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The Discovery Of America By Christopher Columbus (painting by Dali)
The Dali Museum ^

Posted on 10/08/2012 5:54:22 PM PDT by annalex



The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus

Salvador Dalí

1959
oil on canvas
410 cm × 284 cm (161.4 in × 111.8 in)
Salvador Dalí Museum, St. Petersburg, Florida

Dalí completed his tenth masterwork, The Discovery of America by Christopher Columbus, in 1959. This work, which is almost 14 feet tall, is an ambitious homage to Dalí's Spain, combining Spanish history, religion, art and myth.

This painting was commissioned for Huntington Hartford's Gallery of Modern Art on Columbus Circle in New York. At that time, some Catalan historians claimed that Columbus was actually from Catalonia, not Italy. From that perspective, the discovery of America was all the more relevant for Dalí, who was himself Catalan.

Dalí's inspiration for this work was a painting titled The Surrender of Breda by the great 17th century Spanish painter, Velazquez. Dalí repeated the image of spears from that painting on the right hand side of his work. Within these spears, Dalí painted the image of a crucified Christ, based on a drawing by the Spanish mystic Saint John.

The banner that Columbus is holding bears the likeness of Dalí's wife, Gala. She appears as a saint, suggesting that she was Dalí's muse, and that she was responsible for his own "discovery of America," where he captured the attention of the world with her encouragement.

The gadflies and the bishop at the bottom left are a reference to a Catalan folk legend about Saint Narciso. In this legend, on three occasions gadflies emerge from the tomb of St. Narciso to drive away French invaders. Dalí used this myth to underline the Catalan people's strength against foreign influence and to express his patriotic devotion to his homeland's independence.

The most enigmatic element of all in this painting is a celestial sea urchin in the foreground. It was painted in the 1950s, and Dalí told the Morses that the sea urchin's meaning would only be apparent later. In the summer of 1971, Eleanor Morse remarked that Dalí had meant the urchin to symbolize the moon and Neil Armstrong's future first footstep on the moon. Through this symbolism, Dalí paralleled Armstrong's moon walk with Columbus's discovery of America, so that there was a clear continuity between the discovery of the "new world" in 1492 and the discovery of another "new world" in 1969.

(This work is rich in detail. For a much larger view, click here.)


TOPICS: History
KEYWORDS: columbus; godsgravesglyphs
Happy Columbus Day!
1 posted on 10/08/2012 5:54:24 PM PDT by annalex
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To: NYer; Salvation; narses

God bless America.


2 posted on 10/08/2012 5:55:26 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex

Wow. Awesome work.


3 posted on 10/08/2012 5:57:31 PM PDT by GunRunner (***Not associated with any criminal actions by the ATF***)
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To: GunRunner

Dali’s work is even more impressive in person...the Dali collection in St Petersburg is worth the trip down there.


4 posted on 10/08/2012 6:05:01 PM PDT by rebelskid
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To: annalex

Cool painting


5 posted on 10/08/2012 6:12:27 PM PDT by vladimir998
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To: annalex

6 posted on 10/08/2012 6:14:08 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: JoeProBono

Weird as only Dali could do it.


7 posted on 10/08/2012 6:21:13 PM PDT by freepertoo
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To: rebelskid

Beat me to it. I was amazed at the size of some of them.


8 posted on 10/08/2012 6:28:15 PM PDT by CrazyIvan (Obama's birth certificate was found stapled to Soros's receipt.)
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To: annalex


9 posted on 10/08/2012 6:46:35 PM PDT by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: ETL

10 posted on 10/08/2012 6:52:46 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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To: annalex

I LOVE it!


11 posted on 10/08/2012 7:00:57 PM PDT by left that other site (Worry is the Darkroom that Develops Negatives.)
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To: annalex

I was fortunate to visit his museum and home in Catalan last month. There the sculpture takes center stage. He had a thing for Pirelli tires, over sized lips you sit on and a phalic swimming pool.

Then there’s Gaudi in Barcelona who I swear was a soulmate of mine.

Then there’s Picasso, who did strange his own way; very prolific.


12 posted on 10/08/2012 7:15:26 PM PDT by cicero2k
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To: JoeProBono

Pic #2. Dennis Hopper as Columbus?


13 posted on 10/08/2012 7:29:23 PM PDT by kaboom
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To: JoeProBono

14 posted on 10/08/2012 7:33:17 PM PDT by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: kaboom; ETL


15 posted on 10/08/2012 7:41:26 PM PDT by JoeProBono (A closed mouth gathers no feet - Mater tua caligas exercitus gerit ;-{)
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 GGG managers are SunkenCiv, StayAt HomeMother & Ernest_at_the_Beach
Thanks annalex.

Just adding to the catalog, not sending a general distribution.

To all -- please ping me to other topics which are appropriate for the GGG list.


16 posted on 10/08/2012 8:10:49 PM PDT by SunkenCiv (https://secure.freerepublic.com/donate/)
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To: annalex

Saw this in the Dali Museum in Florida years ago. This piece was something. Just amazing.


17 posted on 10/08/2012 8:14:59 PM PDT by Tanniker Smith (Rome didn't fall in a day, either.)
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To: annalex

18 posted on 10/08/2012 9:42:33 PM PDT by Oratam
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To: annalex

Here’s some little-known Salvador Dali illustrations from “The Autobiography of Benvenuto Cellini”:

http://thepoliticallyincorrectfish.com/pif2/?cat=119


19 posted on 10/09/2012 4:41:33 AM PDT by PIF (They came for me and mine ... now it is your turn ...)
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To: annalex
This is the work by Velázquez mentioned as an inspiration.



The Surrender of Breda

Velázquez

Before 1635
Museo del Prado, Madrid

20 posted on 10/09/2012 5:19:42 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: vladimir998

Love it.

I don’t like everything he painted but this is very good.


21 posted on 10/09/2012 5:20:52 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: JoeProBono

That photoshop killed the urchin!


22 posted on 10/09/2012 5:21:43 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: ETL

Thank you.


23 posted on 10/09/2012 5:22:19 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: left that other site

Indeed. What’s not to love? Thank you.


24 posted on 10/09/2012 5:23:19 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: cicero2k
There is something sure and solid in all Spanish art. Like they know something we don't.



Soft Construction with Boiled Beans (Premonition of Civil War)

Salvador Dali

25 posted on 10/09/2012 5:28:02 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: PIF
Beautiful


26 posted on 10/09/2012 5:29:55 AM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: rebelskid

i agree, i got to see a huge exhibit of Dali’s works while in Rome, he was a wierdo, but had great talent


27 posted on 10/09/2012 7:16:26 AM PDT by Docbarleypop
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To: freepertoo

28 posted on 10/09/2012 7:42:33 AM PDT by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: PIF

His stuff makes great 70s-rock album covers (Pink Floyd, Led Zeppelin, etc, etc). But I wouldn’t hang any of it on my wall if it were given to me.


29 posted on 10/09/2012 7:50:42 AM PDT by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: freepertoo
This one is pretty. Would have made a terrific album cover in the 70s. :)


30 posted on 10/09/2012 7:53:47 AM PDT by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: annalex

I can’t see the celestial sea urchin.


31 posted on 10/09/2012 3:25:25 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: little jeremiah
Here's a lighter color-correction:

I am not sure I would describe that round mass as a sea urchin, but I see the connection with the moon.

32 posted on 10/09/2012 5:07:00 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: annalex

Yes, with the lighter color, it is recognizable. Sort of does look like a sea urchin shell without its spines, but I don’t get the moon connection.


33 posted on 10/09/2012 5:31:32 PM PDT by little jeremiah (Courage is not simply one of the virtues, but the form of every virtue at the testing point. CSLewis)
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To: little jeremiah

The round spots resemble the moon craters.


34 posted on 10/09/2012 5:42:53 PM PDT by annalex (fear them not)
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To: ETL
Thanks somewhere in that picture is a great scifi novel. Flatworld or something like that. Just need some odd orbital mechanics and a plot then I'm good to go.
35 posted on 10/09/2012 5:45:44 PM PDT by nomorelurker
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To: nomorelurker

36 posted on 10/09/2012 6:06:54 PM PDT by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: nomorelurker

Do you see the coin spinning? I did initially. Now it’s stopped.


37 posted on 10/09/2012 6:18:06 PM PDT by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: freepertoo

It may be weird to you in this reproduction but you should see the original.

His ‘Last Supper’ is similar. I remember coming around a corner in the National Gallery and viewing the Last Supper. It took my breath away.


38 posted on 10/09/2012 6:21:10 PM PDT by ladyjane
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To: ETL

See that coin. Just need to do a story on a real flat world the implications are fun SCIFI Network here I come. Do you really just fall off the edge of the world or does gravity pull you around to the other side of the “coin”?


39 posted on 10/09/2012 6:41:29 PM PDT by nomorelurker
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To: ETL

See that coin. Just need to do a story on a real flat world the implications are fun SCIFI Network here I come. Do you really just fall off the edge of the world or does gravity pull you around to the other side of the “coin”?


40 posted on 10/09/2012 6:54:38 PM PDT by nomorelurker
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To: nomorelurker

There probably is a not-too-difficult physics formula to calculate the gravitational field of a disc. I tried the following but couldn’t figure it out. I’m sure there are more simple and direct ways of determining the gravitational dynamics of a disc.

Gravitational field of a disc:
http://www.physicsforums.com/showthread.php?t=39461


41 posted on 10/09/2012 6:55:20 PM PDT by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: nomorelurker

...then again, there probably aren’t many solid/rigid, disc-shaped objects in nature or elsewhere massive enough to even exert a gravitational field. There are large dust discs and galactic discs.


42 posted on 10/09/2012 7:03:28 PM PDT by ETL (ALL (most?) of the Obama-commie connections at my FR Home page: http://www.freerepublic.com/~etl/)
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To: annalex
Wow just happened across this thread.

I love Dali!

Great painting, I have never seen it before now.

I have several (prints, not originals) and a couple of books of color renditions of many of his paintings.

My favorite picture of him is his being lifted with a helicopter by his mustache!

43 posted on 10/12/2012 7:59:09 PM PDT by Syncro (The Tea Party is Dead!-->MSM/Dems/GOP-e -- LONG LIVE THE TEA PARTY!)
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