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Keyword: afrocentrism

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  • Lying to People about History Doesn't Help Them

    01/04/2017 9:57:47 AM PST · by Yashcheritsiy · 46 replies
    The Neo-Ciceronian Times ^ | January 04, 2017 | Titus Quinctius Cincinnatus
    If there was anything that you would think would be immutable, it would be the past. Short of inventing a time machine, it should be impossible to change any event that has already occurred. However, this assumption is actually quite incorrect. While the events of objective history themselves cannot be changed, our understanding of them can. Indeed, revising history is easy when you control the levers of education and popular culture. Then, it’s just a matter of telling the history that you want to be told while ignoring the history that actually happened. A case in point would be the...
  • Archeologists discover Mythical Tomb of Osiris, God of the Dead, in Egypt

    01/03/2015 11:59:48 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 46 replies
    Ancient Origins ^ | Saturday, January 3, 2015 | April Holloway
    ...in the necropolis of Sheikh Abd el-Qurna, on the West Bank at Thebes, Egypt... According to the Spanish news agency EFE, the tomb embodies all the features of the tomb of Osiris, as told in ancient Egyptian legends, and is a smaller version of the design of the Osireion, built under Egyptian pharaoh Seti I in the city of Abydos, Luxor. Researchers believe the tomb complex dates back to the 25th dynasty (760-656 BC) or 26th dynasty (672-525 BC), based on a comparison to similar tombs that contain Osirian elements. The complex consists of a large hall supported by five...
  • Sudan's forgotten pyramids

    03/10/2010 7:15:38 AM PST · by Palter · 17 replies · 721+ views
    Agence France-Presse ^ | 07 Mar 2010 | Guillaume Lavallee
    Archaeologists say the pyramids, cemeteries and ancient palaces of the Nubian Desert in northern Sudan hold mysteries to rival ancient Egypt. There is not a tourist in sight as the Sun sets over sand-swept pyramids at Meroe, in northern Sudan. "There is a magic beauty about these sites that is heightened by the privilege of being able to admire them alone, with the pyramids, the dunes and the sun," says Guillemette Andreu, head of antiquities at Paris' Louvre museum. "It really sets them apart from the Egyptian pyramids, whose beauty is slightly overshadowed by the tourist crowds." Meroe lies around...
  • How Africa Became Black

    04/07/2006 2:19:00 PM PDT · by blam · 108 replies · 3,819+ views
    Discover Magazine ^ | 2-1994 | Jared Diamond
    How Africa Became Black Africa's racial history was not necessarily its racial destiny. To unravel the story of Africa's past, you must not only look at its faces but listen to its languages and harvest its crops. By Jared Diamond DISCOVER Vol. 15 No. 02 | February 1994 | Anthropology Despite all I'd read about Africa, my first impressions upon being there were overwhelming. As I walked the streets of Windhoek, the capital of newly independent Namibia, I saw black Herero people and black Ovambo; I saw Nama, a group quite unlike the blacks in appearance; I saw whites, descendants...
  • Ancient Egyptian royal head puzzles archaeologists

    01/30/2006 11:36:54 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 256+ views
    Mail&Guardian online ^ | 30 January 2006 | Sapa-dpa
    The Sakhmet statues, which date to the New Kingdom's 18th dynasty (circa 1533 to 1292 BC), hail from the same period as most of the finds in the area. The head, believed to date to the 25th dynasty (circa 760 to 656 BC) that is characterised by its Nubian features, seems out of place, however.
  • Bust of Memnon: Images of Blacks in Ancient Greece

    01/05/2013 9:35:51 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    The Root via Scoop.it ^ | Tuesday, January 1, 2013 | unattributed
    This marvelous bust is one of the very few documents of an actual black person from Greek and Roman antiquity. Memnon was a pupil and protégé of the well-known Athenian entrepreneur and philosopher Herodes Atticus. It was found more than a century ago in one of several villas owned by Herodes, and it adds a face to the name of the person recorded by Philostratus in his Lives of the Sophists, an account of the famous philosophers of the second century. The exact circumstances of Memnon's entry into this celebrated milieu are unknown, but there is no doubt about the...
  • In The Reign Of The Black Pharaohs

    04/05/2008 8:15:04 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 1,088+ views
    Al-Ahram ^ | 4-4-2008 | Mohamed El-Hebeishy
    In the reign of the Black PharaohsWhich country has the largest collection of pyramids? Think again, for it is not Egypt, but Sudan. Join Mohamed El-Hebeishy as he visits north Sudan in search of answers The Northern Cemetery in Meroe, where more than 30 pyramids are in site Our great grandfathers called it Ta-Seti, Land of the Bow. They were referring to the area south of the First Cataract at Aswan, and the reason behind the name was the unparalleled skill its inhabitants demonstrated when using the bow as a method of arm. Those excellent bowmen were actually the Kushites....
  • SSU exhibit explores archaeology in ancient Nubia [Savannah State University ]

    02/06/2008 6:46:58 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies · 148+ views
    Connect Savannah ^ | February 5, 2008 | Linda Sickler
    Nubia was an important part of the trade route from ancient Egypt to other parts of Africa. Tirhaka, mentioned in the Bible as the king of Ethiopia (II Kings, 18-20; Isaiah, 37-38), actually was Taharqa, king of Nubia and Kush. He ruled Egypt from 690 to 664 BC during its 25th Dynasty. The Kingdom of Kerma was the first Nubian kingdom to unify much of the region. Its capital city was one of the earliest urban centers in tropical Africa. The kings of Kerma left behind rich tombs, which were filled with their possessions and sacrificial offerings. The metalworking and...
  • Black Pharaohs

    01/21/2008 11:49:03 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 1,280+ views
    National Geographic ^ | February 2008 | Robert Draper
    In the year 730 B.C., a man by the name of Piye decided the only way to save Egypt from itself was to invade it... North on the Nile River his soldiers sailed. At Thebes, the capital of Upper Egypt, they disembarked. Believing there was a proper way to wage holy wars, Piye instructed his soldiers to purify themselves before combat by bathing in the Nile, dressing themselves in fine linen, and sprinkling their bodies with water from the temple at Karnak, a site holy to the ram-headed sun god Amun, whom Piye identified as his own personal deity. Piye...
  • How Pharaoh Sailed To Karnak

    01/15/2008 11:00:27 AM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 218+ views
    Al-Ahram ^ | 1-14-2008 | Nevine El-Aref
    How Pharaoh sailed to Karnak New discoveries at Karnak Temple in Luxor have changed the landscape and the history of this great religious complex, writes Nevine El-Aref Clockwise from top: Ptolemaic bath with 16 seats; a stelae bearing the name of the 25th-Dynasty King Taharqa; the obelisk of Tuthmoses I at the eight pylons; restoration work at the Chapel of Osiris Neb-Ankh History has a special scent and taste at Karnak Temple. The emotions it evokes are powerful and timeless. Inside the lofty pylons is amassed an unsurpassed assembly of soaring obelisks, awe-inspiring chapels and hushed sanctuaries reflecting the spectacular...
  • Rare Nubian King Statues Uncovered in Sudan

    05/18/2005 4:21:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 635+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | February 27, 2003 | Hillary Mayell
    The seven statues, which stood between 1.3 to 2.7 meters (4 to 10 feet) tall, were inscribed with the names of five of Nubia's kings: Taharqa, Tanoutamon, Senkamanisken, Anlamani, and Aspelta. Taharqa and Tanoutamon ruled Egypt as well as Nubia. Sometimes known as the "Black Pharaohs," Nubian kings ruled Egypt from roughly 760 B.C. to 660 B.C... The Nubian period in Egypt is known as the Twenty-fifth Dynasty... Historians dislike the term "Black Pharaohs," calling it more of a media ploy than a meaningful designation. "It's such a loaded term," said Kendall. "The ancient Nile dwellers didn't really use...
  • Black Pharaoh Trove Uncovered

    01/20/2003 2:39:11 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 530+ views
    BBC ^ | 1-20-2003 | Ishbel Matheson
    Monday, 20 January, 2003, 17:47 GMT Black pharaoh trove uncovered The Nubian kings ruled 2,500 years ago By Ishbel Matheson BBC, Nairobi A team of French and Swiss archaeologists working in the Nile Valley have uncovered ancient statues described as sculptural masterpieces in northern Sudan. The archaeologists from the University of Geneva discovered a pit full of large monuments and finely carved statues of the Nubian kings known as the black pharaohs. The Swiss head of the archaeological expedition told the BBC that the find was of worldwide importance. The black pharaohs, as they were known, ruled over a mighty...
  • New Egyptian King Discovered

    04/26/2002 5:19:20 PM PDT · by vannrox · 23 replies · 766+ views
    Discovery News ^ | April 26 2002 | By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News
    April 26 A new Egyptian king has been discovered, according to Italian archaeologists digging at Luxor. Known to be a high-ranking priest in the theocratic state of Amon at Thebes, Harwa was also a king ruling southern Egypt during the obscure period of the so-called Black Pharaohs, the Nubian kings of the 25th Dynasty. A fat, bald man with a large face, almond-shaped eyes and thin lips, as portrayed in a statue, Harwa was born in the 8th century B.C. into a family of Theban priests. He must have been at the beginning of his career when Piankhy, the black...
  • Royal Nubia lies under sand

    04/22/2002 3:38:54 PM PDT · by vannrox · 18 replies · 3,992+ views
    National Post ^ | 4-22-02 | Margaret Munro
    Royal Nubia lies under sand Canadian archaeologists in Sudan, using magnetometers, have found a 2,000-year-old palace in the heart of the ancient black civilization If his partner had not fallen into an ancient tomb and broken both legs, Professor Krzysztof Grzymski would have discovered the ancient Nubian royal palace even sooner. Still, Grzymski, a professor at the University of Toronto and a curator at the Royal Ontario Museum, is a happy archaeologist these days. He and his colleague, who is walking again, have found what they believe are the remains of a palace and a colonnade built more than...
  • Martin Bernal, ‘Black Athena’ Scholar, Dies at 76

    06/23/2013 7:54:33 AM PDT · by Borges · 17 replies
    NYT ^ | 6/22/2013 | PAUL VITELLO
    Martin Bernal, whose three-volume work “Black Athena” ignited an academic debate by arguing that the African and Semitic lineage of Western civilization had been scrubbed from the record of ancient Greece by 18th- and 19th-century historians steeped in the racism of their times, died on June 9 in Cambridge, England. He was 76. The cause was complications of myelofibrosis, a bone marrow disorder, said his wife, Leslie Miller-Bernal. “Black Athena” opened a new front in the warfare over cultural diversity already raging on American campuses in the 1980s and ’90s. The first volume, published in 1987 — the same year...
  • Fewer African-Americans are observing Kwanzaa - why?

    12/21/2010 1:58:27 PM PST · by kingattax · 87 replies · 1+ views
    Philadelphia Daily News ^ | Dec. 21, 2010 | Jenice Armstrong
    I ASKED A 17-year-old I know what he thought about Kwanzaa and he said, "That Jewish holiday?" Uh, no. Clearly, his high school hasn't embraced the multicultural thing and isn't teaching students about the 44-year-old Afrocentric holiday. But I don't knock his ignorance because the truth is that Kwanzaa has never caught on with the majority of black Americans. At the same time, though, it has grown in mainstream acceptance as evidenced by the Kwanzaa postal stamps and greeting cards.
  • How The Greek Agora Changed The World

    03/24/2008 3:34:30 PM PDT · by blam · 16 replies · 551+ views
    Live Science ^ | 3-17-2008 | Heather Whipps
    How the Greek Agora Changed the WorldBy Heather Whipps, LiveScience's History Columnist posted: 17 March 2008 08:15 am ET It was the heart of the city – where ordinary citizens bought and sold goods, politics were discussed and ideas were passed among great minds like Aristotle and Plato. Who knows where we'd be without the "agoras" of ancient Greece. Lacking the concept of democracy, perhaps, or the formula for the length of the sides of a triangle (young math students, rejoice!). Modern doctors might not have anything to mutter as an oath. What went on at the agora went beyond...
  • Guess who warned Obama back in 1985 about the likely backlash of joining that Church?

    03/23/2008 8:10:54 PM PDT · by jdm · 33 replies · 2,992+ views
    Red State ^ | March 23, 2008 | Staff
    His kibitzer warned him 23 years ago about the possible repercussions of joining his church. Senator Obama has often referred to Reverend Wright as his Spiritual mentor and role model. Outside of his mother and wife it's Wright that has been the closest to him. He is his father figure or at least it seems that way. The Island PacketHilton Head IslandJanuary 27, 2007In his 1993 memoir Dreams from My Father Obama recounts in vivid detail his first meeting with Wright in 1985. The pastor warned the community activist that getting involved with Trinity might turn off other black clergy...
  • Wright's Mentor (Strange Fruit: The Cross and the Lynching Tree)

    03/23/2008 7:59:06 AM PDT · by JRochelle · 48 replies · 1,121+ views
    TheCorner ^ | 3/22/2008 | Stanley Kurtz
    Jeremiah Wright’s theological mentor, James Cone, Charles A. Briggs Distinguished Professor of Systematic Theology at Union Theological Seminary, is perhaps the most important figure in black liberation theology. Here Cone delivers the 2006 Ingersoll lecture at Harvard Divinity School. Dating from 1893, the Ingersoll Lecture is one of the oldest endowed lectures at Harvard. Cone’s Ingersoll lecture is entitled, "Strange Fruit: The Cross and the Lynching Tree." Cone is clearly an intelligent and charismatic speaker. There are a number of "zingers" in here which I think many listeners will object to. But this lecture is also significantly more toned down...
  • Obama, Hillary and Alinsky's Tactics

    01/17/2008 12:04:27 AM PST · by forkinsocket · 12 replies · 289+ views
    American Thinker ^ | January 17, 2008 | Kyle-Anne Shiver
    The emergence of a racial tinge to the Democratic Party nomination fight was all but inevitable, given both Hillary Clinton's and Barack Obama's training as disciples of Saul Alinsky. Hardball tactics right out of Rules for Radicals provide perspective for understanding the unfolding battle. Saul Alinsky, the hero of bloodless socialist revolution in America, was a master at explaining how to patiently use whatever weapons one has to bring about the transfer of power from the Haves to the Have Nots. Alinsky's definition of the Haves was broad and rather ill-defined; he simply called the Haves the "establishment." He included...