Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $13,600
16%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 16% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: 4thamendment

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Justices asked to review ruling; Attorney general opposes decision on police searches

    05/21/2011 5:40:57 AM PDT · by John W · 32 replies · 1+ views
    Fort Wayne Journal Gazette ^ | May 21, 2011 | Niki Kelly
    INDIANAPOLIS – Indiana Attorney General Greg Zoeller on Friday joined the chorus of Hoosiers protesting a controversial Fourth Amendment ruling recently decided by the Indiana Supreme Court. Zoeller released a statement saying he will support a rehearing of the case due to concerns that the court ruled too broadly when it found citizens have no right under common law to reasonably resist police who unlawfully enter their homes. The Barnes v. State ruling came last week and was the first major opinion penned by Justice Steven David – Gov. Mitch Daniels’ appointment. “We believe however that a right to resist...
  • Court Rules Law Abiding May NOT Resist Police Who ILLEGALLY ENTER THEIR HOMES!

    05/19/2011 12:23:21 PM PDT · by jmaroneps37 · 22 replies
    coachisright.com ^ | May 19, 2011 | Doug Book , staff writer
    It seems that law abiding homeowners no longer enjoy 4th Amendment rights in the State of Indiana. Thanks to the May 12th decision of three robed assassins of liberty on the state Supreme Court, 800 years of common law dating back to the Magna Carta have been discarded. Speaking for this majority of judicial prostitutes, "Justice" Steven David said, "If a police officer wants to enter a home, for any reason or no reason at all, a homeowner cannot do anything to block the officer's entry." Of course the now defunct 4th Amendment says otherwise: "The right of the people...
  • School Wants To Allow Bus Drivers To Search Students (Indiana, again)

    05/19/2011 6:43:52 AM PDT · by Abathar · 20 replies
    AP/theindychannel.com ^ | May 19, 2011 | uncredited
    TERRE HAUTE, Ind. -- A western Indiana school district wants to give its bus drivers the authority to search students for weapons or drugs. The Tribune-Star reported that a Vigo County School Corp. proposal would allow the drivers to search a student and the student's belongings if there is an immediate threat of harm or danger to those on the bus.
  • Trying to be Optimistic Post King Vs Kentucky Reasons to be optimistic

    05/17/2011 6:38:53 AM PDT · by Gus221 · 15 replies
    Los Angeles Times ^ | 05-17-2011 | David G. Savage, Washington Bureau
    Reporting from Washington— The Supreme Court gave police more leeway to break into homes or apartments in search of illegal drugs when they suspect the evidence otherwise might be destroyed. Ruling in a Kentucky case Monday, the justices said that officers who smell marijuana and loudly knock on the door may break in if they hear sounds that suggest the residents are scurrying to hide the drugs. Residents who "attempt to destroy evidence have only themselves to blame" when police burst in, said Justice Samuel A. Alito Jr. for an 8-1 majority. http://www.latimes.com/news/nationworld/nation/la-na-court-search-20110517,0,6746878.story
  • High court sides with police in warrantless search case from Kentucky

    05/16/2011 10:01:20 PM PDT · by Fitzy_888 · 36 replies
    AP ^ | May 16, 2011 | AP
    WASHINGTON — The Supreme Court on Monday ruled against a Kentucky man who was arrested after police burst into his apartment without a search warrant because they smelled marijuana and feared he was trying to get rid of incriminating evidence. Voting 8-1, the justices reversed a Kentucky Supreme Court ruling that threw out the evidence gathered when officers entered Hollis King's apartment. The court said there was no violation of King's constitutional rights because the police acted reasonably. Only Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg dissented. Officers knocked on King's door in Lexington and thought they heard noises that indicated whoever was...
  • 4th Amendment Dead, SCOTUS dancing on grave

    05/16/2011 11:44:39 AM PDT · by jonascord · 154 replies
    US Supreme Court, Kentucky vs King ^ | May 16, 2011 | SCOTUS
    The Fourth Amendment expressly imposes two requirements:All searches and seizures must be reasonable; and a warrant may notbe issued unless probable cause is properly established and the scope of the authorized search is set out with particularity. Although“ ‘searches and seizures inside a home without a warrant are pre-sumptively unreasonable,’ ” Brigham City v. Stuart, 547 U. S. 398, 403, this presumption may be overcome when “ ‘the exigencies of the situation’ make the needs of law enforcement so compelling that [a]warrantless search is objectively reasonable under the Fourth Amendment,”
  • Indiana Supreme Court rules Hoosiers have no right to resist unlawful entry of homes by police

    05/16/2011 8:46:27 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 82 replies · 1+ views
    Hotair ^ | 05/16/2011 | Bruce McQuain
    No, you read it right. That’s what the Indiana Supreme Court decided in what would be a laughable finding if it wasn’t so serious: Overturning a common law dating back to the English Magna Carta of 1215, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Hoosiers have no right to resist unlawful police entry into their homes. The author of the story reporting this is right – somehow the ISC managed, in one fell swoop, to overturn almost 900 years of precedent, going back to the Magna Carta. In a 3-2 decision, Justice Steven David writing for the court said if...
  • No Right to Assault Police Officer Entering Home Even if Entrance is Unlawful: Indiana Supreme Court

    05/13/2011 3:52:05 PM PDT · by BCrago66 · 49 replies
    Volokh Conspiracy ^ | 5/13/11 | Orin Kerr
    The decision is Barnes v. State, and the Indiana Supreme Court divided 3–2. In this case, the officer had come to the home in response to a domestic violence call. He found the defendant, Barnes, outside. The officer and the defendant exchanged heated words, and the defendant started yelling at the officer. The officer threatened to arrest the defendant if he didn’t calm down, and the defendant threatened to have the officer arrested if he arrested him. At this point the defendant’s wife came outside, threw a duffel bag in the defendant’s direction, and told him to take the rest...
  • Court: No right to resist illegal cop entry into home[Indiana]

    05/13/2011 6:35:22 AM PDT · by jaydubya2 · 201 replies
    nwitimes ^ | Thursday, May 12, 2011 | Dan Carden
    INDIANAPOLIS | Overturning a common law dating back to the English Magna Carta of 1215, the Indiana Supreme Court ruled Thursday that Hoosiers have no right to resist unlawful police entry into their homes. In a 3-2 decision, Justice Steven David writing for the court said if a police officer wants to enter a home for any reason or no reason at all, a homeowner cannot do anything to block the officer's entry. "We believe ... a right to resist an unlawful police entry into a home is against public policy and is incompatible with modern Fourth Amendment jurisprudence," David...
  • Michigan Police Could Search Cell Phones During Traffic Stops [what's a 'constitution'?]

    04/19/2011 4:43:57 PM PDT · by Clint Williams · 121 replies
    Slashdot ^ | 4/19/11 | timothy
    SonicSpike writes "The Michigan State Police have a high-tech mobile forensics device that can be used to extract information from cell phones belonging to motorists stopped for minor traffic violations. The American Civil Liberties Union (ACLU) of Michigan last Wednesday demanded that state officials stop stonewalling freedom of information requests for information on the program. A US Department of Justice test of the CelleBrite UFED used by Michigan police found the device could grab all of the photos and video off of an iPhone within one-and-a-half minutes. The device works with 3000 different phone models and can even defeat password...
  • Justice Department opposes digital privacy reforms (as does Sen Grassley)

    04/09/2011 6:23:31 AM PDT · by PghBaldy · 5 replies
    CNET ^ | April 6 | Declan McCullagh
    The U.S. Justice Department today offered what amounts to a frontal attack on proposals to amend federal law to better protect Americans' privacy. James Baker, the associate deputy attorney general, warned that rewriting a 1986 privacy law to grant cloud computing users more privacy protections and to require court approval before tracking Americans' cell phones would hinder police investigations. This appears the first time that the Justice Department has publicly responded to a set of digital privacy proposals unveiled last year by a coalition of businesses and advocacy groups including AT&T, Google, Microsoft, eBay, the American Civil Liberties Union, and...
  • Amtrak Passenger Upset By Early Morning Questioning (5 a.m., sleeping cars, warrantless search)

    03/09/2011 12:05:35 PM PST · by CedarDave · 65 replies · 1+ views
    WOWT-TV Omaha ^ | March 8, 2011 | Mike Mcknight
    A Chicago-bound businessman traveling in an Amtrak sleeping car didn't expect to wake up in Omaha. That's where plain clothes Nebraska State Patrol Investigators boarded and knocked on the doors of four first-class passengers. Greg Travis of Bloomington, Indiana said, "It was a loud knock followed by questions. 'Where are you going! Who did you visit!' They shined a flashlight and I was in my pajamas." Travis said he saw two other groggy passengers in his sleeping car also talking to the investigators. "If I had my wits about me, I might have said, 'No I don't want you looking...
  • Losing freedom little by little

    03/04/2011 6:04:25 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 12 replies
    WorldNetDaily ^ | March 4, 2011 | Joseph Farah
    When the Transportation Security Agency began its intrusive new airport screening procedures last fall, I was sure Americans would rise up to the privacy violations and put an end to the program in short order. I predicted it would happen by Thanksgiving. Later I revised my prediction to Christmas. There was palpable anger expressed by Americans for two or three months. And then it subsided. One more nail in the coffin of American liberties. When was the last time you saw a news report about TSA abuses? It's yesterday's story. A new line in the sand has been drawn for...
  • Screening of Passengers at Savannah Amtrak Station (TSA search upon LEAVING train)

    02/28/2011 7:26:45 AM PST · by CedarDave · 13 replies
    The TSA Blog ^ | February 26, 2011 | Blogger Bob
    A video of Transportation Security Officers (TSOs) screening passengers at a Savannah, Georgia Amtrak station has been gaining quite a bit of attention and many are wondering why we were screening passengers who had just disembarked from a train. We were wondering the same thing. The screening shown in the video was done in conjunction with a VIPR operation. During VIPR operations, any person entering the impacted area has to be screened. In this case, the Amtrak station was the subject of the VIPR operation so people entering the station were being screened for items on the Amtrak prohibited items...
  • Report armed man leads to lockdown at WalMart (see something suspicious say something suspicious).

    01/28/2011 9:21:53 AM PST · by broken_arrow1 · 28 replies
    KirksvilleDailyEspress.com ^ | January 26, 2011 | Daily Express
    Kirksville, Mo. — A report of an armed man acting erratically in the Wal-Mart parking lot Wednesday led to the store being temporarily locked down before Kirksville Police responded to and diffused the situation with no injuries. According to Kirksville Police Chief Jim Hughes, a passerby stopped a Kirksville Police officer and said they had seen an individual acting erratically in a truck in the Wal-Mart parking lot shortly before 2:30 p.m. The passerby believed the individual had a gun to his head. "We don't take these things lightly," Hughes said, "especially nowadays." KPD responded to control the scene and...
  • Feds come knocking for home inspections

    01/16/2011 7:20:35 PM PST · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 96 replies
    WorldNetDaily ^ | January 16, 2011 | Bob Unruh
    A sanitation district in Pennsylvania has notified homeowners that its representatives will be making personal visits to every structure served by its network of drainpipes because that's what the federal Environmental Protection Agency is demanding. The letter informs homeowners the inspections will probably take only about 15 minutes, but that all properties "will be considered a source of clear water discharges until an inspection can be conducted." The effort, according to officials at the Coplay Whitehall Sewer Authority, is to prevent water from sources such as sump pumps or downspouts from being channeled into a water treatment process. But homeowners...
  • TSA Status (Grassroots Web Site Provides Info on dozens of airports!)

    01/02/2011 6:45:03 PM PST · by Recovering_Democrat · 16 replies
    TSA ^ | various
    What's the status of the TSA's new body scanners? They're not at every airport and they're not always in use. If you want to avoid the backscatter-radiation security theater or simply don't want your junk touched, use this list, and let us know any updates or additions. If you have time to kill at an airport, feel free to wander around and check out different checkpoints, and make sure to catch the status on your way out, too.
  • Washington subway police to begin random bag checks

    12/16/2010 1:40:00 PM PST · by ConjunctionJunction · 40 replies · 1+ views
    Reuters ^ | December 16, 2010 | Jeremy Pelofsky
    Officers will start random bag inspections on the sprawling Washington subway system, the Washington Metro Transit Police said on Thursday, a week after a man was arrested for making bomb threats to the rail system. Metrorail police officers plan to randomly select bags before passengers enter subway stations and they will swab them or have an explosives-sniffing dog check the bags, according to the Metro police.
  • Great 4th Amendment News from the Electronic Frontier Foundation (No warrantless e-mail seizures)

    12/14/2010 2:57:51 PM PST · by Smogger · 9 replies
    Reason Online ^ | 12/14/2010 | Brian Doherty
    Your emails should be safe from warrantless search, says 6th Circuit Court of Appeals, again. From an Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF) press release today: In a landmark decision issued today in the criminal appeal of U.S. v. Warshak, the Sixth Circuit Court of Appeals has ruled that the government must have a search warrant before it can secretly seize and search emails stored by email service providers.... EFF filed a similar amicus brief with the 6th Circuit in 2006 in a civil suit brought by criminal defendant Warshak against the government for its warrantless seizure of his emails. There, the...
  • New Clothing Line Reminds TSA of the 4th Amendment

    12/09/2010 9:51:01 AM PST · by Lucky9teen · 10 replies
    http://www.aolnews.com/ ^ | 12/7/10 | Marc Hartzman
    (Dec. 7) -- Not thrilled with the Transportation Security Administration's new touchy-feely pat down techniques and full-body scanners? Now there's a line of underclothes that offer a friendly reminder of the Fourth Amendment during controversial searches. It's called 4th Amendment Wear. Metallic ink printed on shirts spells out the privacy rights stated in the amendment and is designed to appear in TSA scanners. Creators Tim Geoghegan, 34, and Matthew Ryan, 28, both advertising professionals, designed the clothing as a conceptual art piece but ended up selling out of their limited stock shortly after launching their website last week. They initially...
  • Americans A-OK with TSA? Don’t bet on it

    12/01/2010 7:18:53 AM PST · by KeyLargo · 12 replies
    Chicago Sun-Times ^ | December 1, 2010 | JACOB SULLUM
    Americans A-OK with TSA? Don’t bet on it December 1, 2010 BY JACOB SULLUM jsullum@reason.com According to the Transportation Security Administration, Americans have no problem with the new airport screening procedures. So they should stop complaining. That self-contradictory reassurance, which would be unnecessary if it were true, seemed slightly more plausible after chaos failed to ensue from protests by Thanksgiving travelers who refused to walk through the TSA’s full-body scanners last week. But there are reasons to question the TSA’s portrait of placid passengers happily baring all for the sake of homeland security. First of all, the TSA’s numbers are...
  • TSA Security Gone Groping

    11/30/2010 6:57:11 PM PST · by Raquel · 2 replies
    Political Blog ^ | November 30, 2010 | Raquel Okyay
    Americans like to follow the rules, particularly when they are traveling. No one wants disruption at an airport, for instance, when passengers are in a rush to arrive at a desired location, and where long lines can cause the most patient of persons – anxiety. Following the rules even though uncomfortable is a natural impulse. So we get in line, go through an x-ray, have our luggage checked, take off our shoes, smile, and move on. This is acceptable. In March of 2010, the Transportation Safety Administration (TSA), a security arm of the Whitehouse and Department of Homeland Security, “began...
  • Question the TSA

    11/30/2010 5:53:27 AM PST · by hocndoc · 25 replies
    TexasGOPVote.com ^ | 11-29-10 | Beverly Nuckols
    Since when is accusing everyone of terrorism acceptable, much less equal to accusing no one? “It is acceptable and encouraged that a TSA government official can do something to an American citizen that US military personnel cannot do to a member of the Taliban.” Woman who accuses TSA I’m a 50-something, overweight Grandma who, last December, was subjected to a search at Chicago’s O'Hare airport after I went through the metal detector without setting it off. Apparently on the whim of a single Transportation Safety Agency agent who shouted, “Female, no alarm search!” I was pulled aside, wanded and patted...
  • My Personal “Pat-Down” Experience

    11/28/2010 8:15:40 PM PST · by EternalVigilance · 36 replies
    AIPNews.com ^ | November 28, 2010 | Kristia Cavere
    The images on television of children, the elderly, and other individuals who pose zero threat to our aviation security experiencing “pat-downs” by TSA officials at airports is disturbing. This issue became personal to me as I was forced into a pat-down and threatened that I would never get through security until I complied, and I now believe that these demeaning acts are unconstitutional. At O’Hare airport, returning to the east coast after the Thanksgiving holiday, I purposefully stood in the long line for regular metal detectors rather than the much shorter line of those willing to go through the full-body...
  • Protest TSA Without Saying a Word - 4th Amendment Underwear

    I love free enterprise. [url]http://cargocollective.com/4thamendment[/url]
  • Beating the TSA: How a determined passenger spent hours arguing his rights before being waved thru

    11/23/2010 12:22:45 PM PST · by Tucson_AZ · 60 replies · 1+ views
    The Daily MailOnline ^ | 23rd November 2010 | James White
    It's the solution that millions of American airline passengers have been searching for - how to avoid bodyscanners and intrusive pat-downs when they fly. Now one patient traveller has proved it is possible to bypass the high-level security measures in place at all airports, but only if you have time on your hands. Blogger Matt Kernan recorded his epic experience as he returned to North Kentucky International Airport in Cincinnati from Paris on Sunday.
  • My TSA Encounter

    11/23/2010 11:13:43 AM PST · by null and void · 101 replies
    No Blasters! ^ | 2:20 pm - Mon, Nov 22, 2010 | Matt Kernan
    “You don’t need to see his identification.” On November 21, 2010, I was allowed to enter the U.S. through an airport security checkpoint without being x-rayed or touched by a TSA officer.  This post explains how.Edit:  Minor edits for clarity.  I have uploaded the audio and it is available here. This past Sunday, I was returning from a trip to Europe.  I flew from Paris to Cincinnati, landing in Cincinnati/Northern Kentucky International Airport.  As I got off my flight, I did all of the things that are normally requested from U.S. citizens returning from abroad.  I filled out the customs declarations, confirmed...
  • For sexual crime victims, TSA pat-downs can be 're-traumatizing'

    11/24/2010 4:55:55 PM PST · by Tennessee Nana · 21 replies
    ChristianScienceMonitor ^ | November 24, 2010 | Elizabeth Fuller
    As the outcry grows against the new security screenings at US airports, one population may face a special burden at TSA checkpoints: victims of rape or sexual assault who are now confronted with a procedure that they feel explicitly strips them of control over their bodies. The experience “can be extremely re-traumatizing to someone who has already experienced an invasion of their privacy and their body,” says Amy Menna, a counselor and professor at the University of South Florida who has a decade’s experience researching and treating rape survivors. Nationwide, an estimated 1 in 6 women and 1 in 33...
  • Next step for body scanners could be trains, boats, metro

    11/23/2010 4:31:37 PM PST · by JohnKinAK · 82 replies
    The Hill ^ | 11/23/10 | Jory Yager
    Napolitano said she hoped the U.S. could get to a place in the future where Americans would not have to be as guarded against terrorist attacks as they are and that she was actively promoting research into the psychology of how a terrorist becomes radicalized. “The long-term [question] is, how do we get out of this having to have an ever-increasing security apparatus because of terrorists and a terrorist attack?” she said. “I think having a better understanding of what causes someone to become a terrorist will be helpful." DHS and intelligence officials are not as far along in understanding...
  • Beating the TSA: How a determined passenger spent hours arguing his rights before...

    11/23/2010 11:03:40 AM PST · by Do Not Make Fun Of His Ears · 51 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | November 23, 2010 | James White
    Maybe it was the video of the three-year old getting molested, maybe it was the sexual assault victim having to cry her way through getting groped, maybe it was the father watching teenage TSA officers joke about his attractive daughter. 'Whatever it was, this issue didn’t sit right with me. We shouldn’t be required to do this simply to get into our own country.' As a result, Mr Kernan informed staff he did not want to go through the infamous Backscatter imaging machine. He was told he would have to undergo an invasive pat-down search, but again politely told staff...
  • TSA, 2 ; America, 0

    11/23/2010 2:08:23 AM PST · by Scanian · 32 replies
    The American Thinker ^ | November 23, 2010 | Richard Kantro
    There are still some to whom it seems alarmist to assert that the execrable Transportation Security Administration (TSA) is in a purposeful confrontation with the American people. A blue-uniformed, official, we-always-win confrontation. No, they're just trying to do the right thing and keep the skies safe. So what if the TSA's attitude seems quickly to have come up to speed with and fallen in behind that of a rather famous frequent flier whom nobody pats, and who has advised, "Don't think we're not keeping score, brother"? And who cares if no less an authority than the former director of TSA...
  • Breaking: Former Gov. Ventura Will No Longer Fly Due to Abuse He’s Endured at Hands of TSA

    11/20/2010 1:38:08 PM PST · by george76 · 63 replies
    Current TV ^ | November 19, 2010
    Jesse Ventura, announced he will no longer use commercial airlines due to the egregious abuses of the TSA and the government. Ventura said he made the decision to avoid public aircraft after he found himself becoming too comfortable with being routinely searched. He said he was subjected to pat down and search three or four times a week when he traveled for his television show. Ventura had hip surgery and the metal in his body invariably sets off airport metal detectors. Jesse said he will no longer be forced by the TSA to prove he is not a criminal or...
  • KEEP YOUR HAND OFF MY JUNK

    11/17/2010 5:59:53 AM PST · by shortstop · 57 replies
    boblonsberry.com ^ | 11/17/10 | Bob Lonsberry
    Who do you let see you naked? Seriously. Of all the people on earth, which ones do you feel comfortable taking your clothes off in front of? Odds are, the list is pretty short. Odds are, it's about to get a whole lot longer. Your spouse, your doctor, and now Homeland Security. In the name of keeping you safe, Uncle Sam needs to see your nasty bits. That's the bottom line on a new airport security plan that is going to be hard on both budgets and the Fourth Amendment. Here's the background. The government has developed a scanning device...
  • Say 'I Opt Out' of Airport Scanners on National Opt Out Day, November 24

    11/18/2010 8:44:23 AM PST · by FS11 · 268 replies · 1+ views
    Airport Business News ^ | 11-15-10 | AirportBusiness.com
    "Not only are these porno scanners a gross violation of individual privacy," said boycott co-founder George Donnelly, "they're also a threat to the health of millions of passengers and ineffective as well. The goal of the demonstrations is to urge Americans to exercise their legal right to 'opt out' of the scan." If you have to fly on November 24, We Won't Fly urges you to opt out of the new scanners for your own health and privacy. Say "I opt out!" Be prepared for delays and intimate TSA "patdowns." If you're not flying on November 24, We Won't Fly...
  • Almost arrested for refusing the TSA pat-down.

    11/17/2010 11:22:37 AM PST · by Mike Evers · 344 replies
    Mike Evers
    Very unpleasant experience today with TSA employees on a mission from God to conduct full body pat-downs whenever they could. You’ve heard about it. You’ve seen it on television. Well, it actually happened to me this morning and I almost went to jail over it. I was attempting to fly out of Sarasota, Florida to Atlanta, Georgia today. I cleared security and got out to my gate only to discover the flight was delayed for another hour and a half. So I exited the boarding area and went to one of the restaurants in the main terminal. When I attempted...
  • TSA Opt-Out Day, Now with a Superfantastic New Twist!

    11/17/2010 4:11:06 PM PST · by FS11 · 108 replies
    The Atlantic Magazine ^ | November 14, 2010 | Jeffrey Goldberg
    November 24th, as many of you already know, is National Opt-Out Day, when airline passengers should refuse to submit themselves to those privacy-invading, genital-picture-taking, radiation-delivering back-scatter imaging machines now installed at many American airports. By telling the TSA agents in charge that you "opt-out" out of the back-scatter (at which point, the TSA agents, if my experience is typical, will yell, "We got an opt-out!," causing everyone standing on the TSA Checkpoint Coiled Line of Death to look at you funny), you will be subjecting yourself to a fairly thorough frisking, as detailed in this post. But I believe that...
  • Obama's euthanizing of 4th Amendment

    10/07/2010 12:06:41 AM PDT · by Neil E. Wright · 6 replies
    WND ^ | October 05, 2010 | Nat Hentoff
    Before his forced resignation, President Richard Nixon declared, "When the president does it, that means it is not illegal." Our current chief executive, however, speaking this year at the Pentagon on Sept. 11, said of our terrorist enemies: "They may seek to exploit our freedoms, but we will not sacrifice the liberties we cherish or hunker down behind walls of suspicion and distrust." By contrast, on Sept. 27, Pulitzer Prize-winning reporter Charlie Savage, the press' Paul Revere guardian of those cherished liberties, broke a story in the New York Times that next year President Obama will send Congress "sweeping new...
  • Cops caught on tape conspiring to perform an illegal search & confiscate guns

    07/28/2010 7:54:00 AM PDT · by conimbricenses · 200 replies · 3+ views
    Youtube ^ | 7/27/10
    This is one of the most disturbing cop videos I've ever seen. Basically a guy was shooting his 22 rifle at a target on secluded acreage in a rural part of San Luis Obispo County, California. The cops got one of those "shots fired" calls surrounded the place with guns drawn and a half dozen officers. The guy wouldn't consent to a search of his home when they got there, so the cops basically invented "probable cause" to enter on the spot, ripped his keys off his belt, and went inside anyway. Midway through the search it came back over...
  • Your Papers, Please!

    05/07/2010 12:58:46 PM PDT · by foutsc · 13 replies · 315+ views
    Western Hero ^ | 6 May 2010 | Silverfiddle
    The demagogic criticism that the Arizona law requires all Hispanics to produce their "papers" is ridiculous.  Of course, the Demagogocrats use the term "Papers" because it conjures visions of nazi Germany.  How clever. Which looks more like fascism to you? I also find it rich how this party accuses others of old world fascism while dictating everyone's health care by taking over one-sixth of the economy, appropriating automobile manufacturing firms, and forming a government-corporate mutual-benefit society with Wall Street investment bankers.  Have any of these hysterical people ever tried to rent an XBox game at Blockbuster? They demand papers! ...
  • President Obama backs DNA test in arrests

    03/14/2010 5:43:52 PM PDT · by OldDeckHand · 48 replies · 910+ views
    Politico.com ^ | 03/09/10 | JOSH GERSTEIN
    President Barack Obama’s embrace of a national database to store the DNA of people arrested but not necessarily convicted of a crime is heartening to backers of the policy but disappointing to criminal-justice reformers, who view it as an invasion of privacy. Others also worry the practice would adversely affect minorities. In an interview aired Saturday on “America’s Most Wanted,” Obama expressed strong agreement as host John Walsh extolled the virtues of collecting DNA at the time of an arrest and putting it into a single, national database. “We have 18 states who are taking DNA upon arrest,” Walsh said....
  • The Snitch in Your Pocket (Tracking Americans' Cell Phones in Real Time— Without a Warrant)

    02/22/2010 12:29:24 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 51 replies · 1,164+ views
    Newsweek ^ | 2/19/10 | Michael Isikoff
    Law enforcement is tracking Americans' cell phones in real time—without the benefit of a warrant.Amid all the furor over the Bush administration's warrantless wiretapping program a few years ago, a mini-revolt was brewing over another type of federal snooping that was getting no public attention at all. Federal prosecutors were seeking what seemed to be unusually sensitive records: internal data from telecommunications companies that showed the locations of their customers' cell phones—sometimes in real time, sometimes after the fact. The prosecutors said they needed the records to trace the movements of suspected drug traffickers, human smugglers, even corrupt public officials....
  • Feds push for tracking cell phones

    02/11/2010 8:58:30 AM PST · by Cheap_Hessian · 91 replies · 2,580+ views
    CNET News ^ | February 1, 2010 | Declan McCullagh
    Two years ago, when the FBI was stymied by a band of armed robbers known as the "Scarecrow Bandits" that had robbed more than 20 Texas banks, it came up with a novel method of locating the thieves. FBI agents obtained logs from mobile phone companies corresponding to what their cellular towers had recorded at the time of a dozen different bank robberies in the Dallas area. The voluminous records showed that two phones had made calls around the time of all 12 heists, and that those phones belonged to men named Tony Hewitt and Corey Duffey. A jury eventually...
  • Rose Parade Attendees Surrender 4th Amendment Rights in Bizzare Police Squad Program

    01/02/2010 3:21:29 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 29 replies · 1,487+ views
    Examiner ^ | 12/31/09
    The L.A. Times, in a cutesy story about elderly Pasadena Rose Parade volunteers, inadvertently included details of a Pasadena Police program that would make Pol Pot jealous. Nicknamed "Parade Watch", the program consists of 50 volunteers trained by local police to "be on the lookout for suspicious activity" . In order to help "look out for the bad guys", participation in the program requires citizens to sign a form agreeing that their own vehicle can be searched. The article, entitled 'Pasadena police train volunteers to be on 'Parade Watch' includes details of RV enthusiasts parked and waiting to see the...
  • Police: Twitter used to avoid DUI checkpoints

    12/28/2009 6:33:55 AM PST · by relictele · 130 replies · 2,808+ views
    Sacramento Bee / McClatchy Newspapers ^ | 28 Dec 2009 | Brad Banan
    FRESNO, Calif. -- In a ritual nearly as familiar as Santa Claus and crowded stores, police agencies have again stepped up enforcement of drunken-driving laws this holiday season. Studies have found sobriety checkpoints reduce alcohol-related crashes because they create awareness about the risk of arrest. But some public-safety officials say that message might be lost on the group most at risk - young drivers. Trying to elude arrest for drunken driving, young people use technology to keep each other informed about the location of sobriety checkpoints, said Sgt. Dave Gibeault, head of the Fresno Police Department's traffic unit.
  • “Your Papers, Please!”

    11/01/2009 6:47:32 PM PST · by Coleus · 23 replies · 1,290+ views
    tna ^ | 08.19.09 | Becky Akers
    Not long ago, Americans feared and ridiculed the police states cursing too many parts of the world. We worried that they might one day conquer us despite their poverty and general misery even as we mocked their totalitarian tactics — especially their “Papers, please” mentality.  Indeed, being forced to prove one’s identity to a bureaucrat on demand, having to carry and produce documents with personal information for his approval — or condemnation — seemed especially horrifying. One of our classic films, Casablanca, revolved around the deadly hassles of obtaining or forging such papers under the Nazis; episodes of Mission Impossible...
  • Federal SWAT Raid Over . . . Orchids

    10/05/2009 6:26:18 PM PDT · by ellery · 95 replies · 4,801+ views
    The Agitator ^ | October 5, 2009
    So as it turns out, even the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service has its own SWAT team. You don’t need to know. You can’t know.” That’s what Kathy Norris, a 60-year-old grandmother of eight, was told when she tried to ask court officials why, the day before, federal agents had subjected her home to a furious search. The agents who spent half a day ransacking Mrs. Norris’ longtime home in Spring, Texas, answered no questions while they emptied file cabinets, pulled books off shelves, rifled through drawers and closets, and threw the contents on the floor. The six agents, wearing...
  • New meaning for 'Road Tax'

    07/13/2009 5:00:40 PM PDT · by Tolerance Sucks Rocks · 23 replies · 1,827+ views
    GOPUSA ^ | July 13, 2009 | Henry Lamb
    Sara was late for work. The alarm clock didn't alarm, the kids were unusually slow getting ready for school, and nothing went right. She finally got to her car -- a brand new 2020 Chevy Adventure. She touched the finger-print secured start button. Nothing. It wouldn't start. She touched it again. Nothing. Furious, she banged the steering wheel with her fist. Then she noticed the paper hanging from the receipt printer on the dash. "Your designated visa account rejected your Road Use Tax in the amount of $87.32 for the month of June, 2020. You must insert a valid account...
  • Strip-search of US girl illegal (SCOTUS 8-1 decision)

    06/25/2009 10:41:17 AM PDT · by Darren McCarty · 197 replies · 5,198+ views
    BBC ^ | 6-25-09
    The US Supreme Court has ruled that school staff broke the law when they ordered a 13-year-old girl to strip while searching her for painkillers. The Arizona school, which bans prescription and over-the-counter drugs, suspected Savana Redding, then 13, of carrying ibuprofen. After no drugs were found in her bag, she had to remove her clothing, and then move her bra and underwear. However, the court said individuals could not be held liable in a lawsuit. The school principal acted on a tip-off from another student that Savana was carrying ibuprofen. Justice David Souter said: "What was missing from the...
  • E-Mail Surveillance Renews Concerns in Congress

    06/17/2009 6:56:43 PM PDT · by FromLori · 35 replies · 2,980+ views
    NYT ^ | 6/17/09
    The National Security Agency is facing renewed scrutiny over the extent of its domestic surveillance program, with critics in Congress saying its recent intercepts of the private telephone calls and e-mail messages of Americans are broader than previously acknowledged, current and former officials said. Brendan Smialowski for The New York Times Representative Rush Holt Readers' Comments Readers shared their thoughts on this article. Read All Comments (170) » The agency’s monitoring of domestic e-mail messages, in particular, has posed longstanding legal and logistical difficulties, the officials said. Since April, when it was disclosed that the intercepts of some private communications...
  • School police hit the web to stop crime

    05/19/2009 8:01:04 AM PDT · by Kakaze · 13 replies · 485+ views
    KOB4 T.V. Albuquerque, NM ^ | 05/19/2009 7:37 AM | Jeff Maher, Eyewitness News 4; Matthew Kappus, KOB.com
    APS police have a wealth of tips to prevent things like student fights and illegal activity—and they're getting the information from students' personal web pages. At Albuquerque High, there are three police officers on campus watching over about 1,900 students. What the officers have discovered is that patrolling in cyberspace can be as or more effective than patrolling the hallways. When Sgt. Paul Schaefer isn't in the hallways, he's at his desk checking students' MySpace and Facebook pages for any threats or hints of violence that could be around the corner. "Anytime something is going on, usually we find out...