Keyword: aegean

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • In Search of the Real Troy

    02/20/2005 2:33:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 1,322+ views
    Saudi Aramco World ^ | January/February 2005 Volume 56, Number 1 | Graham Chandler, Photographed by Ergun Cagata
    It was then that Swiss scholar Emil Forrer deciphered newly discovered writings from the Hittite Empire to the east, finding two place-names—Wilusa and Taruisa—that sounded convincingly like the Hittite way of writing "Wilios" (the Greek name for the site was "Ilion") and "Troia" (Troy). He also found a treaty, from the early 13th century BC, between the Hittite king Muwatalli and a king of "Wilusa" named Alaksandu. The king’s name, Forrer added, recalls the name of the Trojan prince Alexander—called Paris in Homer’s Iliad. Critics pooh-poohed, conceding that a place named Wilusa may have existed, but where was it on...
  • Monastery new discovery in underground city in Cappadocia

    06/26/2016 6:02:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | June 23, 2016 | Anadolu Agency
    A monastery hewn from the rock has been found during excavations and cleaning works in an underground city that was discovered in 2014 in the Central Anatolian province of Nevsehir... Excavation and cleaning works have been continuing on an area of 400,000 square meters that includes 11 neighborhoods around Nevsehir Castle, which is situated in the city center and has been declared a third-degree archaeological area. At the beginning of the year, a historic church was discovered in the underground city. The church features frescoes depicting the ascension of Jesus to heaven as well as other important objects for the...
  • Early Written Signs

    02/14/2016 9:12:52 AM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 5 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | February 13, 2016 | Alice C. Linsley
    George and I have had several meaningful conversations via email. This one might be of interest to other readers and George gave me permission to reproduce the conversation. George: I want to thank you for your blogs. I read them all the time and they have been a BIG help! I've been trying to sell others on the fact that the Hebrew lettering system goes back further than the 4th century millennium BC thanks to your findings of the Ainu/Annu culture and their lettering system in their later homeland of Japan - but with no success. I definitely believe your...
  • Archaeologists discover 2,800-year-old 'burial jars' in Turkey... but what lies inside?

    09/07/2015 10:36:00 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 49 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 6th September | Sam Matthew
    'Using just a small hand trowel these archaeologists are painstakingly working to unlock the secrets of an ancient kingdom. Historians believe they have unearthed tombs dating back over 2,800 years in Van, eastern Turkey. The pithos burial chambers, which are like large ceramic jars, are thought to be from the Kingdom of Uratu, which ruled the country from the mid-ninth century BC until its defeat by the Medes. Historians at work in the Turkish town of Vans, which was the capital of the Urartian Kingdom. Vans was the capital of the Urartian Kingdom until it fell early in the sixth...
  • Archaeologists Find Assyrian Tablets in Turkey, Some About Women's Rights

    07/19/2015 1:05:42 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    Ancient Assyrian tablets, dictating social arrangements including women's rights, dating back to 4,000 years have been excavated in the Central Anatolian province of Kayseri, a local newspaper reported Thursday. Prof. Fikri Kulakoglu of Ankara University told Dogan News Agency that the Kultepe-Kanis-Karum trade colony site where the tablets were unearthed was remarkable. He said the tablets revealed detailed information about the Assyrians, spanning from commercial trade to the nitty-gritty of the local social life. "From women's rights to the adoption of children and marriages arranged at birth, the tablets include all kinds of civilizational and social data from Anatolia 4,000...
  • Road built over 3000-year-old tumulus in eastern Turkey

    07/27/2010 6:20:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 1+ views
    Hurriyet Daily News and Economic Review ^ | Tuesday, July 27, 2010 | Dogan News Agency
    The paving over of a 3,000-year-old tumulus, a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave, in the eastern city of Van has prompted an outcry from the Provincial Culture and Tourism Directorate. Stating that the road was unnecessarily built, officials said: "We have halted the work on the road. The road and asphalt will be removed and the tumulus will be rehabilitated." Before the road was built by the municipality, the directorate had planned to start archaeological work in the historical tumulus, which dates from the Urartu period, along with work in the historical Van Castle. "A road...
  • Phaistos Disk: Greek or Luwian?

    06/25/2009 3:16:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 592+ views
    Examiner ^ | Wednesday, June 24, 2009 | Diana Gainer
    Since this disk was found in Crete, and the people of Crete today speak Greek, that's a good language to assume was spoken by the maker of the disk. Still, that's a guess, or a hypothesis, not a fact. Besides that, we know that not everybody on Crete spoke Greek in the Bronze Age. The classical Greeks mentioned people they called Eteocretans who did not speak Greek. Further, we know that Linear A, written by the Minoans on Crete before the Mycenean Greeks came, did not represent Greek. Professor Hubert LaMarle considers it to be an early Indo-Iranian language, related...
  • First Toilet And Sewer System Of Prehistoric Period Found In Van

    08/24/2004 8:16:56 AM PDT · by blam · 37 replies · 1,760+ views
    First Toilet And Sewer System Of Prehistoric Period Found In Van Anadolu Agency: 8/22/2004 VAN - The first toilet and sewer system of prehistoric period was found in an Urartian castle in Gurpinar town of eastern province of Van. In an interview with the A.A correspondent, Istanbul University Eurasian Archaeology Institute Director Prof. Dr. Oktay Belli said on Saturday that they had unearthed a toilet in the western part of Cavustepe Castle built by Urartian King Sarduri II in 764 BC. ''We revealed that Urartian architects had formed a sewer system before building the castle. The toilet and sewer system...
  • Smenkhkhare, the Hittite Pharaoh

    07/30/2004 9:42:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 2,926+ views
    BBC History ^ | September 5, 2002 | Dr Marc Gabolde
    [T]he exclusively masculine epithets referring to this individual in the same tomb and on a now-vanished block at Memphis, confirm that we are dealing with a man - as distinct from the pharaoh-queen Ankh(et)kheperure Neferneferuaten... Contrary to Ancient Egyptian custom, Smenkhkare is not presented under a coronation name and a birth name in his two cartouches, but under two coronation names. The explanation for this curious fact seems to me clear: both his royal names were composed on the occasion of his coronation. He therefore must have had another name beforehand... The absence of a birth name, the lack of...
  • History Channel to air Ancient Battles [Persians-Greeks-Romans - starts 7/23]

    07/20/2004 10:29:52 PM PDT · by freedom44 · 9 replies · 2,821+ views
    CHN ^ | 7/21/04 | CHN
    The History Channel is going to air a new historical series entitled DECISIVE BATTLES including some classic wars between ancient Persian armies and Roman and Greek ones. The History Channel goes on location to the actual battlefields and integrates cutting-edge videogame technology to bring history and imagination together in the new series DECISIVE BATTLES. The half-hour series DECISIVE BATTLES premieres Friday, July 23 at 9-9:30pm ET/PT. The series is hosted by Matthew Settle (Band of Brothers) on location at the ancient battlefields and features expert commentary from the world©s foremost historians. DECISIVE BATTLES is unlike any series The History Channel...
  • Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy (A Preserved Library from 1340BC discovered!)

    01/19/2003 11:04:10 AM PST · by vannrox · 9 replies · 375+ views
    UK Independent ^ | 19 January 2003 | By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Key To An Ancient Tongue

    07/23/2002 12:31:32 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies · 468+ views
    Philadelphi Enquirer ^ | 7-22-2002 | Faye Flam
    Posted on Mon, Jul. 22, 2002 Key to an ancient tongue Penn archaeologists have puzzled over the cuneiform writings for decades. At last, a Sumerian dictionary may be ready by 2004. By Faye Flam Inquirer Staff Writer Steve Tinney and Tonia Sharlach hold cuneiform tablets from the collection at Penn’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The two Sumerologists are working on the 30-year dictionary project. The people known as Sumerians are credited with starting the first civilization and building the first settlements worthy of being called cities. They also invented writing, and then they wrote and wrote and wrote, filling...
  • The Last Days of Hattusa

    06/27/2016 4:41:20 PM PDT · by wildbill · 18 replies
    Biblical Archeology ^ | 5/072016 | Trevor Bryce
    Mysterious Collapse of a Great Ancient Empire. From his capital, Hattusa, in central Anatolia, the last-known Hittite king, Suppiluliuma II (1207 B.C.-?), ruled over a people who had once built a great empire—one of the superpowers (along with Egypt, Mittani, Babylon and Assyria) of the Late Bronze Age. The Kingdom of the Hittites, called Hatti, had stretched across the face of Anatolia and northern Syria, from the Aegean in the west to the Euphrates in the east. But now those days were gone, and the royal capital was about to be destroyed forever by invasion and fire.
  • Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age

    05/15/2016 1:12:48 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 65 replies
    mirror.co.uk ^ | 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 | JASPER HAMILL
    Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient Mediterranean civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age 11:41, 13 MAY 2016 UPDATED 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 BY JASPER HAMILL Controversial theory finally identifies mysterious 'Sea Peoples' blamed for cataclysmic series of events which changed the course of history It was a disaster which destroyed the ancient world's greatest civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age that lasted centuries. Now one archaeologist think he's worked out who's to blame for sparking an event he calls "World War Zero", but which most academics refer to as the The Late Bronze Age Collapse ....
  • World War Zero brought down mystery civilisation of 'sea people'

    05/13/2016 7:38:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    New Scientist ^ | May 12, 2016 | Colin Barras
    The Trojan War was a grander event than even Homer would have us believe. The famous conflict may have been one of the final acts in what one archaeologist has controversially dubbed "World War Zero" -- an event he claims brought the eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age world crashing down 3200 years ago. And the catalyst for the war? A mysterious and arguably powerful civilisation almost entirely overlooked by archaeologists: the Luwians. By the second millennium BC, civilisation had taken hold throughout the eastern Mediterranean. The Egyptian New Kingdom coexisted with the Hittites of central Anatolia and the Mycenaeans of mainland...
  • Traces of Vikings found at Bathonea archaeological excavation in Istanbul

    12/08/2015 2:32:37 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Today's Zaman ^ | Monday, December 07, 2015 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have found the figure of a goddess that dates back to the early Hittite period as well as a Viking amber necklace during an ongoing excavation in the ancient city of Bathonea by Lake Kucukcekmece in Istanbul. An archaeological excavation was launched in 2009 near Lake Kucukcekmece in the Avcilar district of Istanbul to uncover the ancient city of Bathonea, which is estimated to be 1,600 years old. The excavation is being conducted under the supervision of Associate Professor Fengul Aydingun from Kocaeli University. in an earlier interview with the press, she had said the first two years of...
  • Archaeologists discover secret tunnel in ancient Hittite castle

    10/21/2015 1:33:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    The Week ^ | October 19, 2015 | Jeva Lange, Hurriyet Daily News
    The excavation of a mountain castle in central Turkey has revealed a secret tunnel, built by the Hittites around 4,000 years ago. Geval Castle, on Takkel Mountain in Central Anatolia, sits over 5,500 feet above sea level and once offered a strategic 360-degree vantage point for a population that regularly faced assaults from the Egyptians, Assyrians, and Thracians throughout their history. As a result, Hittites were master underground builders, although the exciting discoveries at Takkel Mountain appear to be the first of their kind. "We have discovered secret tunnels in the castle. We have cleaned there and revealed a [328-foot...
  • Archaeological team prepares 4,000-year-old Hittite meals

    09/14/2015 5:20:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    The Daily Sabah Food ^ | September 8, 2015 | Daily Sabah with Anadolu Agency
    An archaeological team excavating the ancient site of Alacahöyük, one of the most significant centers of the ancient Hittite civilization, cooked pastries belonging to Hittite cuisine that dates back 4,000 years. The foods found on Hittite tablets were cooked without modern technology or equipment. The 4,000-year-old Hittite cuisine was cooked in Alacahöyük, an important Neolithic settlement and Turkey's first nationally excavated area. Aykut Çınaroğlu, the head of the excavations and professor of archaeology at Ankara University, told Anadolu Agency (AA) that Chef Ömür Akkor, an excavation team member, prepared a special Hittite menu in light of the available archaeological findings....
  • Symbols of Hittite goddess of sexuality found on 4,000-year-old tablet discovered in central Turkey

    08/15/2015 7:49:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | August 13, 2015 | Dogan News Agency
    Amid excavations at four different ancient sites in the Central Anatolian province of Yozgat, a cuneiform tablet has been unearthed in the Uflakle Mound at the Büyük Tafllek village. Thought to date back to around 2,000 B.C., the cuneiform tablet in the Sorgun district of Yozgat shows symbols of ishtar, known as the Hittite goddess of love, war, fertility and sexuality, more clearly than those on any other unearthed tablets. "Considering the intensity of archaeological materials on the surface and diffusion area, the mound tends to bear traces of Hittite Civilization. it is thought that the mound was affiliated to...
  • European languages linked to migration from the east

    02/13/2015 12:32:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Nature ^ | 12 February 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    Large ancient-DNA study uncovers population that moved westwards 4,500 years ago. A mysterious group of humans from the east stormed western Europe 4,500 years ago -- bringing with them technologies such as the wheel, as well as a language that is the forebear of many modern tongues, suggests one of the largest studies of ancient DNA yet conducted. Vestiges of these eastern emigres exist in the genomes of nearly all contemporary Europeans, according to the authors, who analysed genome data from nearly 100 ancient Europeans. ...last year, a study of the genomes of ancient and contemporary Europeans found echoes not...
  • Pollen Study Points to Drought as Culprit in Bronze Age Mystery (Global Warming in Ancient Times)

    10/26/2013 6:42:44 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    NY Times ^ | 10/24/2013 | ISABEL KERSHNER
    More than 3,200 years ago, life was abuzz in and around what is now this modern-day Israeli metropolis on the shimmering Mediterranean shore. To the north lay the mighty Hittite empire; to the south, Egypt was thriving under the reign of the great Pharaoh Ramses II. Cyprus was a copper emporium. Greece basked in the opulence of its elite Mycenaean culture, and Ugarit was a bustling port city on the Syrian coast. In the land of Canaan, city states like Hazor and Megiddo flourished under Egyptian hegemony. Vibrant trade along the coast of the eastern Mediterranean connected it all. Yet...
  • Syrian Conflict Imperils Historical Treasures

    08/18/2012 11:04:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    New York Times ^ | August 15, 2012 | Patricia Cohen
    Preservationists and archaeologists are warning that fighting in Syria's commercial capital, Aleppo -- considered the world's oldest continuously inhabited human settlement -- threatens to damage irreparably the stunning architectural and cultural legacy left by 5,000 years of civilizations. Already the massive iron doors to the city's immense medieval Citadel have been blown up in a missile attack, said Bonnie Burnham, president of the World Monuments Fund, an organization that works to preserve cultural heritage sites... President Bashar al-Assad's forces have been shelling the city, and in recent days his army has taken up positions inside the Citadel, trading fire with...
  • University of Toronto archaeologists find...cuneiform tablets in 2,700-year old Turkish temple

    08/10/2009 9:49:19 AM PDT · by decimon · 38 replies · 1,096+ views
    University of Toronto ^ | August 7, 2009 | Unknown
    University of Toronto archaeologists find cache of cuneiform tablets in 2,700-year old Turkish templeTORONTO, ON – Excavations led by a University of Toronto archaeologist at the site of a recently discovered temple in southeastern Turkey have uncovered a cache of cuneiform tablets dating back to the Iron Age period between 1200 and 600 BCE. Found in the temple’s cella, or ‘holy of holies’, the tablets are part of a possible archive that may provide insights into Assyrian imperial aspirations. The assemblage appears to represent a Neo-Assyrian renovation of an older Neo-Hittite temple complex, providing a rare glimpse into the religious...
  • Hittites' holy city Nerik to emerge

    09/05/2008 9:48:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 136+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | Tuesday, September 2, 2008 | Fulya Cemen
    Today, excavators at the Oymaagac mound in the Black Sea city of Samsun's Vezirkopru district are reveling in their potential find, believing the evidence is mounting and Oymaagac will be unveiled as the holder of Nerik. The geographical location of Oymaagac, the impressive representative building on top of the acropolis, and especially the tiny cuneiform writing style on the tablet fragments all suggested the excavators might find Nerik here... the tiny cuneiform writing resembled that on clay tablets from the Bogazkoy/Hattusha archives dealing with Nerik... the writings, along with several ritual texts from the Hittite period, suggested Oymaagac had to...
  • Messages from the Dead [ Qatna's royal palace and cuneiform archive ]

    02/01/2007 8:39:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 235+ views
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2006 | Marco Merola
    Inscribed on the small, pillow-shaped tablet is a 3,000-year-old warning to Idanda, king of Qatna, from the Hittite general Hanutti, telling him to prepare for war. A small Bronze Age Syrian city-state, Qatna was once under Hittite control, but had been conquered by the Mitanni people from the north. The clay tablet, like others found with it, was fired twice--once just after it was written, to preserve it, and again when the ancient city was sacked and burned to the ground in 1340 B.C. by the Hittites, who ruled an empire that stretched from northern Turkey to Mesopotamia and Syria......
  • French Explorer's Bad Luck In Syria Avenged At Last (Hittites)

    10/17/2006 2:57:17 PM PDT · by blam · 7 replies · 973+ views
    Reuters ^ | 10-17-2006 | Khaled Yacoub Oweis
    French explorer's bad luck in Syria avenged at last Tue 17 Oct 2006 11:45 AM ET By Khaled Yacoub Oweis ALEPPO, Syria, Oct 17 (Reuters) - First the 1920s French archaeologist ran out of money to uncover the treasures he suspected hidden under a Syrian castle, and then he ran out of time to see others finish the work. Twelve years too late for Georges Ploix de Rotrou, a German team has now revealed the full glory of the 500 square metre (5,400 sq ft) Temple of the Storm God that lay under the vast citadel in Aleppo. Ploix de...
  • Ancient Hittite Dam Inaugurated After 32 Centuries

    09/20/2006 11:11:24 AM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 1,023+ views
    Ancient Hittite dam inaugurated after 32 centuries Wednesday, September 20, 2006 ANKARA - Turkish Daily News A Hittite-era dam located in the central Anatolian province of Çorum and believed to be one of the oldest in the world to have survived to date has been restored and is once again serving as a source of irrigation for local residents. The dam, located at the Alacahöyük archaeological site, was built by the Hittites in 1240 B.C. The dam's inauguration was marked with a ceremony over the weekend attended by Professor Aykut Çýnaroðlu, who heads the team excavating Alacahöyük, Ankara University Rector...
  • Hittite winds blow in Istanbul

    05/19/2006 12:46:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 212+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | Friday, May 19, 2006 | Dogan Daily News
    An exhibition titled "The Hittite Winds" by sculptor and ceramic artist Erdinç Bakla opened on Tuesday at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum in Topkap› Palace. The exhibition, which interprets Hittite artifacts in various materials, features 35 pieces of marble, bronze, plexiglas and fiberglass as well as a golden dinner set and silver tea set. The exhibition will run until May 28 and will also be on display in Ankara in June, reported the Anatolia news agency.
  • Hittite graves, artifacts unearthed in Adana

    06/14/2006 10:55:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 284+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | Thursday, Jun 15 2006 | unattributed
    Four graves, two jugs and seven coins dating to the Hittite period were unearthed during excavations conducted in the Mediterranean province of Adana, archaeologists working at the site announced on Monday. Adana Archaeology Museum Director Kaz›m Tosun told reporters that the graves were unearthed on May 25 during the excavations in the Ceyhan village of Sirkeli. Tosun said they had found some human bones in the graves. "The excavation is still under way. The findings will be exhibited at the Adana Archaeology Museum," he said. He also said the excavations were begun at the request of Akdeniz Petrolleri Inc. prior...
  • Amazon Warrior Women

    08/04/2004 8:51:53 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 5,400+ views
    PBS ^ | Current | PBS
    Amazon Warrior WomenThis painting on a Greek vase depicts an Amazon woman warrior on horseback engaged in battle.Amazons in myth: History's first mention of a race of warrior women comes in Homer's ILIAD, an account of the Trojan War, probably written in the 8th to the 7th century B.C. Homer's Amazons, a race of fierce women who mated with vanquished male foes and kept only the female children they bore, were believed to occupy the area around the Black Sea. Amazon women also crop up in other Greek myths. One of the labors of Hercules, for example, required him to...
  • Unearthed: The Humble Origins Of World Diplomacy (Hittites)

    01/18/2003 2:51:58 PM PST · by blam · 41 replies · 847+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 1-19-2003 | David Keys
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Recent Finds Prove That Homer's Stories Were More Than Myth

    02/24/2002 4:46:17 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 674+ views
    The Times (UK) ^ | 2-25-2002 | Norman Hammond
    February 25, 2002 Recent finds prove that Homer's stories were more than myth By Norman Hammond, Archaeology Correspondent A CYNICAL scholar once noted that the reason that academic disputes were so bitter was that the stakes were so small. In the real world maybe, but Troy has been a battleground for 3,000 years not because of mundane matters of funding and status but because of its grip on our imaginations. There may or may not have been a decade’s siege on the edge of the Dardanelles around 1100BC, pitting Late Mycenaean Greeks against their neighbours and possible distant kin: but ...
  • Ancient Greek 'computer' came with a user guide

    07/02/2016 1:00:20 AM PDT · by blueplum · 63 replies
    Fox News ^ | 28 June 2016 | Megan Gannon
    ....With the turn of a hand crank, the ancient Greeks could track the positions of the sun and the moon, the lunar phases, and even cycles of Greek athletic competitions. The 82 corroded metal fragments of the Antikythera mechanism contain ancient Greek text, much of which is unreadable to the naked eye. But over the past 10 years, new imaging techniques, such as 3D X-ray scanning, have revealed hidden letters and words in the text...
  • Astronomy Picture of the Day -- From Alpha to Omega in Crete

    06/29/2016 7:39:42 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    NASA ^ | Wednesday, June 29, 2016 | (see photo credit)
    Explanation: This beautiful telephoto composition spans light-years in a natural night skyscape from the island of Crete. Looking south, exposures both track the stars and record a fixed foreground in three merged panels that cover a 10x12 degree wide field of view. The May 15 waxing gibbous moonlight illuminates the church and mountainous terrain. A mere 18 thousand light-years away, huge globular star cluster Omega Centauri (NGC 5139) shining above gives a good visual impression of its appearance in binoculars on that starry night. Active galaxy Centaurus A (NGC 5128) is near the top of the frame, some 11 million...
  • The World's First Computer May Have Been Used To Tell Fortunes [Engraved text translation]

    06/10/2016 6:55:53 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    A ten-year project to decipher inscriptions on the ancient Greek “Antikythera mechanism” has revealed new functions, including the first hint that the device was used to make astrological predictions. The writings also lend support to the idea that the gadget, often called the world's first computer because of its ability to model complex astronomical cycles, originated from the island of Rhodes. Until now, scholars have focused on decoding the sophisticated array of gearwheels inside the 2000-year-old artifact. The new publication tackles instead the lettering squeezed onto every available surface. “It’s like discovering a whole new manuscript,” says Mike Edmunds, emeritus...
  • Seafaring in the Aegean: new dates

    03/02/2012 6:23:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Stone Pages ^ | January 21, 2012 | Journal of Archaeological Science
    Seafaring before the Neolithic -- circa 7th millennium BCE -- is a controversial issue in the Mediterranean. However, evidence from different parts of the Aegean is gradually changing this, revealing the importance of early coastal and island environments. The site of Ouriakos on the island of Lemnos (Greece) tentatively dates to the end of the Pleistocene and possibly the beginning of the Holocene, circa 12,000 BP... Obsidian, or 'volcanic glass', has been a preferred material for stone tools wherever it is found or traded. It also absorbs water vapour when exposed to air -- for instance, when it is shaped...
  • Russian destroyer fires warning shots at Turkish fishing boat on collision course in Aegean

    12/13/2015 8:09:52 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 21 replies
    RT ^ | 13 Dec, 2015 12:29
    A Russian destroyer had to open warning fire as a Turkish fishing vessel sailed on a collision course towards them and didn't respond to calls from the warship, the Russian Defense Ministry reported. Following the incident, the Russian Defense Ministry warned the Turkish military attaché about "the possible harmful consequences of the reckless actions by Ankara against the Russian military contingent, involved in tackling international terrorism in Syria." "Deep concerns were voiced over another provocative action by the Turkish side against the Russian patrol ship Smetlivy in the Aegean Sea, which forced them to open warning fire...in order to avoid...
  • Russia fires Turkey boat warning shot

    12/13/2015 4:34:20 AM PST · by tcrlaf · 31 replies
    BBC News ^ | 11-13-2015 | BBC NEws
    Russia says one of its warships fired warning shots at a Turkish fishing vessel in the Aegean Sea to avoid a collision. A Russian defence ministry statement said the Turkish vessel approached to 600m (1,800ft) before turning away in response to Russian small arms fire.
  • One of the grandest structures of the ancient world could be reborn: The Colossus of Rhodes

    11/03/2015 12:49:41 PM PST · by SeekAndFind · 60 replies
    Business Insider ^ | 11/03/2015 | Dennis Green
    Until an earthquake in 226 BCE knocked it down, the Colossus of Rhodes, a 98-foot-high iron and bronze statue of the Greek god Helios, sat near the harbor of Rhodes, Greece, for 54 years. Now, a plan put forth by a small team of scientists seeks to rebuild the ancient statue and boost tourism and local jobs in the process. The plan calls for a a new statue that's way taller than the ancient one. At 400 feet tall, the new Helios would be nearly four times the height of the original. The proposal also includes an interior library, museum,...
  • 22 Shipwrecks Found in Single Location in Greece

    10/29/2015 3:22:11 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, October 28, 2015 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Hailed as one of the top archaeological finds of 2015, the discovery was made by a joint Greek-American archaeological expedition in the small Fourni archipelago with an area of just 17 square miles. This is a collection of 13 islands and islets located between the eastern Aegean islands of Samos and Icaria. "Surpassing all expectations, over only 13 days we added 12 percent to the total of known ancient shipwrecks in Greek territorial waters," Peter Campbell, of the University of Southampton and co-director from US based RPM Nautical Foundation, told Discovery News. Fourni lies right in the middle of the...
  • Grave of ‘Griffin Warrior’ at Pylos Could Be a Gateway to Civilizations

    10/27/2015 1:02:44 PM PDT · by Brad from Tennessee · 15 replies
    New York Times ^ | October 26, 2015 | By Nicholas Wade
    Archaeologists digging at Pylos, an ancient city on the southwest coast of Greece, have discovered the rich grave of a warrior who was buried at the dawn of European civilization. He lies with a yardlong bronze sword and a remarkable collection of gold rings, precious jewels and beautifully carved seals. Archaeologists expressed astonishment at the richness of the find and its potential for shedding light on the emergence of the Mycenaean civilization, the lost world of Agamemnon, Nestor, Odysseus and other heroes described in the epics of Homer. “Probably not since the 1950s have we found such a rich tomb,”...
  • Marine Archaeologists Excavate Greek Antikythera Shipwreck

    09/26/2015 2:47:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Heritage Daily ^ | September 25, 2015
    The shipwreck dates to circa 65 B.C., and was discovered by Greek sponge fishermen in 1900 off the southwestern Aegean island of Antikythera. They salvaged 36 marble statues of mythological heroes and gods; a life-sized bronze statue of an athlete; pieces of several more bronze sculptures; scores of luxury items; and skeletal remains of crew and passengers. The wreck also relinquished fragments of the world’s first computer: the Antikythera Mechanism, a geared mechanical device that encoded the movements of the planets and stars and predicted eclipses... The project is the first-ever systematic excavation of this shipwreck, relying on the precise...
  • GREECE: In desperation INHABITANTS OF LESVOS shout: "What do you want us to die?" [VIDEO]

    INTERNAL SECURITY In desperation INHABITANTS OF LESVOS shouting: "What do you want us to die?" The "illegal" is now armed: They smashed windows and grabbed from butcher store cleavers, knives and Hajar! The situation in Mytilini mostly shows beyond any limit with illegal immigrants they even threaten the very life of the people that they themselves describe as helping them. Angry residents reveal that illegal immigrants are now armed with knives, Hajar, axes as yesterday broke into big butcher in the region of Moria and took only the tools of the work of butchers. At the same time as themselves...
  • Lost city found in Turkey: It is older than Troy

    09/27/2011 6:16:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies · 1+ views
    National Turk ^ | Monday, September 26, 2011 | unattributed
    A group of scientists and archeologists from Canakkale (Dardanelles) University have found traces of a lost city, older than famed Troy, now buried under the waters of Dardanelles strait. Led by associate professor Rustem Aslan, the archeology team made a surface survey in the vicinity of Erenkoy, Canakkale on the shore. The team has found ceramics and pottery, what led them to ponder a mound could be nearby. A research on the found pottery showed that the items belonged to an 7000 years old ancient city. The team has intensified the research and discovered first signs of the lost city...
  • Underwater archaeology: Hunt for the ancient mariner

    01/26/2012 9:06:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, January 25, 2012 | Jo Marchant
    Foley, a marine archaeologist at the Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution in Massachusetts, and his colleagues at Greece's Ephorate of Underwater Antiquities in Athens have spent the day diving near the cliffs of the tiny island of Dia in the eastern Mediterranean. They have identified two clusters of pottery dating from the first century BC and fifth century AD. Together with other remains that the team has discovered on the island's submerged slopes, the pots reveal that for centuries Greek, Roman and Byzantine traders used Dia as a refuge during storms, when they couldn't safely reach Crete. It is a nice...
  • The Minoans of Crete

    05/07/2015 3:43:32 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 39 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, April 06, 2015 | Jarrett A. Lobell
    ...In the course of both Boyd's and Watrous' excavations, more than 50 houses or areas with evidence of industrial activity have been uncovered -- 20 areas producing pottery, 15 producing stone vases, 18 producing bronze and bronze implements, and some with evidence for textile production. At one location on the north edge of the settlement, Buell points out an area of burned bedrock inside a space identified as a foundry. 'Here we have all sorts of scraps of bronze crucibles, bronze drips, copper scraps, and iron used for flux. Elsewhere, we also found a tin ingot, the closest known source...
  • Archaeologists Rewrite Timeline Of Bronze And Iron Ages, Alphabet

    12/24/2001 5:04:31 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 613+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 12-19-2001 | Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
    Archaeologists rewrite timeline of Bronze and Iron Ages, including early appearance of alphabet FOR RELEASE: Dec. 19, 2001 Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr. Office: 607-255-3290 E-Mail: bpf2@cornell.edu ITHACA, N.Y. -- Using information gleaned from the sun's solar cycles and tree rings, archaeologists are rewriting the timeline of the Bronze and Iron Ages. The research dates certain artifacts of the ancient eastern Mediterranean decades earlier than previously thought. And it places an early appearance of the alphabet outside Phoenicia at around 740 B.C. Writing in two articles in the forthcoming issue of the journal Science (Dec. 21), archaeologists from Cornell University ...
  • Ancient Mariners: Did Neanderthals Sail to Mediterranean?

    11/24/2012 8:17:46 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 38 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, November 15, 2012 | Charles Choi
    Neanderthals and other extinct human lineages might have been ancient mariners, venturing to the Mediterranean islands thousands of years earlier than previously thought. This prehistoric seafaring could shed light on the mental capabilities of these lost relatives of modern humans, researchers say. Scientists had thought the Mediterranean islands were first settled about 9,000 years ago by Neolithic or New Stone Age farmers and shepherds... For instance, obsidian from the Aegean island of Melos was uncovered at the mainland Greek coastal site of Franchthi cave in layers that were about 11,000 years old, while excavations on the southern coast of Cyprus...
  • Scientist tackles mystery of ancient astronomical device

    01/11/2015 1:41:07 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 63 replies
    Phys.org, Science X network ^ | January 6, 2015 | Sandi Doughton, The Seattle Times
    "The amazing thing is the mechanical engineering aspect," says James Evans, a physicist and science historian at the University of Puget Sound in Tacoma, Wash. He is part of an international group working to crack the puzzle of the device's origins and purpose. Evans recently added a new twist with an analysis that suggests it dates to 205 B.C. -- as much as a century earlier than previously believed. If he's right, it is more likely that the Antikythera Mechanism was inspired by the work of the legendary Greek mathematician Archimedes. It would also mean the device was built at...
  • Top food was olives in time of the ancient mariner

    08/15/2010 10:35:46 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    al-Reuters ^ | Thursday, August 12, 2010 | Michele Kambas (ed by Paul Casciato)
    A huge quantity of olive stones on an ancient shipwreck more than 2,000 years old has provided valuable insight into the diet of sailors in the ancient world, researchers in Cyprus said Thursday. The shipwreck, dating from around 400 B.C. and laden mainly with wine amphorae from the Aegean island of Chios and other north Aegean islands, was discovered deep under the sea off Cyprus's southern coast. Excavation on the site, which started in November 2007, has determined that the ship was a merchant vessel of the late classical period. "An interesting piece of evidence that gives us information on...