Keyword: alexanderyakovlev

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  • A Hidden History of Evil

    04/02/2011 9:26:44 AM PDT · by bronxville · 54 replies
    City Journal ^ | Spring 2010 | Claire Berlinski
    A Hidden History of Evil Why doesn’t anyone care about the unread Soviet archives? In the world’s collective consciousness, the word “Nazi” is synonymous with evil. It is widely understood that the Nazis’ ideology—nationalism, anti-Semitism, the autarkic ethnic state, the Führer principle—led directly to the furnaces of Auschwitz. It is not nearly as well understood that Communism led just as inexorably, everywhere on the globe where it was applied, to starvation, torture, and slave-labor camps. Nor is it widely acknowledged that Communism was responsible for the deaths of some 150 million human beings during the twentieth century. The world remains...
  • U.N. suspends catering company subsidiary

    10/21/2005 7:43:23 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 7 replies · 523+ views
    ap on Yahoo ^ | 10/21/05 | Edith M. Lederer - ap
    UNITED NATIONS - In a widening scandal over contracts, the United Nations announced Friday that it has suspended a subsidiary of the world's largest catering company as a U.N. supplier until the outcome of an investigation into alleged contract irregularities. The suspension is the latest blow to U.N. contracting which in recent months has seen the arrest of two Russians by the FBI for alleged money laundering. U.N. spokesman Stephane Dujarric said Eurest Support Services, or ESS, has been barred from seeking new U.N. contracts until completion of a U.N. investigation into allegations that it "improperly obtained" internal U.N. information...
  • U.N. Procurement Scandal: Ties to Saddam and Al Qaeda

    10/22/2005 12:55:43 PM PDT · by 68skylark · 86 replies · 2,621+ views
    Fox News ^ | October 21, 2005 | Claudia Rosett and George Russell
    NEW YORK — The scandal engulfing the United Nations Procurement Department () now appears to be bottomless. It also shows signs of growing more sinister, especially where it involves a mysterious private company called IHC Services (), which did big business with the procurement department until it was removed from U.N. rosters in June. New details of how dark the scandal could prove to be have emerged from the private sale of IHC on June 3, 2005, just as the procurement scandal was about to break. It now appears that while doing business with the U.N., IHC had links both to Saddam...
  • The U.N. Aims to Tighten Contract Oversight

    08/16/2005 11:32:23 AM PDT · by the anti-liberal · 4 replies · 298+ views
    LA Times ^ | August 16, 2005 | Maggie Farley
    An outside firm will join investigators in looking into a bribe scandal. A former senior official has pleaded guilty; another is accused. UNITED NATIONS — The U.N. announced new measures Monday to strengthen oversight of contracting after a senior U.N. official pleaded guilty last week to soliciting nearly $1 million in bribes for confidential bidding information. An outside consulting firm will soon join the U.N.'s internal investigators and the U.S. attorney's office in examining how many contracts may have gone to the highest bribe, not the lowest bid, and to ensure it doesn't happen again. The firm, which is expected...
  • Ex-United Nations Official Taken Into Custody (Alexander Yakovlev)

    08/08/2005 11:40:14 AM PDT · by areafiftyone · 161 replies · 7,088+ views
    Fox News ^ | 8/8/05
    U.S. Attorney's Office takes into custody ex-United Nations Procurement Official in Oil-for-food Investigation. - Just Breaking!
  • U.N. Procurement Official Resigns Job

    06/22/2005 9:14:48 AM PDT · by NO_2_CORZINE · 17 replies · 1,665+ views
    Breaking on Fox UNITED NATIONS — The U.N. procurement official who has been at the center of a FOX News investigation into a possible conflict of interest involving his son has quit his job, officials at the United Nations confirmed Wednesday. On Monday, the United Nations announced it was going to into whether procurement officer Alexander Yakovlev (search) violated conflict-of-interest rules. But the U.N. decision did more than draw attention to the man's possible wrongdoing — it also raised questions about how the world body investigates itself.