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Keyword: adultstemcells

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  • Adult Stem Cells Imitate Human Brain, Are Hope for Neurological Disorders

    10/31/2013 1:02:39 PM PDT · by GonzoII · 14 replies
    Charlotte Lozier Institute ^ | September 3, 2013 | Nora Sullivan
    Adult Stem Cells Imitate Human Brain, Are Hope for Neurological Disorders Charlotte Lozier Institute on September 3, 2013 in Science & Medicine - No comments By Nora SullivanA study published last week has shown that adult stem cells derived from ethical sources can be used to create living tissues that imitate the developing human brain.  In their findings, published in the science journal Nature, researchers asserted that, by using human stem cells derived from skin cells, they were able to assemble brain-like pieces of living tissue.  These stem cells could prove to be an invaluable resource for the study and...
  • Government Overreach Threatens Lives - Will the FDA shut down vital stem-cell treatments?

    10/02/2013 10:37:43 AM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Hoover Institution ^ | October 1, 2013 | Richard A. Epstein
    Throughout its long history, the Federal Food and Drug Administration has insisted that its mission is “protecting and promoting your health.” Take that your seriously. In area after area, the record suggests that the paternalist FDA fails you in its announced purpose. Far from protecting “your health,” the FDA prevents you from making the informed decisions to preserve and promote your own health. All too often, the FDA lacks both the judgment and technical expertise to decide which treatments ordinary people may choose to undergo and which they must turn aside. To take one example, the FDA’s critics have bemoaned...
  • Milestone study probes cancer origin

    08/17/2013 4:54:38 PM PDT · by CutePuppy · 17 replies
    BBC ^ | 2013 August 14 | James Gallagher
    Scientists are reporting a significant milestone for cancer research after charting 21 major mutations behind the vast majority of tumours. The disruptive changes to the genetic code, reported in Nature, accounted for 97% of the 30 most common cancers. Finding out what causes the mutations could lead to new treatments. Some causes, such as smoking are known, but more than half are still a mystery. Cancer Research UK said it was a fascinating and important study. A tumour starts when one of the building blocks of bodies, a cell, goes wrong. Over the course of a lifetime cells pick up...
  • Here It Comes The $375,000 Lab-Grown Beef Burger

    08/04/2013 3:53:18 PM PDT · by neverdem · 31 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 2013-08-02 | Kai Kupferschmidt
    Francois Lenoir/Reuters Meet the new meat. Tiny pieces of muscle tissue grown in the lab will make up the patty of the first test-tube burger to be unveiled in London on Monday. If you take some scientists' word for it, the biggest agricultural revolution since the domestication of livestock is starting on Mondayin an arts center in London. At a carefully orchestrated media event, Dutch stem cell researcher Mark Post is planning to present the world's first test-tube hamburger. Its patty is made from meat that Post has laboriously grown from bovine stem cells in his lab at an estimated...
  • New teeth grown from urine - study

    07/30/2013 10:25:53 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 62 replies
    BBC ^ | 29 July 2013 Last updated at 19:44 ET | By James Gallagher
    Scientists have grown rudimentary teeth out of the most unlikely of sources, human urine. The results, published in Cell Regeneration Journal, showed that urine could be used as a source of stem cells that in turn could be grown into tiny tooth-like structures. The team from China hopes the technique could be developed into a way of replacing lost teeth. Other stem cell researchers caution that that goal faces many challenges. Teams of researchers around the world are looking for ways of growing new teeth to replace those lost with age and poor dental hygiene. Stem cells - the master...
  • Researchers Identify Proteins Key in Stem Cell Production

    07/29/2013 10:02:49 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | Jul 8, 2013 | Sergio Prostak
    A multinational team of scientists led by Prof Benjamin Blencowe from the University of Toronto has identified proteins that play a key role in controlling pluripotency, which may mean a potential breakthrough in producing the so-called induced pluripotent stem cells.Colonies of the induced pluripotent stem cells (Boston University Center for Regenerative Medicine) Induced pluripotent stem cells can be of great value for medical research because they can flexibly develop into many different types of cells. However, producing these cells is challenging because the proteins that control their generation are largely unknown.The team discovered the proteins using the splicing code developed...
  • Stricter standards sought to curb stem-cell confusion

    07/23/2013 10:00:26 PM PDT · by neverdem
    Nature News ^ | 23 July 2013 | Helen Shen
    Initiative aims to clarify description of mesenchymal cells. Pamela Robey is used to being sent samples by scientists who are anxious to know whether the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) they have extracted from fat can be coaxed to turn into either bone or cartilage. Robey, who directs the Stem Cell Unit at the US National Institutes of Health (NIH), is also used to delivering bad news to many of those who seek her help. They usually are not happy, she says, when her attempts to differentiate the cells produce little more than fatty globules. To Robey, that disappointment reflects a...
  • Stem cells reprogrammed using chemicals alone

    07/18/2013 1:48:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Nature News ^ | 18 July 2013 | David Cyranoski
    Patient-specific cells could be made without genetic manipulation. Scientists have demonstrated a new way to reprogram adult tissue to become cells as versatile as embryonic stem cells without the addition of extra genes that could increase the risk of dangerous mutations or cancer. Researchers have been striving to achieve this since 2006, when the creation of so-called induced pluripotent (iPS) cells was first reported. Previously, they had managed to reduce the number of genes needed using small-molecule chemical compounds, but those attempts always required at least one gene, Oct42, 3. Now, writing in Science, researchers report success in creating...
  • Trial and error

    07/10/2013 10:45:23 PM PDT · by neverdem
    Nature News ^ | 09 July 2013 | Masthead Editorial
    Italian officials should not go ahead with expensive clinical tests of an unproven stem-cell therapy that has no good scientific basis. The Italian government is planning to oversee a clinical trial of a controversial stem-cell therapy. There are many reasons for the trial to be stopped and no good reason for it to be carried out. Last week, Nature revealed that the method used by Italian researcher Davide Vannoni, founder of the Stamina Foundation in Brescia, to treat scores of very sick patients is based on flawed data. The revelation struck a major nerve, and hit the front pages...
  • Italian stem-cell trial based on flawed data

    07/10/2013 9:38:15 PM PDT · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Nature News ^ | 02 July 2013 | Alison Abbott
    Scientists raise serious concerns about a patent that forms the basis of a controversial stem-cell therapy. Davide Vannoni, a psychologist turned medical entrepreneur, has polarized Italian society in the past year with a bid to get his special brand of stem-cell therapy authorized. He has gained fervent public support with his claims to cure fatal illnesses and equally fervent opposition from many scientists who say that his treatment is unproven. Now those scientists want the Italian government to pull out of a 3-million (US$3.9-million) clinical trial of the therapy that it promised to support in May, after bowing to...
  • Newly identified bone marrow stem cells reveal markers for ALS

    07/09/2013 3:50:18 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    Medical Xpress ^ | July 9, 2013 | NA
    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS) is a devastating motor neuron disease that rapidly atrophies the muscles, leading to complete paralysis. Despite its high profileestablished when it afflicted the New York Yankees' Lou GehrigALS remains a disease that scientists are unable to predict, prevent, or cure. Although several genetic ALS mutations have been identified, they only apply to a small number of cases. The ongoing challenge is to identify the mechanisms behind the non-genetic form of the disease and draw useful comparisons with the genetic forms.Now, using samples of stem cells derived from the bone marrow of non-genetic ALS patients, Prof. Miguel...
  • Synthetic Trachea Recipient Dies

    07/08/2013 6:16:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 8 July 2013 | Gretchen Vogel
    The youngest patient to receive an artificial trachea seeded with stem cells has died, The New York Times reported today. Hannah Warren, who was born with a rare birth defect that left her without a trachea, underwent surgery in April to have a synthetic trachea implanted that was seeded with stem cells from her bone marrow. She would have turned 3 in August. Her doctors told The New York Times that her death was due to complications related to a second surgery that was needed to repair her esophagus, which had not properly healed after the initial surgery. They said...
  • Miniature human liver grown in mice

    07/04/2013 1:26:41 PM PDT · by neverdem · 6 replies
    Nature News ^ | 03 July 2013 | Monya Baker
    Cells self-organize and grow into functional organs after transplantation. Transplanting tiny 'liver buds' constructed from human stem cells restores liver function in mice, researchers have found. Although preliminary, the results offer a potential path towards developing treatments for the thousands of patients awaiting liver transplants every year. The liver buds, approximately 4 mm across, staved off death in mice with liver failure, the researchers report this week in Nature1. The transplanted structures also took on a range of liver functions secreting liver-specific proteins and producing human-specific metabolites. But perhaps most notably, these buds quickly hooked up with nearby blood...
  • Stem-Cell Trial a Victory for Science, and for Life

    06/28/2013 3:27:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    National Review Online ^ | June 28, 2013 | Will Allen
    The Japanese Health Ministry has approved the first human clinical trial involving induced pluripotent stem cells (know as iPSCs), which are taken from a patients epithelial tissue for use elsewhere in his body. The trial will remove skin cells from six adults who suffer from age-related macular degeneration; scientists at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Kobe will then attempt to develop the cells into retinal tissue for transplant back to each patients eyes. The outcome of the treatment is by no means assured; the trial will take four years to complete, and as the National Institutes of Health...
  • Keeping stem cells strong

    05/24/2013 12:15:35 PM PDT · by neverdem
    Biology News Net ^ | May 21, 2013 | NA
    When infections occur in the body, stem cells in the blood often jump into action by multiplying and differentiating into mature immune cells that can fight off illness. But repeated infections and inflammation can deplete these cell populations, potentially leading to the development of serious blood conditions such as cancer. Now, a team of researchers led by biologists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech) has found that, in mouse models, the molecule microRNA-146a (miR-146a) acts as a critical regulator and protector of blood-forming stem cells (called hematopoietic stem cells, or HSCs) during chronic inflammation, suggesting that a deficiency of...
  • Nineteenth Century Technique Turns Old Mouse Hearts Young

    05/15/2013 2:09:10 PM PDT · by neverdem · 16 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 9 May 2013 | Paul Gabrielsen
    Enlarge Image Young at heart. Cross-sections of mouse ventricles show the visible change in size when old hearts are immersed in young blood. Credit: Francesco Loffredo It's time to turn back the clock on an aging ticker. Drawing on an odd experimental technique invented more than a century ago but rarely done now, researchers have found that a blood-borne protein makes old mouse hearts appear young and healthy again. It's not clear yet whether humans would react the same way, but scientists are hopeful that this discovery may help treat one of the heart's most frustrating ailments. "This is probably...
  • Position Yourself for Big Returns in the Stem Cell Space: Jason Kolbert

    05/15/2013 3:34:26 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    The Life Sciences Report ^ | May 13th, 2013 | George S. Mack
    This interview was conducted by George S. Mack of The Life Sciences Report (5/10/13) Stem cell companies have languished long enough in micro-cap territory. The industry is now approaching highly visible phase 2 and phase 3 catalysts that will produce results never before seen in medicine. Managing Director and Senior Biotechnology Analyst Jason Kolbert of the Maxim Group has staked out a select group of nascent cell therapy companies positioned to reap huge gains for investors willing to diversify. In this interview with The Life Sciences Report, Kolbert reflects on the regenerative medicine space following the recent RegenMed Investor Day...
  • Two-year-old gets windpipe made from her own stem cells

    04/30/2013 6:28:17 PM PDT · by neverdem · 9 replies
    CBS News ^ | April 30, 2013 | Jonathan LaPook
    Two-year-old Hannah Warren lived her whole life in an intensive care unit with a breathing tube. She was born without a windpipe and has been unable to talk, swallow, or eat on her own. Her parents, Darryl and Young-mi Warren were told Hannah would not live past age six. "Hannah didn't have a chance. There was no hope. We were waiting for her to die essentially," said Darryl Warren...
  • Antibody Transforms Stem Cells Directly Into Brain Cells

    04/24/2013 3:59:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 8 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Apr. 22, 2013 | NA
    In a serendipitous discovery, scientists at The Scripps Research Institute (TSRI) have found a way to turn bone marrow stem cells directly into brain cells. Current techniques for turning patients' marrow cells into cells of some other desired type are relatively cumbersome, risky and effectively confined to the lab dish. The new finding points to the possibility of simpler and safer techniques. Cell therapies derived from patients' own cells are widely expected to be useful in treating spinal cord injuries, strokes and other conditions throughout the body, with little or no risk of immune rejection. "These results highlight the potential...
  • Mayo Clinic: Cardiopoietic 'Smart' Stem Cells Show Promise in Heart Failure Patients

    04/12/2013 7:05:00 PM PDT · by neverdem · 7 replies
    Mayo Clinic ^ | April 10, 2013 | NA
    First-in-humans study introduces next generation cell therapyROCHESTER, Minn. — Translating a Mayo Clinic stem-cell discovery, an international team has demonstrated that therapy with cardiopoietic (cardiogenically-instructed) or "smart" stem cells can improve heart health for people suffering from heart failure. This is the first application in patients of lineage-guided stem cells for targeted regeneration of a failing organ, paving the way to development of next generation regenerative medicine solutions. Results of the clinical trial appear online of the Journal of the American College of Cardiology. VIDEO ALERT: Audio and video resources are available on the Mayo Clinic News Network. The multi-center,...
  • Discovery in Neuroscience Could Help Re-Wire Appetite Control

    04/06/2013 9:05:01 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Apr. 5, 2013 | NA
    Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA) have made a discovery in neuroscience that could offer a long-lasting solution to eating disorders such as obesity. It was previously thought that the nerve cells in the brain associated with appetite regulation were generated entirely during an embryo's development in the womb and therefore their numbers were fixed for life. But research published today in the Journal of Neuroscience has identified a population of stem cells capable of generating new appetite-regulating neurons in the brains of young and adult rodents. Obesity has reached epidemic proportions globally. More than 1.4 billion adults...
  • Stem Cells Entering Heart Can Be Tracked With Nano-Hitchhikers

    03/25/2013 10:42:08 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Mar. 20, 2013 | NA
    The promise of repairing damaged hearts through regenerative medicine -- infusing stem cells into the heart in the hope that these cells will replace worn out or damaged tissue -- has yet to meet with clinical success. But a highly sensitive visualization technique developed by Stanford University School of Medicine scientists may help speed that promise's realization. The technique is described in a study published March 20 in Science Translational Medicine. Testing the new imaging method in humans is probably three to five years off. Human and animal trials in which stem cells were injected into cardiac tissue to treat...
  • OHSU scientists first to grow liver stem cells in culture, demonstrate therapeutic benefit

    03/20/2013 1:29:35 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | February 25, 2013 | NA
    For decades scientists around the world have attempted to regenerate primary liver cells known as hepatocytes because of their numerous biomedical applications, including hepatitis research, drug metabolism and toxicity studies, as well as transplantation for cirrhosis and other chronic liver conditions. But no lab in the world has been successful in identifying and growing liver stem cells in culture -- using any available technique until now. In the journal Nature, physician-scientists in the Pap Family Pediatric Research Institute at Oregon Health & Science University Doernbecher Children's Hospital, Portland, Ore., along with investigators at the Hubrecht Institute for Developmental Biology...
  • Stem Cell Biology

    03/15/2013 12:37:53 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Cell Research ^ | January 2013 | NA
    The January special issue of Cell Research on Stem Cell Biology brings together the latest reviews and articles in the field. Together with the accompanying web focus, Cell Research delves into our current understanding and investigates recent advances in various aspects of stem cell biology, cell reprogramming, and their relevance to diseases.Special Issue on Stem Cell Biology
  • Stem cell heart repairs: 21st century medicine in action

    02/22/2013 5:45:02 PM PST · by neverdem · 18 replies
    Miami Herald ^ | February 22, 2013 | LIDIA DINKOVA
    Gerard Cuomo loves to dance. Until recently, however, the 70-year-old couldnt even do a two-step. After having three heart attacks in the early 1990s, Cuomos heart was severely damaged. The scar tissue that had formed around his heart left him easily fatigued. I felt like an old man, said Cuomo of Aventura. I could barely climb the stairs. I could walk for about a quarter of a mile. Shopping at the mall I wish I did not have to sit down all the time. In May 2010, he participated in a University of Miami Miller School of Medicines clinical...
  • First Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell Trial

    02/15/2013 12:12:07 AM PST · by neverdem
    National Review Online ^ | February 14, 2013 | Wesley J. Smith
    At present, there are three small human safety embryonic stem cell studies. All deal with macular degeneration-type conditions. And now, a human trial looks to soon get underway in Japan using induced pluripotent stem cells, that is, stem cells made from a patient’s own skin or other tissues. From the Nature News story: Having already received IRB approval at her home institution, Takahashi can now move towards the final step before patient recruitment: getting health ministry approval.  She’s expected receive that in time for starting the trials during this fiscal year, ending March 2014. The trial will enroll six patients...
  • Stem cells in Texas: Cowboy culture

    02/14/2013 4:01:37 PM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Nature News ^ | 13 February 2013 | David Cyranoski
    By offering unproven therapies, a Texas biotechnology firm has sparked a bitter debate about how stem cells should be regulated. Ann McFarlane is losing faith. In the first half of 2012, the Houston resident received four infusions of adult stem cells grown from her own fat. McFarlane has multiple sclerosis (MS), and had heard that others with the inflammatory disease had experienced improvements in mobility and balance after treatment. The infusions which have cost her about US$32,000 so far didn't help, but she knew that there were no guarantees. It is McFarlane's experience with Celltex Therapeutics, the company...
  • Fighting fat with fat: Stem cell discovery identifies potential obesity treatment

    02/05/2013 11:04:06 AM PST · by Red Badger · 8 replies
    http://medicalxpress.com ^ | Feb 05, 2013 | Ottawa Hospital Research Institute
    Ottawa scientists have discovered a trigger that turns muscle stem cells into brown fat, a form of good fat that could play a critical role in the fight against obesity. The findings from Dr. Michael Rudnicki's lab, based at the Ottawa Hospital Research Institute, were published today in the prestigious journal Cell Metabolism. "This discovery significantly advances our ability to harness this good fat in the battle against bad fat and all the associated health risks that come with being overweight and obese," says Dr. Rudnicki, a senior scientist and director for the Regenerative Medicine Program and Sprott Centre for...
  • Stem-cell approach shows promise for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    01/23/2013 5:28:33 PM PST · by neverdem · 1 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | January 14, 2013 | NA
    University of Illinois comparative biosciences professor Suzanne Berry-Miller, veterinary clinical medicine professor Robert OBrien.Researchers have shown that transplanting stem cells derived from normal mouse blood vessels into the hearts of mice that model the pathology associated with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) prevents the decrease in heart function associated with DMD. Their findings appear in the journal Stem Cells Translational Medicine. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetic disorder caused by a mutation in the gene for dystrophin, a protein that anchors muscle cells in place when they contract. Without dystrophin, muscle contractions tear cell membranes, leading to cell death. The lost...
  • Faster, Safer Method for Producing Stem Cells

    12/18/2012 12:06:26 AM PST · by neverdem
    ScienceDaily ^ | Dec. 3, 2012 | NA
    A new method for generating stem cells from mature cells promises to boost stem cell production in the laboratory, helping to remove a barrier to regenerative medicine therapies that would replace damaged or unhealthy body tissues. The technique, developed by researchers at the Salk Institute for Biological Studies, allows for the unlimited production of stem cells and their derivatives as well as reduces production time by more than half, from nearly two months to two weeks. "One of the barriers that needs to be overcome before stem cell therapies can be widely adopted is the difficulty of producing enough cells...
  • EUROPEAN PROJECT AIMS TO CREATE 1,500 NEW STEM CELL LINES

    12/17/2012 10:49:43 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Singularity Hub ^ | 12/17/12 | Peter Murray
    Stem cells derived from patients with disorders, such as these Parkinson’s cells, could foster drug screening to find treatments and also provide researchers a valuable tool to study disease. Europe certainly believes in the promise of stem cells.A joint public-private collaboration between the European Union and Europe’s pharmaceutical industry, called the StemBANCC project, will spend nearly 50 million euros to create 1,500 pluripotent stem cell lines. But the initiative’s goal isn’t to find a stem cell-based cure for diabetes or Alzheimer’s disease. They hope instead that their stem cell lines will prove to be faster and more effective drug screens...
  • Repair damaged eyes with stem cell discs

    12/13/2012 8:25:58 PM PST · by neverdem · 9 replies
    Futurity ^ | December 11, 2012 | Amy Stone-Sheffield
    U. SHEFFIELD (UK) — Engineers have developed a new technique to graft a biodegradable disc loaded with stem cells onto damaged eyes.The team at the University of Sheffield describes the method, which involves producing membranes to assist with grafting, in the journal Acta Biomaterialia. The goal is to treat damage to the cornea, the transparent layer on the front of the eye, which is one of the major causes of blindness in the world.Using a combination of techniques known as microstereolithography and electrospinning, the researchers made a disc of biodegradable material that can be fixed over the cornea. The disc...
  • Stem-Cell Cures Without the Controversy

    12/08/2012 9:49:01 PM PST · by neverdem · 3 replies
    Wall Street Journal ^ | December 7, 2012 | Matt Ridley
    The chief medical ambition of those who study stem cells has always been that the cells would be used to repair and regenerate damaged tissue. That's still a long way off, despite rapid progress exemplified by the presentation of the Nobel Prize next week to Shinya Yamanaka of Kyoto University for a key stem-cell breakthrough. But there's another, less well known application of stem cells that is already delivering results: disease modeling. Dr. Yamanaka used a retrovirus to insert four genes into a mouse cell to return it to a "pluripotent" statecapable of turning into almost any kind of cell....
  • 'Fountain of youth' technique rejuvenates aging stem cells

    11/29/2012 7:38:28 PM PST · by neverdem · 4 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | November 27, 2012 | NA
    This is an image of an aged stem cell after growth factors were added. A new method of growing cardiac tissue is teaching old stem cells new tricks. The discovery, which transforms aged stem cells into cells that function like much younger ones, may one day enable scientists to grow cardiac patches for damaged or diseased hearts from a patient's own stem cellsno matter what age the patientwhile avoiding the threat of rejection. Stem cell therapies involving donated bone marrow stem cells run the risk of patient rejection in a portion of the population, argues Milica Radisic, Canada Research Chair...
  • Pancreas stem cell discovery may lead to new diabetes treatments

    11/15/2012 10:13:02 PM PST · by neverdem · 17 replies
    Professor Len Harrison (pictured) and Dr Ilia Banakh have identified stem cells in the adult pancreas that can be turned into insulin producing cells, a discovery that may lead to new diabetes treatments. Stem cells in the adult pancreas have been identified that can be turned into insulin producing cells, a finding that means people with type 1 diabetes might one day be able to regenerate their own insulin-producing cells.The discovery was made by scientists from the Walter and Eliza Hall Institute and provides further evidence that stem cells don't only occur in the embryo.The ability to produce the hormone...
  • Stem Cells Help Md. Boy With Cerebral Palsy To Walk

    11/08/2012 11:55:03 PM PST · by neverdem · 2 replies
    baltimore.cbslocal.com ^ | November 8, 2012 | Adam May
    EASTERN SHORE, Md. (WJZ) The miracle of stem cells changes the life of a little boy from the Eastern Shore. Adam May has the amazing story of a mother and the choice she made moments after her son was born. Xander McKinley was a beautiful babybut challenging. The newborn didnt eat or sleep well, and by two-years-old, he couldnt walk or even crawl. Something just wasnt right, said Xanders mother, Jennifer McKinley. Jennifer McKinley got the news every parent fears. Xander had cerebral palsya brain condition that slows motor functions. Adam: Did you ever fear he would never have...
  • Two Years On, Stem Cells Still Healing Damaged Hearts

    11/08/2012 10:14:32 PM PST · by neverdem · 1 replies
    HealthDay News viaU.S.News & World Report ^ | November 6, 2012 | E.J. Mundell
    Latest data from small study suggests therapy could fight heart failure, but larger trials are needed ) -- Updated two-year results from a small trial using cardiac stem cells to repair damaged hearts suggest the treatment's healing effect persists.Patients with heart failure caused by prior heart attacks who got the treatment continue to see reductions in cardiac scar tissue, improvements in the heart's pumping ability and even a boost in their quality of life, researchers said.These improvements seem to be continuing as time goes on, suggesting that stem cell therapy's healing power hasn't diminished."Now we need to perform larger and...
  • President Obama and the Embryonic Backfire

    11/08/2012 12:54:57 AM PST · by neverdem · 21 replies
    huffingtonpost.com | November 7, 2012 | Robin L. Smith
    Here's the link.
  • Stem Cells Safe for Rare Brain Disorder

    10/10/2012 7:07:34 PM PDT · by neverdem · 4 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 10 October 2012 | Emily Underwood
    Enlarge Image Direct delivery. Neurosurgeons inject human neural stem cells into bundles of nerve axons, hoping the cells will become myelinating oligodendrocytes. Credit: Kenneth Probst Four young boys with a rare, fatal brain condition have made it through a dangerous ordeal. Scientists have safely transplanted human neural stem cells into their brains. Twelve months after the surgeries, the boys have more myelin—a fatty insulating protein that coats nerve fibers and speeds up electric signals between neurons—and show improved brain function, a new study in Science Translational Medicine reports. The preliminary trial paves the way for future research into potential...
  • One Day, Growing Spare Parts Inside the Body

    09/29/2012 7:50:29 PM PDT · by neverdem · 10 replies
    NY Times ^ | September 17, 2012 | HENRY FOUNTAIN
    Dr. Tracy Grikscheit held a length of intestine in her gloved hands, examining it inch by inch as if she were checking a bicycle tube for leaks... --snip-- Dr. Grikscheits work is at the forefront of efforts in laboratories around the world to build replacement organs and tissues. Although the long-sought goal of creating complex organs like hearts and livers to ease transplant shortages remains a long way off, researchers are having success making simpler structures like bladders and windpipes, thanks to advances in understanding stem cells... --snip-- This kind of seeding of scaffolds with cells is a common approach...
  • A First: Organs Tailor-Made With Bodys Own Cells

    09/29/2012 4:40:56 PM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies
    NY Times ^ | September 15, 2012 | HENRY FOUNTAIN
    Andemariam Beyene sat by the hospital window, the low Arctic sun on his face, and talked about the time he thought he would die. Two and a half years ago doctors in Iceland, where Mr. Beyene was studying to be an engineer, discovered a golf-ball-size tumor growing into his windpipe. Despite surgery and radiation, it kept growing. In the spring of 2011, when Mr. Beyene came to Sweden to see another doctor, he was practically out of options. I was almost dead, he said. There was suffering. A lot of suffering. But the doctor, Paolo Macchiarini, at the Karolinska Institute...
  • Evidence Grows That Cancer Has Its Own Stem Cells

    08/01/2012 1:45:54 PM PDT · by Olog-hai · 15 replies
    US News HealthDay ^ | August 1, 2012 | Lisa Esposito
    While scientists hotly debate the existence of cancer stem cells, three related new studies, all conducted on mice, provide some supporting evidence. Stem cells are the foundation for healthy cell growth in the body. Some researchers believe that malignant stem cells also existso-called cancer stem cells that generate tumors and resist treatment by simply re-growing afterward. "Cancer stem cells are still controversial, but with progress in studies like these, it's less about whether they exist and more about 'what does this mean?'" said Dr. Max Wicha, director of the University of Michigan Comprehensive Cancer Center, who is familiar with the...
  • FDAs claims over stem cells upheld

    07/30/2012 11:17:45 AM PDT · by newzjunkey · 5 replies
    Nature ^ | 27 July 2012 | David Cyranoski
    A court decision on 23 July could help to tame the largely unregulated field of adult stem-cell treatments. The US District Court in Washington DC affirmed the right of the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to regulate therapies made from a patients own processed stem cells. The case hinged on whether the court agreed with the FDA that such stem cells are drugs. The judge concurred, upholding an injunction brought by the FDA against Regenerative Sciences, based in Broomfield, Colorado...
  • Stunning Recovery for First Child to Get Stem Cell Trachea

    07/26/2012 1:41:45 PM PDT · by Former Fetus · 10 replies
    Yahoo ^ | 7/26/2012 | LARA SALAHI
    The first child in history to receive a trachea fashioned by his own stem cells has shown remarkable progress since the initial transplant two years ago, marking a new record for the novel procedure. Ciaran Finn-Lynch, the now 13-year-old boy from the UK who the world's first child to receive the stem cell trachea transplant, is breathing normally and no longer needs anti-rejection medication, researchers reported in a paper published Wednesday in the journal Lancet. The organ itself is strong, has not shown signs of rejection, and has even grown 11 centimeters since it had been transplanted, according to the...
  • New method generates cardiac muscle patches from stem cells

    06/25/2012 11:17:30 PM PDT · by neverdem · 11 replies
    Biology News Net ^ | June 20, 2012 | NA
    A cutting-edge method developed at the University of Michigan Center for Arrhythmia Research successfully uses stem cells to create heart cells capable of mimicking the heart's crucial squeezing action. The cells displayed activity similar to most people's resting heart rate. At 60 beats per minute, the rhythmic electrical impulse transmission of the engineered cells in the U-M study is 10 times faster than in most other reported stem cell studies. An image of the electrically stimulated cardiac cells is displayed on the cover of the current issue of Circulation Research, a publication of the American Heart Association. For those suffering...
  • Stem Cells Move Into Prime Time

    06/18/2012 6:49:31 PM PDT · by neverdem · 21 replies
    ScienceNOW ^ | 18 June 2012 | Dennis Normile
    Enlarge Image Ring of protection. In experiments, myelin produced by injected human neural stem cells (green) formed protective sleeves around the nerve fibers in mouse brains (red). Credit: RIKEN CDB; StemCells Inc. YOKOHAMA, JAPAN—For more than a decade, stem cell therapies have been touted as offering hope for those suffering from genetic and degenerative diseases. The promise took another step toward reality last week with announcements here at the annual meeting of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) that two groups are moving forward with human clinical research, one focusing on a rare genetic neurological disease and...
  • Stem cell treatment regrows Whitfield man's foot

    05/29/2012 5:45:45 AM PDT · by GrootheWanderer · 21 replies
    The (Dalton, Georgia) Daily Citizen ^ | 05-28-2012 | Charles Oliver
    By the time Dr. Spencer Misner had carved away the dead and diseased flesh from Bobby Rices right foot last year, little remained other than bones and tendons. I couldnt believe it. It didnt look real. It looked like something out of a movie, recalled Rice, a Whitfield County resident. Today, the ankle has almost completely healed. It looks like Rice had simply scraped it. And Rices foot has largely healed, too. Misner credits cutting-edge stem cell treatments for saving Rices foot and leg.
  • Improved Adult-Derived Human Stem Cells Have Fewer Genetic Changes Than Expected

    05/01/2012 1:29:10 AM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    ScienceDaily ^ | Apr. 30, 2012 | NA
    A team of researchers from Johns Hopkins University and the National Human Genome Research Institute has evaluated the whole genomic sequence of stem cells derived from human bone marrow cells -- so-called induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells -- and found that relatively few genetic changes occur during stem cell conversion by an improved method. The findings, reported in the March issue of Cell Stem Cell, the official journal of the International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR), will be presented at the annual ISSCR meeting in June. "Our results show that human iPS cells accrue genetic changes at about the...
  • UPDATED: Experts Divided on Texas Medical Board's Plan to Regulate Stem Cell Treatments

    04/14/2012 11:42:38 PM PDT · by neverdem · 1 replies
    ScienceInsider ^ | 12 April 2012 | Jocelyn Kaiser
    Enlarge Image Governor Rick Perry Credit: Gage Skidmore Tomorrow the Texas Medical Board will decide whether to sign off on what's said to be the first state-level policy imposing oversight on the medical use of experimental treatments using adult stem cells. The hotly debated plan has drawn mixed views from the scientific community over whether it's a good way to raise standards—and has generated confusion in the media. Some experts say the rule will allow unscrupulous doctors to evade review by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) because it may clear methods that haven't been rigorously examined. But others...
  • A Stem Cell Report

    01/26/2012 12:53:37 PM PST · by Coleus · 2 replies
    First Things ^ | 01.26.12 | Rebecca Oas
    Generally speaking, the American public is well accustomed to the concept of tissue and organ transplantation, as stories of life-saving heart and kidney transplants, or American Red Cross blood drives collecting blood and platelets for transfusions have become commonplace. Since these procedures typically require a transfer of tissue from one patient to another, physicians must be careful to choose well-matched donors to avoid rejection by the recipients immune system. But what about other specialized tissues that can be affected by disease, such as those of the eye? A recent study published in the journal Stem Cells by Winston Kao and...