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Keyword: americanrevolution

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • This day in history

    03/23/2008 4:44:06 PM PDT · by moderatewolverine · 8 replies · 337+ views
    Primetime Politics ^ | March 23, 2008 | Associated Press
    This day in history...VIDEO
  • The American Revolution

    03/17/2008 6:33:43 AM PDT · by deadrock · 14 replies · 293+ views
    Sorry for the vanity - but I can't think of a better resource than FR regarding this topic. I don't trust Amazonian recommendations. Please, if you can, recommend the best book/s detailing the American Revolution. Not just the battles, but the politics leading up to the war, the writing of the Declaration of Ind., who the signers were ...etc. I'd appreciate any input. Thanks for your time.
  • Then and Now - The startling parallels between the Iraq War and the American Revolution.

    03/14/2008 7:28:07 PM PDT · by neverdem · 22 replies · 832+ views
    Washington Post ^ | March 16, 2008 | Thomas E. Ricks
    Five years into their war to retain control of America, the British thought they were winning. As Piers Mackesy relates in his brilliant, classic history of the American Revolution, The War for America, 1775-1783, the British cabinet believed the rebel cause was disintegrating by 1780. One of the best American generals, Benedict Arnold, had changed sides. Rebel finances were weak. Morale in George Washington's army appeared to be plummeting, and there was talk of mutiny in the rebel camp. The British army had landed in the South and was chewing up American forces there. The intervention of the French on...
  • Medal belonging to American hero Lafayette to be sold at auction

    12/09/2007 8:10:42 PM PST · by RDTF · 2 replies · 148+ views
    Breitbart ^ | Dec 9, 2007 | AFP
    A gold and enamel medal that once belonged to the American Revolutionary hero the Marquis de Lafayette goes on auction here Tuesday, and could fetch as much as 10 million dollars, experts said. The medal being sold by Lafayette's descendants was given to the Frenchman in 1824 by relatives of America's first US President George Washington, when Lafayette was 67 years old. The gift was made a quarter-century after the death in 1799 of Washington, who as a general led US troops to victory in their battle for independence against Britain. -snip-
  • Looking Back: Future governor, Revolutionary soldier born

    12/03/2007 8:23:35 PM PST · by Coleus · 49+ views
    star ledger ^ | December 03, 2007 | Claire Heininger
    ON THIS DATE IN HISTORY:On Dec. 3, 1756, Aaron Ogden was born in Elizabethtown, the son of a legislator who would rise to a public service career of his own.Ogden, who served in the military during the American Revolution and the undeclared war against France, grew into a skilled orator and debater. He served in Congress from 1801 to 1803 and was elected governor of New Jersey in 1812. Ogden, who also had business interests in steamboat machinery, later became embroiled in a Supreme Court case concerning the monopoly of steamboat service in New York waters. Drained of his...
  • George Washington takes Fort Lee exit from redcoats

    11/22/2007 11:58:03 AM PST · by Coleus · 3 replies · 231+ views
    the record ^ | November 18, 2007 | JOHN BRENNAN
     Andrew Wnukowski of Hillside checks his redcoat costume in the glint of a car window. About 5,000 British troops came ashore at Closter Dock in Alpine on Nov. 20, 1776, setting the stage for the redcoats to capture Fort Lee from the upstart American revolutionaries later in the day.   On Saturday, four "soldiers" with red coats, muskets and goatskin backpacks -- along with a dozen or so intrepid "civilians" -- re-created the climb up the Palisades toward the site named after Gen. Charles Lee, who would be court-martialed two years later for disobeying Gen. George Washington's orders during the...
  • New fight brews at famed Princeton battle site, A plan to build housing on historic site

    08/21/2007 5:46:16 PM PDT · by Coleus · 7 replies · 509+ views
    star ledger ^ | August 08, 2007 | TOM HESTER
    The way Jerry Hurwitz sees it, it doesn't take an Einstein to understand the significance of the hal lowed ground on which a pivotal Revolutionary War Battle of Princeton was fought 230 years ago. Part of the battle on Jan. 3, 1777, was waged on 22 acres of gently sloping farmland now owned by the Institute for Advanced Study. The institute -- an independent, private research institution that counted physicist Albert Ein stein among its faculty -- is adja cent to the 85-acre Princeton Battlefield State Park. But that section of the battlefield was never incorporated into the state park,...
  • Revolutionary War remnant pulled from Delaware River

    11/24/2007 8:25:17 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 39 replies · 440+ views
    AP via pennlive.com ^ | 11/24/2007 | EDWARD COLIMORE
    PHILADELPHIA (AP) — In a small survey boat, maritime archaeologist J. Lee Cox Jr. was checking the bottom of the Delaware River at the Sunoco Logistics pier in South Philadelphia when he got a hit on the side-scan sonar. A pipe? A log? A hazard to the oil tankers docking nearby? No one was sure until a diver was sent down weeks later and found a strange pointed object buried in the muck about 40 feet down. Earlier this month, Cox identified it as the business end of a cheval-de-frise, an iron-tipped log once embedded in the river, along with...
  • 100 Days That Shook the World

    08/20/2007 6:11:20 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 27 replies · 961+ views
    The Smithsonian ^ | July, 2007 | John Ferling
    On March 15, 1781, American forces inflicted heavy losses on the British Army at Guilford Courthouse, North Carolina. The redcoats had seemed invincible only a few months before. Winter clouds scudded over New Windsor, New York, some 50 miles up the Hudson River from Manhattan, where Gen. George Washington was headquartered. With trees barren and snow on the ground that January 1781, it was a "dreary station," as Washington put it. The commander in chief's mood was as bleak as the landscape. Six long years into the War of Independence, his army, he admitted to Lt. Col. John Laurens,...
  • Revolution was won around here

    07/22/2007 8:09:15 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 29 replies · 576+ views
    Charlotte Observer ^ | Jul. 22, 2007 | DAN HUNTLEY
    IN MY OPINION One of the first lessons you learn when studying history is that history books are usually written by the side that wins the war. After the Civil War, the South's role in the American Revolution was relegated to practically a footnote. My 10th-grade U.S. history book basically had two paragraphs about the South's role -- the British took Charleston, there were lots of backwoods skirmishes in the Carolinas at places such as Kings Mountain and Cowpens, and the British surrendered at Yorktown. The implication was that the only battles of consequence took place within 200 miles of...
  • How a Jewish patriot saved America

    07/04/2007 8:16:03 AM PDT · by wagglebee · 102 replies · 1,760+ views
    WorldNetDaily ^ | 7/4/07 | Richard Booker
    In 1975 the United States Postal Service issued a stamp honoring a man named Haym Salomon for his contribution to the cause of the American Revolution. This stamp was uniquely printed on the front and the back. On the glue side of the stamp, the following words were printed in pale, green ink: "Financial Hero – Businessman and broker Haym Salomon was responsible for raising most of the money needed to finance the American Revolution and later to save the new nation from collapse." I personally have one of these stamps. Historians who have studied the story of Salomon all...
  • If Washington Crossed The Delaware In 2007 (American Revolution Run Aground By PC Alert)

    07/04/2007 1:40:44 AM PDT · by goldstategop · 14 replies · 713+ views
    Frontpagemag.com ^ | 07/04/2007 | Tom Purcell
    "Let me get this straight, Gen. Washington: You want us, the representatives of the Second Continental Congress, to fund a sneak attack on British troops starting on Christmas?" "That is correct, sir. After we declared our independence from King George, he was most unhappy. He ordered his army to attack us. The Brits have made tremendous gains on our homeland." "Gains, Washington?" "Sir, whereas our Continental Army is something of a motley crew, the Brits are well-trained and well-funded. Their forces include Hessian mercenaries, professional fighters who are most skilled at the art of war." "Your point, Washington?" "The Brits...
  • Escape From New York

    07/02/2007 9:14:23 PM PDT · by gpapa · 7 replies · 738+ views
    OpinionJournal.com ^ | July 3, 2007 | BRENDAN MINITER
    In 1776 Lt. Col. Thomas Knowlton seemed to be precisely the kind of military officer the American military needed to win the Revolution. He was a veteran of the French and Indian War two decades earlier. He proved to be a supreme leader of men in combat outside Boston. And he was tapped by Gen. George Washington to start a new elite military unit--Knowlton's Rangers--that was capable of operating behind enemy lines.
  • Independence Forever: Why America Celebrates the Fourth of July

    06/30/2007 5:06:47 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 23 replies · 977+ views
    Heritage Foundation ^ | 6/28/07 | Matthew Spalding, Ph.D.
    The Fourth of July is a great opportunity to renew our dedication to the principles of liberty and equality enshrined in what Thomas Jefferson called "the declaratory charter of our rights."As a practical matter, the Declaration of Independence publicly announced to the world the unanimous decision of the American colonies to declare themselves free and independent states, absolved from any allegiance to Great Britain. But its greater meaning—then as well as now—is as a statement of the conditions of legitimate political authority and the proper ends of government, and its proclamation of a new ground of political rule in...
  • Will the North Sea give up America's most prized naval treasure?[John Paul Jones]

    06/28/2007 8:59:42 AM PDT · by BGHater · 31 replies · 1,639+ views
    Yorkshire Post ^ | 28 June 2007 | Martin Hickes
    The Americans will be taking to the high seas off the Yorkshire coast this summer in search of their nautical "Holy Grail". Martin Hickes reports on an expensive obsession. THIS August, a flotilla of American scientists will mount a £175,000 expedition off Flamborough Head in search of a wreck, more than 200 years after it sank. Two US teams will plunge into the North Sea in search of the flagship of a Scottish captain, known to the Brits as little more than a pirate, but to the Americans as a hero of the American Revolution and the "Father of the...
  • This Day In History - American Revolution June 17, 1775 Battle of Bunker Hill

    1775 : The Battle of Bunker Hill During the American Revolution, British General William Howe lands his troops on the Charlestown peninsula overlooking Boston and leads them against Breed's Hill, a fortified American position just below Bunker Hill. As the British advanced in columns against the Americans, Patriot General William Prescott reportedly told his men, "Don't one of you fire until you see the whites of their eyes!" When the Redcoats were within 40 yards, the Americans let loose with a lethal barrage of musket fire, cutting down nearly 100 enemy troops and throwing the British into retreat. After reforming...
  • April 19: Freedom’s Birthday

    04/19/2007 9:40:59 AM PDT · by Irontank · 8 replies · 430+ views
    Americans revere a great number of dates that hold special significance for their culture and history. The Fourth of July, Veterans Day, the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. — a quick glance through any calendar provides numerous other examples. Yet the one day of most importance, to both the nation and its culture, is the one that is conspicuously absent from any mention of notable historical dates. No parades honor the fallen; no speeches in Congress remind us of their deeds; no wreaths are laid; no moments of silence requested. On this sacred date no president will stand on...
  • The Last Naval Battle of the American Revolution

    03/10/2007 5:54:23 PM PST · by NonValueAdded · 24 replies · 3,401+ views
    FreeRepublic.com ^ | March 10, 2007 | NonValueAdded
    A monument and historical marker were dedicated today at Port Canaveral, Florida, commemorating The Last Naval Battle of the American Revolution From the historical marker, dedicated on March 10, 2007: The last naval battle of the American Revolutionary War took place off the coast of Cape Canaveral on March 10, 1783. The fight began when three British ships sighted two Continental Navy ships, the Alliance commanded by Captain John Barry and the Duc De Lauzun commanded by Captain John Green sailing northward along the coast of Florida. The Alliance, a 36-gun frigate, and the Duc De Lauzun, a 20-gun ship,...
  • The Man Who Would Not Be King (George Washington)

    02/17/2007 12:45:14 PM PST · by wagglebee · 43 replies · 1,683+ views
    Heritage Foundation ^ | 2/5/07 | Matthew Spalding
    George Washington is one of the most recognized figures in U.S. history. But familiarity breeds contempt. More often than not, Washington is an old painting on the wall – solemn, impersonal and distant – or the subject of childhood stories and nursery rhymes. We all know that he chopped down a cherry tree and had wooden teeth. The actual Washington is much more compelling. We can all see the brilliant flourishes of Jefferson's pen, Madison's constitutional handiwork or the success of Hamilton's economic policies, and that can cause us to overlook or underestimate the magnitude of Washington's achievement. Yet he...
  • Forcing Girls To Cheer For Girls (Dennis Prager: The Left Is Obssessed With Running Your Life Alert)

    01/29/2007 11:01:27 PM PST · by goldstategop · 24 replies · 1,474+ views
    Townhall.com ^ | 01/29/2006 | Dennis Prager
    High school cheerleaders must now cheer for girls' teams as often as for boys' teams thanks to federal education officials' interpretations of Title IX, the civil rights law that mandates equal playing fields for both sexes. According to The New York Times, almost no one directly involved wants this -- not the cheerleaders, not the fans, not the boys' teams, and not even the girls' teams. But it doesn't matter: The law coerces cheerleaders to cheer at girls' games. Of all the myths that surround Left-Right differences, one of the greatest is that the Left values liberty more than the...
  • The Great Christmas Night Raid

    12/22/2006 4:29:21 AM PST · by Molly Pitcher · 43 replies · 1,522+ views
    Townhall ^ | 12/22/06 | W. Thomas Smith, Jr.
    Continental Army General George Washington’s celebrated “Crossing of the Delaware” has been dubbed in some military circles, “America’s first special operation.” Though there were certainly many small-unit actions, raids, and Ranger operations during the Colonial Wars – and there was a special Marine landing in Nassau in the early months of the American Revolution – no special mission by America’s first army has been more heralded than that which took place on Christmas night exactly 230 years ago. Certainly the mission had all the components of a modern special operation (though without all the modern battlefield technologies we take for...
  • Maryland to buy Washington letter (for $600,000)

    12/21/2006 6:06:51 AM PST · by Cagey · 52 replies · 663+ views
    WDBJ NEWS ^ | 12-21-2006
    ANNAPOLIS, Md. Maryland will spend 600-thousand dollars to buy George Washington's handwritten resignation from the Continental Army. Maryland archivists said in February that they'd acquired the speech to put in the State House in Annapolis, where the Revolutionary War hero resigned his commission in 1783. The state Board of Public Works approved that purchase yesterday, along with 150-thousand dollars for an accompanying letter written by a witness describing the event. The speech is seen as a turning point in America's formation because it established that the military should be subservient to civil authority. The 750-thousand dollars granted by the Board...
  • Sons of American Revolution welcome Gates

    09/14/2006 4:38:49 PM PDT · by Pharmboy · 19 replies · 534+ views
    Gates learned of the Revolutionary War veteran in his lineage while filming his PBS documentary, 'African American Lives.' (Staff file photo Justin Ide/Harvard News Office) Henry Louis Gates Jr., W.E.B. Du Bois Professor of the Humanities and director of the W.E.B. Du Bois Institute for African and African American Research at Harvard, was inducted into the Sons of the American Revolution (SAR) on July 10 at the society’s 116th annual convention, held in Addison, Texas. Gates learned of the Revolutionary War veteran in his lineage while filming his PBS documentary, “African American Lives,” a program that used innovations in...
  • The “Desperate Valor” of an African-American Regiment in The American Revolution (August 28, 1778)

    The American Revolution’s Continental Army was fighting hard in late 1777. General George Washington faced serious need of soldiers to serve through more than the usual 90-day enlistment. General James Varnum gave him the idea to raise a regiment of volunteer “Blacks, Mulattoes, and Indians” from Northern colonies, and in January 1778 Washington ordered Rhode Island governor Nicholas Cooke to organize the new force. While Northern slave-owners received 120 English pounds for each volunteer, the volunteers themselves were promised more than pay---full freedom in exchange for loyal service through the war. By June 10, about 138 Northerïn slaves from several...
  • Native Sons of Liberty (HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.)

    08/06/2006 1:27:47 AM PDT · by neverdem · 2 replies · 1,474+ views
    NY Times ^ | August 6, 2006 | HENRY LOUIS GATES Jr.
    ON June 11, 1823, a man named John Redman walked into the courtroom of Judge Charles Lobb in Hardy County, Virginia, to apply for a pension, claiming to be a veteran of the Revolutionary War. Redman, more than 60 years old, testified that he had been in the First Virginia Regiment of Light Dragoons from Christmas 1778 through 1782, serving initially as a waiter to Lt. Vincent Howell. The Light Dragoons fought mainly on horseback, using sabers, pistols, and light carbines. They marched from Winchester, Va., to Georgia, where, in the fall of 1779, they laid siege to Savannah. The...
  • Revolutionary War flag auctioned for $12.3M ( total of $17 million )

    06/14/2006 5:44:28 PM PDT · by george76 · 8 replies · 511+ views
    Reuters ^ | June 14, 2006
    Anonymous bidder snaps up flag belonging to a Connecticut regiment and three others for total of $17 million. An American Revolutionary War flag fetched $12.3 million at an auction in New York on Wednesday, and a group of three other flags went for more than $5 million to the same bidder, Sotheby's said. The total price of $17,392,000 was well over the pre-sale estimate of $4 million to $10 million for the two lots of battle flags captured by the British during the 1775-83 war,...
  • David McCullough: A Man Worth Knowing (John Adams)

    06/04/2006 8:53:58 AM PDT · by wagglebee · 42 replies · 2,526+ views
    Hillsdale College ^ | May, 2006 | David McCullough
     David McCullough was born in 1933 in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, and was educated there and at Yale University. Author of 1776, John Adams, Truman, Brave Companions, The Path Between the Seas, Mornings on Horseback, The Great Bridge and The Johnstown Flood, he has twice received the Pulitzer Prize and twice the National Book Award, as well as the Francis Parkman Prize and the Los Angeles Times Book Award. The following is adapted from a public lecture delivered at Hillsdale College on March 31, 2006, during Mr. McCullough's one-week residency at the College to teach a class on “Leadership and the History...
  • "Washington the Warrior" Rebroadcast Tonight at 8 (Saturday, June 3) on The History Channel

    06/03/2006 6:15:51 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 31 replies · 372+ views
    The History Channel ^ | 6-3-06 | Me
    I saw this last week and wanted to recommend it for those who did not see, tape, Tivo or DVD it. Although the first hour (French and Indian War) was a bit more negative in terms of Washington's strategy and sophistication (yeah, he shouldn't have built Fort Necessity on low ground), he was a mere kid at the time in charge of the Virginia Militia, and the only one in the colony to step up. Also, the depiction of events in Jumonville Glen is antithetical to what I have read in several different sources, that is, Washington never gave the...
  • Matthews: U.S. in Iraq No Better Than 'Colonial Masters'

    05/22/2006 4:49:55 PM PDT · by governsleastgovernsbest · 24 replies · 464+ views
    Hardball/NewsBusters ^ | Mark Finkelstein
    by Mark Finkelstein May 22, 2006 In one fell segment, Chris Matthews pulled back the curtain and revealed his view of America's foreign policy intentions as fundamentally pernicious. For him, the United States in Iraq is no better than a 'colonial master.' Matthews' guest on this evening's 'Hardball' was John Batiste, one of the former generals calling for Donald Rumsfeld's removal as Secretary of Defense. The topic at hand was the failure to anticipate the insurgency with which we have been been faced in Iraq. Describing the miscalculation, Matthews said: "It's like the British coming in to New York at...
  • THE SPIRIT OF '75: REMEMBER LEXINGTON AND CONCORD

    04/19/2006 7:31:42 AM PDT · by Hemingway's Ghost · 29 replies · 585+ views
    Beneath Old Roof Trees ^ | 1896 | Abram English Brown
    The following narrative appeared in an obituary notice of the Columbian Sentinel of Feb. 6, 1793: Died at Menotomy, the 2d instant, Capt. Samuel Whittemore, AEt. 96 years and 6 months. The manly and moral virtues, in all the varied relations of a brother, husband, father, and friend, were invariably exhibited in this gentleman. He was not more remarkable for his longevity and his numerous descendants (his progeny being 185, one of which is the fifth generation) than for his patriotism. When the British troops marched to Lexington, he was 79 years of age, and one of the first on...
  • April 19: Freedom’s Birthday

    04/19/2006 6:51:32 AM PDT · by Irontank · 53 replies · 1,615+ views
    Americans revere a great number of dates that hold special significance for their culture and history. The Fourth of July, Veterans Day, the birthday of Martin Luther King Jr. — a quick glance through any calendar provides numerous other examples. Yet the one day of most importance, to both the nation and its culture, is the one that is conspicuously absent from any mention of notable historical dates. No parades honor the fallen; no speeches in Congress remind us of their deeds; no wreaths are laid; no moments of silence requested. On this sacred date no president will stand on...
  • Sons of Liberty Redux

    04/05/2006 11:49:47 AM PDT · by rtwingr · 4 replies · 501+ views
    Metrowest Daily News ^ | 4/3/06 | Steve Bowler
    In 1773, members of the Sons of Liberty, including people from right here in the Marlborough area, dumped tea into Boston Harbor in protest against the British. It was one of the seminal events of the Revolutionary years. So how is that event presented in today's high school history classes?
  • Reclaiming the American Revolution

    01/25/2006 9:08:14 AM PST · by Irontank · 10 replies · 497+ views
    Future of Freedom Foundation ^ | December 30, 2005
    How do you devise a system of limited government that actually works? It is easy enough to put words on paper that purport to accomplish that task, but where has that (or any other) approach worked in the long run? Certainly not in the United States, where the Founders’ design for a limited and highly decentralized system of government came apart at the seams in the 20th century. What is very little known, even among those few Americans who have an understanding of the Constitution and our early history, is how quickly the stitching began to fray. The new nation...
  • Gen. Marion's neglected shrine

    01/21/2006 6:48:15 PM PST · by Pharmboy · 38 replies · 1,831+ views
    Charleston Post and Courier ^ | Jan 21, 2006 | Anon. Editorialist
    Gen. Francis Marion is rightly remembered as one of South Carolina's greatest heroes. Unfortunately, the condition of his grave site belies the historical importance of the pivotal Revolutionary War figure. The Legislature should provide for the necessary structural repairs to grave markers of the general and his wife as well as improvements to the site and its access road. The general's Pineville grave site is reached by a narrow rutted road, more than a mile in length. The small Huguenot cemetery in which his grave is located is surrounded by a low, rambling chain-link fence. (Former Congressman and state Sen....
  • Plan would park Swamp Fox in Washington

    12/30/2005 11:59:16 AM PST · by Between the Lines · 12 replies · 659+ views
    Charleston Post and Courier ^ | December 28, 2005 | YVONNE M. WENGER
    In 1887, a grassy area along South Carolina Avenue in Washington, D.C., was named Marion Park, but was never graced with the likeness of its namesake. More than 115 years later, John F. McCabe of Columbia wants to change that with an act of Congress and a bronze statue of Gen. Francis Marion, who was known as the Swamp Fox for his guerrilla warfare tactics during the American Revolution. McCabe visited Washington on a boating trip in June and stopped by to see the acre-and-a-half park about four blocks from Capitol Hill, and was surprised when he did not find...
  • 229 Years Ago Tonight - The American Revolution is Saved on the Banks of the Delaware River

    12/25/2005 9:09:40 AM PST · by XRdsRev · 42 replies · 2,518+ views
    2003 | Ernest R. Bower
    In the gloom of this holy Christmas night, a cold sleet fell. It was not a night for man nor beast but yet here they were. Huddled upon the banks of this frigid river, 2000 men contemplated their bleak fate. The past few months had gone very, very badly. Their hopes had been crushed time and again. The noble experiment in Liberty which had begun with such promise, had by this time deteriorated to the point where every day was a battle just to survive. Defeat after defeat, at places like Long Island, Harlem Heights, Fort Washington and White Plains...
  • This Day In History December 25, 1776 Washington crosses the Delaware

    This Day In History | General Interest December 25 1776 Washington crosses the Delaware During the American Revolution, Patriot General George Washington crosses the Delaware River with 5,400 troops, hoping to surprise a Hessian force celebrating Christmas at their winter quarters in Trenton, New Jersey. The unconventional attack came after several months of substantial defeats for Washington's army that had resulted in the loss of New York City and other strategic points in the region. At about 11 p.m. on Christmas, Washington's army commenced its crossing of the half-frozen river at three locations. The 2,400 soldiers led by Washington successfully...
  • Historical Folly of "Exit Strategy" for Iraq

    11/16/2005 5:12:28 PM PST · by Congressman Billybob · 22 replies · 1,137+ views
    Special to FreeRepublic ^ | 16 November 2005 | John Armor (Congressman Billybob)
    The Hill is a specialized publication, mostly for Members of Congress and those whose living depends on Congress. Still, an article in The Hill today (Wednesday) is typical of the media coverage of the Senate vote yesterday to require “reports” to Congress on the progress of the Iraq War. The title is “Needed: An Exit Strategy from Iraq.” It is written by Rep. Jane Harmon (D. Calif) and its lede includes these paragraphs. "There is now a strong bipartisan consensus that we need an exit strategy. But yet to emerge is the content of that strategy. "We have two overriding...
  • Reddy Finney, Joe Enge, and the US Constitution

    11/05/2005 9:24:44 AM PST · by Congressman Billybob · 11 replies · 1,638+ views
    Special to FreeRepublic ^ | 6 November 2005 | John Armor (Congressman Billybob)
    The Carson City, Nevada, school administrators are attempting to fire an award-winning history teacher, Joe Enge. Why should that matter to you? I’ll combine his story with that of my 11th grade history teacher. Maybe you’ll agree this matters to everyone who cares about the future of America. In Carson City schools, administrators insist that history teachers begin teaching American history with the Civil War. Joe Enge, an 11th grade teacher there who’s written two history books and has served on a statewide board on history teaching, disagrees. He begins at the beginning, teaching his students about the American Revolution,...
  • The FReeper Foxhole Remembers the Siege of Savannah (1779) - Sep 22nd, 2005

    09/21/2005 8:32:58 PM PDT · by SAMWolf · 53 replies · 5,126+ views
    Military History Magazine | March 1997 | Thomas G. Rodgers
    Lord, Keep our Troops forever in Your care Give them victory over the enemy... Grant them a safe and swift return... Bless those who mourn the lost. . FReepers from the Foxhole join in prayer for all those serving their country at this time. .................................................................. .................... ........................................... U.S. Military History, Current Events and Veterans Issues Where Duty, Honor and Countryare acknowledged, affirmed and commemorated. Our Mission: The FReeper Foxhole is dedicated to Veterans of our Nation's military forces and to others who are affected in their relationships with Veterans. In the FReeper Foxhole, Veterans or their family members should...
  • The FReeper Foxhole Remembers Colonel Benedict Arnold at Quebec (Winter 1775) - Sep 15th, 2005

    09/14/2005 10:06:30 PM PDT · by SAMWolf · 18 replies · 2,480+ views
    Military History Magazine. | August 1999 | Lee Enderlin
    Lord, Keep our Troops forever in Your care Give them victory over the enemy... Grant them a safe and swift return... Bless those who mourn the lost. . FReepers from the Foxhole join in prayer for all those serving their country at this time. .................................................................. .................... ........................................... U.S. Military History, Current Events and Veterans Issues Where Duty, Honor and Countryare acknowledged, affirmed and commemorated. Our Mission: The FReeper Foxhole is dedicated to Veterans of our Nation's military forces and to others who are affected in their relationships with Veterans. In the FReeper Foxhole, Veterans or their family members should...
  • New York State Works to Preserve Rare 18th Century Artifacts, Including Benedict Arnold Papers

    08/20/2005 11:52:11 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 8 replies · 400+ views
    Associated Press ^ | Aug 20, 2005 | Chris Carola
    ALBANY, N.Y. (AP) - The major general was so well known that even his abbreviated signature - "B. Arnold" - was sufficient on a pass to ensure anyone safe passage. But in September 1780, that signature sealed Benedict Arnold's fate as the American hero of Saratoga became America's most infamous traitor. The passes he scrawled for "John Anderson" - the alias of John Andre, a British spy - are among the most treasured items among the thousands of Revolutionary War documents and relics in the state library and archives, located in the New York State Museum. Now, thanks to a...
  • Triumph of the rabble

    07/04/2005 4:36:38 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 4 replies · 371+ views
    Townhall.com ^ | 7/4/05 | Suzanne Fields
    Fantasy time: If I had lived in the colonies 229 years ago today, would I have stayed here in harm's way, or returned to London to sip tea and nibble crumpets with Fortnum and Mason (or one of their forbears)? The temptation would have been great on the eve of the Revolution. Losers would have been traitors, to pay at the end of a British rope. Would I have had the confidence in a ragtag army of farmers who knew how to use a pitchfork, but not necessarily a gun? Would I have trusted that the sailors and fishermen, artisans...
  • The American Revolution pts 1 - 6 (The History Channel)

    07/01/2005 6:14:30 AM PDT · by lunarbicep · 24 replies · 743+ views
    The History Channel is currently showing a 6 part series called The American Revolution part 1: The Conflict Ignites - Colonists oppose England; Paul Revere's ride alerts his countrymen to arm. part 2: 1776 - The Second Continental Congress chooses George Washington to command its military. part 3: Washington & Arnold - Washington crosses the Delaware; Franklin goes to France. part 4: The World at War - Despite international support, the Continental Army suffers at Valley Forge. part 5: England's Last Chance - The Continental Army uses guerrilla tactics to counter British maneuvers part 6: Birth of the Republic -...
  • City Renews Eternal Flame (Media pressure does something right in Philly!)

    06/30/2005 11:44:25 AM PDT · by Dems_R_Losers · 6 replies · 293+ views
    KYW-TV Philadelphia ^ | June 29, 2005 | KYW-TV
    PHILADELPHIA (KYW) At Washington Square, on 7th and Walnut in Philadelphia, is of one of the nation’s most poignant tributes. It is a monument to those who gave their lives fighting for their country. (A veterans memorial that includes a Tomb of the Unknowns from the Revolutionary War.) An overwhelming response from CBS 3 viewers convinced the city to re-light the eternal flame in Washington Square Park. A dedication ceremony was held at the monument Wednesday. Over one-hundred people turned out to witness the official re-lighting of the historic monument. CBS 3 Anchor Larry Mendte reported that in front of...
  • "The Decisive Day is Come": The Battle of Bunker Hill (June 17, 1775)

    06/16/2005 12:53:13 PM PDT · by Irontank · 6 replies · 1,143+ views
    "The story of Bunker Hill battle," Allen French wrote, "is a tale of great blunders heroically redeemed." The first blunder was the decision of the Massachusetts Committee of Safety to fortify Charlestown heights and attempt to hold it against the British, cooped up in Boston after their withdrawal from Lexington and Concord. The ultimate aim was, in the abstract at least, sensible enough: to tighten the encirclement of Boston by commanding the heights both north and south of the town—Dorchester as well as Charlestown—and to deny those commanding hills to the British. But in fact the Americans did not have...
  • The FReeper Foxhole Remembers the Battle of Stony Point (7/15-16/1779) - May 16th, 2005

    05/15/2005 9:33:56 PM PDT · by SAMWolf · 83 replies · 2,645+ views
    Military History Quarterly | Fall 2003 | Noah Andre Trudeau
    Lord, Keep our Troops forever in Your care Give them victory over the enemy... Grant them a safe and swift return... Bless those who mourn the lost. . FReepers from the Foxhole join in prayer for all those serving their country at this time. .................................................................. .................... ........................................... U.S. Military History, Current Events and Veterans Issues Where Duty, Honor and Countryare acknowledged, affirmed and commemorated. Our Mission: The FReeper Foxhole is dedicated to Veterans of our Nation's military forces and to others who are affected in their relationships with Veterans. In the FReeper Foxhole, Veterans or their family members should...
  • R.J. Rummel: The American Vs. French Revolutions, A Freedomist Interpretation

    05/02/2005 12:57:32 PM PDT · by Tolik · 18 replies · 2,142+ views
    R.J. Rummel ^ | 5/1/2005 | R.J. Rummel
    The intellectual struggle worldwide today is now between the beliefs encapsulated in the American Revolution and those in the French. It is interests versus reason.First, some background. During the Middle Ages, the power of kings was checked by the a belief in the higher laws of God, to which kings and commoner alike - the nation, country, or kingdom, in short, the State -- were subject. But with the 16th century Reformation and the conflict between Protestantism and Catholicism, the battle was decided for the State. The Treaty of Westphalia in 1648 ended the Wars of Religion, and established the...
  • April 19, 1775: The American Revolution Begins

    04/19/2005 5:27:52 AM PDT · by kellynla · 14 replies · 1,494+ views
    History Channel.com ^ | 4/19/2005 | staff
    At about 5 a.m., 700 British troops, on a mission to capture Patriot leaders and seize a Patriot arsenal, march into Lexington to find 77 armed minutemen under Captain John Parker waiting for them on the town's common green. British Major John Pitcairn ordered the outnumbered Patriots to disperse, and after a moment's hesitation the Americans began to drift off the green. Suddenly, the "shot heard around the world" was fired from an undetermined gun, and a cloud of musket smoke soon covered the green. When the brief Battle of Lexington ended, eight Americans lay dead or dying and 10...
  • The FReeper Foxhole Remembers Peter Francisco: A One Man Army (1760-1831) - Apr. 7th, 2005

    04/06/2005 9:41:34 PM PDT · by SAMWolf · 59 replies · 9,527+ views
    American History Magazine | October 1998 | Joseph Gustaitis
    Lord, Keep our Troops forever in Your care Give them victory over the enemy... Grant them a safe and swift return... Bless those who mourn the lost. . FReepers from the Foxhole join in prayer for all those serving their country at this time. .................................................................. .................... ........................................... U.S. Military History, Current Events and Veterans Issues Where Duty, Honor and Countryare acknowledged, affirmed and commemorated. Our Mission: The FReeper Foxhole is dedicated to Veterans of our Nation's military forces and to others who are affected in their relationships with Veterans. In the FReeper Foxhole, Veterans or their family members should...