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Keyword: americanrevolution

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  • New AMC show: Turn (about America's first spy ring in the Revolutionary War)

    04/03/2014 11:52:22 AM PDT · by FrdmLvr · 20 replies
    I thought this sounded good. It starts this Sunday on AMC. Has anyone heard anything about it yet?
  • ‘Turn,’ AMC’s New Series About America’s First Spy Ring, Is A Visually Arresting Historical Epic

    04/06/2014 9:42:14 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 79 replies
    The new AMC series Turn, which premieres April 6, is bewildering at first. We’re dropped smack in the middle of British-occupied New York. The year is 1776, and Abraham Woodhull (Jamie Bell) is scraping by as a cabbage farmer and sometime innkeeper in Setauket, Long Island. He’s husband to Mary (Meegan Warner), and father to a young child. His father, Richard (Kevin McNally), is a local magistrate loyal to George III. Then the scene shifts. We’re now in New Jersey. A stunning overhead shot reveals a sprawling field of bluecoat rebel bodies lying next to a pool dyed red with...
  • The American Flag Daily: Give Me Liberty Or Give Me Death

    03/23/2014 5:44:47 AM PDT · by Master Zinja · 7 replies
    The American Flag Daily ^ | March 23, 2014 | FlagBearer
    On this day in 1775 at Saint John's Church in Richmond, Virginia, Patrick Henry made his speech before the House of Burgesses pressing for the need to mobilize to respond to the British. The end of Henry's speech is popularly known as: "Is life so dear, or peace so sweet, as to be purchased at the price of chains and slavery? Forbid it, Almighty God! I know not what course others may take; but as for me, give me liberty or give me death!" No one is exactly sure what Henry said that day, as the speech was written decades...
  • The American Flag Daily: Washington's Birthday

    02/22/2014 5:54:58 AM PST · by Master Zinja · 5 replies
    The American Flag Daily ^ | February 22, 2014 | FlagBearer
    Today is the birthdate of George Washington, first President of the United States, general of the Continental Army and president of the Constitutional Convention of 1787. On this date, we raise Washington's Commander-In-Chief flag, the flag of Washington's Army command. Following his death, Washington was eulogized by Congressman Henry Lee: First in war—first in peace—and first in the hearts of his countrymen, he was second to none in the humble and enduring scenes of private life; pious, just, humane, temperate, and sincere; uniform, dignified, and commanding, his example was as edifying to all around him as were the effects of...
  • The American Flag Daily: Thomas Paine's Birthday

    02/09/2014 5:50:30 AM PST · by Master Zinja · 5 replies
    The American Flag Daily ^ | February 9, 2014 | FlagBearer
    Born on this date in 1737, Thomas Paine was one of the great voices of the American Revolution, stirring patriots to action with his words in Common Sense (1776) and The American Crisis (a series published 1776-1783). He later was involved in the French Revolution in the 1790's. Paine's words concerning the American Revolution continue to resound today. Not a man lives on the continent but fully believes that a separation must some time or other finally take place, and a generous parent should have said, "If there must be trouble, let it be in my day, that my child...
  • The Revolution is saved at Trenton...1776

    12/26/2013 5:24:15 AM PST · by XRdsRev · 5 replies
    self | Ernest Bower
    In the gloom of this holy Christmas night, a cold sleet fell. It was not a night for man nor beast but yet here they were. Huddled upon the banks of this frigid river, 2000 men contemplated their bleak fate. The past few months had gone very, very badly. Their hopes had been crushed time and again. The noble experiment in Liberty which had begun with such promise, had by this time deteriorated to the point where every day was a battle just to survive. Defeat after defeat, at places like Long Island, Harlem Heights, Fort Washington and White Plains...
  • Video doc link: Washington's 12/26/76 attack on Hessian camp: Trenton/Delaware Crossing

    12/23/2013 6:08:10 PM PST · by ETL · 12 replies
    This is part three of a 6-part 1997 PBS documentary on the Revolutionary War. The episode is titled "The Times That Try Men's Souls" (1776-1777). In addition to the Delaware River crossing and Hessian camp attack it also covers the British invasion of New York and subsequent Battle of Brooklyn, aka, The Battle of Long Island. "Days after the Declaration of Independence is signed, a British force arrives in New York harbor. Washington and his troops are driven to New Jersey. With only a few days of enlistment left for many of his volunteers, a desperate Washington leads his army...
  • The American Flag Daily: Valley Forge

    12/19/2013 4:16:04 AM PST · by Master Zinja · 7 replies
    The American Flag Daily ^ | December 19, 2013 | FlagBearer
    On this day in 1777, General George Washington led his Continental Army into Valley Forge for what would be a brutal winter encampment where approxomately 2,500 soldiers would eventually perish due to exposure, disease and starvation. However, the remaining men in the Army would eventually leave Valley Forge a better army, due in part to increased and unified training during the winter, along with the knowledge that France had joined the American effort to defeat the British. In their honor, we raise the Betsy Ross flag along with our own modern Stars and Stripes, which would have been impossible today...
  • Tom Paine’s Two Radicalisms - And their consequences—for his era and ours

    11/14/2013 2:01:33 PM PST · by neverdem · 16 replies
    City Journal ^ | Autumn 2013 | Myron Magnet
    On November 30, 1774, a 37-year-old Englishman—an ex-privateer, ex–corset stay maker, ex–tax collector (fired twice for dereliction of duty), and ex-husband (also twice over)—arrived in Philadelphia with a letter of recommendation from Benjamin Franklin in his pocket. The old philosopher’s praise was understandably restrained. This “ingenious worthy young man,” Franklin wrote, would make a useful “clerk, or assistant tutor in a school, or assistant surveyor.” Four months later, however, the shots that rang out at Lexington and Concord galvanized the newcomer’s hitherto aimless life into focus and purpose. “When the country into which I had just set foot was set...
  • "April Morning" - April 19, 1775: The first day of the American Revolution (Movie Review)

    10/29/2013 5:44:13 PM PDT · by Perseverando · 14 replies
    Amazon.com ^ | August 22, 2001 | John Elsegood
    This is simply a gem of a movie based on Howard Fast's excellent 1962 novel,( which I still have), of the first day of hostilities between colonists and Britain. There may have been bigger blockbusters made about the American Revolution (The Patriot, Revolution etc) but to me this under- rated 1988 film is a true classic, capturing the quintessential decency of American colonial village life in Lexington and the developing tensions and conflict on that fateful day of 19th April 1775. I agree with the 2 previous reviewers that this film is a great teaching tool. It shows many things:...
  • The Central Planning Solution to Evil (Guns or the Tyranny of the Police State?)

    09/22/2013 5:25:44 AM PDT · by Perseverando · 5 replies
    Sultan Knish ^ | September 22, 2013 | Daniel Greenfield
    We are not a violent society. We are a society sheltered from violence. No one in Rwanda spends time wondering what kind of man would murder people. They probably live next door to him. If your neighborhood is diverse enough, you might be unfortunate enough to live next door to war criminals all the way from Eastern Europe to Africa. Guns are how we misspell evil. Guns are how we avoid talking about the ugly realities of human nature while building sandcastles on the shores of utopia. It's not about the fear of what one motivated maniac can do in...
  • Was the American Revolution a holy war?

    07/07/2013 8:47:39 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 42 replies
    The Washington Post ^ | July 5, 2013 | James P. Byrd
    Holy war can seem like something that happened long ago or that happens far away — the Crusades of medieval Europe, for example, or jihadists fighting secular forces today. But since their country’s founding, Americans have often thought of their wars as sacred, even when the primary objectives have been political. This began with the American Revolution. When colonists declared their independence on July 4, 1776, religious conviction inspired them. Because they believed that their cause had divine support, many patriots’ ardor was both political and religious. They saw the conflict as a just, secular war, but they fought it...
  • Seventy-two killed resisting gun confiscation in Boston

    06/28/2013 1:24:38 PM PDT · by DelaWhere · 62 replies
    DelawareVolunteerGuard ^ | 6/26/13 | History Made Current
    Delaware Volunteer Guard shared America's Misled Patriots status. Tuesday Interesting take on events. Seventy-two killed resisting gun confiscation in Boston BOSTON National guard units seeking to confiscate a cache of recently banned assault weapons were ambushed on April 19th by elements of a Para-military extremist faction. Military and law enforcement sources estimate that 72 were killed and more than 200 injured before government forces were compelled to withdraw. Speaking after the clash, Massachusetts Governor Thomas Gage declared that the extremist faction, which was made up of local citizens, has links to the radical right-wing tax protest movement. Gage blamed the...
  • Whence cometh the revolution? (...compares level of despotism today to what founders faced in '76)

    06/06/2013 11:11:09 AM PDT · by Perseverando · 104 replies
    WND ^ | June 5, 2013 | Erik Rush
    Why is Justice blindfolded? I am speaking of the allegorical Justice, also known as “Lady Justice.” She is usually represented holding a balance and sword, the former symbolizing fairness and the latter her power. Altogether, she represents the moral authority of law, or rather, that the law ought to observe morality. She is also blindfolded. The blindfold represents the impartiality of Justice, that she is subject neither to prejudice nor influence. The second one – influence – is most significant in terms of our discussion. It has been pointed out that the Boston Tea Party was carried out over confiscatory...
  • Our Nations' First TRUE Patriots

    05/06/2013 5:07:21 PM PDT · by True Grit · 16 replies
    Keelynet ^ | Bob Aldrich
    Have you ever wondered what happened to the 56 men who signed the Declaration of Independence? For the record, here's a portrait of the men who pledged "our lives, our fortunes and our sacred honor" for liberty many years ago. Fifty-six men from each of the original 13 colonies signed the Declaration of Independence on July 4, 1776. Nine of the signers were immigrants, two were brothers and two were cousins. One was an orphan. The average age of a signer was 45. Benjamin Franklin was the oldest delegate at 70. The youngest was Thomas Lynch Jr. of South Carolina...
  • Dangerous Old Men

    01/12/2013 10:19:09 AM PST · by old school · 35 replies
    American Thinker ^ | January 12, 2013 | Ebben Raves
    "Let us look back at Samuel Whittemore. Samuel was an old man -- seventy-eight years old, to be exact -- on April 19, 1775. After many years of service bearing arms for the British Crown, surely he was too old to fight, and his wife even told him so. On that fateful morning, though, he gathered up his musket, two pistols, and a cavalry saber that he acquired from a French officer who "died suddenly" and took his place to meet the British Regulars in Menotomy."
  • The American Revolution against British Gun Control

    01/02/2013 9:13:50 AM PST · by RoosterRedux · 23 replies
    davekopel.org ^ | Summer 2012 | David B. Kopel
    This Article reviews the British gun control program that precipitated the American Revolution: the 1774 import ban on firearms and gunpowder; the 1774-75 confiscations of firearms and gunpowder; and the use of violence to effectuate the confiscations. It was these events that changed a situation of political tension into a shooting war. Each of these British abuses provides insights into the scope of the modern Second Amendment. Furious at the December 1773 Boston Tea Party, Parliament in 1774 passed the Coercive Acts. The particular provisions of the Coercive Acts were offensive to Americans, but it was the possibility that the...
  • George Washington's 1776 Christmas Present: Saving the American Revolution

    12/25/2012 8:20:59 AM PST · by Bratch · 9 replies
    Yahoo! Voices ^ | Dec 20, 2006 | Brian Tubbs
    The American Revolution was over. The United States of America was finished. The Continental Army was all but finished in December 1776 as the British and their Hessian (German) mercenary allies settled in for a long winter rest. In those days, it was customary that armies rest and refit in the winter months in preparation for the campaign seasons of spring and summer. And the British were all about custom and tradition. No matter, thought the British. They saw little need to move directly against Washington's army and risk further casualties. The Continental Army was disintegrating. Unpaid, ill-equipped, cold, and...
  • The Americanness of the American Revolution - Why the Founders succeeded

    11/15/2012 4:18:11 PM PST · by neverdem · 27 replies
    City Journal ^ | Autumn 2012 | MYRON MAGNET
    Why was the American Revolution, of all great revolutions, the only successful one, resulting in two centuries and more of unexampled freedom and prosperity? The French Revolution, by contrast, illuminated by AmericaÂ’s example and Enlightenment thought, began in blissful optimism but collapsed into a blood-soaked tyranny much worse than the monarchy it deposed. It spawned a military dictatorship that convulsed Europe and roiled half the globe for over a decade with wars of grandiose imperial aggression that slew at least 3 million. And the result of 25 years of turmoil? The Bourbon monarchy, minus the Enlightenment of its earlier incarnation,...
  • Colonial Baptists used Bible to rally support for revolution

    10/17/2012 9:42:02 AM PDT · by Alex Murphy · 5 replies
    The Baptist Standard ^ | October 16, 2012 | Ken Camp
    From the days surrounding the American Revolution, Baptists used religious arguments to make political points and political arguments to make religious points, historian James P. Byrd, associate dean at Vanderbilt Divinity School, told a conference at the University of Mary Hardin-Baylor. At the same time Baptists argued for separation of church and state, they did not hesitate to preach on political topics or embrace patriotic causes with religious fervor, Byrd said, addressing an Oct. 12-13 conference on “Baptists and the Shaping of American Culture.” In a sense, Baptists reflected their culture. Neither Thomas Jefferson nor Benjamin Franklin accepted orthodox Christian...
  • True Patriots

    10/09/2012 7:24:26 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 1 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | October 9, 2012 | Chuck Norris
    The third definition of "patriot" in the Oxford English Dictionary is "A person actively opposing enemy forces occupying his or her country; a member of a resistance movement, a freedom fighter. Originally used of those who opposed and fought the British in the American War of Independence." The term first was used in the U.S. by Benjamin Franklin in a 1773 letter. It referred to people who stood in opposition of those pledged to the British Crown -- the Tories aka loyalists. On Oct. 7, 1780, American patriots prevailed against loyalists in the Carolinas and won their first Southern...
  • Conceived in Liberty - How William Livingston gave the American Revolution its rationale

    08/28/2012 11:22:14 PM PDT · by neverdem · 17 replies
    City Journal ^ | Summer 2012 | MYRON MAGNET
    In John Adams’s view, the American Revolution started long before the shots rang out at Lexington and Concord in April 1775. “But what do we mean by the American Revolution?” he asked in an 1818 article. “Do we mean the American War? The Revolution was effected before the War commenced. The Revolution was in the minds and hearts of the people; a change in their religious sentiments, of their duties and obligations . . . . This radical change in the principles, opinions, sentiments, and affections of the people was the real American Revolution.” And anyone who wants to trace...
  • In Defense of His Majesty

    09/10/2005 10:30:16 AM PDT · by Unreconstructed Selmerite · 17 replies · 836+ views
    military.com ^ | September 7, 2005 | William S. Lind
    As regular readers in this column know, my reporting senior and lawful sovereign is His Imperial Majesty Kaiser Wilhelm II. When I finally report in to that great Oberste Heeresleitung in the sky, I expect to do so as the Kaiser’s last soldier. Why? Well, beyond Bestimmung, the unhappy fact is that Western civilization’s last chance of survival was probably a victory by the Central Powers in World War I. Their defeat let all the poisons of the French Revolution loose unchecked, which is the main reason that we now live in a moral and cultural cesspool.
  • On July 4, remember: We are not French

    07/04/2012 6:50:47 AM PDT · by Former Fetus · 15 replies
    Jewish World Review | 7/4/2012 | Ann Coulter
    It has become fashionable to equate the French and American revolutions, but they share absolutely nothing in common beyond the word "revolution." The American Revolution was a movement based on ideas, painstakingly argued by serious men in the process of creating what would become the freest, most prosperous nation in world history. The French Revolution was a revolt of the mob. It was the primogenitor of the horrors of the Bolshevik Revolution, Hitler's Nazi Party, Mao's Cultural Revolution, Pol Pot's slaughter, and America's periodic mob uprisings from Shays' Rebellion to today's dirty waifs in the "Occupy Wall Street" crowd. The...
  • Future tense, X: The fourth revolution

    06/05/2012 9:46:41 PM PDT · by neverdem · 16 replies
    The New Criterion ^ | June 2012 | James Piereson
    On the possibility of a forthcoming political revolution.The United States has been shaped by three far-reaching political revolutions: Thomas Jefferson’s “revolution of 1800,” the Civil War, and the New Deal. Each of these upheavals concluded with lasting institutional and cultural adjustments that set the stage for new phases of political and economic development. Are we on the verge of a new upheaval, a “fourth revolution” that will reshape U.S. politics for decades to come? There are signs to suggest that we are. In fact, we may already be in the early stages of this twenty-first-century revolution.The great recession that began...
  • James Madison explains the uniqueness of the American Revolution

    05/06/2012 9:17:57 AM PDT · by ProgressingAmerica · 5 replies
    In "Charters", James Madison wrote the following: In Europe, charters of liberty have been granted by power. America has set the example and France has followed it, of charters of power granted by liberty. This is what makes modern revolutionaries so backward. They are stuck on stupid in old-think - that is, that power grants liberty. If only government could get bigger, we could grant the rights to _________________ for whatever special interest group they have in mind at the moment. Like the "right" to healthcare. In the comment "America has set the example", he makes it clear that it's...
  • Bonhoeffer on America

    12/11/2011 11:31:33 PM PST · by RobbyS · 16 replies
    Ethics by Dietrich Bonhoeffer, | 1949 | Dietrich Bonhoffer
    The American Revolution was almost contemporaneous with the French one, and politically the two were not unconnected; yet they were profoundly different in character. The American democracy is not founded upon the emancipated man bit. quite the contrary, upon the kingdom of God and the limitation of earthly powers by the sovereignty of God. It is indeed significant when, in contrast to the Declaration of the Rights of Man, American historians can say that the federal constitution was written by men who were conscious of original sin and of the wickedness of the human heart. Earthly wielders of power, and...
  • Do "We the People" have the right of Revolution?

    10/07/2011 9:03:21 AM PDT · by Oldpuppymax · 38 replies
    Coach is Right ^ | 10/7/2011 | Doug Book
    Do the citizens of the United States have an absolute right to, by force of arms if necessary, overthrow a government which has, with malicious deliberation, become destructive of those ideals of liberty granted by God and guaranteed by instruments such as the Constitution of the Unites States? Clearly the Founders believed in the existence of such a right. There could be no more axiomatic example than the American Revolution itself! And though these men warned against pursuing such a course for “light and transient causes”, rightly observing that “…mankind are more disposed to suffer…than right themselves by abolishing forms...
  • ANN COULTER: THIS IS WHAT A MOB LOOKS LIKE

    10/07/2011 3:18:43 AM PDT · by Yosemitest · 14 replies
    www.anncoulter.com ^ | October 5, 2011 | ANN COULTER
    THIS IS WHAT A MOB LOOKS LIKE October 5, 2011 by ANN COULTER I am not the first to note the vast differences between the Wall Street protesters and the tea partiers. To name three: The tea partiers have jobs, showers and a point. No one knows what the Wall Street protesters want -- as is typical of mobs. They say they want Obama re-elected, but claim to hate "Wall Street."You know, the same Wall Street that gave its largest campaign donation in history to Obama,who, in turn, bailed out the banks and made Goldman Sachs the fourth branch...
  • From Alliance to Independence at the Hotel d'York

    09/03/2011 11:51:58 AM PDT · by jfd1776
    Illinois Review ^ | Sept. 3, 2011 A.D. | John F. Di Leo
    Reflections on the signing of the Treaty of Paris by John F. Di Leo On September 3, 1783, a group of tired diplomats got together at the Hotel d’York, and signed the Treaty of Paris. It was a long time coming. Rumblings of dissatisfaction began to be noticeable during the French and Indian War, growing to a fever pitch in the Stamp Act Congress, then a few years of calm, and then Revolution. From shots fired at Lexington and Concord on April 19, 1775 through the surrender of Cornwallis at Yorktown on October 19, 1781, the fighting had lasted –...
  • Walter Williams: Gross Media Ignorance About the Founders

    07/05/2011 8:53:47 PM PDT · by neverdem · 51 replies
    Real Clear Politics ^ | July 5, 2011 | Walter Williams
    There's little that's intelligent or informed about Time magazine editor Richard Stengel's article "One Document, Under Siege" (June 23, 2011). It contains many grossly ignorant statements about our Constitution. If I believed in conspiracies, I'd say Stengel's article is part of a leftist agenda to undermine respect for the founding values of our nation. Stengel says: "The framers were not gods and were not infallible. Yes, they gave us, and the world, a blueprint for the protection of democratic freedoms -- freedom of speech, assembly, religion -- but they also gave us the idea that a black person was three-fifths...
  • Of Great Empires and Little Minds

    07/04/2011 7:56:57 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 6 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | July 4th, 2011 | Paul Greenberg
    He rose to speak in the midst of a colonial war that would prove more than a colonial war but a whole Novus Ordo Seclorum, as it still says on the dollar bill, or A New Order for the Ages. Eloquent rhetorician, thoughtful student of history and insightful analyst of events in his own time, Edmund Burke had decided ideas about what made nations great and what undermined them. The member of parliament for Bristol understood very well what was at stake in the coming conflict over the nature of the British empire: the empire itself. Author, orator, thinker, and...
  • The signers of the Declaration of Independence pledged their lives, their very lives for us

    07/03/2011 3:24:30 PM PDT · by jmaroneps37 · 6 replies
    coachisright.com ^ | July 3, 2011 | Kevin “Coach” Collins
    The words at the beginning of the Declaration of Independence are far more familiar than the closing sentence. “When, in the course of human events, it becomes necessary for one people to dissolve the political bands which have connected them with another,…” are words we know from schooldays. They are the political poetry of our national founding. The words we have not heard enough about are …. closing sentence of this powerful document: “And for the support of this declaration, with a firm reliance on the protection of Divine Providence, we mutually pledge to each other our lives, our fortunes...
  • Battle of Lexington - This day in History

    04/19/2011 2:05:14 AM PDT · by abb · 18 replies
    RevolutionaryWar.com ^ | April 19, 2011 | Staff
    In February, the British Parliament declared the colony of Massachusetts to be in open rebellion and authorized British troops to kill the violent rebels. They were ordered to destroy all of the stores that had ammunition, rifles, or other arms. Lt. Gen. Thomas Gage, the commander-in-chief of the British Army in America, was given command to quell the rebellion. He gave the orders to the British troops to destroy stores and rebels. He thought that the citizens were planning to collect enough arms to form a rebellion. Some American spies learned of the British orders and sent word to the...
  • Meigs native recounts controversy over battle [WV]

    01/21/2011 5:55:54 AM PST · by Pharmboy · 33 replies
    Parkersburg News and Sentinel ^ | January 21, 2011 | JESS MANCINI
    PARKERSBURG - A Meigs County native has written a book about the Battle of Point Pleasant and whether it was the first fought in the Revolutionary War. Charles S. Badgley of the Badgley Publishing Co., Canal Winchester, Ohio, says he often heard while growing up along the river in Meigs County that the battle was the first in the war, the basis of his most recent novel, "A Point of Controversy." Conventional wisdom was the battles of Lexington and Concord in 1775 were the first in the war of independence. "The controversy has been around a long time, it actually...
  • VIDEO: Christine O’Donnell: Tea Party = SECOND AMERICAN REVOLUTION

    12/11/2010 3:10:28 PM PST · by Moseley · 15 replies
    Northern Virginia Tea Party, 2nd Annual Banquet ^ | December 7, 2010 | Christine O'Donnell
    Christine O'Donnell describes the tea party movement as "the Second American Revolution" and analyzes the future of the tea party movement at the Northern Virginia Tea party Second Annual Banquet on December 7, 2010, in Falls Church, Virginia.
  • CARDINAL GIBBONS ON ARCHBISHOP CARROLL [The Catholic Church in America and the American Revolution]

    10/30/2010 2:40:08 AM PDT · by GonzoII · 1 replies
    CARDINAL GIBBONS ON ARCHBISHOP CARROLL The address Cardinal Gibbons delivered the other day before the Catholic Club of Baltimore on the life and character of the first American Bishop afforded the Cardinal an opportunity of showing that the Catholic Church has not lost the impress stamped on her by the patriotic priest who has earned the title of " the Patriarch of the American Church." An American of Americans, Archbishop Carroll could not fail to thoroughly sympathise with his country in her efforts to throw off the English yoke under which she was groaning. The declaration of Independence appealed alike...
  • Glenn Beck Accused Redcoats of Burning Churches ("VANITY")

    08/28/2010 7:51:41 AM PDT · by the OlLine Rebel · 116 replies
    N/A | 8/28/2010 | Me
    I didn't see any comments about Glenn Beck's 1st words on his Friday TV show. He talked about the "Black Robe Regiment", and said that Brits largely blamed churches/preachers for fomenting the Revolution. Then he said as a result, when the Redcoats came here upon the war starting, they burned churches because of this. Then he said they even "locked up people inside and burned them".
  • Should Black Folks Give the Tea Party a Second Look?

    07/15/2010 2:12:19 PM PDT · by neverdem · 61 replies
    The Root ^ | July 14, 2010 | Sophia Nelson
    Yes, the Tea Party movement is overwhelmingly white. But this writer says the black community should stop being emotional and consider the facts. As a black woman in America, I have remained largely silent about the Tea Party movement and whether the movement itself is ''racist,'' as it is being charged by many in our community, including the leadership of the NAACP. As a community, we should take a step back for a moment and learn how to stop making emotional judgments and consider the facts about the Tea Party movement. I think we can all agree that the Tea...
  • A Call to Remember the Early Heroes (holiday vanity)

    07/03/2010 6:36:10 PM PDT · by 2sheds · 3 replies · 1+ views
    me
    All of us here support our troops in whatever way each of us can. Today, during this Independence Day weekend, I'd like to take a moment to remember the earlier heroes, the ones without whom we might not have this holiday. Men of character, strong will, and faith. The events of April 19, 1775, set in motion the founding of our great nation, which served as a beacon of freedom and land of hope for the whole world for over 200 years. Recent events have grieved us deeply as we see that ideal slipping away but that's a topic for...
  • Sam Adams creator wants National Patriot’s Day

    04/19/2010 7:41:18 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 36 replies · 997+ views
    AP ^ | April 19, 2010
    The founder of a beer named after an American Revolutionary hero is pushing for Patriot’s Day to become a national holiday. Jim Koch, founder and owner of the Boston Beer Co., the maker of Sam Adams, says he is launching a personal campaign and starting a petition to begin a movement for the national holiday. Koch said if Patriot’s Day was a national holiday, more Americans would understand the nation’s "revolutionary spirit" and how much the Founder Fathers risked their lives.
  • This Day in History: The Stamp Act is Passed!

    03/22/2010 8:00:32 AM PDT · by McBuff · 32 replies · 1,311+ views
    Vanity | 3/22/2010 | McBuff
    George Santayana said that those who fail to learn from history are doomed to repeating history. Today marks the 245 anniversary of the passing of The Stamp Act. It was repealed one year later, however the spark of the American Revolution was ignited. In this most timely hour, let us learn from our history, let us learn from the ways of the sons of liberty, let us be heartened by their example. A spark has been ignited and a new revolution is underway!
  • Legacy of Boston Tea Party Sullied by Sensationalist Politics (Tea Party Pooper Alert)

    02/17/2010 8:20:33 AM PST · by Fiji Hill · 41 replies · 591+ views
    Occidental Weekly ^ | 2/3/2010 | Chloe Jenkins-Sleczkowski
    Legacy of Boston Tea Party Sullied by Sensationalist Politics By: Chloe Jenkins-Sleczkowski Posted: 2/3/10 The past year has brought on an inreased exposure of tea - not Earl Grey. I am speaking of the Tea Party Movement, the grassroots and conservative-minded (dis-)organization that has been making headlines with its latest shenanigans to reclaim the country for the intellectually lazy. Although some political diversity is a nice change, it does not need to be in the form of griping conservatives who are only making it harder on a president who has more than enough on his plate. The Tea Party...
  • The Education of John Jay - America’s indispensable diplomat (MUST READ AMERICAN HISTORY!)

    02/08/2010 12:37:57 AM PST · by neverdem · 42 replies · 1,031+ views
    City Journal ^ | Winter 2010 | Myron Magnet
    Few could fathom why 55-year-old John Jay turned down President Adams’s nomination to rejoin the Supreme Court when his two terms as New York’s governor ended. What would lead him, in the hale prime of life, to retire instead to the plain yellow house he’d just built on a hilltop at the remote northern edge of Westchester County, two days’ ride from Manhattan, where visitors were few and the mail and newspapers came but once a week? After 27 years at the forge of the new nation’s founding, why would so lavishly talented a man give up his vital role...
  • A little "Common Sense" gives rise to the American Revolution and the birth of America

    01/21/2010 7:48:02 PM PST · by Ravnagora · 2 replies · 269+ views
    www.aleksandrarebic.com ^ | January 14, 2010 | Thomas Paine
    Aleksandra's Note: If anyone has ever doubted the power of words and the ability of a writer of them to light fires under men and women, to embolden hearts, to move people to courageous action, and to inspire true change based on noble virtues and principles for the benefit of mankind, they need only learn the story of Thomas Paine's "Common Sense", a mere "pamphlet" that was published anonymously in 1776. It was this little pamphlet that kicked open the door to the American Revolution and the birth of America. To this day, "Common Sense" remains one of the greatest...
  • Brown Fires First Shot Of Second American Revolution

    01/20/2010 10:54:00 AM PST · by Stoutcat · 9 replies · 339+ views
    Grand Rants ^ | 01-20-10 | Gerry Ashley
    First and foremost, Grand Rants wishes to congratulate Scott Brown in his victory over Atty Gen. Martha Coakley in yesterday’s Massachusetts special election. We salute Sen. Brown, his staff, and his supporters state-wide for running a clean campaign. While a smug President Obama cruised into town last weekend to downplay the Brown threat, mocking Scott’s pickup truck, it was Brown who used his the truck to skillfully navigate through Coakley’s negative campaign, taking only the high roads. Obama and Coakley just didn’t get that this is what America wants and desperately needs at this time. Let them wallow in the...
  • The Second American Revolution Begins Tomorrow

    01/18/2010 11:57:35 AM PST · by American Dream 246 · 5 replies · 352+ views
    theobamafile ^ | 01/18/10 | theobamafile
    On April 19, 1775, about 700 British Army regulars were confronted by a small band of armed, colonial farmers in Lexington, Massachusetts. The first shots were fired just as the sun was rising over Lexington Green. This, "shot heard 'round the world," began the first American Revolution. Tomorrow, on January 19th, 2010, the final day of the Usurper's first year, the Second American Revolution will commence in Massachusetts, where, once again, American Patriots, facing overwhelming odds, will strike a blow for American values and freedom. This will be a difficult task. The Massachusetts Democrats are highly skilled at manipulating the...
  • The American Revolution.Who Cares? (.pdf)

    01/06/2010 11:19:54 AM PST · by pillut48 · 19 replies · 601+ views
    Glenn Beck ^ | The American Revolution Center
    "This nationwide survey of American adults revealed that nearly every one of us cares about the American Revolution. More than nine in 10 Americans agreed that it is important for us to know the history of and principles forged during America’s War for Independence. This belief is shared by Americans across all demographic categories and political affiliations. Yet when tested on basic knowledge of the American Revolution and our Founding documents, 83 percent of Americans scored an average of 44 percent. We are failing our Founders."
  • Idaho Gubernatorial Candidate: Saving U.S. Constitution Requires God’s Help!

    01/05/2010 11:05:14 AM PST · by iloveamerica1980 · 1 replies · 187+ views
    Dittos Rush! ^ | 1-5-10 | James
    Video from press conference: "America would not exist if it wasn't for the divine hand of providence in not only intervening to win the Revolutionary War but in writing the inspired words of the Constitution. To think that we can save the Constitution without God's help when the government of the United States is corrupt is absurdity," Idaho GOP gubernatorial candidate Rex Rammell said.
  • Revolutionary War hero Pulaski becomes honorary US citizen

    11/06/2009 6:39:18 PM PST · by Saije · 31 replies · 966+ views
    Augusta Chronicle ^ | 11/6/2009 | AP
    Finally, Gen. Casimir Pulaski became an American, 230 years after the Polish nobleman died in Georgia fighting for what became the United States. President Barack Obama signed a joint resolution today of the Senate and the House of Representatives that made Pulaski an honorary citizen. Pulaski's contribution to the Americans' effort to leave the British Empire began with a flourish. He wrote a letter to Gen. George Washington, the Revolution's leader, with the declaration: "I came here, where freedom is being defended, to serve it, and to live or die for it." Democratic Rep. Dennis Kucinich, whose home city of...