Free Republic 1st Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $37,010
42%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 42% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: 1914

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • The forgotten sneak attack on Britain that backfired on the Kaiser

    12/14/2014 6:32:50 AM PST · by the scotsman · 33 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 14th December 2014 | Tony Rennell
    'A bank of fog was sitting a couple of miles out at sea and a heavy mist lay over the East Coast resort of Scarborough as postman Alfred Beal climbed the wide front steps of Dunollie, a porticoed mansion high on the town’s South Cliff. He never reached the door that fateful morning on December 16, 1914, almost exactly a century ago. Three German warships had burst out of the fog bank and were now steaming past the headland, firing volley after volley of shells. One caught poor Beal and blasted his shattered body back down the drive. A second...
  • Norman Lloyd at 100: Hollywood’s Living Memory (turns 100 today)

    11/08/2014 10:22:32 AM PST · by EveningStar · 20 replies
    Variety ^ | November 7, 2014 | Scott Foundas
    After nine decades in the business, the former collaborator of Charlie Chaplin, Alfred Hitchcock and Orson Welles is still looking for his next great role. The earliest surviving footage of broadcast television in America is a fragment of "The Streets of New York," an adaptation of playwright Dion Boucicault's 19th-century drama, aired by the experimental New York NBC affiliate W2XBS on August 31, 1939. All that now remains of the hour-long program is a silent, 11-minute kinescope, filmed off a TV screen and archived at the Paley Center For Media. And there, in those primitive flickering images, you can catch...
  • The Ultimatum That Made The Great War A Foregone Conclusion

    07/24/2014 4:28:00 AM PDT · by Ravnagora · 5 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | July 23, 2014 | Aleksandra Rebic
    THE ULTIMATUM THAT MADE THE GREAT WAR A FOREGONE CONCLUSION / Austria-Hungary presents the Kingdom of Serbia with the "Impossible Ultimatum" 100 years ago July 23, 1914Aleksandra's Note: What follows is the impossible Austro-Hungarian ultimatum presented to the government of the Kingdom of Serbia on July 23, 1914, just over 3 weeks after the June 28th assassination of Archduke Franz Ferdinand in Sarajevo, Bosnia. Fair historians have assessed this ultimatum as being both unreasonable and, more importantly, clearly intended to set Serbia up to fail to meet the demands, thus giving the green light for the war against the Serbs...
  • The ruling class ignores at its peril two important anniversaries coming up

    06/19/2014 8:08:44 AM PDT · by markomalley · 14 replies
    American Thinker ^ | 6/19/2014 | Rosslyn Smith
    June 24th marks the 700th anniversary of the Scots’ defeat of the English at the Battle of Bannockburn, an event that drove the English army out of Scotland and firmly established Robert the Bruce as king. Although the war for Scottish independence wasn't over for another 14 years, this overwhelming victory of inferior Scottish forces is generally viewed as the event that secured Scotland's independence for the next 400 years. An outnumbered, ragtag band of patriots prevailing over a large, well-equipped national army has long been the favored narrative of insurrectionists of all ilks. June 28th marks the 100 anniversary...
  • World War I Claims Two More Casualties ... in 2014

    03/20/2014 7:23:24 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 44 replies
    The Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | 19 March 2014 | Luke Garratt
    First World War bomb kills two construction site workers 100 years after it was fired at Belgian battlefield • Armament was disturbed and exploded evacuation works at the site • Killed two and injured two, all construction workers working in the area • This area of Belgium is rife with unexploded bombs from the Great War • It is the former Flanders battleground where many shells were fired A First World War bomb killed two construction site workers when it exploded 100 years after being fired at a Belgian battlefield. The bomb had laid dormant for a century at an...
  • PHOTOS: Cigarettes Save Life! - WWI Cravan "A" Cigarette Tin With The Shot It Stopped Still Inside

    10/17/2013 6:53:44 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 19 replies
    Retronaut ^ | circa WWI | Retronaut
    “Arthur Mann joined the Royal Flying Corps in 1914. His daughter-in-law says he was shot down by the Red Baron, Manfred von Richthofen – Arthur’s parachute caught in a tree. He also fought in the trenches – when Arthur was shot, the bullet bounced off this tin and saved his life. He also survived gassing, but this experience badly affected his long-term health. He died in 1953″ Explore Europeana 1914 – 1918
  • THE DAY BEFORE THE WORLD CHANGED FOREVER - JUNE 27.

    06/27/2013 5:50:27 PM PDT · by Ravnagora · 3 replies
    www.heroesofserbia.com ^ | June 27, 2013 | Aleksandra Rebic
    June 27, 2013 By Aleksandra Aleksandra's Note: Today is Thursday, June 27, 2013. Exactly 99 years ago today was the day before everything in the world changed forever. History tells us that it was a beautiful summer in 1914 - everything a summer should be. The peaceful atmosphere in Europe had only 24 hours left. The next day, June 28, 1914 was Vidovdan, a most sacred day in Serbian history. It was also the day that an Austrian Archduke and his wife would come visiting and go for a carriage ride in a city in Bosnia. It was a day...
  • The Century 1914

    06/16/2013 1:25:22 PM PDT · by annalex · 58 replies
    dominiquevenner.fr ^ | 23 April, 2009 | Dominique Venner/Pauline Lecomte
    The Century 1914 On the book The Century 1914 by Dominique Venner (Pygmalion, 2006). The author answers the questions of the journalist Pauline Lecomte. In publishing The Age of 1914 , Dominique Venner offered an impressive historical synthesis which is a culmination of all his works, and proposed a new interpretation of the European history in the twentieth century. To summarize this book is impossible. Everyone will make their own interpretations. It provides a detailed analysis of the great revolutionary movements and major conflicts of the twentieth century. It contains a broad meditations on history, politics and great actors. It...
  • Marin Environmentalist Claims Recreating Extinct Species Is Possible [ No more endangered species! ]

    02/28/2013 7:32:53 PM PST · by NoLibZone · 22 replies
    cbslocal.com ^ | Feb 28 2013 | cbslocal.com
    LONG BEACH (CBS SF) – Speaking from the prestigious TED Conference in Long Beach Wednesday, Sausalito activist Stewart Brand said scientists are developing the ability to reassemble an extinct animal’s genome, and even recreate the animal itself. Brand, who gained fame after he campaigned to have the original NASA space photos of earth published, and subsequently created the Whole Earth Catalog, said Wednesday that “de-extinction” could be used to help restore organisms and habitats damaged human activity, according to a report in the Marin Independent Journal. A team of Harvard geneticists are currently working to bring back the passenger pigeon,...
  • In Defense of His Majesty

    09/10/2005 10:30:16 AM PDT · by Unreconstructed Selmerite · 17 replies · 836+ views
    military.com ^ | September 7, 2005 | William S. Lind
    As regular readers in this column know, my reporting senior and lawful sovereign is His Imperial Majesty Kaiser Wilhelm II. When I finally report in to that great Oberste Heeresleitung in the sky, I expect to do so as the Kaiser’s last soldier. Why? Well, beyond Bestimmung, the unhappy fact is that Western civilization’s last chance of survival was probably a victory by the Central Powers in World War I. Their defeat let all the poisons of the French Revolution loose unchecked, which is the main reason that we now live in a moral and cultural cesspool.
  • Thanking America: When Americans Save Lives Overseas, it Doesn't Make the Textbooks

    11/24/2011 5:03:20 PM PST · by varialectio · 16 replies
    American Thinker ^ | November 24, 2011 | Jeff Lipkes
    In October 1914, over 5 million Belgians faced starvation. The German Army had invaded on August 4 and swept across the country in three weeks. Revisionist historians would later snicker about "atrocities" invented by the British, but the Kaiser's troops executed over 5,500 Belgians, women and children as well as men, though there was no civilian resistance to the invasion. Over 2 million refugees fled to Holland, France, and Britain. The Germans requisitioned all grain, flour, livestock, fruit, and vegetables. They seized the railroads, canals, all motor vehicles, and telegraph and telephone lines, and removed machinery from factories. The economy...
  • Book Review: The Marne, 1914

    12/03/2009 9:31:48 AM PST · by C19fan · 5 replies · 648+ views
    Wall Street Journal ^ | December 3, 2009 | Robert Messenger
    France and Germany marshaled 3.7 million soldiers for the Western offensives that began World War I in August 1914—with Britain adding an additional 130,000. In the decisive days between Sept. 5 and Sept. 11, the two sides threw two million men into desperate combat along the Marne River, the right tributary of Paris's famed Seine. More than 610,000 men were killed and wounded during the month-long campaign—two-thirds the number of casualties suffered by the U.S. in the whole of World War II. But such numbers do little to bring home the ordeal. To reach the Marne, Alexander von Kluck's First...
  • The Christmas Truce of 1914

    12/24/2008 11:04:58 PM PST · by Coleus · 20 replies · 2,007+ views
    the new american ^ | 12.22.08 | Kurt Hyde
    What if they called a war and peace broke out instead? That's exactly what happened during the Christmas season of 1914 when the soldiers themselves called a truce and, had it not been for intervention by the higher authorities on both sides, World War I might have ended. Stanley Weintraub does an excellent job of preserving for posterity this remarkable wartime truce in his book  Silent Night: The Story of the World War I Christmas Truce, and much of what follows is derived from that valuable source. The truce came as no surprise, Weintraub explains, as there were early indications...
  • Christmas Truce.

    12/25/2007 12:36:10 AM PST · by Dawnsblood · 3 replies · 153+ views
    Snopes.com ^ | 12/25/07 | Snopes
    During World War I, in the winter of 1914,the battlefields of Flanders, one of the most unusual events in all of human history took place. The Germans had been in a fierce battle with the British and French. Both sides were dug in, safe in muddy, man-made trenches six to eight feet deep that seemed to stretch forever. All of a sudden, German troops began to put small Christmas trees, lit with candles, outside of their trenches. Then, they began to sing songs. Across the way, in the "no man's land" between them, came songs from the British and French...
  • This Day In History - World War I June 28, 1914 Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated

    1914 : Archduke Franz Ferdinand assassinated In an event that is widely acknowledged to have sparked the outbreak of World War I, Archduke Franz Ferdinand, nephew of Emperor Franz Josef and heir to the Austro-Hungarian Empire, is shot to death along with his wife by a Serbian nationalist in Sarajevo, Bosnia, on this day in 1914. The great Prussian statesman Otto von Bismarck, the man most responsible for the unification of Germany in 1871, was quoted as saying at the end of his life that “One day the great European War will come out of some damned foolish thing in...
  • THE CHRISTMAS TRUCE OF 1914

    12/24/2005 9:26:11 AM PST · by Valin · 14 replies · 766+ views
    "A complete Boche figure suddenly appeared on the parapet and looked about. This complaint became infectious. It didn't take 'Our Bert' long to be up on the skyline. This was a signal for more Boche anatomy to be disclosed, and this was replied to by all our Alfs and Bills, until, in less time than it takes to tell, half a dozen or so of each of the belligerents were outside the trenches, and were advancing towards each other in no-man's land. "A strange sight, truly!" So writes Bruce Bairnsfather about the Christmas Truce of 1914. This event was an...
  • Buchanan: "The War We're Losing"

    06/30/2004 9:51:34 AM PDT · by Theodore R. · 168 replies · 1,201+ views
    WND.com ^ | 06-30-04 | Buchanan, Patrick J.
    The war we're losing Posted: June 30, 2004 1:00 a.m. Eastern © 2004 Creators Syndicate, Inc. June 28, the day in 2004 that the Americans transferred sovereignty to Iraqis and proconsul Paul Bremer hastily departed Baghdad, is a day freighted with historic significance. On June 28, 1914, 90 years before, Serb nationalist Gavrilo Princip fired the shots that killed the Austrian Archduke Franz Ferdinand and led, five weeks later, to World War I. On June 28, 1919, German representatives, their country under an Allied starvation blockade, prostrate before a threat by Marshal Foch to march on Berlin, signed the Versailles...
  • Let the Hate Begin (Yankees-Red Sox Style)

    03/28/2003 1:51:40 PM PST · by WaveThatFlag · 76 replies · 968+ views
    The Wall Street Journal ^ | 3/28/3 | By RUSS SMITH
    <p>Granted, there is upheaval in the world and there are battles where a great deal is at stake -- life itself. All the more precious, then, the minor skirmishes on the home front that mean a great deal in a small way and remind us of how lucky we are to feel innocent hatreds, from summer to summer, at the ballpark.</p>