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To: vladimir998
I'll refer you back to the initial link I provided, amply sourced, with the key excerpt being as follows:

The movement that was to become the Moravian Church was started by Jan Hus (English: John Huss) in the late 14th century. Hus objected to some of the practices of the Roman Catholic Church and wanted to return the church in Bohemia and Moravia to what were the practices in these territories when it had been Eastern Orthodox: liturgy in the language of the people (i.e. Czech), having lay people receive communion in both kinds (bread and wine - that is, in Latin, communio sub utraque specie), married priests, and eliminating indulgences and the idea of Purgatory. Evidence of their roots in Eastern Orthodoxy can be seen today in their form of the Nicene Creed, which like Orthodox Churches, does not include the filioque clause. In rejecting indulgences, Jan Hus can be said to have adopted a doctrine of justification by grace through faith alone; in doing so, the Moravians arguably became the first Protestant church.[2][3]

47 posted on 03/30/2013 9:31:46 PM PDT by RegulatorCountry
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To: RegulatorCountry

you wrote:

“I’ll refer you back to the initial link I provided, amply sourced, with the key excerpt being as follows:”

It is not “amply” sourced. It is, in fact, not sourced at all. The two footnotes are about Hus not any Eastern Orthodox connection. That’s exactly why the superscript numbers only come at the end of the sentence and NOT after the comment about supposed Eastern Orthodox origins. Also, please not that both titles referenced in footnotes 2 and 3 lack page numbers which shows us that no specific point is being made except a general reference to the Protestant nature of the sect in question - as is amply demonstrated in the titles and description of the two books referenced.

In other words, you got nothing!

Now, again, I ask you to provide me with a source, preferably an official source from the Moravians, which gives evidence, actual evidence rather than a claim of evidence, that the Moravian Church, a 15th century heretical sect which broke away from the Catholic Church was actually Eastern Orthodox in origins. Can you do it or not?


58 posted on 03/31/2013 8:22:59 AM PDT by vladimir998
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To: RegulatorCountry
Sorry, but that article is wrong and let me point out why:

1. it says what were the practices in these territories when it had been Eastern Orthodox: liturgy in the language of the people (i.e. Czech) -- the liturgy of the Orthodox among the Slavs was Church Slavonic, not Czech. Czech is a Western Slavic language, while Church Slavonic, having originated from the missionary teachings of Saints C&M in Bułgaria was/is a South Slavic language - and, as a person who is learning a West Slavic language, let me tell you that there is a substantial difference between West and South Slavic languages, they are not easily comprehensible -- more like if an English person tried to speak Dutch or Flemish

married priests, -- ok, this is hilarious. There was nothing about married priests in Jan Hus' revolt. He was unmarried btw. The article ismixing up the actions of the re-created Hussite Church, re-created centuries later.

indulgences -- the person who wrote this doesn't realise that the Orthodox had a practice of absolution certificates (συγχωροχάρτια – synchorochartia). Greek Orthodox Patriarch of Jerusalem Dositheos Notaras (1641–1707) wrote: "It is an established custom and ancient tradition, known to all, that the Most Holy Patriarchs give the absolution certificate (συγχωροχάρτιον – synchorochartion) to the faithful people … they have granted them from the beginning and still do."

purgatory -- again another example that the link you provided has people who have no idea what they are talking about -- the Orthodox hold that Prayer for the dead is necessary.The Eastern Orthodox Church holds that it is necessary to believe in an intermediate after-death state in which believers are perfected and brought to full divinization, a process of growth rather than of punishment, which some Orthodox have called purgatory

67 posted on 03/31/2013 1:33:40 PM PDT by Cronos (Latin presbuteros->Late Latin presbyter->Old English pruos->Middle Engl prest->priest)
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