Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

Skip to comments.

Top 10 Reasons to Come Back to the Catholic Church...
St. Michael the Archangel Catholic Church in Monroe, Michigan ^

Posted on 02/07/2003 3:00:37 PM PST by heyheyhey

You Can't Go Home Again is the title of a once famous novel by Thomas Wolfe. There is deep wistfulness in his novel. He believed that going home again is bound to be a great disappointment. Not so with the Catholic Church. No matter how long you've been away, you can always come home. You can start coming to Mass. You can become a part of a parish community. You can enter into the faith far more deeply than when you left...

There are as many reasons for coming back to the Church as there are people who left. While God is at the center of each person's decision to return the circumstances are varied. Here are ten reasons that influenced the decision of other people to return to the practice of the Catholic faith.

10) Because they want meaning in their life,

9) Because childhood memories surface,

8) Because they made mistakes,

7) Because they need to forgive others,

6) Because they want to be healed,

5) Because the Catholic Church has the fullness of truth and grace,

4) Because they want their children to have a faith foundation,

3) Because they want to be part of a faith community,

2) Because they want to help other people,

... AND ...

1) Because they hunger for the Eucharist.

Many people come back to the Catholic Church because they feel an intense longing for the Eucharist. Sometimes it happens at a wedding, a funeral, a baptism, a First Communion, or a Confirmation. Sometimes it happens when people are alone or facing difficulties in life. They describe it as a deep hunger for the spiritual nourishment that comes when they receive the Body and Blood, soul and divinity of Jesus Christ.

(Excerpt) Read more at home.catholicweb.com ...


TOPICS: General Discusssion
KEYWORDS: catholic; church; conversion; reasons

1 posted on 02/07/2003 3:00:37 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
I was a CEO Catholic for too long. While loosely raised Catholic, I wasn't required to go to church and it was easy not to go when there was no one to go with as a kid.

I was confirmed later than normal (23) right before I got married (in the church) and at the time tried to go to church regularly with my husband, but didn't really get anything out of it. My heart was still closed, and I didn't really repent all my sins, and I guess I still felt like an outsider. But when I was pregnant with my third child, at the same time my oldest started Catechism, I suddenly felt drawn back to the church. I knew I had to be the example for my children.

The best thing about it is that once I had the realization, I couldn't read enough about the Church and my faith, I started attending Mass every Sunday, and during Advent went to Confession for the first time in 20+ years. The weight lifted off my soul after Confession was almost palpable. I truly felt free from sin for the first time in years, and I had plenty to atone for.

Now, three years later, I feel blessed that the Holy Spirit guided me back to the Church, and I even find myself going sometimes during the week just because I want to, not because I feel I have to. I look forward to Mass on Sunday and receiving the Eucharist, and knowing that Jesus is right there with me, and He has and will forgive me and love me. When things get rough, I don't whine and complain (much) anymore, but I try and hand everything to Jesus and say, you know what's best for me, help me get through this.

Anyway, I just thought I'd share, and praise the Lord for bringing me home.
2 posted on 02/07/2003 4:06:44 PM PST by Gophack
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
My wife and I returned to the Church after many, many years. The local Catholic paper made us the cover story.
3 posted on 02/07/2003 5:40:35 PM PST by madprof98
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: madprof98; Gophack
Extraordinary testimonies.
Praised be the Lord, and may He continue to bless you abundantly!

Long, long time ago I lived in a small and very friendly parish where everyone knew everyone else. A young married couple moved into the area. They joined the parish and immediately became involved in some ministries only to leave the Catholic Church officially and noisily after a couple of months or so. They got "re-baptized" in some local Evangelical community.

It was a shock to all in the parish, and most of all to our elderly pastor - one of the finest priests I've ever known. No one in the church knew the reasons behind their decision. Some speculated that they came to the parish and got involved in it with the predetermined decision to leave the Catholic Church with a lot of noise, but no one knew for sure.

It took place over 25 years ago, and I still remember the first intercession said by the pastor on Sunday in the prayer of the faithful: Let us pray for those who left the Church because of our lack of charity.

I thought then that by saying the prayer our pastor told us what could be the actual reason for the young couple to leave our parish and the Church. And, even if they had other reasons, our true Christian charity might have prompted them to stay.

4 posted on 02/07/2003 7:24:10 PM PST by heyheyhey
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: madprof98
I read your story, it was great.

When I converted from Methodism to the Catholic Church my heart and convictions were solidly there for 2 years before I joined RCIA. I went to Mass, I prayed the prayers, I tried to live the life but something was holding me back. My friends would tell me I was ready, one even arranged for a priest to work with me privately. I just kept telling them I didn't know why but I felt sure I'd know when the time was right.

Finally, one evening I was talking to a friend and when I hung up the phone, I had made my decision. I turned to my husband and said, "I'm going to join the Catholic Church and I won't ask you to join with me but I'll need your cooperation. You'll have to get baptized and we'll have to have our marriage blessed."

He said okay way too easy. So something (the Holy Spirit?) urged me to push just a little harder and within 5 minutes I had him agreeing to attend the inquiry part of RCIA with no strings attached. If he dropped out I wouldn't say a word. After the inquiry he kept going but he never committed himself out loud to me.

I get cold chills when I think about how many things happened.

About the middle of October the priest asked the RCIA leaders if they would start another period of inquiry because he had some others who were interested. So the next time I saw my son I asked him to go. He gave me the "Mother, you have to be out of your mind look!" I just said "Please, just do it for me." Then I got a hold of my poor daughter-in-law and convinced her to join him, promising to babysit the kids while they were at class.

There was no turning back for any of us. We all came into Communion with the Church Easter 2000. My husband was baptized, my son and I had first Communion and Confirmation and my daughter-in-law who was baptized a Catholic was Confirmed.

There is more but this is long enough already.

5 posted on 02/07/2003 10:43:45 PM PST by tiki
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: tiki; madprof98; heyheyhey; SMEDLEYBUTLER; redhead; Notwithstanding; nickcarraway; Romulus; ...
Thank you all for witnessing to your faith! These stories are just beautiful. Many cradle catholics who, like me, strayed at some point in time from the faith, often find themselves called back through "extraordinary" means. In my case, it was a young man who asked me to be his sponsor at Confirmation. After years as a lapsed catholic, once inside that church, I didn't want the "moment" to end. I inhaled it, and left the rest up to God. Each day, I am more committed than the day before.

For converts, like you tiki, there is a wonderful web site where you can read the stories of others who entered the catholic church.

The purpose of The Coming Home Network International (CHNetwork) is to provide fellowship, encouragement and support for Protestant pastors and laymen who are somewhere along the journey or have already been received into the Catholic Church. The CHNetwork is committed to assisting and standing beside all inquirers, serving as a friend and an advocate.

Would you like to assist others on the journey home? Your help is needed especially if you have faced the same journey. There are others from your previous denomination who could use an encouraging word or someone to discuss specific issues with by email, phone, mail or even in person.

For more information please contact our office at 800-664-5110 or helpers@chnetwork.org. Please include your postal address in your message as well as your email.

The Coming Home Network International

Marcus Grodi, who founded CHN, has a wonderful program entitled Journey Home that runs on EWTN, Monday nights.

6 posted on 02/08/2003 2:47:11 PM PST by NYer (Kyrie Eleison)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Because childhood memories surface This is listed as a reason why people return to the Church. I am sure that has always been so, but will it be in future? The type of childhood memories which people now have of Catholicism do not have any strong cultural pull. The practices are not different from the rest of life, and follow various passing fashions.
7 posted on 02/08/2003 3:42:58 PM PST by BlackVeil
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: tiki; Lloyd Grey
What a wonderful witness!

I have had the priviledge of seeing similar examples of the Holy Spirit's work.

8 posted on 02/09/2003 1:07:24 AM PST by Jeff Chandler ( ; -)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Gophack
Thanks for your story. From reading your posts it's hard to believe that you've been back for only three years. You're very knowledgeable.

I had a reconversion experience myself in my early twenties, although I never formally left the Church. My reconversion was actually prompted by an early "mid-life crisis." At 22 I had a beautiful girlfriend and was graduating with a degree in a high-paying field, yet I felt completely empty and was very depressed.

I remember one fateful day when I was 19 and had met my college girlfriend. I remember saying to myself, "Thanks for everything God. I have everything I need now. I'll get back to you when I'm about to die." Looking back I can see that everything started to become unglued after that point. My heart was divided. My heroes were Jesus and Mick Jagger. Pretty embarassing in retrospect. Fortunately, I never stopped going to Mass.

After graduating I decided to change my career to something I loved and my girlfriend dumped me. I then began to take some responsibility for my spiritual life. I clearly remember going into a Catholic bookstore to purchase a Bible and thinking, "I hope these people don't think I'm some kind of religious nut."

Within three years both of my parents died. I can see that God "turned me around" just in time to survive the loss of my parents.

I spent most of my twenties sorting things out and married at thirty. I'm now happily married to a wonderful Catholic woman and we have two lovely children. Our home is solidly Catholic, and I don't think it would have been had I not experienced the suffering I did in my twenties.

9 posted on 02/10/2003 5:45:12 AM PST by Aquinasfan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
I love reading these stories.
My abbreviated and not well- written testimony:
I came back to the Church about 4 years ago after a 20 year absence. I'm also constantly reading and looking for things Catholic :) Being raised in a Catholic home certainly helped...although, I don't remember ever learning anything in my CCD classes. I hated that my Dad always made us go to Church on Holy days and every single Sunday :)
By the time I was 17 yrs old I knew better than Dad and had no interest in religion...I could find God in a forest and didn't need a Church. Didn't need a priest to confess because I could talk directly to God. You've all heard it before.
After a failed marriage and the end of my time in the Marine Corps I struggled daily with doing the right thing. I prayed quite a bit but still didn't go to Church.
When my daughter was 8, I enrolled her in the RCIC program so she could make her 1st Communion. Since I was making her go, I felt I had to set a good example so I volunteered as a prayer aide and we attended Church.
My son was finally baptized when he turned 7 and I've since married in the Church.
But the real heartfelt conversion happened about 4 years ago....reading Bud McFarlane's books definitely pushed this process along. My eyes were opened and my heart softened to hear the Good News.
My younger sisters and brother are still in shock that I've become a "Holy Roller" and I'm still trying to explain how exciting it is and why they should be excited also.
I highly recommend www.catholicity.com

10 posted on 02/10/2003 7:04:09 AM PST by MudPuppy (Pierced By a Sword)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey; madprof98; Gophack; tiki; NYer; Aquinasfan
Wonderful testimonies to the grace of conversion.

Most of my adult life was spent in Hedonism. I was born and raised Catholic but by the time I was eighteen, I was totally enamored with satisfying my appetite for the passions. I loved fame and fortune. Sex and Silver were my primary interests. I was an entrepreneur and a musician. When I wasn't working I was playing. I lead a very selfish hedonistic lifestyle. Eighty hours a week of work and playing out was not unusual. I played with a blues band called "Roomful of Blues" in my younger days, and then with a big showband, "TNT", later on. Life was fast and perceivably good.

But that all changed in 1988. A couple of born again Christians challenged my spiritual side which lead me to ask, "What happened to Christ in your life?" The death of my mother, who was a saintly and devout Catholic woman, was of no small consequence in my conversion, either. The night before she died, she told me she was offering up her suffering (she had cancer and suffered for six long months) for the souls of her deceased husband and the conversion of her three sons (me being the middle). The grace of conversion lead me further into a desire to have a closer relationship with God. This lead me to state, "I want to be a GOOD whatever (Catholic or Protestant)!" I was lead to read the early fathers of the Church and quickly found out how Catholic the Church was in those early centuries. I fell in love with the Church Fathers and spent the next seven years reading the thirty-eight volumes of their writings.

By 1990 I was not only back in the faith but was now attending daily Mass, frequenting the Sacrament of Reconciliation and receiving the Holy Eucharist daily. It was a very powerful and ongoing conversion of heart that lead me to the Charismatic Renewal, the Cursillo Movement, back to school to study theology and philosophy and eventually to the Permanent Diaconate.

I've spent the last 10 years of my life, together with my wife of 30 years, in service to God's people. They have been the best years of my life. If you would have told me fifteen years ago I would be a Deacon today, I would have laughed in your face. But today I see the folly of my past ways. Along the way, on my own "journey home", many a convert played a big role in my own learning experience. Some I've come to know personally and will be ever grateful to God for these relationships.

TM

11 posted on 02/10/2003 7:30:42 AM PST by ThomasMore
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Wonderful find!

Bookmarking this.

In our series "Catholics Can Come Home Again" (book by Carrie Kemp) the reasons coincide with this lisit totally!
12 posted on 02/10/2003 8:06:20 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: Gophack
Thanks for sharing your story!

13 posted on 02/10/2003 8:07:39 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 2 | View Replies]

To: madprof98
And thank you for letting us read your story! So inspiriing! Praise the Lord!
14 posted on 02/10/2003 8:09:39 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 3 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Let us pray for those who left the Church because of our lack of charity.

We pray to the Lord,

Lord hear our prayer.

15 posted on 02/10/2003 8:12:11 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 4 | View Replies]

To: tiki
Your story exemplifies the way Jesus evangelized!

Talking to people one on one. Different words and actions for different people.

Consider the Samaritan woman versus the man perched in a tree to just get a glimpse of Christ versus the good thief on the Cross. He treated them all differently!

Thanks for sharing.
16 posted on 02/10/2003 8:16:02 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 5 | View Replies]

To: Aquinasfan
**Fortunately, I never stopped going to Mass.**

One of the secrets of success -- keep showing up!

Thanks for sharing your story and God bless!
17 posted on 02/10/2003 8:18:49 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 9 | View Replies]

To: MudPuppy
**When my daughter was 8, I enrolled her in the RCIC program so she could make her 1st Communion**

Thanks for sharing. It is beautiful.

Many Catholics don't know that there is a RCIA for children.
18 posted on 02/10/2003 8:20:50 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 10 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
The strongest reason above (IMHO, of course) is #3. The others don't mean that much to me.

They should replace one of the 10 with "has a presiding bishop with real authority."

As a methodist, I really wish we didn't have this coffee-clatch of bishops who jaw around and do their own thing, the denomination be damned. I wish one of them could kick the others' butts and make them go to the left or to the right.

At least, if I disagreed with the head bighat, I could know the official policy, and that I need to leave that organization.
19 posted on 02/10/2003 8:21:52 AM PST by xzins (Babylon - You have been weighed in the balance and been found wanting.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 16 | View Replies]

To: ThomasMore
**By 1990 I was not only back in the faith but was now attending daily Mass, frequenting the Sacrament of Reconciliation and receiving the Holy Eucharist daily. It was a very powerful and ongoing conversion of heart that lead me to the Charismatic Renewal, the Cursillo Movement, back to school to study theology and philosophy and eventually to the Permanent Diaconate.**

You have an inspirational story. It is a step by step progression as you posted. God bless, Deacon!
20 posted on 02/10/2003 8:22:48 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: xzins
"Taste and see the goodness of the Lord"
21 posted on 02/10/2003 8:24:03 AM PST by Salvation (†With God all things are possible.†)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 19 | View Replies]

To: Salvation
The Lord has a sense of humor...I've been teaching RCIC for 7-12th graders for 2 years now. I love telling them WHY we do things and talking about the history of the Church.
It's always fun when I tell them the Exorcist was based off a true story and we discuss demons & why Oija boards are very bad things, etc. They get the HELL scared into them.
Never a dull class :)
They are tasked with asking any question they have on the faith or the Church. If there's something I don't know, I ask the priest. He visits our class often.

To Jesus through the Immaculate Heart of Mary
22 posted on 02/10/2003 8:39:50 AM PST by MudPuppy (Pierced By a Sword)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 18 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey; Gophack; Aquinasfan
Wonderful thread. I was raised in the Church, but fell away when I went of to (a Jesuit!) college. I got wrapped up in Randian libertarianism and agnosticism before meeting my wife and coming back into the fold four years ago.

Interesting story: at the Jesuit college I attended (and I believe all Catholic universities and colleges), six hours of theology were required for graduation. In the first theology class I took, the book we studied was Matthew Fox's "Original Blessing", which denied the fall of Man and Original Sin. Fox had already been defrocked for writing this heretical book, but there his book was, being taught out in the open at a ostensibly Catholic University. I was a skeptic at the time, so it didn't bother me, but looking back it's not hard to see why so many Catholics don't understand the basics of the faith...

Cheers...

23 posted on 02/10/2003 9:14:43 AM PST by HumanaeVitae (The purpose of the 'animal rights movement' is not to humanize animals, but to dehumanize men.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

To: heyheyhey
Funny thing...I really never left. I got lazy about going to Mass while I was in college, but I never left. In fact, as a teen-ager, I was ridiculed a lot for being traditional in many ways. That doen't mean that I haven't needed Confession more often than I went. I didn't realize it so much as I do now. I confess to my fair share of human failings.

I was taught badly in Catholic schools and some things that are not part of the church. My home life as a kid was that of the post-Vatican II hyper-drive. My family isn't strict about much of anything beyond Mass and meatless Fridays during Lent. Heaven forbid we break that. Well, and Grace before dinner.

In the last year, as things in my home parish unravelled, I came to realize that as warm as that congregation is, they're more protestant than Catholic and, frankly, I want to be Catholic. There's just so much more depth. Eucharistic Adoration is so peaceful. The Rosary is wonderful for helping to put things in their proper perspective. Private devotions and the Liturgy of the Hours are very helpful. These are all recent discoveries.

I do like to help people, but I recognize that they have to want it. I am giving serious consideration to volunteering in the archdiocesan program called "Coming Home." I also have a great interest in spreading orthodoxy among people my age and younger (under 35 crowd). There's a lot no one ever told us - and actually the blank slate makes learning much easier. The more I learn, the more I realize how rich the Church, not just as the Body of Christ, but culturally, is.

Daily I pray for those who have fallen away. They have to decide they want to return, no one can force them. But we're always here when they are ready.
24 posted on 02/10/2003 9:40:37 AM PST by Desdemona
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 1 | View Replies]

Comment #25 Removed by Moderator

Comment #26 Removed by Moderator

Comment #27 Removed by Moderator

To: sandyeggo
The difference is that your head bishop can kick butt if he wants. Apparently, he chose that route with Card. Law.

I'd probably nail a few more than he did in your denom, and I'd definitely nail a lot more in my own. As far as I'm concerned, we have more anti-bishops floating around than the real mccoys.
28 posted on 02/10/2003 10:18:31 AM PST by xzins (Babylon - You have been weighed in the balance and been found wanting.)
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 27 | View Replies]

To: Desdemona
I also have a great interest in spreading orthodoxy among people my age and younger (under 35 crowd). There's a lot no one ever told us - and actually the blank slate makes learning much easier.

I'm 33 and feel the same way as you. I also think that our generation is more "conservative" and more willing to sacrifice in some areas, much as our grandparents generation were so willing to sacrifice their lives in war. I try and talk in my parish about practicing NFP ... not being lecturer about it, but just talking about how we use it and what a blessing it's been to our marriage and family. The younger families are more receptive to NFP, even if they are not currently practicing, than the 40+ crowd. (I think they just don't want to admit they've been wrong most of their lives).

Young people need something to believe in. Of course this is Jesus Christ ... but at the same time, they knew to know in their hearts that their time at church is not in vain, that living the Gospel, though difficult at times, is believing the Gospel.

On another thread, I said that I started practicing NFP after my firstborn was conceived while I was using a barrier method (as a pro-lifer, I believed only the pill was evil because it was an abortificant.) After learning NFP in my pre-marital class I said, well, I don't know, but the church is teaching it and I want to be a better Catholic (this was years before my re-conversion). I know that by faithfully practicing NFP and learning more about why the Church teaches what she teaches has led be into a deeper relationship with God, even though at the beginning I was skeptical and only practicing NFP to try and be obedient.

I hope there are more ministries aimed at young people, particularly being CEOs fully into the faith. I commend your work!

29 posted on 02/10/2003 10:18:46 AM PST by Gophack
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 24 | View Replies]

Comment #30 Removed by Moderator

To: Gophack
There's more to what I am interested in doing than re-emphasizing Humanae Vitae. It could just be that I'm single and, while I would very much like my own family, God has something else in mind for me for now (I wish He'd let me in on it).

Things like the Real Presence, the Blessed Mother's true place, learning the Doctors of the Church, true Theology - that's the meat and potatoes of the Faith. That's what has been missing.
31 posted on 02/10/2003 11:25:01 AM PST by Desdemona
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Desdemona
You're right, I didn't mean to sound "one issue", I was using it as an example.

I would like to see an expansion of the Rosary for young people, perhaps with a combination Rosary/Bible Study. Also, regular Eucharistic Adoration. I like your idea about the church fathers, perhaps a "bible study" studying the church fathers (focusing on a different father each month and what they contributed to the deposit of faith.)
32 posted on 02/10/2003 5:05:36 PM PST by Gophack
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 31 | View Replies]

To: ThomasMore
<> God Bless you, ThomasMore. Great story. It echoed St. Augustine's and your Mom sounds like she was St. Monica.<>
33 posted on 02/11/2003 4:38:31 AM PST by Catholicguy
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 11 | View Replies]

To: MudPuppy
It's always fun when I tell them the Exorcist was based off a true story and we discuss demons & why Oija boards are very bad things, etc. They get the HELL scared into them.

Fear of the Lord can begin with fear of the devil. I actually think this is one of the most effective ways to penetrate teenage malaise. It can shock them out of their dull, two-dimensional, MTV world into the 3D world of good vs. evil.

Download this interview with the exorcist from the archdiocese of NY while it's still available on-line.

34 posted on 02/11/2003 4:53:15 AM PST by Aquinasfan
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 22 | View Replies]

To: Gophack
Back when I was a lapsed Baptist, almost the only thing I thought the Catholic Church had RIGHT was her position on birth control. If you really believe in a personal God, who pays personal attention to you and your needs, why would you not believe that he knows how many children you need also?

One of my sisters & her husband belong to a non-denom storefront (literally - it's in an industrial park) church. I have heard them with my own ears ask God to find them a good parking place. Yet they contracept. I'm just waiting for an opening to bring up the illogic of their practices.
35 posted on 02/11/2003 5:45:08 AM PST by nina0113
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 29 | View Replies]

To: Catholicguy
She was a real saint. I don't remember a day that went by not seeing her pray, intently, for her deceased husband's and her sons' salvation. My younger brother, a recovering alcoholic, was actively alcoholic for 25 years. For all 25 of those years, my Mom prayed. She never saw him sober, but she does now. He's been in recovery for 7 years. It all began with a rosary! :^) (BVM is powerful intercessor)

As for me, I wasn't a basket case like my brother but I was very much an Augustine type. Praise the Lord for His grace, love and patience. (Amazing Grace has always been one of my favorites)

Blessed be God, forever!

TM
36 posted on 02/11/2003 6:52:29 AM PST by ThomasMore
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 33 | View Replies]

To: nina0113
Many protestants are turning to NFP. There was a great article on the Couple to Couple League website about a protestant couple who wrote a book about NFP. Remember, most Protestant churches opposed all forms of birth control until the 1930s. Many are going back to their roots. If they go far enough back, they'll find themselves back in the Catholic Church! :-)

37 posted on 02/11/2003 10:55:21 AM PST by Gophack
[ Post Reply | Private Reply | To 35 | View Replies]

Disclaimer: Opinions posted on Free Republic are those of the individual posters and do not necessarily represent the opinion of Free Republic or its management. All materials posted herein are protected by copyright law and the exemption for fair use of copyrighted works.

Free Republic
Browse · Search
Religion
Topics · Post Article

FreeRepublic, LLC, PO BOX 9771, FRESNO, CA 93794
FreeRepublic.com is powered by software copyright 2000-2008 John Robinson