Keyword: adultstemcells

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  • Keeping stem cells strong

    05/24/2013 12:15:35 PM PDT · by neverdem
    Biology News Net ^ | May 21, 2013 | NA
    When infections occur in the body, stem cells in the blood often jump into action by multiplying and differentiating into mature immune cells that can fight off illness. But repeated infections and inflammation can deplete these cell populations, potentially leading to the development of serious blood conditions such as cancer. Now, a team of researchers led by biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has found that, in mouse models, the molecule microRNA-146a (miR-146a) acts as a critical regulator and protector of blood-forming stem cells (called hematopoietic stem cells, or HSCs) during chronic inflammation, suggesting that a deficiency of...
  • Nineteenth Century Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young

    05/15/2013 2:09:10 PM PDT · by neverdem · 16 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 9 May 2013 | Paul Gabrielsen
    Enlarge Image Young at heart. Cross-sections of mouse ventricles show the visible change in size when old hearts are immersed in young blood. Credit: Francesco Loffredo It's time to turn back the clock on an aging ticker. Drawing on an odd experimental technique invented more than a century ago but rarely done now, researchers have found that a blood-borne protein makes old mouse hearts appear young and healthy again. It's not clear yet whether humans would react the same way, but scientists are hopeful that this discovery may help treat one of the heart's most frustrating ailments. "This is probably...
  • Position Yourself for Big Returns in the Stem Cell Space: Jason Kolbert

    05/15/2013 3:34:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    The Life Sciences Report ^ | May 13th, 2013 | George S. Mack
    This interview was conducted by George S. Mack of The Life Sciences Report (5/10/13) Stem cell companies have languished long enough in micro-cap territory. The industry is now approaching highly visible phase 2 and phase 3 catalysts that will produce results never before seen in medicine. Managing Director and Senior Biotechnology Analyst Jason Kolbert of the Maxim Group has staked out a select group of nascent cell therapy companies positioned to reap huge gains for investors willing to diversify. In this interview with The Life Sciences Report, Kolbert reflects on the regenerative medicine space following the recent RegenMed Investor Day...
  • Two-year-old gets windpipe made from her own stem cells

    04/30/2013 6:28:17 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    CBS News ^ | April 30, 2013 | Jonathan LaPook
    Two-year-old Hannah Warren lived her whole life in an intensive care unit with a breathing tube. She was born without a windpipe and has been unable to talk, swallow, or eat on her own. Her parents, Darryl and Young-mi Warren were told Hannah would not live past age six. "Hannah didn't have a chance. There was no hope. We were waiting for her to die essentially," said Darryl Warren...
  • Antibody Transforms Stem Cells Directly Into Brain Cells

    04/24/2013 3:59:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Apr. 22, 2013 | NA
    In a serendipitous discovery, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a way to turn bone marrow stem cells directly into brain cells. Current techniques for turning patients' marrow cells into cells of some other desired type are relatively cumbersome, risky and effectively confined to the lab dish. The new finding points to the possibility of simpler and safer techniques. Cell therapies derived from patients' own cells are widely expected to be useful in treating spinal cord injuries, strokes and other conditions throughout the body, with little or no risk of immune rejection. "These results highlight the potential...
  • Mayo Clinic: Cardiopoietic 'Smart' Stem Cells Show Promise in Heart Failure Patients

    04/12/2013 7:05:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    Mayo Clinic ^ | April 10, 2013 | NA
    First-in-humans study introduces next generation cell therapyROCHESTER, Minn. — Translating a Mayo Clinic stem-cell discovery, an international team has demonstrated that therapy with cardiopoietic (cardiogenically-instructed) or "smart" stem cells can improve heart health for people suffering from heart failure. This is the first application in patients of lineage-guided stem cells for targeted regeneration of a failing organ, paving the way to development of next generation regenerative medicine solutions. Results of the clinical trial appear online of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. VIDEO ALERT: Audio and video resources are available on the Mayo Clinic News Network. The multi-center,...
  • Discovery in Neuroscience Could Help Re-Wire Appetite Control

    04/06/2013 9:05:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Apr. 5, 2013 | NA
    Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) have made a discovery in neuroscience that could offer a long-lasting solution to eating disorders such as obesity. It was previously thought that the nerve cells in the brain associated with appetite regulation were generated entirely during an embryo's development in the womb and therefore their numbers were fixed for life. But research published today in the Journal of Neuroscience has identified a population of stem cells capable of generating new appetite-regulating neurons in the brains of young and adult rodents. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally. More than 1.4 billion adults...
  • Stem Cells Entering Heart Can Be Tracked With Nano-Hitchhikers

    03/25/2013 10:42:08 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Mar. 20, 2013 | NA
    The promise of repairing damaged hearts through regenerative medicine -- infusing stem cells into the heart in the hope that these cells will replace worn out or damaged tissue -- has yet to meet with clinical success. But a highly sensitive visualization technique developed by Stanford University School of Medicine scientists may help speed that promise's realization. The technique is described in a study published March 20 in Science Translational Medicine. Testing the new imaging method in humans is probably three to five years off. Human and animal trials in which stem cells were injected into cardiac tissue to treat...
  • OHSU scientists first to grow liver stem cells in culture, demonstrate therapeutic benefit

    03/20/2013 1:29:35 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | February 25, 2013 | NA
    For decades scientists around the world have attempted to regenerate primary liver cells known as hepatocytes because of their numerous biomedical applications, including hepatitis research, drug metabolism and toxicity studies, as well as transplantation for cirrhosis and other chronic liver conditions. But no lab in the world has been successful in identifying and growing liver stem cells in culture -- using any available technique – until now. In the journal Nature, physician-scientists in the Papé Family Pediatric Research Institute at Oregon Health & Science University Doernbecher Children's Hospital, Portland, Ore., along with investigators at the Hubrecht Institute for Developmental Biology...
  • Stem Cell Biology

    03/15/2013 12:37:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Cell Research ^ | January 2013 | NA
    The January special issue of Cell Research on Stem Cell Biology brings together the latest reviews and articles in the field. Together with the accompanying web focus, Cell Research delves into our current understanding and investigates recent advances in various aspects of stem cell biology, cell reprogramming, and their relevance to diseases.Special Issue on Stem Cell Biology
  • Stem cell heart repairs: 21st century medicine in action

    02/22/2013 5:45:02 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    Miami Herald ^ | February 22, 2013 | LIDIA DINKOVA
    Gerard Cuomo loves to dance. Until recently, however, the 70-year-old couldn’t even do a two-step. After having three heart attacks in the early 1990s, Cuomo’s heart was severely damaged. The scar tissue that had formed around his heart left him easily fatigued. “I felt like an old man,” said Cuomo of Aventura. “I could barely climb the stairs. I could walk for about a quarter of a mile. Shopping at the mall — I wish I did not have to sit down all the time.” In May 2010, he participated in a University of Miami Miller School of Medicine’s clinical...
  • First Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Trial

    02/15/2013 12:12:07 AM PST · by neverdem
    National Review Online ^ | February 14, 2013 | Wesley J. Smith
    At present, there are three small human safety embryonic stem cell studies. All deal with macular degeneration-type conditions. And now, a human trial looks to soon get underway in Japan using induced pluripotent stem cells, that is, stem cells made from a patient’s own skin or other tissues. From the Nature News story: Having already received IRB approval at her home institution, Takahashi can now move towards the final step before patient recruitment: getting health ministry approval.  She’s expected receive that in time for starting the trials during this fiscal year, ending March 2014. The trial will enroll six patients...
  • Stem cells in Texas: Cowboy culture

    02/14/2013 4:01:37 PM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Nature News ^ | 13 February 2013 | David Cyranoski
    By offering unproven therapies, a Texas biotechnology firm has sparked a bitter debate about how stem cells should be regulated. Ann McFarlane is losing faith. In the first half of 2012, the Houston resident received four infusions of adult stem cells grown from her own fat. McFarlane has multiple sclerosis (MS), and had heard that others with the inflammatory disease had experienced improvements in mobility and balance after treatment. The infusions — which have cost her about US$32,000 so far — didn't help, but she knew that there were no guarantees. It is McFarlane's experience with Celltex Therapeutics, the company...
  • Fighting fat with fat: Stem cell discovery identifies potential obesity treatment

    02/05/2013 11:04:06 AM PST · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    http://medicalxpress.com ^ | Feb 05, 2013 | Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
    Ottawa scientists have discovered a trigger that turns muscle stem cells into brown fat, a form of good fat that could play a critical role in the fight against obesity. The findings from Dr. Michael Rudnicki's lab, based at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, were published today in the prestigious journal Cell Metabolism. "This discovery significantly advances our ability to harness this good fat in the battle against bad fat and all the associated health risks that come with being overweight and obese," says Dr. Rudnicki, a senior scientist and director for the Regenerative Medicine Program and Sprott Centre for...
  • Stem-cell approach shows promise for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    01/23/2013 5:28:33 PM PST · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | January 14, 2013 | NA
    University of Illinois comparative biosciences professor Suzanne Berry-Miller, veterinary clinical medicine professor Robert O’Brien.Researchers have shown that transplanting stem cells derived from normal mouse blood vessels into the hearts of mice that model the pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) prevents the decrease in heart function associated with DMD. Their findings appear in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the gene for dystrophin, a protein that anchors muscle cells in place when they contract. Without dystrophin, muscle contractions tear cell membranes, leading to cell death. The lost...
  • Faster, Safer Method for Producing Stem Cells

    12/18/2012 12:06:26 AM PST · by neverdem
    ScienceDaily ^ | Dec. 3, 2012 | NA
    A new method for generating stem cells from mature cells promises to boost stem cell production in the laboratory, helping to remove a barrier to regenerative medicine therapies that would replace damaged or unhealthy body tissues. The technique, developed by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, allows for the unlimited production of stem cells and their derivatives as well as reduces production time by more than half, from nearly two months to two weeks. "One of the barriers that needs to be overcome before stem cell therapies can be widely adopted is the difficulty of producing enough cells...
  • EUROPEAN PROJECT AIMS TO CREATE 1,500 NEW STEM CELL LINES

    12/17/2012 10:49:43 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Singularity Hub ^ | 12/17/12 | Peter Murray
    Stem cells derived from patients with disorders, such as these Parkinson’s cells, could foster drug screening to find treatments and also provide researchers a valuable tool to study disease. Europe certainly believes in the promise of stem cells.A joint public-private collaboration between the European Union and Europe’s pharmaceutical industry, called the StemBANCC project, will spend nearly 50 million euros to create 1,500 pluripotent stem cell lines. But the initiative’s goal isn’t to find a stem cell-based cure for diabetes or Alzheimer’s disease. They hope instead that their stem cell lines will prove to be faster and more effective drug screens...
  • Repair damaged eyes with stem cell discs

    12/13/2012 8:25:58 PM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Futurity ^ | December 11, 2012 | Amy Stone-Sheffield
    U. SHEFFIELD (UK) — Engineers have developed a new technique to graft a biodegradable disc loaded with stem cells onto damaged eyes.The team at the University of Sheffield describes the method, which involves producing membranes to assist with grafting, in the journal Acta Biomaterialia. The goal is to treat damage to the cornea, the transparent layer on the front of the eye, which is one of the major causes of blindness in the world.Using a combination of techniques known as microstereolithography and electrospinning, the researchers made a disc of biodegradable material that can be fixed over the cornea. The disc...
  • Stem-Cell Cures Without the Controversy

    12/08/2012 9:49:01 PM PST · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | December 7, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    The chief medical ambition of those who study stem cells has always been that the cells would be used to repair and regenerate damaged tissue. That's still a long way off, despite rapid progress exemplified by the presentation of the Nobel Prize next week to Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University for a key stem-cell breakthrough. But there's another, less well known application of stem cells that is already delivering results: disease modeling. Dr. Yamanaka used a retrovirus to insert four genes into a mouse cell to return it to a "pluripotent" state—capable of turning into almost any kind of cell....
  • 'Fountain of youth' technique rejuvenates aging stem cells

    11/29/2012 7:38:28 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | November 27, 2012 | NA
    This is an image of an aged stem cell after growth factors were added. A new method of growing cardiac tissue is teaching old stem cells new tricks. The discovery, which transforms aged stem cells into cells that function like much younger ones, may one day enable scientists to grow cardiac patches for damaged or diseased hearts from a patient's own stem cells—no matter what age the patient—while avoiding the threat of rejection. Stem cell therapies involving donated bone marrow stem cells run the risk of patient rejection in a portion of the population, argues Milica Radisic, Canada Research Chair...