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Keyword: anatolia

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  • Turkey and The Old Testament...Turkey's significance pt 1

    08/26/2016 5:03:15 PM PDT · by pastorbillrandles · 10 replies
    Billrandles.wordpress ^ | 08-23-16 | Bill Randles
    I have come to the conclusion that the earnest Bible believer would do well to incorporate a new discipline to his study of the Word of God; Biblical Geography. My study of end times prophecy has drawn me into this aspect of Bible prophecy, particularly in my work on the book “A Sword On The Land;The Muslim World in Bible Prophecy”. Reading the Sacred text with a map and realizing the updated names of commonly cited places and peoples such as Moab,Ammon, Persia, Edom, Kedar and Dedan *has revolutionized my understanding of the stunning relevance of familiar prophecies throughout the...
  • The Hittite capital hosts ambassadors

    07/11/2016 11:47:26 PM PDT · by Cronos · 4 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | 12 July 2016 | HDN
    The archaeological site of Hattusha, the capital of the Hittite civilization which entered the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1986, was visited by a number of ambassadors in Turkey over the weekend as part of its two-day 30th anniversary celebrations organized by the governor’s office in the Central Anatolian province Çorum. The ancient site is notable for its cuneiform inscriptions, one of the most important discoveries at the site, consisting of official correspondence and contracts, as well as legal codes, procedures for cult ceremonies, oracular prophecies and literature of the ancient Near East. The cuneiforms entered the UNESCO Memory...
  • In Search of the Real Troy

    02/20/2005 2:33:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 1,322+ views
    Saudi Aramco World ^ | January/February 2005 Volume 56, Number 1 | Graham Chandler, Photographed by Ergun Cagata
    It was then that Swiss scholar Emil Forrer deciphered newly discovered writings from the Hittite Empire to the east, finding two place-names—Wilusa and Taruisa—that sounded convincingly like the Hittite way of writing "Wilios" (the Greek name for the site was "Ilion") and "Troia" (Troy). He also found a treaty, from the early 13th century BC, between the Hittite king Muwatalli and a king of "Wilusa" named Alaksandu. The king’s name, Forrer added, recalls the name of the Trojan prince Alexander—called Paris in Homer’s Iliad. Critics pooh-poohed, conceding that a place named Wilusa may have existed, but where was it on...
  • Early Written Signs

    02/14/2016 9:12:52 AM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 5 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | February 13, 2016 | Alice C. Linsley
    George and I have had several meaningful conversations via email. This one might be of interest to other readers and George gave me permission to reproduce the conversation. George: I want to thank you for your blogs. I read them all the time and they have been a BIG help! I've been trying to sell others on the fact that the Hebrew lettering system goes back further than the 4th century millennium BC thanks to your findings of the Ainu/Annu culture and their lettering system in their later homeland of Japan - but with no success. I definitely believe your...
  • Phaistos Disk: Greek or Luwian?

    06/25/2009 3:16:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 592+ views
    Examiner ^ | Wednesday, June 24, 2009 | Diana Gainer
    Since this disk was found in Crete, and the people of Crete today speak Greek, that's a good language to assume was spoken by the maker of the disk. Still, that's a guess, or a hypothesis, not a fact. Besides that, we know that not everybody on Crete spoke Greek in the Bronze Age. The classical Greeks mentioned people they called Eteocretans who did not speak Greek. Further, we know that Linear A, written by the Minoans on Crete before the Mycenean Greeks came, did not represent Greek. Professor Hubert LaMarle considers it to be an early Indo-Iranian language, related...
  • Smenkhkhare, the Hittite Pharaoh

    07/30/2004 9:42:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 2,926+ views
    BBC History ^ | September 5, 2002 | Dr Marc Gabolde
    [T]he exclusively masculine epithets referring to this individual in the same tomb and on a now-vanished block at Memphis, confirm that we are dealing with a man - as distinct from the pharaoh-queen Ankh(et)kheperure Neferneferuaten... Contrary to Ancient Egyptian custom, Smenkhkare is not presented under a coronation name and a birth name in his two cartouches, but under two coronation names. The explanation for this curious fact seems to me clear: both his royal names were composed on the occasion of his coronation. He therefore must have had another name beforehand... The absence of a birth name, the lack of...
  • History Channel to air Ancient Battles [Persians-Greeks-Romans - starts 7/23]

    07/20/2004 10:29:52 PM PDT · by freedom44 · 9 replies · 2,821+ views
    CHN ^ | 7/21/04 | CHN
    The History Channel is going to air a new historical series entitled DECISIVE BATTLES including some classic wars between ancient Persian armies and Roman and Greek ones. The History Channel goes on location to the actual battlefields and integrates cutting-edge videogame technology to bring history and imagination together in the new series DECISIVE BATTLES. The half-hour series DECISIVE BATTLES premieres Friday, July 23 at 9-9:30pm ET/PT. The series is hosted by Matthew Settle (Band of Brothers) on location at the ancient battlefields and features expert commentary from the world©s foremost historians. DECISIVE BATTLES is unlike any series The History Channel...
  • Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy (A Preserved Library from 1340BC discovered!)

    01/19/2003 11:04:10 AM PST · by vannrox · 9 replies · 375+ views
    UK Independent ^ | 19 January 2003 | By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Key To An Ancient Tongue

    07/23/2002 12:31:32 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies · 468+ views
    Philadelphi Enquirer ^ | 7-22-2002 | Faye Flam
    Posted on Mon, Jul. 22, 2002 Key to an ancient tongue Penn archaeologists have puzzled over the cuneiform writings for decades. At last, a Sumerian dictionary may be ready by 2004. By Faye Flam Inquirer Staff Writer Steve Tinney and Tonia Sharlach hold cuneiform tablets from the collection at Penn’s Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The two Sumerologists are working on the 30-year dictionary project. The people known as Sumerians are credited with starting the first civilization and building the first settlements worthy of being called cities. They also invented writing, and then they wrote and wrote and wrote, filling...
  • Traces of Vikings found at Bathonea archaeological excavation in Istanbul

    12/08/2015 2:32:37 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Today's Zaman ^ | Monday, December 07, 2015 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have found the figure of a goddess that dates back to the early Hittite period as well as a Viking amber necklace during an ongoing excavation in the ancient city of Bathonea by Lake Kucukcekmece in Istanbul. An archaeological excavation was launched in 2009 near Lake Kucukcekmece in the Avcilar district of Istanbul to uncover the ancient city of Bathonea, which is estimated to be 1,600 years old. The excavation is being conducted under the supervision of Associate Professor Fengul Aydingun from Kocaeli University. in an earlier interview with the press, she had said the first two years of...
  • Archaeological team prepares 4,000-year-old Hittite meals

    09/14/2015 5:20:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    The Daily Sabah Food ^ | September 8, 2015 | Daily Sabah with Anadolu Agency
    An archaeological team excavating the ancient site of Alacahöyük, one of the most significant centers of the ancient Hittite civilization, cooked pastries belonging to Hittite cuisine that dates back 4,000 years. The foods found on Hittite tablets were cooked without modern technology or equipment. The 4,000-year-old Hittite cuisine was cooked in Alacahöyük, an important Neolithic settlement and Turkey's first nationally excavated area. Aykut Çınaroğlu, the head of the excavations and professor of archaeology at Ankara University, told Anadolu Agency (AA) that Chef Ömür Akkor, an excavation team member, prepared a special Hittite menu in light of the available archaeological findings....
  • European languages linked to migration from the east

    02/13/2015 12:32:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Nature ^ | 12 February 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    Large ancient-DNA study uncovers population that moved westwards 4,500 years ago. A mysterious group of humans from the east stormed western Europe 4,500 years ago -- bringing with them technologies such as the wheel, as well as a language that is the forebear of many modern tongues, suggests one of the largest studies of ancient DNA yet conducted. Vestiges of these eastern emigres exist in the genomes of nearly all contemporary Europeans, according to the authors, who analysed genome data from nearly 100 ancient Europeans. ...last year, a study of the genomes of ancient and contemporary Europeans found echoes not...
  • Pollen Study Points to Drought as Culprit in Bronze Age Mystery (Global Warming in Ancient Times)

    10/26/2013 6:42:44 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    NY Times ^ | 10/24/2013 | ISABEL KERSHNER
    More than 3,200 years ago, life was abuzz in and around what is now this modern-day Israeli metropolis on the shimmering Mediterranean shore. To the north lay the mighty Hittite empire; to the south, Egypt was thriving under the reign of the great Pharaoh Ramses II. Cyprus was a copper emporium. Greece basked in the opulence of its elite Mycenaean culture, and Ugarit was a bustling port city on the Syrian coast. In the land of Canaan, city states like Hazor and Megiddo flourished under Egyptian hegemony. Vibrant trade along the coast of the eastern Mediterranean connected it all. Yet...
  • Syrian Conflict Imperils Historical Treasures

    08/18/2012 11:04:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    New York Times ^ | August 15, 2012 | Patricia Cohen
    Preservationists and archaeologists are warning that fighting in Syria's commercial capital, Aleppo -- considered the world's oldest continuously inhabited human settlement -- threatens to damage irreparably the stunning architectural and cultural legacy left by 5,000 years of civilizations. Already the massive iron doors to the city's immense medieval Citadel have been blown up in a missile attack, said Bonnie Burnham, president of the World Monuments Fund, an organization that works to preserve cultural heritage sites... President Bashar al-Assad's forces have been shelling the city, and in recent days his army has taken up positions inside the Citadel, trading fire with...
  • University of Toronto archaeologists find...cuneiform tablets in 2,700-year old Turkish temple

    08/10/2009 9:49:19 AM PDT · by decimon · 38 replies · 1,096+ views
    University of Toronto ^ | August 7, 2009 | Unknown
    University of Toronto archaeologists find cache of cuneiform tablets in 2,700-year old Turkish templeTORONTO, ON – Excavations led by a University of Toronto archaeologist at the site of a recently discovered temple in southeastern Turkey have uncovered a cache of cuneiform tablets dating back to the Iron Age period between 1200 and 600 BCE. Found in the temple’s cella, or ‘holy of holies’, the tablets are part of a possible archive that may provide insights into Assyrian imperial aspirations. The assemblage appears to represent a Neo-Assyrian renovation of an older Neo-Hittite temple complex, providing a rare glimpse into the religious...
  • Messages from the Dead [ Qatna's royal palace and cuneiform archive ]

    02/01/2007 8:39:48 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 3 replies · 235+ views
    Archaeology ^ | January/February 2006 | Marco Merola
    Inscribed on the small, pillow-shaped tablet is a 3,000-year-old warning to Idanda, king of Qatna, from the Hittite general Hanutti, telling him to prepare for war. A small Bronze Age Syrian city-state, Qatna was once under Hittite control, but had been conquered by the Mitanni people from the north. The clay tablet, like others found with it, was fired twice--once just after it was written, to preserve it, and again when the ancient city was sacked and burned to the ground in 1340 B.C. by the Hittites, who ruled an empire that stretched from northern Turkey to Mesopotamia and Syria......
  • French Explorer's Bad Luck In Syria Avenged At Last (Hittites)

    10/17/2006 2:57:17 PM PDT · by blam · 7 replies · 973+ views
    Reuters ^ | 10-17-2006 | Khaled Yacoub Oweis
    French explorer's bad luck in Syria avenged at last Tue 17 Oct 2006 11:45 AM ET By Khaled Yacoub Oweis ALEPPO, Syria, Oct 17 (Reuters) - First the 1920s French archaeologist ran out of money to uncover the treasures he suspected hidden under a Syrian castle, and then he ran out of time to see others finish the work. Twelve years too late for Georges Ploix de Rotrou, a German team has now revealed the full glory of the 500 square metre (5,400 sq ft) Temple of the Storm God that lay under the vast citadel in Aleppo. Ploix de...
  • Ancient Hittite Dam Inaugurated After 32 Centuries

    09/20/2006 11:11:24 AM PDT · by blam · 27 replies · 1,023+ views
    Ancient Hittite dam inaugurated after 32 centuries Wednesday, September 20, 2006 ANKARA - Turkish Daily News A Hittite-era dam located in the central Anatolian province of Çorum and believed to be one of the oldest in the world to have survived to date has been restored and is once again serving as a source of irrigation for local residents. The dam, located at the Alacahöyük archaeological site, was built by the Hittites in 1240 B.C. The dam's inauguration was marked with a ceremony over the weekend attended by Professor Aykut Çýnaroðlu, who heads the team excavating Alacahöyük, Ankara University Rector...
  • Hittite winds blow in Istanbul

    05/19/2006 12:46:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 212+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | Friday, May 19, 2006 | Dogan Daily News
    An exhibition titled "The Hittite Winds" by sculptor and ceramic artist Erdinç Bakla opened on Tuesday at the Istanbul Archaeology Museum in Topkap› Palace. The exhibition, which interprets Hittite artifacts in various materials, features 35 pieces of marble, bronze, plexiglas and fiberglass as well as a golden dinner set and silver tea set. The exhibition will run until May 28 and will also be on display in Ankara in June, reported the Anatolia news agency.
  • Amazon Warrior Women

    08/04/2004 8:51:53 PM PDT · by blam · 30 replies · 5,400+ views
    PBS ^ | Current | PBS
    Amazon Warrior WomenThis painting on a Greek vase depicts an Amazon woman warrior on horseback engaged in battle.Amazons in myth: History's first mention of a race of warrior women comes in Homer's ILIAD, an account of the Trojan War, probably written in the 8th to the 7th century B.C. Homer's Amazons, a race of fierce women who mated with vanquished male foes and kept only the female children they bore, were believed to occupy the area around the Black Sea. Amazon women also crop up in other Greek myths. One of the labors of Hercules, for example, required him to...
  • Unearthed: The Humble Origins Of World Diplomacy (Hittites)

    01/18/2003 2:51:58 PM PST · by blam · 41 replies · 847+ views
    Independent (UK) ^ | 1-19-2003 | David Keys
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Recent Finds Prove That Homer's Stories Were More Than Myth

    02/24/2002 4:46:17 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 674+ views
    The Times (UK) ^ | 2-25-2002 | Norman Hammond
    February 25, 2002 Recent finds prove that Homer's stories were more than myth By Norman Hammond, Archaeology Correspondent A CYNICAL scholar once noted that the reason that academic disputes were so bitter was that the stakes were so small. In the real world maybe, but Troy has been a battleground for 3,000 years not because of mundane matters of funding and status but because of its grip on our imaginations. There may or may not have been a decade’s siege on the edge of the Dardanelles around 1100BC, pitting Late Mycenaean Greeks against their neighbours and possible distant kin: but ...
  • Archaeologists Rewrite Timeline Of Bronze And Iron Ages, Alphabet

    12/24/2001 5:04:31 AM PST · by blam · 21 replies · 613+ views
    Cornell University ^ | 12-19-2001 | Blaine P. Friedlander Jr.
    Archaeologists rewrite timeline of Bronze and Iron Ages, including early appearance of alphabet FOR RELEASE: Dec. 19, 2001 Contact: Blaine P. Friedlander Jr. Office: 607-255-3290 E-Mail: ITHACA, N.Y. -- Using information gleaned from the sun's solar cycles and tree rings, archaeologists are rewriting the timeline of the Bronze and Iron Ages. The research dates certain artifacts of the ancient eastern Mediterranean decades earlier than previously thought. And it places an early appearance of the alphabet outside Phoenicia at around 740 B.C. Writing in two articles in the forthcoming issue of the journal Science (Dec. 21), archaeologists from Cornell University ...
  • The Last Days of Hattusa

    06/27/2016 4:41:20 PM PDT · by wildbill · 18 replies
    Biblical Archeology ^ | 5/072016 | Trevor Bryce
    Mysterious Collapse of a Great Ancient Empire. From his capital, Hattusa, in central Anatolia, the last-known Hittite king, Suppiluliuma II (1207 B.C.-?), ruled over a people who had once built a great empire—one of the superpowers (along with Egypt, Mittani, Babylon and Assyria) of the Late Bronze Age. The Kingdom of the Hittites, called Hatti, had stretched across the face of Anatolia and northern Syria, from the Aegean in the west to the Euphrates in the east. But now those days were gone, and the royal capital was about to be destroyed forever by invasion and fire.
  • Monastery new discovery in underground city in Cappadocia

    06/26/2016 6:02:05 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | June 23, 2016 | Anadolu Agency
    A monastery hewn from the rock has been found during excavations and cleaning works in an underground city that was discovered in 2014 in the Central Anatolian province of Nevsehir... Excavation and cleaning works have been continuing on an area of 400,000 square meters that includes 11 neighborhoods around Nevsehir Castle, which is situated in the city center and has been declared a third-degree archaeological area. At the beginning of the year, a historic church was discovered in the underground city. The church features frescoes depicting the ascension of Jesus to heaven as well as other important objects for the...
  • Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age

    05/15/2016 1:12:48 PM PDT · by Trumpinator · 65 replies ^ | 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 | JASPER HAMILL
    Devastating 'World War ZERO' destroyed ancient Mediterranean civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age 11:41, 13 MAY 2016 UPDATED 11:44, 13 MAY 2016 BY JASPER HAMILL Controversial theory finally identifies mysterious 'Sea Peoples' blamed for cataclysmic series of events which changed the course of history It was a disaster which destroyed the ancient world's greatest civilisations and plunged Europe into a dark age that lasted centuries. Now one archaeologist think he's worked out who's to blame for sparking an event he calls "World War Zero", but which most academics refer to as the The Late Bronze Age Collapse ....
  • World War Zero brought down mystery civilisation of 'sea people'

    05/13/2016 7:38:33 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    New Scientist ^ | May 12, 2016 | Colin Barras
    The Trojan War was a grander event than even Homer would have us believe. The famous conflict may have been one of the final acts in what one archaeologist has controversially dubbed "World War Zero" -- an event he claims brought the eastern Mediterranean Bronze Age world crashing down 3200 years ago. And the catalyst for the war? A mysterious and arguably powerful civilisation almost entirely overlooked by archaeologists: the Luwians. By the second millennium BC, civilisation had taken hold throughout the eastern Mediterranean. The Egyptian New Kingdom coexisted with the Hittites of central Anatolia and the Mycenaeans of mainland...
  • Why Turkey's Historic Churches Are Being Turned Into Mosques

    05/09/2016 6:13:49 PM PDT · by george76 · 21 replies
    Clarion Project ^ | May 9, 2016 | Uzay Bulut
    Christians in Turkey have become a tiny minority. The few remaining Christian churches in Anatolia are also on the path to total annihilation. Christians in Turkey have – throughout the centuries -- been turned into a tiny, dwindling minority. The remaining few Christian churches in Anatolia are also on the path to total annihilation. Hagia Sophia in Trabzon: Church-mosque-museum and now mosque again. The Hagia Sophia, Greek for “Holy Wisdom,” was one of the many historic Orthodox churches located in the city of Trabzon. ... The city of Trabzon .. is located in the ancient land of Pontos, in the...
  • ‘Be cheerful, live your life:’ Ancient mosaic ‘meme’ found in Turkey’s south

    04/23/2016 2:02:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | April 20, 2016 | Anadolu Agency
    Demet Kara, an archaeologist from the Hatay Archaeology Museum, said the mosaic, which was called the “skeleton mosaic,” belonged to the dining room of a house from the 3rd century B.C., as new findings have been unearthed in the ancient city of Antiocheia. “There are three scenes on glass mosaics made of black tiles. Two things are very important among the elite class in the Roman period in terms of social activities: The first is the bath and the second is dinner. In the first scene, a black person throws fire. That symbolizes the bath. In the middle scene, there...
  • First Greek Orthodox Epiphany Celebration in Izmir [Turkey] Since 1922

    01/06/2016 6:21:38 AM PST · by marshmallow · 4 replies
    Greek Europe Reporter ^ | 1/5/16 | Ioanna Zikakou
    For the first time since the Asia Minor Catastrophe of 1922, a Greek Orthodox Epiphany celebration is set to take place in Izmir on January 6, 2016. The Greek Orthodox community has received permission from the Turkish authorities to perform the Diving for the Holy Cross ceremony on the local pier. "For the first year we will be performing the Blessing of the Waters at the port of Izmir. Officially, this is the first year. We had also done it around 10 years ago, but not officially. This time we have received a license from the Turkish government, the Ministry...
  • Xenophon's Retreat

    08/04/2004 12:51:05 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 434+ views
    Archaeology ^ | April 7, 1997 | Norman Hammond
    British scholar Timothy Mitford believes he has found the spot from which a Greek army first sighted the Black Sea during its flight from the forces of the Persian king Artaxerxes II in 401 B.C. Earlier that year Artaxerxes had defeated his brother Cyrus at Cunaxa on the Euphrates, crushing the latter's bid for the throne. Among Cyrus' forces was a contingent of Greek mercenaries known as the Ten Thousand, led by the Athenian general and historian Xenophon, who recounts the event in his Anabasis. After the battle Xenophon led his troops through the Tigris and upper Euphrates valleys,...
  • Archaeologists discover secret tunnel in ancient Hittite castle

    10/21/2015 1:33:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    The Week ^ | October 19, 2015 | Jeva Lange, Hurriyet Daily News
    The excavation of a mountain castle in central Turkey has revealed a secret tunnel, built by the Hittites around 4,000 years ago. Geval Castle, on Takkel Mountain in Central Anatolia, sits over 5,500 feet above sea level and once offered a strategic 360-degree vantage point for a population that regularly faced assaults from the Egyptians, Assyrians, and Thracians throughout their history. As a result, Hittites were master underground builders, although the exciting discoveries at Takkel Mountain appear to be the first of their kind. "We have discovered secret tunnels in the castle. We have cleaned there and revealed a [328-foot...
  • Archaeologists discover 2,800-year-old 'burial jars' in Turkey... but what lies inside?

    09/07/2015 10:36:00 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 49 replies
    MailOnline ^ | 6th September | Sam Matthew
    'Using just a small hand trowel these archaeologists are painstakingly working to unlock the secrets of an ancient kingdom. Historians believe they have unearthed tombs dating back over 2,800 years in Van, eastern Turkey. The pithos burial chambers, which are like large ceramic jars, are thought to be from the Kingdom of Uratu, which ruled the country from the mid-ninth century BC until its defeat by the Medes. Historians at work in the Turkish town of Vans, which was the capital of the Urartian Kingdom. Vans was the capital of the Urartian Kingdom until it fell early in the sixth...
  • Road built over 3000-year-old tumulus in eastern Turkey

    07/27/2010 6:20:52 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies · 1+ views
    Hurriyet Daily News and Economic Review ^ | Tuesday, July 27, 2010 | Dogan News Agency
    The paving over of a 3,000-year-old tumulus, a mound of earth and stones raised over a grave, in the eastern city of Van has prompted an outcry from the Provincial Culture and Tourism Directorate. Stating that the road was unnecessarily built, officials said: "We have halted the work on the road. The road and asphalt will be removed and the tumulus will be rehabilitated." Before the road was built by the municipality, the directorate had planned to start archaeological work in the historical tumulus, which dates from the Urartu period, along with work in the historical Van Castle. "A road...
  • Symbols of Hittite goddess of sexuality found on 4,000-year-old tablet discovered in central Turkey

    08/15/2015 7:49:16 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 41 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | August 13, 2015 | Dogan News Agency
    Amid excavations at four different ancient sites in the Central Anatolian province of Yozgat, a cuneiform tablet has been unearthed in the Uflakle Mound at the Büyük Tafllek village. Thought to date back to around 2,000 B.C., the cuneiform tablet in the Sorgun district of Yozgat shows symbols of ishtar, known as the Hittite goddess of love, war, fertility and sexuality, more clearly than those on any other unearthed tablets. "Considering the intensity of archaeological materials on the surface and diffusion area, the mound tends to bear traces of Hittite Civilization. it is thought that the mound was affiliated to...
  • Has Turkey found world's oldest temple?

    08/10/2015 5:47:29 PM PDT · by markomalley · 18 replies
    Al Monitor ^ | 8/10/15 | Tulay Cetingulec
    The ancient city of Ephesus and the Diyarbakir Fortress and its surrounding Hevsel Gardens have become the latest historical sites in Turkey to be inscribed on the UNESCO World Heritage List in July. Turkey’s next nomination is the Stone Age cult site of Gobeklitepe, located in Sanliurfa province not far from the turbulent Syrian border. The site’s discovery began with a coincidence reminiscent of a movie plot. In 1983, local farmer Mahmut Kilic found a carved stone while plowing his field in the village of Orencik. He took it to the Sanliurfa Museum, where it was to wait a decade...
  • Signs of world's first pictograph found in Gobeklitepe

    07/25/2015 4:58:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | July 15, 2015 | Anadolu Agency
    Turkey's Göbeklitepe, the site of the world's oldest temple, may be the home of the first pictograph, according to a scene etched into an obelisk. A scene on an obelisk found during excavations in Göbeklitepe, a 12,000-year-old site in the southeastern province of Sanliurfa, could be humanity's first pictograph, according to researchers... Ercan said the artifacts found in Göbeklitepe provided information about ancient burial traditions. "There were no graves 12,000 years ago. The dead bodies were left outdoors and raptors ate them. In this way, people believed the soul goes to the sky," he added. Ercan said it was called...
  • Archaeologists Find Assyrian Tablets in Turkey, Some About Women's Rights

    07/19/2015 1:05:42 AM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 20 replies
    Ancient Assyrian tablets, dictating social arrangements including women's rights, dating back to 4,000 years have been excavated in the Central Anatolian province of Kayseri, a local newspaper reported Thursday. Prof. Fikri Kulakoglu of Ankara University told Dogan News Agency that the Kultepe-Kanis-Karum trade colony site where the tablets were unearthed was remarkable. He said the tablets revealed detailed information about the Assyrians, spanning from commercial trade to the nitty-gritty of the local social life. "From women's rights to the adoption of children and marriages arranged at birth, the tablets include all kinds of civilizational and social data from Anatolia 4,000...
  • Ancient City Discovered Beneath Biblical-Era Ruins in Israel

    11/18/2013 6:48:04 AM PST · by BenLurkin · 22 replies ^ | November 16, 2013 10:43am ET | Tia Ghose,
    The ancient city of Gezer has been an important site since the Bronze Age, because it sat along the Way of the Sea, or the Via Maris, an ancient trade route that connected Egypt, Syria, Anatolia and Mesopotamia. The city was ruled over many centuries by Canaanites, Egyptians and Assyrians, and Biblical accounts from roughly the 10th century describe an Egyptian pharaoh giving the city to King Solomon as a wedding gift after marrying his daughter. .... The site has been excavated for a century, and most of the excavations so far date to the the 10th through eighth centuries...
  • Inscription in Carian and Greek

    07/17/2004 6:20:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 1,150+ views
    Anistoriton ^ | 27 Dec. 1997 | (editors)
    On 8/9 November 1997 the Swiss newspaper Neue Zurcher Zeitung reported that German and Turks archaeologists, who conducted excavations at the ancient site of Kaunos on Asia Minor coast just across the Greek island of Rhodes, unearthed an inscription in two scripts. The top part is inscribed in the Carian language and the same text is repeated in the lower part in classical Greek. The inscription is a resolution of the city of Kaunos to honor two Athenians, one of whom is Nikokles of Lycekleous a fairly know person and contemporary of Demosthenes. Thus, the stone was safely dated to...
  • A New Type of Inscribed Copper Plate from Indus Valley (Harappan) Civilisation

    10/17/2014 10:28:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 37 replies
    Ancient Asia Journal ^ | October 8, 2014 | Vasant Shinde, Rick J. Willis
    A group of nine Indus Valley copper plates (c. 2600–2000 BC), discovered from private collections in Pakistan, appear to be of an important type not previously described. The plates are significantly larger and more robust than those comprising the corpus of known copper plates or tablets, and most significantly differ in being inscribed with mirrored characters. One of the plates bears 34 characters, which is the longest known single Indus script inscription. Examination of the plates with x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrophotometry indicates metal compositions, including arsenical copper, consistent with Indus Valley technology. Microscopy of the metal surface and internal structure...
  • The Minoans were Caucasian

    07/12/2014 4:58:18 AM PDT · by Renfield · 49 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 5-16-2013 | Damien Gayle
    DNA analysis has debunked the longstanding theory that the Minoans, who some 5,000 years ago established Europe's first advanced Bronze Age culture, were from Africa. The Minoan civilisation arose on the Mediterranean island of Crete in approximately the 27th century BC and flourished for 12 centuries until the 15th century BC. But the culture was lost until British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans unearthed its remains on Crete in 1900, where he found vestiges of a civilisation he believed was formed by refugees from northern Egypt. Modern archaeologists have cast doubt on that version of events, and now DNA tests of...
  • Skeleton of Ancient Prince Reveals Etruscan Life

    09/28/2013 1:09:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Discovery News ^ | September 20, 2013 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Found in Tarquinia, a hill town about 50 miles northwest of Rome, famous for its Etruscan art treasures, the 2,600 year old intact burial site came complete with a full array of precious grave goods. "It's a unique discovery, as it is extremely rare to find an inviolate Etruscan tomb of an upper-class individual. It opens up huge study opportunities on the Etruscans," Alessandro Mandolesi, of the University of Turin, told Discovery News. Mandolesi is leading the excavation in collaboration with the Archaeological Superintendency of Southern Etruria. A fun loving and eclectic people who among other things taught the French...
  • Unraveling the Etruscan Enigma

    10/15/2010 10:02:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Archaeology mag ^ | November/December 2010 | Rossella Lorenzi
    They taught the French to make wine and the Romans to build roads, and they introduced writing to Europe, but the Etruscans have long been considered one of antiquity's great enigmas. No one knew exactly where they came from. Their language was alien to their neighbors. Their religion included the practice of divination, performed by priests who examined animals' entrails to predict the future. Much of our knowledge about Etruscan civilization comes from ancient literary sources and from tomb excavations, many of which were carried out decades ago. But all across Italy, archaeologists are now creating a much richer picture...
  • Italy: Ancient Etruscan home found near Grosseto

    06/01/2010 8:45:35 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 36 replies · 572+ views
    ADNKRONOS ^ | Tuesday, May 25, 2010 | AKI
    An ancient Etruscan home dating back more than 2,400 years has been discovered outside Grosseto in central Italy. Hailed as an exceptional find, the luxury home was uncovered at an archeological site at Vetulonia, 200 kilometres north of Rome. Archeologists say it is rare to find an Etruscan home intact and believe the home was built between the 3rd and 1st century BC. Using six Roman and Etruscan coins uncovered at the home, archeologists believe the house collapsed in 79 AD during wars unleashed by Roman general and dictator, Lucio Cornelio Silla. Archeologists have discovered a large quantity of items...
  • Golden Bough from Roman mythology 'found in Italy'

    02/23/2010 6:45:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies · 664+ views
    Telegraph ^ | February 18, 2010 | Nick Squires
    In Roman mythology, the bough was a tree branch with golden leaves that enabled the Trojan hero Aeneas to travel through the underworld safely. They discovered the remains while excavating religious sanctuary built in honour of the goddess Diana near an ancient volcanic lake in the Alban Hills, 20 miles south of Rome. They believe the enclosure protected a huge Cypress or oak tree which was sacred to the Latins, a powerful tribe which ruled the region before the rise of the Roman Empire. The tree was central to the myth of Aeneas, who was told by a spirit to...
  • Etruscan tomb unearthed in Perugia

    07/09/2008 9:46:57 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 201+ views ^ | Tuesday, July 8, 2008 | unattributed
    An ancient Etruscan tomb has resurfaced after centuries underground during the course of building work in the central Italian city of Perugia. The tomb, which has been preserved in excellent condition, contains seven funerary urns, the municipal archaeology department said. It is in the shape of a square and was covered by a sheet of travertine marble, which had apparently remained untouched since being laid centuries ago. The tomb is split into two halves by a pillar and there are two benches running along each side. The funerary urns, which were placed on the benches, were marked with brightly coloured...
  • DNA Boosts Herodotus’ Account of Etruscans as Migrants to Italy

    04/03/2007 9:27:29 PM PDT · by neverdem · 58 replies · 1,641+ views
    NY Times ^ | April 3, 2007 | NICHOLAS WADE
    Geneticists have added an edge to a 2,500-year-old debate over the origin of the Etruscans, a people whose brilliant and mysterious civilization dominated northwestern Italy for centuries until the rise of the Roman republic in 510 B.C. Several new findings support a view held by the ancient Greek historian Herodotus — but unpopular among archaeologists — that the Etruscans originally migrated to Italy from the Near East. Though Roman historians played down their debt to the Etruscans, Etruscan culture permeated Roman art, architecture and religion. The Etruscans were master metallurgists and skillful seafarers who for a time dominated much of...
  • Where Did The Etruscans Come From?

    08/06/2005 9:08:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies · 2,066+ views
    Etruscology website ^ | June 2002 | Dieter H. Steinbauer
    Nevertheless, after more than a century of research, the linguistic relationship between Lemnian and Etruscan -- despite the scanty material -- is nowadays established to a large extent as an undeniable fact. The phonemic systems can not be set to coincide completely, yet it is significant that apart from the already mentioned four vowel system parallels exist in the consonant inventory, too. There are two varieties of s (here written s and sh) and no indications of the voiced plosives b, d, g, while next to each other are to be found in both languages t and th (no aspirate...
  • Archaeologists May Have Found What Was Once The Biggest City In Italy

    11/07/2004 5:27:22 PM PST · by blam · 51 replies · 2,055+ views
    The Economist ^ | 11-4-2004
    Scientific treasure hunters Nov 4th 2004 | CLUSIUM, OR POSSIBLY NOT From The Economist print edition Archaeologists may have found what was once the biggest city in Italy REAL archaeology bears about as much resemblance to an Indiana Jones movie as real spying bears to James Bond. Excavation—at least if it is to be meaningfully different from grave robbing—is a matter of painstaking trowel work, not gung-ho gold-grabbing. But there is still a glimmer of the grave robber in many archaeologists, and the search for a juicy royal tomb can stimulate more than just rational, scientific instincts. Few tombs would...