Keyword: akhenaten

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  • Ancient Egyptian Woman with 70 Hair Extensions Discovered

    09/21/2014 12:13:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    LiveScience ^ | September 17, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    More than 3,300 years ago, in a newly built city in Egypt, a woman with an incredibly elaborate hairstyle of lengthy hair extensions was laid to rest. She was not mummified, her body simply being wrapped in a mat. When archaeologists uncovered her remains they found she wore "a very complex coiffure with approximately 70 extensions fastened in different layers and heights on the head," writes Jolanda Bos, an archaeologist working on the Amarna Project, in an article recently published in the Journal of Egyptian Archaeology. Researchers don't know her name, age or occupation, but she is one of hundreds...
  • The Greek Age of Bronze -- Middle Helmets

    Outside the Greek mainland and Aegean Island a possible representation of Achaean warriors equipped with boar tusks helmets is from an Egyptian papyrus fragments from Tell el-Amarna, home of Amenhotep III's son, dated around 1350 BC (*2). In this papyrus some warriors are depicted with conical pale-yellow helmets which remaind in general design the typical Aegean boar tusks helmet. This identification is strengthened by the find of a piece of boar’s tusk, with perforations for attaching it to a leather frame, during excavations at Qantir, the site of the Ramesside capital Pi-ramesse in the eastern delta. It appears likely that...
  • Egypt reveals Tutankhamun's lineage, cause of death

    02/17/2010 5:59:51 PM PST · by Pan_Yan · 20 replies · 708+ views
    xinhuanet.com ^ | 2010-02-17 22:50:55
    CAIRO, Feb. 17 (Xinhua) -- A DNA study shows Egypt's famed King Tutankhamun who suffered from a club foot died of malaria and that his father was the "heretic" king Akhenaten, Egypt's antiquities chief Zahi Hawass said on Wednesday. Speaking at a press conference, Hawass said two years of DNA testing and CT scans on Tutankhamun's 3,300-year-old mummy and mummies either known or believed to be members of his immdiate family are helping reveal many of the myths surrounding the boy king's lineage and cause of death. Tutankhamun's father was the "heretic" king, Akhenaten, whose body is now almost certainly...
  • Theban Mapping Project (Valley of the Kings etc)

    01/13/2005 8:03:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies · 2,248+ views
    Theban Mapping Project ^ | 1980s to present | Kent Weeks et al
    The original page used client side image maps, and that was pretty, but a little search and replace turned it into a usable (I hope) table of links. Enjoy. FR Lexicon·Posting Guidelines·Excerpt, or Link only?·Ultimate Sidebar Management·HeadlinesDonate Here By Secure Server·Eating our own -- Time to make a new start in Free RepublicPDF to HTML translation·Translation page·Wayback Machine·My Links·FreeMail MeGods, Graves, Glyphs topic·and group·Books, Magazines, Movies, Music
  • Mystery of Tut's Father: New Clues on Unidentified Mummy

    07/10/2007 4:52:43 PM PDT · by blam · 22 replies · 852+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 7-10-2007 | Brian Handwerk
    Mystery of Tut's Father: New Clues on Unidentified Mummy Brian Handwerk for National Geographic News July 10, 2007 Egyptologists have uncovered new evidence that bolsters the controversial theory that a mysterious mummy is the corpse of the heretic pharaoh Akhenaten, husband of Nefertiti and, some experts believe, the father of King Tut. (Photos: Who Was Tut's Father?) The mummy's identity has generated fierce debate ever since its discovery in 1907 in tomb KV 55, located less than 100 feet (30 meters) from King Tutankhamun's then hidden burial chamber. So an international team of researchers led by Zahi Hawass, head of...
  • A different take on Tut

    02/16/2014 2:27:10 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies
    Alvin Powell ^ | February 11, 2013 | Harvard
    In recent years, DNA analysis has shed light on the parents of Egypt’s most famous pharaoh, the boy king Tutankhamun, known to the world as King Tut. Genetic investigation identified his father as Akhenaten and his mother as Akhenaten’s sister, whose name was unknown. French Egyptologist Marc Gabolde offered a different interpretation of the DNA evidence on Thursday. Speaking at Harvard’s Science Center, Gabolde said he’s convinced that Tut’s mother was not his father’s sister, but rather his father’s first cousin, Nefertiti. Nefertiti was already known to be Akhenaten’s wife and in fact the two had six daughters. Gabolde believes...
  • King Tut's Mummified Erect Penis May Point to Ancient Religious Struggle

    01/06/2014 6:58:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 97 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 02, 2014 | Owen Jarus
    The pharaoh was buried in Egypt's Valley of the Kings without a heart (or a replacement artifact known as a heart scarab); his penis was mummified erect; and his mummy and coffins were covered in a thick layer of black liquid that appear to have resulted in the boy-king catching fire... The mummified erect penis and other burial anomalies were not accidents during embalming, Ikram suggests, but rather deliberate attempts to make the king appear as Osiris, the god of the underworld, in as literal a way as possible. The erect penis evokes Osiris' regenerative powers; the black liquid made...
  • King Tut’s Sister Stolen in Massive Museum Heist

    11/15/2013 9:58:11 AM PST · by smokingfrog · 40 replies
    ABC News ^ | 11-15-13 | Lana Zak
    PRETORIA, South Africa – King Tut’s sister is missing and Egypt has issued an international alert for her return. UNESCO and Interpol are working with Egyptian authorities to recover the priceless artifact, a limestone figurine of the young pharaoh’s sister from the 14th century BC. The young girl holds a piece of fruit and her hair flows loosely on one side–a symbol of her youth–but her head is held high, a decidedly regal look on her face. “This constitutes irreversible damage to the history and identity of the Egyptian people,” said Irina Bokova, the Director-General of UNESCO. The statuette, “A...
  • Pictures: Looters Shatter Museum of Ancient Egyptian Treasures

    08/25/2013 2:34:09 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    National Geographic ^ | August 23, 2013 | A.R. Williams
    Amid the deadly chaos that has erupted in Egypt, the country's cultural heritage took a hit last week when looters ransacked the archaeological museum in the town of Mallawi. Located about 190 miles (300 kilometers) south of Cairo, the museum was opened in 1963 to showcase the finds from excavations at nearby sites. "The museum contained irreplaceable artifacts, many not yet studied," says Salima Ikram, a professor of Egyptology at the American University in Cairo. "The looting leaves enormous gaps in our understanding of ancient Egyptian religious and funerary rites." ...According to local news reports, looters -- as yet unidentified...
  • Mysterious Toe Rings Found on Ancient Egyptian Skeletons

    07/06/2013 12:22:59 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 5 July 2013 | Owen Jarus
    Archaeologists have discovered two ancient Egyptian skeletons, dating back more than 3,300 years, which were each buried with a toe ring made of copper alloy, the first time such rings have been found in ancient Egypt. The toe rings were likely worn while the individuals were still alive, and the discovery leaves open the question of whether they were worn for fashion or magical reasons. Supporting the magical interpretation, one of the rings was found on the right toe of a male, age 35-40, whose foot had suffered a fracture along with a broken femur above it. Unique rings in...
  • "Beauty of the Nile" May Have Had Ancient Makeover

    03/30/2009 11:08:28 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 19 replies · 772+ views
    Reuters ^ | Tue Mar 31, 2009
    An ancient Egyptian queen regarded as the Mona Lisa of the ancient world may not have been such a looker after all, German scientists said on Tuesday. A delicately carved face in the limestone core of the famous bust of Nefertiti suggests the royal sculptor at the time may have smoothed creases around the mouth and fixed a bumpy nose to depict the "Beauty of the Nile" in a better light. The bust of Nefertiti was found in Egypt in 1912 at Tell el-Amarna, the short-lived capital of Nefertiti's husband, the Pharaoh Akhenaten. It is now housed in Berlin's Altes...
  • Found: Queen Nefertiti's Mummy

    06/08/2003 10:05:51 AM PDT · by blam · 75 replies · 4,731+ views
    The Sunday Times (UK) ^ | 6-8-2003 | Jack Grinston
    June 08, 2003 Found: Queen Nefertiti’s mummy Jack Grimston BRITISH archeologists believe they may have identified the body of one of the most legendary beauties of the ancient world. They are confident a tattered mummy found in a tomb in the Valley of the Kings is probably Queen Nefertiti, stepmother of the boy king Tutankhamun and one of the most powerful women in ancient Egypt. The conclusion has been made after 12 years of research, using clues such as fragments of a wig and the piercing of the mummy’s ears. The breakthrough came after the Egyptian authorities allowed the 3,500-year-old...
  • Nefertiti mummy 'found in Egypt'

    06/10/2003 10:42:05 AM PDT · by Constitution Day · 65 replies · 3,137+ views
    BBC News ^ | 10 June 2003 | BBC staff
    Nefertiti mummy 'found in Egypt' Scientists in Egypt say they may have discovered the mummy of Queen Nefertiti, one of the most famous figures of ancient Egypt. A group of scientists believe that she is one of three mummies discovered in a secret chamber of a tomb known as KV35 in Egypt's Valley of the Kings in Luxor.The tomb was originally located and catalogued in 1898, but the mummies were sealed up and apparently forgotten, until scientists drilled through to the room."There is a very, very strong possibility that... this in fact is the great female Pharaoh Nefertiti herself,"...
  • Teasing The Sun (Nefertiti)

    09/12/2004 6:02:36 PM PDT · by blam · 24 replies · 1,125+ views
    IOL ^ | 9-5-2004
    Teasing The Sun September 05 2004 at 08:02PM By David Leafe An erotic striptease to arouse the sun god was part of Queen Nefertiti's daily routine. With the early morning sun glinting off her golden bracelets and great clouds of aromatic incense billowing all around her, Queen Nefertiti of Egypt began her elaborate dance of seduction. Music was provided by a choir of blind men - chosen because they could see nothing of this most erotic of royal rituals - who clapped and sang as she moved towards the altar. Nefertiti's religious striptease was an important part of her daily...
  • Tutankhamun's death and the birth of monotheism

    09/10/2012 6:16:15 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    New Scientist ^ | 5 September 2012 | Jessica Hamzelou
    ...says Hutan Ashrafian, a surgeon with an interest in medical history at Imperial College London. Tutankhamun died young with a feminised physique, and so did his immediate predecessors. Paintings and sculptures show that Smenkhkare, an enigmatic pharaoh who may have been Tutankhamun's uncle or older brother, and Akhenaten, thought to have been the boy king's father, both had feminised figures, with unusually large breasts and wide hips. Two pharaohs that came before Akhenaten -- Amenhotep III and Tuthmosis IV -- seem to have had similar physiques. All of these kings died young and mysteriously, says Ashrafian. "There are so many...
  • Archaeology meets politics: Spring comes to ancient Egypt

    12/01/2011 8:25:02 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Nature ^ | Wednesday, November 23, 2011 | Jo Marchant
    In a secluded stretch of desert about 300 kilometres south of Cairo, hundreds of bodies lie buried in the sand. Wrapped in linen and rolled up in stiff mats made of sticks... their ornate plaited hair styles and simple personal possessions help to reveal details about the individuals in each grave. The bodies date from... when the Pharaoh Akhenaten... moved his capital to remote Amarna, to worship... the Sun disc Aten... Barry Kemp, an archaeologist at the University of Cambridge, UK, and director of the Amarna Project, has been working with his colleagues to excavate the skeletons, and says that...
  • Nefertiti & the Aten in Colour! 16K Amarna Art Talatat blocks in Luxor w/Original Pigment Preserved

    08/10/2010 8:53:12 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    Heritage Key ^ | Mondat, August 9, 2010 | Owen Jarus
    Talatat blocks were used by the pharaoh Akhenaten nearly 3,400 years ago. They were constructed in a standardized size -- 55 cm x 25 cm x 25 cm. This standardization probably would have made it easier for temples to be built. The blocks are in a storage area in Luxor. Almost all of them are decorated. Back in antiquity each block would have been part of a larger scene. Another key find is that the Aten, the sun disc which the pharaoh Akhenaten focussed Egyptian religion around, radiates light in two colours. "We have red sun rays and yellow sun...
  • DNA Shows that KV55 Mummy Probably Not Akhenaten [Smenkhare]

    03/02/2010 7:00:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 626+ views
    KV-64 blog ^ | Tuesday, March 2, 2010 | Kate Phizackerley
    If we identify the KV55 mummy as Smenkhare and assume that Akhenaten remains missing, we can add Akhenaten and Nefertiti into the family tree, while retaining KV55 (Smenkhare) as the father of Tutankhamun as shown by the Hawass team. It's tempting to consider that KV21B and the Younger Lady are also daughters of Akhenaten and Nefertiti. While not essential for my revised theory, this would neatly fit historical facts. In considering whether the DNA data would fit the revised family tree, it seems appropriate to consider that KV21B and the Younger Lady may also have been daughters of Akhenaten and...
  • When Ancient Artifacts Become Political Pawns: Egypt contesting German possession of Nefertiti bust

    10/27/2009 4:22:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 860+ views
    New York Times ^ | October 23, 2009 | Michael Kimmelman
    Egypt's chief archaeologist, Zahi Hawass, announced that his country wanted its queen handed back forthwith, unless Germany could prove that the 3,500-year-old bust of Akhenaten's wife wasn't spirited illegally out of Egypt nearly a century ago... Then he said he was sure the work had been stolen... Mr. Hawass also recently fired a shot at France, demanding the Louvre return five fresco fragments it purchased in 2000 and 2003 from a gallery and at auction. They belonged to a 3,200-year-old tomb near Luxor and had been in storage at the museum. Egypt had made the demand before, but this time...
  • King Tut's Father ID'd in Stone Inscription

    12/21/2008 1:39:52 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies · 1,286+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Wednesday, December 17, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    "We can now say that Tutankhamun was the child of Akhenaten," Zahi Hawass, chief of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, told Discovery News. The finding offers evidence against another leading theory that King Tut was sired by the minor king Smenkhkare. Hawass discovered the missing part of a broken limestone block a few months ago in a storeroom at el Ashmunein, a village on the west bank of the Nile some 150 miles south of Cairo. Once reassembled, the slab has become "an accurate piece of evidence that proves Tut lived in el Amarna with Akhenaten and he married his...
  • The Androgynous Pharaoh? Akhenaten had feminine physique

    05/02/2008 10:57:44 AM PDT · by ElkGroveDan · 50 replies · 334+ views
    AP via Yahoo ^ | Fri May 2, 6:23 AM ET | ALEX DOMINGUEZ
    BALTIMORE - Akhenaten wasn't the most manly pharaoh, even though he fathered at least a half-dozen children. In fact, his form was quite feminine. And he was a bit of an egghead. So concludes a Yale University physician who analyzed images of Akhenaten for an annual conference Friday at the University of Maryland School of Medicine on the deaths of historic figures. The female form was due to a genetic mutation that caused the pharaoh's body to convert more male hormones to female hormones than needed, Dr. Irwin Braverman believes. And Akhenaten's head was misshapen because of a condition in...
  • Grim Secrets Of Pharaoh's City

    01/26/2008 10:18:42 PM PST · by blam · 16 replies · 469+ views
    BBC ^ | 1-26-2008 | John Hayes-Fisher
    Grim secrets of Pharaoh's city By John Hayes-Fisher BBC Timewatch Bones reveal the darker side to building Ancient Egypt Evidence of the brutal lives endured by some ancient Egyptians to build the monuments of the Pharaohs has been uncovered by archaeologists. Skeletal remains from a lost city in the middle of Egypt suggest many ordinary people died in their teenage years and lived a punishing lifestyle. Many suffered from spinal injuries, poor nutrition and stunted growth. The remains were found at Amarna, a new capital built on the orders of the Pharaoh Akhenaten, 3,500 years ago. Hieroglyphs written at the...
  • Archaeologists find Akhenaten-era tomb (as a result of Dutch team excavation in the Sakkara area)

    02/14/2007 1:01:18 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 14 replies · 475+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 2/14/07 | Reuters
    CAIRO (Reuters) - Dutch archaeologists have discovered the tomb of the Pharaoh Akhenaten's seal bearer, decorated with paintings including scenes of monkeys picking and eating fruit, Egyptian antiquities officials said on Wednesday. The tomb belonged to the official named Ptahemwi and was discovered during a Dutch team's excavation in the Sakkara area, the burial ground for the city of Memphis, the state news agency MENA said, quoting chief antiquities official Zahi Hawass. Akhenaten, the 18th-dynasty pharaoh who ruled Egypt from 1379 to 1362 BC, abandoned most of the old gods and tried to imposed a monotheistic religion based on worship...
  • Amarna: Ancient Egypt's Place in the Sun [ U Penn exhibit, open now ]

    11/25/2006 8:41:47 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 418+ views
    Tutankhamun, ancient Egypt's famous boy pharaoh, grew up 3,300 years ago in the royal court at Amarna, the ancient city of Akhet-aten, whose name meant the "Horizon of the Aten." This extraordinary royal city grew, flourished -- and vanished -- in hardly more than a generation's time. Amarna, Ancient Egypt's Place in the Sun, a new exhibition at the University of Pennsylvania Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology in Philadelphia, offers a rare look at the meteoric rise and fall of this unique royal city during one of Egypt's most intriguing times. The exhibition, the centerpiece of the Museum's event-filled "Year...
  • The Trial of Akhenaten [ a play ]

    11/21/2006 9:09:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies · 265+ views
    Philadelphia City Paper ^ | Nov 21, 2006 | Rachel Frankford
    God's been on trial a whole lot lately, poor fellow. Now it's even going on retroactively. For proof, check out Vagabond Acting Troupe's The Trial of Akhenaten, a 25-minute play written specifically to be performed in the Penn Museum of Art and Architecture's exhibit "Amarna: Ancient Egypt's Place in the Sun." The city of Amarna was built by the pharaoh Akhenaten (believed to be the father of King Tut), and razed just a generation later. His legacy turned to rubble so quickly because he angered the Egyptian people by replacing the traditional pantheon of gods with worship of just one,...
  • Potential Cure Discovered for Marfan Syndrome

    07/10/2006 5:58:40 PM PDT · by wjersey · 19 replies · 783+ views
    WPVI ( Philadelphia) ^ | 7/10/2006 | Anita Brikman
    Hundreds of people with Marfan syndrome came from around the country to the University of Pennsylvania over the weekend to hear good news. Years of genetic research may have yielded a "cure" for the most dangerous complications of this disorder. 13-year-old Westin Corbin from Arkansas has many of the hallmark signs of Marfan Syndrome - a disorder affecting the body's connective tissues. He is tall with unusually long arms, thin legs and flat feet, and a chest wall that seems to cave in. His joints are loose and hyper-flexible, but the real danger of Marfan's lies inside because it also...
  • King Tut returns to Chicago

    05/30/2006 12:50:43 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 17 replies · 333+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 5/30/06 | Tara Burghart - ap
    CHICAGO - You can kick back with a King Tuttini cocktail, learn to decipher hieroglyphs or indulge in an "Egyptian Golden Body Wrap" complete with exfoliating Dead Sea salts and a dusting of golden powder. Yes, King Tut is back, and Chicago is fired up for the pharaoh. The traveling exhibit "Tutankhamun and the Golden Age of the Pharaohs" has opened at The Field Museum, attracting a line of ticket buyers. Organizers believe the show, which opened Friday, could draw 1 million visitors before it closes here on Jan. 1, 2007, and businesses, restaurants and universities are lining up special...
  • Smenkhkhare, the Hittite Pharaoh

    07/30/2004 9:42:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 2,926+ views
    BBC History ^ | September 5, 2002 | Dr Marc Gabolde
    [T]he exclusively masculine epithets referring to this individual in the same tomb and on a now-vanished block at Memphis, confirm that we are dealing with a man - as distinct from the pharaoh-queen Ankh(et)kheperure Neferneferuaten... Contrary to Ancient Egyptian custom, Smenkhkare is not presented under a coronation name and a birth name in his two cartouches, but under two coronation names. The explanation for this curious fact seems to me clear: both his royal names were composed on the occasion of his coronation. He therefore must have had another name beforehand... The absence of a birth name, the lack of...