDT by annalex (http://www.catecheticsonline.com/CatenaAurea.php)
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To: Scoutdad

**The reply originated because of the insinuation that the individuals moving toward the Protestant side were of the timber of Pelosi, Biden and Sibelius.**

That was my statement. I apologize — I didn’t mean all Catholics or all evangelicals are like them. I think they are in a genre of their own.


40 posted on 05/17/2012 6:33:40 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: daniel1212

What is the source of your post, please.


41 posted on 05/17/2012 6:34:43 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Salvation

Agreed. I would call it “apostate”.


42 posted on 05/17/2012 6:37:00 PM PDT by Scoutdad
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To: Melas
Just my two cents: From the outside looking in, the Catholic church always seemed to have a sense of holiness that protestants lacked. Note that I say this knowing full well and good that since I’ve been married to my second wife (and I her second husband) for well over 20 years, that I’ll never be asked to set foot in a Catholic church.

If you ever get into south Central Virginia I would likle to take this opportunity to invite you. Depending on the circumstances of the previous marriages of both of you, there may be no reason why you can't come into the Catholic Church.

43 posted on 05/17/2012 6:39:14 PM PDT by verga (Party like it is 1773)
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To: The KG9 Kid
Pageantry.

If only... A lot of the beauty of the Catholic liturgical tradition was thrown out in the silly season of the 1960s and 1970s, but with our traditional and liturgical minded Pope, I think things are starting to slowly get back on track. Liturgy should be about worshipping the Lord worthily in communion, but not worship of the community itself and singing Kumbaya.

44 posted on 05/17/2012 6:42:55 PM PDT by Unam Sanctam
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To: MarkBsnr

Ah, but it’s all good now:)

I literally attend Mass daily and twice on Sunday, lol!

I also serve as an EM, lector and teach CCD.

I learned a LOT of patience with my husband and the Lord.


45 posted on 05/17/2012 6:45:31 PM PDT by Jvette
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To: Salvation

Sounds like your parish is flourishing. Do you think it is mainly a combination of lapsed returnees and new immigrants?


46 posted on 05/17/2012 6:46:51 PM PDT by Unam Sanctam
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To: Unam Sanctam

A little of both as well as people from other parishes doing their parish-hopping thing.

Our priest is an excellent preacher and teacher, and I think that has a lot to do with it.

Many people can sit in the congregation, and after Mass I hear statements such as “He was talking straight to me. How did he know?”

And I would say I hear that statement about every three months — for people to say something positive like that — multiply by ten at least.


47 posted on 05/17/2012 6:53:55 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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To: Melas

Actually, that is hardly likely to be an issue today, unless you advertise it or want to be more active than the typical RC.

And considering the wide criteria for annulments and the thousands granted after being sought and processed, it is possible many married Catholics are really not, and if your wife married a nonRC, that would be grounds for an annulment, in addition to things like psychological abnormality, stubbornness.


48 posted on 05/17/2012 6:56:04 PM PDT by daniel1212 (Come to the Lord Jesus as a damned+morally destitute sinner,+trust Him to forgive+save you,+live....)
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To: MarkBsnr; metmom; boatbums; caww; smvoice; presently no screen name; Quix; sasportas; wmfights; ...

Mark, as you also have asserted that the apostle Paul himself was a “pushy guy with a chip on his shoulder”, and a large “inferiority complex a mile wide,” and whose epistles likely had to be massaged, then it is not surprising to see you relegate the RC convert to evangelical churches to only be ones who have personal reasons, rather than the lack of the spiritual life which attracted souls originally to the church.


49 posted on 05/17/2012 6:56:51 PM PDT by daniel1212 (Come to the Lord Jesus as a damned+morally destitute sinner,+trust Him to forgive+save you,+live....)
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To: daniel1212

I’m wondering where you are getting the authority to speak for the Catholic Church???

Are you a priest, a deacon?

It appears that you are of another denomination, for no Catholic (usually) uses the initials RC to denote Catholicism.

So, then I ask, Are you a minister?

Where are you getting this authority to speak for the Catholic Church?


50 posted on 05/17/2012 7:01:25 PM PDT by Salvation ("With God all things are possible." Matthew 19:26)
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