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Keyword: aborigine

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  • First Australians did not boost fire activity

    12/08/2010 7:23:50 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | Monday, December 6, 2010 | Bob Beale
    The arrival of the first people in Australia about 50,000 years ago did not result in significantly greater fire activity, according to a landmark new research report on the continent's fire history going back 70,000 years. Despite a widely held belief that the frequent use of fire by Aboriginal people resulted in vegetation change and other environmental impacts in prehistoric times, the most comprehensive study of Australian charcoal records has found they had no major impact on fire regimes... On large time scales, overall fire activity in Australia predominantly reflects prevailing climate, with less activity in colder glacial periods and...
  • Aboriginal Female Hunters Aided By Dingoes

    10/24/2015 6:23:20 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    ScienceNetwork WA ^ | Friday, October 23, 2015 | Michelle Wheeler
    In modern society dogs are often referred to as "man's best friend" but according to an archaeological review early Aboriginal society sported a similar relationship between women and dingoes (Canis lupus dingo). The study by UWA and ANU suggests people formed close bonds with dingoes soon after the dogs' arrival on the mainland roughly 4000 years ago, with the dogs enabling women to contribute more hunted food. UWA archaeologist Jane Balme, who led the research, says it is thought the first dingoes arrived on watercraft with people from South East Asia. "What they're doing on the boat is not clear...
  • Australian Aborigines 'world's first astronomers'

    09/18/2010 1:58:35 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 18 replies · 2+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | Fri Sep 17, 5:39 am ET | U/A
    SYDNEY (AFP) – An Australian study has uncovered signs that the country's ancient Aborigines may have been the world's first stargazers, pre-dating Stonehenge and Egypt's pyramids by thousands of years. Professor Ray Norris said widespread and detailed knowledge of the stars had been passed down through the generations by Aborigines, whose history dates back tens of millennia, in traditional songs and stories. "We know there's lots of stories about the sky: songs, legends, myths," said Norris, an astronomer for Australia's science agency, the Commonwealth Scientific and Research Organization (CSIRO). "We wondered how much further does it go than that. It...
  • Megafauna cave painting could be 40,000 years old

    05/31/2010 1:31:34 AM PDT · by Palter · 23 replies · 717+ views
    ABC ^ | 31 May 2010 | Emma Masters
    Scientists say an Aboriginal rock art depiction of an extinct giant bird could be Australia's oldest painting. The red ochre painting, which depicts two emu-like birds with their necks outstretched, could date back to the earliest days of settlement on the continent. It was rediscovered at the centre of the Arnhem Land plateau about two years ago, but archaeologists first visited the site a fortnight ago. A palaeontologist has confirmed the animals depicted are the megafauna species Genyornis. Archaeologist Ben Gunn said the giant birds became extinct more than 40,000 years ago. "The details on this painting indicate that it...
  • Human role in big kangaroo demise

    06/27/2009 9:09:29 PM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 15 replies · 1,633+ views
    BBC Science and Technology ^ | Monday, 22 June 2009 22:25 UK | By Jason Palmer Science and technology reporter, BBC News
    Debate has raged about the demise of “whopper hopper” P. goliah A fossil study of the extinct giant kangaroo has added weight to the theory that humans were responsible for the demise of “megafauna” 46,000 years ago. The decline of plants through widespread fire or changes toward an arid climate have also played into the debate about the animals’ demise. But an analysis of kangaroo fossils suggested they ate saltbush, which would have thrived in those conditions. The research is in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. There has long been dissent in the palaeontology community about the cause...
  • Prehistoric giant animals killed by man, not climate: study (Tasmania)

    08/12/2008 4:53:23 AM PDT · by decimon · 36 replies · 114+ views
    AFP ^ | Aug 12, 2008 | Madeleine Coorey
    SYDNEY (AFP) - The chance discovery of the remains of a prehistoric giant kangaroo has cast doubts on the long-held view that climate change drove it and other mega-fauna to extinction, a new study reveals. < > He said that it was likely that hunting killed off Tasmania's mega-fauna -- including the long-muzzled, 120 kilogram (264 pound) giant kangaroo, a rhinoceros-sized wombat and marsupial 'lions' which resembled leopards. < > The finding of the latest study has already been contested, with Judith Field of the University of Sydney saying the idea that humans killed the giant creatures was "in the...
  • Mega-Tsunami Theory Disputed (Australia)

    02/03/2008 4:35:17 PM PST · by blam · 47 replies · 256+ views
    The Australian ^ | 2-3-2008
    Mega-tsunami theory disputed February 03, 2008 SUPPOSED evidence Australia has been subject to prehistoric tsunamis up to 20m in height over the past 10,000 years could just be the result of Aboriginal occupation, a major conference is set to hear tomorrow. Archaeologists from the Australian National University say the theory about the mega-tsunamis, which has influenced the development of emergency service plans in Western Australia, is not supported by evidence. In 2003 Australian geological researchers suggested prehistoric tsunamis over the past 10,000 years were much larger than those recorded since European settlement, including findings of surges up to 20m in...
  • Sole survivor sitting on a $5b fortune

    07/15/2007 6:25:31 AM PDT · by Daffynition · 23 replies · 827+ views
    Sydney Morning Herald ^ | July 14, 2007 | Staff Reporter
    As the only member of his clan, Jeffrey Lee controls the fate of Koongarra, writes Lindsay Murdoch. Custodian … Jeffrey Lee at an outcrop sacred to his clan. "I can go fishing and hunting. That's all that matters to me." Custodian … Jeffrey Lee at an outcrop sacred to his clan. "I can go fishing and hunting. That's all that matters to me." "It's my belief that if you disturb that land bad things will happen … there will be a big flood, there will be an earthquake and people will have a big accident." Mr Lee said there were...
  • Arid Australian Interior Linked To Lanscape Burning By Ancient Humans

    01/26/2005 12:28:52 PM PST · by blam · 52 replies · 1,327+ views
    University Of Colorado-Boulder ^ | 1-26-2005 | Gifford Miller/Jim Scott
    Contact: Gifford Miller 303-492-6962 Jim Scott 303-492-3114 University of Colorado at Boulder Arid Australian interior linked to landscape burning by ancient humans The image of a controlled burn in the interior of Australia today, featured on the cover of the January 2005 issue of Geology, illustrates how Australia might have looked 50,000 years ago. Photo courtesy Gifford Miller, University of Colorado at Boulder Click here for a high resolution photograph. Landscape burning by ancient hunters and gatherers may have triggered the failure of the annual Australian Monsoon some 12,000 years ago, resulting in the desertification of the country's interior...
  • Aboriginal folklore leads to meteorite crater

    01/12/2010 9:59:26 AM PST · by Palter · 17 replies · 968+ views
    COSMOS ^ | 07 Jan 2010 | Aaron Cook
    SYDNEY: An Australian Aboriginal 'Dreaming' story has helped experts uncover a meteorite impact crater in the outback of the Northern Territory. Duane Hamacher, an astrophysicist studying Aboriginal astronomy at Sydney's Macquarie University, used Google Maps to search for the signs of impact craters in areas related to Aboriginal stories of stars or stones falling from the sky. One story, from the folklore of the Arrernte people, is about a star falling to Earth at a site called Puka. This led to a search on Google Maps of Palm Valley, about 130 km southwest of Alice Springs. Here Hamacher discovered what...
  • Aboriginal Australian History Finally Resolved

    03/22/2013 3:50:30 AM PDT · by ABrit · 15 replies
    DNA Consultants Blog ^ | October 8, 2011 | Blogger
    We present an Aboriginal Australian genomic sequence obtained from a 100-year-old lock of hair donated by an Aboriginal man from southern Western Australia in the early 20th century. We detect no evidence of European admixture and estimate contamination levels to be below 0.5%. We show that Aboriginal Australians are descendants of an early human dispersal into eastern Asia, possibly 62,000 to 75,000 years ago. This dispersal is separate from the one that gave rise to modern Asians 25,000 to 38,000 years ago. We also find evidence of gene flow between populations of the two dispersal waves prior to the divergence...
  • Australian Aboriginal boxer and former world titleholder Lionel Rose dies at age 62

    05/08/2011 8:04:10 AM PDT · by EveningStar · 2 replies
    Lionel Rose, the first Australian Aborigine to win a world boxing title, has died. He was 62.
  • 'Fires wiped out' ancient mammals

    07/08/2005 9:39:15 AM PDT · by LibWhacker · 33 replies · 967+ views
    BBC ^ | 7/8/05 | Helen Briggs
    The first humans to arrive in Australia destroyed the pristine landscape, probably by lighting huge fires, the latest research suggests.The evidence, published in Science magazine, comes from ancient eggshells. These show birds changed their diets drastically when humans came on the scene, switching from grass to the type of plants that thrive on scrubland. The study supports others that have blamed humans for mass extinctions across the world 10-50,000 years ago. Many scientists believe the causes are actually more complex and relate to climate changes during that period, but, according to Dr Marilyn Fogel, of the Carnegie Institution in Washington,...
  • Boy Jailed for an Ice Cream (in custody for 12 days so far, more than 1500km from home- Australia)

    06/03/2005 9:54:32 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 19 replies · 792+ views
    The Australian ^ | June 04, 2005 | Amanda Banks
    A 15-YEAR-OLD Aboriginal boy has been in custody for the past 12 days after being sent more than 1500km from his home in the nation's remote northwest - for attempting to steal a $2 ice cream. West Australian authorities spent about $10,000 escorting the teenager on a flight to Perth, where he faced the Children's Court yesterday. The cold hazelnut roll was stuffed down the back of his shorts as "Joshua" initially denied he had taken the ice cream when confronted by a staff member - the wife of a local policeman - at the supermarket in Onslow, a tiny...
  • The sound of Australia in Joshua Tree's outback

    10/13/2003 8:46:10 AM PDT · by coton_lover · 2 replies · 238+ views
    Hi-Desert Star ^ | 10/11/2003 | Sara Munro
    The sound of Australia in Joshua Tree's outback By Sara Munro / Hi-Desert Star Bet you didn't know that the International Didgeridoo Festival is happening right here in your own backyard. It's true, but "What's a didgeridoo?" you ask? Not only is it really a word, it's a unique wind instrument with an eerie, hypnotic sound that conjures up the myth and legend of Australia's ancient history and people. Its mysterious, droning tones are weird and wonderful. "It was the coolest thing I had ever heard," says event organizer Grahm Doe of the time he happened upon the didgeridoo...
  • Aborigine Insists Tribal Law Gives Right To Underage Sex

    02/21/2003 7:54:11 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 268+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 2-22-2003 | Kathy Marks
    Aborigine insists tribal law gives right to underage sex By Kathy Marks in Sydney 22 February 2003 The place of tribal law in Australia's legal system will be reviewed after a 50-year-old Aboriginal man argued that tradition gave him the right to have sex with a 15-year-old girl. Jackie Pascoe Jamilmira, who lives in an isolated community in the Northern Territory, was given a 13-month jail sentence for having unlawful sexual intercourse with the girl, but had the sentence reduced to one day after an appeal. The girl, who had been "promised" to him in marriage by her family, initially...