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Keyword: anatolia

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  • As Islamic Militants Destroy Iraq Heritage, a Stunning Find in Kurdistan

    08/10/2014 5:13:14 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Rudaw ^ | July 22, 2014 | Alexandra Di Stefano Pironti
    While the history of civilization is being demolished by war and religious zealots in the rest of Iraq, in the Kurdistan Region archeologists are marveling at a stunning discovery: the remains of a long-lost temple from the biblical kingdom of Urartu, dating back to the 9th century BC. Kurdish archaeologist Dlshad Marf Zamua, who has studied the columns and other artifacts at the find, told Rudaw these were unearthed piecemeal over the past four decades by villagers going about their lives, digging for cultivation or construction. But only recently, after the discovery of life-size human statues and the unearthed columns,...
  • Traces of tsunami discovered in Gokceada

    06/06/2014 5:41:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 19 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | June 2, 2014 | DoGan News Agency
    Archaeological work on the island of Gökçeada has revealed that an earthquake occurred in the region 4,700 years ago, followed by a tsunami. Çanakkale Onsekiz Mart University Geology Department Professor Doğan Perinçek said they had found the traces of the earthquake and tsunami during works between 2006 and 2008. Gökçek made a statement June 2 after an earthquake measuring 6.5 that occurred on May 24 in the region. He said both he and Professor Halime Hüryılmaz had found traces of an earthquake that occurred in 2680 B.C. following work in the area of Yenibademli. “The earthquake broke the walls of...
  • Excavations unearth basilica in Bursa

    05/07/2014 6:52:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | May 2, 2014 | Anadolu Agency
    Excavations at a tower in the Tophane portion of Bursa’s city walls have revealed a basilica from the early Roman era that could be one of the oldest structures ever discovered in the northwestern province. Architect İbrahim Yılmaz, who has been conducting the restoration projects on Bursa’s city walls, said the Tophane city walls restoration project included an area of 1,200 square meters from the north of the Saltanat Gate to the Kaplıca Gate... Speaking about the technical features of the basilica, Yılmaz said: “There is a round apse [the place for religious ceremonies] and a window bay in front...
  • Mound excavation reveals transition from hunting to herding in Neolithic settlement

    04/30/2014 5:04:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Phy dot org ^ | Tuesday, April 29, 2014 | Bob Yirka
    A team of researchers with members from several countries has found evidence of the birth of pre-ceramic Neolithic populations in a region of what is now Turkey. In their paper published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the team describes how excavations of various levels at Aşıklı Höyük, reveal the history of the people that lived there... Aşıklı Höyük is the earliest known preceramic Neolithic mound site in Central Anatolia. The oldest Levels, 4 and 5, spanning 8,200 to approximately 9,000 cal B.C., associate with round-house architecture and arguably represent the birth of the Pre-Pottery Neolithic in the...
  • Minoan civilization was made in Europe

    05/14/2013 12:29:08 PM PDT · by Renfield · 10 replies
    Nature.com ^ | 5-13-2013 | Ewen Callaway
    When the British archaeologist Sir Arthur Evans discovered the 4,000-year-old Palace of Minos on Crete in 1900, he saw the vestiges of a long-lost civilization whose artefacts set it apart from later Bronze-Age Greeks. The Minoans, as Evans named them, were refugees from Northern Egypt who had been expelled by invaders from the South about 5,000 years ago, he claimed. Modern archaeologists have questioned that version of events, and now ancient DNA recovered from Cretan caves suggests that the Minoan civilization emerged from the early farmers who settled the island thousands of years earlier....
  • Archaeologists Find Celts in Unlikely Spot: Central Turkey

    12/27/2001 11:45:39 AM PST · by Apollo · 21 replies · 816+ views
    NY Times ^ | December 25, 2001 | JOHN NOBLE WILFORD
    In storybook histories, the ancient city of Gordion is remembered only as the seat of King Midas, he of the golden touch, and the place where Alexander the Great struck a famous blow in legend and metaphor. Challenged to separate the strands of an impossible knot, the Gordion knot, the conqueror cut through the problem, in the manner of conquerors, with one authoritative swing of his sword. After Midas and Alexander, Gordion languished on the fringes of history, and until recently archaeologists had taken little notice of its Celtic past. Yes, European Celts the Gauls of Roman times and ...
  • [Indo-Euro]Language family may have Anatolian origins

    09/01/2012 6:51:05 AM PDT · by Pharmboy · 22 replies
    Science News ^ | August 23rd, 2012 | Bruce Bower
    Indo-European tongues traced back more than 8,000 years to present-day Turkey ANCIENT SPREADThe map shows the timing and geographic expansion of Indo-European languages proposed in a new statistical analysis. The red area in whats now Turkey is a possible birthplace of the Indo-European language family more than 8,000 years ago.Remco Bouckaert et al. Indo-European languages range throughout Europe and South Asia and even into Iran, yet the roots of this widespread family of tongues have long been controversial. A new study adds support to the proposal that the language family expanded out of Anatolia whats now Turkey between...
  • Oldest Swords Found In Turkey (3,300BC)

    03/30/2003 4:37:06 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 3,170+ views
    Discovery Channel ^ | 3-25-2003 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Oldest Swords Found in Turkey By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News March 25, 2003 The most ancient swords ever found were forged 5,000 years ago in what is today Turkey, according to Italian archaeologists who announced the results of chemical analysis at a recent meeting in Florence. Digging at Arslantepe, a site in the Taurus mountains of southeast Anatolia, Marcella Frangipane, professor at the department of historical science, archaeology and anthropology of antiquities of Rome University, found nine swords dating back to about 3,300 B.C. Blade and hilt were cast in one piece; moreover, three swords were beautifully inlaid with...
  • LINGUISTICS: Early Date for the Birth of Indo-European Languages

    11/28/2003 10:24:23 AM PST · by Lessismore · 36 replies · 3,431+ views
    Science Magazine ^ | 2003-11-28 | Michael Balter
    Ever since British jurist Sir William Jones noted in 1786 that there are marked similarities between diverse languages such as Greek, Sanskrit, and Celtic, linguists have assumed that most of the languages of Europe and the Indian subcontinent derive from a single ancient tongue. But researchers have fiercely debated just when and where this mother tongue was first spoken. Now a bold new study asserts that the common root of the 144 so-called Indo-European languages, which also include English and all the Germanic, Slavic, and Romance languages, is very ancient indeed. In this week's issue of Nature, evolutionary biologist Russell...
  • Neolithic Mural in Turkey May Illustrate Ancient Volcanic Eruption

    01/09/2014 2:21:41 PM PST · by Theoria · 6 replies
    Popular Archaeology Magazine ^ | 08 Jan 2014 | Popular Archaeology Magazine
    Study indicates a correlation between the ancient mural image and date of the Hasan Dagi volcanic eruption. First discovered and excavated in the 1960's by British archaeologist James Mellaart, the world-famous 9,000-year-old Neolithic site of Catlhyuk in Central Anatolia, Turkey, has provided a unique window on the lives of humans at the transition from hunter-gatherer to settled agriculture societies. Among the spectacular finds was a mural or wall-painting dated to about 6600 BCE and described by its discoverer and others as depicting a volcanic eruption. Arguably regarded as the first map or graphical representation of a landscape, it featured "a...
  • Humans have been drinking beer for 11,500 years

    01/01/2013 10:38:04 AM PST · by Renfield · 45 replies
    Antiquity ^ | Dietrich, Oliver, et al
    (Abstract of article only): The role of cult and feasting in the emergence of Neolithic communities. New evidence from Göbekli Tepe, south-eastern Turkey 1Deutsches Archäologisches Institut, Orient-Abteilung, Podbielskiallee 69–71, D-14195 Berlin, Germany (Email: odi@orient.dainst.de; jn@orient.dainst.de; kls@orient.dainst.de), 2Norwegian University of Life Sciences, P.O. Box 5003, NO-1432 Aas, Norway (Email: manfred.heun@umb.no), and 3Technische Universität München, Wissenschaftszentrum Weihenstephan, Weihenstephaner Steig 20, D-85354 Freising, Germany (Email: Martin.Zarnkow@wzw.tum.de)*Author for correspondence Göbekli Tepe is one of the most important archaeological discoveries of modern times, pushing back the origins of monumentality beyond the emergence of agriculture. We are pleased to present a summary of work in progress...
  • Ancient city of Iasos rises out of the ashes

    09/30/2013 6:11:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 23 replies
    Hrriyet Daily News ^ | Tuesday, September 13 2011 | Dogan News Agency
    Archaeologists working on Iasos on Turkeys Aegean coast have recently discovered that the ancient city was buried under a mountain of ash caused by the explosion of Mt. Thera on Santorini 3,600 years ago. Excavation works have also revealed a sewage system that was in place in the 4,000-year-old city and tunnels to the citys theater... Spanu said columns that were found one meter underground provided vital information about the history of the city. Following the explosion of the volcano Thera, which also caused the destruction of the Minoan civilization on the islands of Crete and Santorini, the ancient city...
  • Lucca's Roman past revealed

    03/30/2006 9:34:39 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 451+ views
    ANSA ^ | March 30 2006
    Archaeologists have unearthed evidence of a Roman presence long before the traditonal date of Roman settlement in 180 BCE - corroborating Roman historian Livy's account of the great Carthaginian general Hannibal passing through Lucca in 217 BCE... The discovery came after other finds last year which highlighted how Lucca thrived because of its strategic position on the main road that led towards Gaul. Among the treasures turned up were the remains of a well-preserved 2nd-century BC Roman house. Other digs have traced Lucca's beginnings under the Etruscans, a people who once ruled much of central Italy including Rome. Lucca's foundation...
  • Thieves steal goddess head while museum awaits restoration

    03/02/2006 8:50:18 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 263+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | March 2, 2006
    A head belonging to a statue of the goddess of health that was stored in the garden of the Eskiflehir Archaeology Museum has been stolen, reported the Anatolia news agency on Tuesday. Artifacts languishing on the grounds of Eskiflehir Archeology Museum are waiting for restoration to begin.
  • Discovery: Oldest Lighthouse At Ancient Port

    02/06/2008 6:20:24 PM PST · by blam · 12 replies · 538+ views
    New Anatolian ^ | 2-6-2008
    DISCOVERY: Oldest lighthouse at ancient Roman port The New Anatolian / Ankara 06 February 2008 Turkish archaeologists unearthed a 2000-year-old lighthouse at the ancient Roman port of Patara, near southern town of Kas, Antalya, discovering probably the oldest such structure that managed to remain intact. The 12-meter-high lighthouse was built under the reign of Emperor Nero who ruled from 54 to 68, Professor Havva Iskan Isik, head of the excavation team reported. "The oldest known lighthouse is the one in Alexandria but there is nothing left of it. So, the lighthouse at the Patara port is the oldest one that...
  • World's oldest temple built to worship the dog star

    08/17/2013 4:28:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 44 replies
    New Scientist ^ | Friday, August 16, 2013 | Anil Ananthaswamy
    Magli simulated what the sky would have looked like from Turkey when Gbekli Tepe was built. Over millennia, the positions of the stars change due to Earth wobbling as it spins on its axis. Stars that are near the horizon will rise and set at different points, and they can even disappear completely, only to reappear thousands of years later. Today, Sirius can be seen almost worldwide as the brightest star in the sky -- excluding the sun -- and the fourth brightest night-sky object after the moon, Venus and Jupiter. Sirius is so noticeable that its rising and setting...
  • Mycenaean artifacts found in Bodrum

    08/06/2013 7:29:58 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | Monday, August 5, 2013 | unattributed
    During excavations carried out by the Bodrum Underwater Archaeology Museum in the Aegean town of Bodrums Ortakent district, graves from the Mycenaean era have been unearthed. According to a written statement issued by the Culture and Tourism Ministry, pieces unearthed in the graves are very important for the scientific world. Among the pieces are baked earth, water bottles, cups with three handles, a carafe, a razor, animal bones and lots of glass and beads of various sizes. Examinations on nearly 3,500-year-old artifacts show that the graves date back to the Mycenaean III era around 600 B.C. to 1,000 B.C years...
  • Gobekli Tepe Constellations

    08/04/2013 6:12:23 PM PDT · by Renfield · 22 replies
    The first interesting form is the scorpion, which might first be thought to represent is known as Scorpius, but this does not appear to be the case.  This is due to the presence of the three birds to the middle right (A, B, C), these three most clearly correspond to the “Summer Triangle” stars, the three birds, one represented by each star: Cygnus, Aquila (aka Vultur volans), and Vultur cadens (Lyra).  The shape of the Aquila constellations holds the same general appearance as bird A, the angle of the Cygnus stars matches the shape of the body of bird B,...
  • Archaeologists discover 'finest ever' piece of Neolithic art...3,500BC (Scotland)

    08/04/2013 8:36:09 AM PDT · by Renfield · 36 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 8-1-2013 | Mark Duell
    Archaeologists have found an astonishing piece of Neolithic artwork that was buried for 4,500 years. The stone creation - which is decorated on both sides and has been described as one of the finest ever to be found in Britain - was uncovered last night on the Ness of Brodgar in Orkney, Scotland. It was found at the base of the south-west internal corner of the Neolithic cathedral at the site, which covers 2.5 hectares and is believed to have been occupied from as early as 3,500BC....
  • New Indo-European Language Discovered

    06/21/2012 5:14:04 PM PDT · by Renfield · 18 replies
    Sci-News.com ^ | 6-19-2012 | John Shanks
    A linguistics researcher at the Macquarie University in Australia has discovered that the language, known as Burushaski, which is spoken by about 90,000 people who reside in a remote area of Pakistan, is Indo-European in origin. Prof Ilija Casules discovery, which has now been verified by a number of the worlds top linguists, has excited linguistics experts around the world. An entire issue of the eminent international linguistics journal the Journal of Indo-European Studies is devoted to a discussion of his findings later this month. More than fifty eminent linguists have tried over many years to determine the genetic relationship...
  • 'World's Oldest Temple' May Have Been Cosmopolitan Center

    03/17/2012 10:44:00 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, March 15, 2012 | Owen Jarus
    Gobekli Tepe is located in southern Turkey near the modern-day city of Urfa. It contains at least 20 stone rings (circles within a circle) that date back more than 11,000 years. T-shaped limestone blocks line the circles and reliefs are carved on them. Long ago, people would fill in the outer circle with debris before building a new circle within... Ancient blades made of volcanic rock that were discovered at what may be the world's oldest temple suggest that the site in Turkey was the hub of a pilgrimage that attracted a cosmopolitan group of people some 11,000 years ago....
  • Rewriting the dawn of civilization ( Was Gbekli Tepe the cradle of civilization? )

    01/03/2012 10:27:32 AM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 44 replies · 1+ views
    JoNova ^ | January 2nd, 2012 | Joanne
    If National Geographic had more stories like this one, I’d be inclined to subscribe. This is fascinating stuff.Seven thousand years before Stonehenge was Göbekli Tepe in southern Turkey, where you’ll find ring upon ring of T-shaped stone towers arranged  in a circle. Around 11,600 B.C. hundreds of people gathered on this mound, year after year, possibly for centuries.There are plenty of mysteries on this hill.  Some of the rocks weigh 16 tons, but archaeologists can find no homes, no hearths, no water source, and no sign of a town or village to support the hundreds of workers who built the rings...
  • Archaeologist argues world's oldest temples were not temples at all

    10/07/2011 2:07:06 PM PDT · by decimon · 26 replies
    University of Chicago Press Journals ^ | October 6, 2011 | Unknown
    Ancient structures uncovered in Turkey and thought to be the world's oldest temples may not have been strictly religious buildings after all, according to an article in the October issue of Current Anthropology. Archaeologist Ted Banning of the University of Toronto argues that the buildings found at Göbekli Tepe may have been houses for people, not...gods. The buildings at Göbekli, a hilltop just outside of the Turkish city of Urfa, were found in 1995 by Klaus Schmidt of the German Archaeological Institute and colleagues from the Şanlıurfa Museum in Turkey. The oldest of the structures at the site are immense...
  • Gbekli Tepe - The Birth of Religion

    05/23/2011 8:23:10 AM PDT · by No One Special · 27 replies
    National Geographic Magazine ^ | June 2011 | Charles C. Mann
    We used to think agriculture gave rise to cities and later to writing, art, and religion. Now the world’s oldest temple suggests the urge to worship sparked civilization. Every now and then the dawn of civilization is reenacted on a remote hilltop in southern Turkey. The reenactors are busloads of tourists—usually Turkish, sometimes European. The buses (white, air-conditioned, equipped with televisions) blunder over the winding, indifferently paved road to the ridge and dock like dreadnoughts before a stone portal. Visitors flood out, fumbling with water bottles and MP3 players. Guides call out instructions and explanations. Paying no attention, the visitors...
  • 12,000 Years Old Unexplained Structure [Gobekli Tepe]

    04/18/2011 4:25:18 PM PDT · by stockpirate · 107 replies
    via UTUBE ^ | 2/10/2011 | HISTORY CHANNEL
    This site is 12,000 years old, the most advanced strutures ever found. Several video's on the link
  • History in the Remaking

    02/23/2010 8:21:35 AM PST · by Palter · 30 replies · 885+ views
    Newsweek ^ | 19 Feb 2010` | Patrick Symmes
    A temple complex in Turkey that predates even the pyramids is rewriting the story of human evolution. They call it potbelly hill, after the soft, round contour of this final lookout in southeastern Turkey. To the north are forested mountains. East of the hill lies the biblical plain of Harran, and to the south is the Syrian border, visible 20 miles away, pointing toward the ancient lands of Mesopotamia and the Fertile Crescent, the region that gave rise to human civilization. And under our feet, according to archeologist Klaus Schmidt, are the stones that mark the spotthe exact spotwhere humans...
  • Do These Mysterious Stones Mark The Site Of The Garden Of Eden?

    02/27/2009 9:47:03 PM PST · by Steelfish · 122 replies · 4,668+ views
    Daily Mail (U.K.) ^ | February 27, 2009
    Do these mysterious stones mark the site of the Garden of Eden? By TOM COX For the old Kurdish shepherd, it was just another burning hot day in the rolling plains of eastern Turkey. Following his flock over the arid hillsides, he passed the single mulberry tree, which the locals regarded as 'sacred'. The bells on his sheep tinkled in the stillness. Then he spotted something. Crouching down, he brushed away the dust, and exposed a strange, large, oblong stone. The man looked left and right: there were similar stone rectangles, peeping from the sands. Calling his dog to heel,...
  • Stone Age Temple May Be Birthplace of Civilization

    11/14/2008 7:46:29 PM PST · by Free ThinkerNY · 41 replies · 1,333+ views
    foxnews.com ^ | November 14, 2008
    It's more than twice as old as the Pyramids, or even the written word. When it was built, saber-toothed tigers and woolly mammoths still roamed, and the Ice Age had just ended. The elaborate temple at Gobelki Tepe in southeastern Turkey, near the Syrian border, is staggeringly ancient: 11,500 years old, from a time just before humans learned to farm grains and domesticate animals. According to the German archaeologist in charge of excavations at the site, it might be the birthplace of agriculture, of organized religion of civilization itself.
  • Gobekli Tepe: The Worlds First Temple? ( massive carved stones about 11,000 years old )

    11/11/2008 5:08:14 PM PST · by Ernest_at_the_Beach · 86 replies · 3,696+ views
    Smithsonian magazine ^ | November 2008 | # Andrew Curry # Photographs by Berthold Steinhilber
    Predating Stonehenge by 6,000 years, Turkey's stunning Gobekli Tepe upends the conventional view of the rise of civilization Six miles from Urfa, an ancient city in southeastern Turkey, Klaus Schmidt has made one of the most startling archaeological discoveries of our time: massive carved stones about 11,000 years old, crafted and arranged by prehistoric people who had not yet developed metal tools or even pottery. The megaliths predate Stonehenge by some 6,000 years. The place is called Gobekli Tepe, and Schmidt, a German archaeologist who has been working here more than a decade, is convinced it's the site of the...
  • Mysterious Neolithic People Made Optical Art

    09/25/2008 5:39:23 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 5,997+ views
    Discovery News ^ | September 22, 2008 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Running until the end of October at the Palazzo della Cancelleria in the Vatican, the exhibition, "Cucuteni-Trypillia: A Great Civilization of Old Europe," introduces a mysterious Neolithic people who are now believed to have forged Europe's first civilization... Archaeologists have named them "Cucuteni-Trypillians" after the villages of Cucuteni, near Lasi, Romania and Trypillia, near Kiev, Ukraine, where the first discoveries of this ancient civilization were made more than 100 years ago. The excavated treasures -- fired clay statuettes and op art-like pottery dating from 5000 to 3000 B.C. -- immediately posed a riddle to archaeologists... "Despite recent extensive excavations, no...
  • A Journey To 9,000 Years Ago (atalhyk)

    01/17/2008 4:06:53 PM PST · by blam · 20 replies · 114+ views
    Turkish Daily News ^ | 1-17-2008 | VERCİHAN ZİFLİOĞLU
    A journey to 9,000 years ago Thursday, January 17, 2008VERCİHAN ZİFLİOĞLU ISTANBUL - Turkish Daily News Çatalhöyük Research Project Director Ian Hodder says goddess icons do not, contrary to assumptions, point to a matriarchal society in Çatalhöyük. Findings in Çatalhöyük show that men and women had equal social status. According to Hodder, who also has been following the Göbeklitepe excavations in Şanlıurfa, meticulous archaeological excavation in southeastern Anatolia can change all scientific archaeological assumptions Clues as to when mankind really began living in urban patterns lie in the Neolithic layers of Çatalhöyük. Çatalhöyük is within the borders of Cumra district...
  • Did we plough up the Garden of Eden?

    10/17/2006 6:10:35 AM PDT · by NYer · 159 replies · 8,639+ views
    First Post ^ | October 17, 2006
    An archaeological dig may have uncovered ‘Eden’ in Turkey, says sean thomas I am standing above an archaeological dig, on a hillside in southern Turkey. Beneath me, workmen are unearthing a sculpture of some sort of reptile (right). It is delicate and breathtaking. It is also part of the world's oldest temple. If this sounds remarkable, it gets better. The archaeologist in charge of the dig believes that this artwork once stood in Eden. The archaeologist is Klaus Schmidt; the site is called Gobekli Tepe. In academic circles, the astonishing discoveries at Gobekli Tepe have long been a talking...
  • anlurfa To Shed More Light On History Of Civilization

    06/24/2006 3:14:51 PM PDT · by blam · 19 replies · 558+ views
    anlurfa to shed more light on history of civilization Saturday, June 24, 2006 anlurfa to shed more light on history of civilization ANKARA - Turkish Daily News The southeastern Anatolian province of anlurfa, considered to be the cradle of agriculture as well as hosting numerous examples of ancient architecture, promises new discoveries to shed light on the history of human evolution in the region. Harran University Assistant Professor Cihan Krkolu noted that every archaeological excavation to be carried out in anlurfa would provide new information on the history of civilization in the region. Krkolu reminded the Anatolia news agency that...
  • German Paper Reports World's Oldest Temple Is In Sanliurfa (Turkey- 10,000BC)

    01/21/2006 10:34:38 AM PST · by blam · 26 replies · 972+ views
    German paper reports worlds oldest temple is in anlurfa Saturday, January 21, 2006 ANKARA - Turkish Daily News One of Germany's leading newspapers, Die Welt, reported this week that the world's oldest temple, dating back around 12,000 years, is located on Gbekli Hill in Turkey's province of anlurfa, said the Anatolia news agency. According to an article titled Holy Hill of the Hunters, the temple was discovered by German archaeologist Klaus Schmidt, standing around 15 meters in height and located on a hill upon which a single tree stands. Defining the area as the cradle of civilization, the paper said...
  • Layers of clustered apartments hide artifacts of ancient urban life

    04/20/2005 9:26:57 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 752+ views
    San Francisco Chronicle ^ | Monday, April 18, 2005 | David Perlman
    But because of the spectacular female clay figures that the archaeologists have found in the excavated layers over the years, atalhyk has become a draw for modern believers who hold to the idea that the neolithic people were ruled by a matriarchy whose central figure was a mother goddess... But to Ian Hodder of Stanford and Ruth Tringham of Berkeley, who will lead the expedition's 11th season at atalhyk this summer, the evidence questions the notion of a mother goddess and a matriarchal society... Mellaart's mother goddess was found in a grain bin, and the Hodder team's 3-inch figurine was...
  • Gbekli Tepe, Turkey: a new wonder of the ancient world (9,000 B.C. Neolithic site)

    04/23/2013 10:17:25 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 53 replies
    The London Telegraph ^ | April 23, 2013 | Jeremy Seal
    "Wow," exclaims the visitor from New Zealand, a place, after all, with a human history shorter than most. For from a wooden walkway were gazing down at an archaeological site of giddying age. Built about 9000 BC, its more than twice as old as Stonehenge or the Pyramids, predating the discovery of metals, pottery or even the wheel. This is Gbekli Tepe in south-eastern Turkey, generally reckoned the most exciting and historically significant archaeological dig currently under way anywhere in the world, and there are neither queues nor tickets to get in. Wow for a number of reasons, then, though...
  • Pluto's 'Gate to Hell' uncovered in Turkey

    04/02/2013 1:36:33 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 35 replies
    www.iTech Post.com ^ | April , 2013 | Pierre Dumont
    Italian archaeologists have uncovered Pluto's Gate, the so-called "gate to hell," in southwestern Turkey. In Greco-Roman mythology the cave was considered the portal to the underworld. It was found in the ancient ruins of Hierapolis, now called Pamukkale, and was described by Cicero and the Greek geographer Strabo in their writings. According to Strabo, the opening was filled with deadly vapors. "This space is full of vapor so misty and dense that one can scarcely see the ground. Any animal that passes inside meets instant death," Strabo wrote. "I threw in sparrows and they immediately breathed their last and fell...
  • Archaeologists uncover ancient 'gate to hell' in Turkey

    04/02/2013 12:51:11 PM PDT · by illiac · 22 replies
    MSN News ^ | 4/2/13 | MSNNews
    An ancient cave known as the 'gate to hell' in Greco-Roman mythology has reportedly been discovered in southwestern Turkey. The ruins of the "gate to hell," an ancient cave to the underworld in Greco-Roman mythology, have been discovered in Turkey, Italian archaeologists have announced. The cave, also known as Pluto's Gate, was uncovered in the ancient Phrygian city of Hierapolis, now known as the city of Pamukkale, in southwestern Turkey.
  • Turkey: Famous fifth-century monastery to be turned into a mosque

    03/04/2013 5:22:55 AM PST · by NYer · 5 replies
    Jihad Watch ^ | March 3, 2013
    More indication of the rapid Islamization of Turkey. It is noteworthy also that none of the world's "human rights" organizations seem concerned about this, or the worsening plight of the remaining tiny Christian minority in Turkey, at all. "Studios Monastery Will Be Turned Into a Mosque," from Mystagogy, March 2 (thanks to Filip): January 29, 2013 Sedmitsa A correspondent of the Greek church news agency "Amen" in Istanbul, reported that the Studios Monastery, famous in the history of Orthodoxy, will be transferred from Turkey's Ministry of Culture to the General Directorate of Endowments, and will be transformed from a branch...
  • Russian Culture Official Suggests Legendary Gold Collection From Troy Unlikely be Returned Germany

    02/27/2005 2:03:19 AM PST · by LibWhacker · 19 replies · 1,353+ views
    AP ^ | 2/27/05
    MOSCOW (AP) - A legendary collection of gold objects from ancient Troy seized by Soviet troops in Berlin in 1945 should become Russian government property, a top Russian cultural official said in remarks published Saturday. But Anatoly Vilkov, deputy chief of the Russian agency that preserves the nation's cultural legacy, stopped short of ruling out the objects' return, as quoted by the newspaper Moskovsky Komsomolets. The gold collection - excavated by amateur German archaeologist Hermann Schliemann - will be made federal property after it is inventoried, he said. It could be exhibited in Germany but only if its return is...
  • Incredible, Epic Genes: Dating The Iliad

    03/01/2013 8:35:53 AM PST · by STD · 8 replies
    Biblical Archaeology Review ^ | 02/28/2013 | Noah Wiener
    Epic Genes: Dating The Iliad This 3-inch-high bronze statue from Crete, dating to the early seventh century B.C.E., depicts a young boy and a blind musician. According to ancient tradition, Homer was a blind poet. J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles
  • Bio Warfare Rears Its Head- The Ancient world USED IT!!!(MUST READ!)

    01/30/2004 7:18:50 AM PST · by vannrox · 32 replies · 1,062+ views
    Newsday ^ | January 13, 2004 | By Bryn Nelson
    The following ARE exerpts... "...From Hercules' poisoned arrows to early germ warfare and attacks with scorpion bombs and red-hot sand, she contends, cultures around the world have grappled with the revulsion and justification of using these unconventional weapons ever since they began creating their own myths and recording their histories. Mayor has compiled a slew of examples in her new book, "Greek Fire, Poison Arrows & Scorpion Bombs: Biological and Chemical Warfare in the Ancient World" (Overlook Press)..." "...The early dilemmas posed in mythic form would be recorded eventually in the annals of historians as combatants put their growing knowledge...
  • Sick Rams Used As Ancient Bioweapons

    11/29/2007 2:53:57 PM PST · by blam · 46 replies · 143+ views
    Discovery Channel ^ | Rossella Lorenzi
    Sick Rams Used as Ancient Bioweapons Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Once, a Weapon Nov. 28, 2007 -- Infected rams and donkeys were the earliest bioweapons, according to a new study which dates the use of biological warfare back more than 3,300 years. According to a review published in the Journal of Medical Hypotheses, two ancient populations, the Arzawans and the Hittites, engaged "in mutual use of contaminated animals" during the 1320-1318 B.C. Anatolian war. "The animals were carriers of Francisella tularensis, the causative agent of tularemia," author Siro Trevisanato, a molecular biologist based in Oakville, Ontario, Canada told Discovery News....
  • Bees, snakes, germs - any weapon in a pinch

    11/30/2003 7:12:18 AM PST · by TrebleRebel · 23 replies · 428+ views
    The Vancouver Sun | 11/29/2003 | Jay Currie
    If you are under Roman siege in the middle of a desert, a scorpion bomb seems like a very good idea. Collect a bunch of lethal scorpions and, very carefully, seal them in clay pots. Hurl the pots at the attackers as needed. That's exactly what the defenders of Hatra, just south of Mosul in today's Iraq, did in 198 AD. The siege was lifted in 20 days. As Adrienne Mayor writes in her intriguing book Greek Fire, Poison Arrows and Scorpion Bombs, scorpions weren't the only stinging animals pressed into service in the ancient world. A clay pot full...
  • DNA sleuth hunts wine roots in Anatolia

    11/27/2012 2:05:44 PM PST · by Renfield · 6 replies
    Agence France Press (via Google Hosted News) ^ | 11-27-2012 | Suzanne Mustacich
    ELAZIG, Turkey There are easier places to make wine than the spectacular, desolate landscapes of southeast Turkey, but DNA analysis suggests it is here that Stone Age farmers first domesticated the wine grape. ~~~snip~~~ "We wanted to collect samples from wild and cultivated grape vines from the Near East -- that means southeastern Anatolia, Armenia and Georgia -- to see in which place the wild grape was, genetically speaking, linked the closest to the cultivated variety." "It turned out to be southeastern Anatolia," the Asian part of modern Turkey, said Vouillamoz, speaking at the EWBC wine conference in the...
  • Archaeologists discover second Lycian synagogue

    10/06/2012 7:07:23 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | Tuesday, September 13 2011 | unattributed
    Archaeological teams digging in the ancient city of Limyra in the Mediterranean province of Antalya have announced the discovery of a second synagogue from the Lycian civilization. Researchers initially thought the house of worship was a glass furnace, according to the head of the excavations, Dr. Martin Seyer of the Austrian Archaeology Institute. "We first found a bath and a menorah. After some [further] investigation, we found out that it was a synagogue," he said. Second synagogue in the Lycian city The synagogue in Limyra, which is located in Turunova in Antalya's Finike district, is the second to be found...
  • Headless statues unearthed in Aphrodisias excavations

    09/03/2012 7:00:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | Anatolia News Agency
    The two big headless statues have been found at the ancient city of Aphrodisias. The ongoing excavation works at one of Turkey's most important archaeological sites, the Karacasu Aphrodisias Ancient City, have revealed two headless statues. According to information provided by the Culture and Tourism Ministry, one of the statues is in 1.76 meters in height and the other is 1.68 meters. One of the statues holds a roll in its left hand and its right hand is on its chest. There is a pack of documents behind its left foot, but the fingers and head are broken. The second...
  • A Turkish origin for Indo-European languages

    08/24/2012 8:04:40 AM PDT · by Renfield · 43 replies
    Nature.com ^ | 8-23-2012 | Alyssa Joyce
    Languages as diverse as English, Russian and Hindi can trace their roots back more than 8,000 years to Anatolia now in modern-day Turkey. That's the conclusion of a study1 that assessed 103 ancient and contemporary languages using a technique normally used to study the evolution and spread of disease. The researchers hope that their findings can settle a long-running debate about the origins of the Indo-European language group...
  • 5,000-year-old Venus figure found in Canakkale

    10/02/2009 8:11:42 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 1,344+ views
    Today's Zaman ^ | Friday, September 25, 2009 | unattributed
    A 5,000-year-old Venus figure and a seal have been found in an excavation. A 5,000-year-old Venus figure has been found as part of an excavation being carried out in anakkale's Ezine district. The excavation began in the field three weeks ago in cooperation with Germany's University of Tbingen. Assistant Professor Rstem Aslan, who is vice head of the excavation, told the Anatolia news agency that the aim of the dig is to find settlements outside Troy from the Bronze Age. Some interesting findings have been unearthed during the excavation, Aslan said. "We found a 5,000-year-old Venus figure, which used to...
  • Mixed Martial Arts Celebrity Recruited for Ancient Roman Army

    04/07/2012 9:49:40 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    LiveScience ^ | Thursday, March 29, 2012 | Owen Jarus
    A newly translated inscription, dating back about 1,800 years, reveals that Oinoanda, a Roman city in southwest Turkey, turned to a mixed martial art champion to recruit for the Roman army and bring the new soldiers to a city named Hierapolis, located hundreds of miles to the east, in Syria. His name was Lucius Septimius Flavianus Flavillianus and he was a champion at wrestling and pankration, the latter a bloody, and at times lethal, mixed martial art where contestants would try to pound each other unconscious or into submission. Flavillianus proved to be so successful as a military recruiter that...