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Keyword: anatolia

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  • A Turkish Man Discovered a Whole City in His Basement

    01/28/2018 1:23:11 PM PST · by aMorePerfectUnion · 70 replies
    Floor8beta ^ | 25 January 2018 | Lindsey Young
    ​In 1963, a Turkish man accidentally uncovered an underground city while making renovations to his home. In the region of ​Cappadocia, the man was knocking down a wall in his basement when he unintentionally came across a secret room, which led to an underground tunnel, which opened up to a ancient hidden city: Derinkuyu.This ancient city was lying 18 stories beneath the Earth's surface. With about 600 entrances, it could house over 20,000 people and the preservation from the photos show the possibility of livestock, food supplies, churches, tombs, communal rooms, schools and stables all hidden in the underground city (Chapel featured in image above). The subterranean...
  • What Happened to the Dream of Underground Cities?

    06/10/2016 5:47:01 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 70 replies
    Motherboard ^ | June 9, 2016 | Ernie Smith
    The rediscovery of an ancient underground city in Turkey a few years ago was an exciting find—the very kind of exciting find that the internet eats up. The 5,000-year-old cave villa, found in the city of Nevşehir, is fairly huge, with approximately 3.5 miles of tunnels, and dozens of rooms making up churches, tombs, and other safe spaces. In comments to National Geographic, Nevşehir Mayor Hasan Ünver noted that there was a bit of a paper trail that went back hundreds of years, but not one that implied that there was an entire city in the area. "We found documents...
  • A 1500-Year-Old Underground Byzantine Church Is Found in Turkey

    05/11/2016 1:59:25 PM PDT · by NYer · 24 replies
    Aletelial ^ | May 11, 2016 | Daniel Esparza
    Last February, archaeologists unearthed a unique rock-carved underground church in Nevsehir, in the central Turkish region of Cappadocia. The church was decorated with never before seen frescoes depicting Jesus’ Ascension, the Final Judgement, Jesus feeding the multitudes, and portraits of saints and prophets.The discovery, made during excavations and cleaning operations in an underground city recently uncovered as part of an urban project in Nevsehir, is located within a castle that might date back to the fifth century. Authorities expect it will make Cappadocia an even more important pilgrimage center for Orthodox Christians. Semih İstanbulluoğlu, the archaeologist who heads the works for...
  • New details emerge in massive ancient underground city discovery in Cappadocia

    01/03/2015 11:01:05 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | December 30, 2014 | Erdinc Celikkan
    New details have been revealed about the massive ancient underground city discovered in Turkey's Central Anatolian province of Nevsehir. The tunnels of the underground city are located under a conical-shaped hill and are wide enough for a car to pass through. Ozcan Cakir, associate professor at the Geophysics Engineering department of the 18 March University and involved in the excavations of the underground city, said they believe the tunnels were used to carry agricultural products. "We believe that people, who were engaged in agriculture, were using the tunnels to carry agricultural products to the city. We also estimate that one...
  • Ancient clay tablet has revealed locations of 11 'lost cities' from 4,000 years ago

    11/22/2017 12:16:14 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 60 replies
    Metro.co.uk ^ | Wednesday, November 15, 2017 | Rob Waugh
    Baked clay tablets from ancient Assyria, dating back as much as 4,000 years, could reveal the locations of 11 'lost cities' in modern-day Turkey. Harvard researchers analysed tablets found in the ancient city of Kanesh, the 12,000 cuneiform trade records include business transactions, accounts, seals and contracts. The researchers used mathematical models based on the price of goods and how frequently goods travelled between trade hubs to track down the locations of the ancient cities. Researchers reconstructed an economic network of trade goods such as wool, wine and precious metals across the Anatolian plateau in the 19th Century BC. The...
  • Turkey and The Old Testament...Turkey's significance pt 1

    08/26/2016 5:03:15 PM PDT · by pastorbillrandles · 10 replies
    Billrandles.wordpress ^ | 08-23-16 | Bill Randles
    I have come to the conclusion that the earnest Bible believer would do well to incorporate a new discipline to his study of the Word of God; Biblical Geography. My study of end times prophecy has drawn me into this aspect of Bible prophecy, particularly in my work on the book A Sword On The Land;The Muslim World in Bible Prophecy. Reading the Sacred text with a map and realizing the updated names of commonly cited places and peoples such as Moab,Ammon, Persia, Edom, Kedar and Dedan *has revolutionized my understanding of the stunning relevance of familiar prophecies throughout the...
  • The Hittite capital hosts ambassadors

    07/11/2016 11:47:26 PM PDT · by Cronos · 4 replies
    Hurriyet Daily News ^ | 12 July 2016 | HDN
    The archaeological site of Hattusha, the capital of the Hittite civilization which entered the UNESCO World Heritage list in 1986, was visited by a number of ambassadors in Turkey over the weekend as part of its two-day 30th anniversary celebrations organized by the governor’s office in the Central Anatolian province Çorum. The ancient site is notable for its cuneiform inscriptions, one of the most important discoveries at the site, consisting of official correspondence and contracts, as well as legal codes, procedures for cult ceremonies, oracular prophecies and literature of the ancient Near East. The cuneiforms entered the UNESCO Memory...
  • In Search of the Real Troy

    02/20/2005 2:33:23 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 32 replies · 1,322+ views
    Saudi Aramco World ^ | January/February 2005 Volume 56, Number 1 | Graham Chandler, Photographed by Ergun Cagata
    It was then that Swiss scholar Emil Forrer deciphered newly discovered writings from the Hittite Empire to the east, finding two place-namesWilusa and Taruisathat sounded convincingly like the Hittite way of writing "Wilios" (the Greek name for the site was "Ilion") and "Troia" (Troy). He also found a treaty, from the early 13th century BC, between the Hittite king Muwatalli and a king of "Wilusa" named Alaksandu. The kings name, Forrer added, recalls the name of the Trojan prince Alexandercalled Paris in Homers Iliad. Critics pooh-poohed, conceding that a place named Wilusa may have existed, but where was it on...
  • Early Written Signs

    02/14/2016 9:12:52 AM PST · by Jandy on Genesis · 5 replies
    Just Genesis ^ | February 13, 2016 | Alice C. Linsley
    George and I have had several meaningful conversations via email. This one might be of interest to other readers and George gave me permission to reproduce the conversation. George: I want to thank you for your blogs. I read them all the time and they have been a BIG help! I've been trying to sell others on the fact that the Hebrew lettering system goes back further than the 4th century millennium BC thanks to your findings of the Ainu/Annu culture and their lettering system in their later homeland of Japan - but with no success. I definitely believe your...
  • Phaistos Disk: Greek or Luwian?

    06/25/2009 3:16:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 592+ views
    Examiner ^ | Wednesday, June 24, 2009 | Diana Gainer
    Since this disk was found in Crete, and the people of Crete today speak Greek, that's a good language to assume was spoken by the maker of the disk. Still, that's a guess, or a hypothesis, not a fact. Besides that, we know that not everybody on Crete spoke Greek in the Bronze Age. The classical Greeks mentioned people they called Eteocretans who did not speak Greek. Further, we know that Linear A, written by the Minoans on Crete before the Mycenean Greeks came, did not represent Greek. Professor Hubert LaMarle considers it to be an early Indo-Iranian language, related...
  • Smenkhkhare, the Hittite Pharaoh

    07/30/2004 9:42:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 2,926+ views
    BBC History ^ | September 5, 2002 | Dr Marc Gabolde
    [T]he exclusively masculine epithets referring to this individual in the same tomb and on a now-vanished block at Memphis, confirm that we are dealing with a man - as distinct from the pharaoh-queen Ankh(et)kheperure Neferneferuaten... Contrary to Ancient Egyptian custom, Smenkhkare is not presented under a coronation name and a birth name in his two cartouches, but under two coronation names. The explanation for this curious fact seems to me clear: both his royal names were composed on the occasion of his coronation. He therefore must have had another name beforehand... The absence of a birth name, the lack of...
  • History Channel to air Ancient Battles [Persians-Greeks-Romans - starts 7/23]

    07/20/2004 10:29:52 PM PDT · by freedom44 · 9 replies · 2,821+ views
    CHN ^ | 7/21/04 | CHN
    The History Channel is going to air a new historical series entitled DECISIVE BATTLES including some classic wars between ancient Persian armies and Roman and Greek ones. The History Channel goes on location to the actual battlefields and integrates cutting-edge videogame technology to bring history and imagination together in the new series DECISIVE BATTLES. The half-hour series DECISIVE BATTLES premieres Friday, July 23 at 9-9:30pm ET/PT. The series is hosted by Matthew Settle (Band of Brothers) on location at the ancient battlefields and features expert commentary from the worlds foremost historians. DECISIVE BATTLES is unlike any series The History Channel...
  • Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy (A Preserved Library from 1340BC discovered!)

    01/19/2003 11:04:10 AM PST · by vannrox · 9 replies · 375+ views
    UK Independent ^ | 19 January 2003 | By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent
    Unearthed: the humble origins of world diplomacy By David Keys, Archaeology Correspondent 19 January 2003 Archaeologists have discovered evidence of an invasion of the Middle East by one of the world's first superpowers, which destroyed much of the region 33 centuries ago. Under the ruins of a 3,800-year-old royal palace in western Syria they have found part of an ancient diplomatic and administrative library, the most important archaeological discovery of its kind for more than 20 years. Accounts on clay tablets describe the region's conquest by one of the Bronze Age's superpowers, the Hittite Empire, in 1340BC. This helped to...
  • Key To An Ancient Tongue

    07/23/2002 12:31:32 PM PDT · by blam · 18 replies · 468+ views
    Philadelphi Enquirer ^ | 7-22-2002 | Faye Flam
    Posted on Mon, Jul. 22, 2002 Key to an ancient tongue Penn archaeologists have puzzled over the cuneiform writings for decades. At last, a Sumerian dictionary may be ready by 2004. By Faye Flam Inquirer Staff Writer Steve Tinney and Tonia Sharlach hold cuneiform tablets from the collection at Penns Museum of Archaeology and Anthropology. The two Sumerologists are working on the 30-year dictionary project. The people known as Sumerians are credited with starting the first civilization and building the first settlements worthy of being called cities. They also invented writing, and then they wrote and wrote and wrote, filling...
  • Traces of Vikings found at Bathonea archaeological excavation in Istanbul

    12/08/2015 2:32:37 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 21 replies
    Today's Zaman ^ | Monday, December 07, 2015 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have found the figure of a goddess that dates back to the early Hittite period as well as a Viking amber necklace during an ongoing excavation in the ancient city of Bathonea by Lake Kucukcekmece in Istanbul. An archaeological excavation was launched in 2009 near Lake Kucukcekmece in the Avcilar district of Istanbul to uncover the ancient city of Bathonea, which is estimated to be 1,600 years old. The excavation is being conducted under the supervision of Associate Professor Fengul Aydingun from Kocaeli University. in an earlier interview with the press, she had said the first two years of...
  • Archaeological team prepares 4,000-year-old Hittite meals

    09/14/2015 5:20:19 PM PDT · by 2ndDivisionVet · 36 replies
    The Daily Sabah Food ^ | September 8, 2015 | Daily Sabah with Anadolu Agency
    An archaeological team excavating the ancient site of Alacahöyük, one of the most significant centers of the ancient Hittite civilization, cooked pastries belonging to Hittite cuisine that dates back 4,000 years. The foods found on Hittite tablets were cooked without modern technology or equipment. The 4,000-year-old Hittite cuisine was cooked in Alacahöyük, an important Neolithic settlement and Turkey's first nationally excavated area. Aykut Çınaroğlu, the head of the excavations and professor of archaeology at Ankara University, told Anadolu Agency (AA) that Chef Ömür Akkor, an excavation team member, prepared a special Hittite menu in light of the available archaeological findings....
  • European languages linked to migration from the east

    02/13/2015 12:32:32 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    Nature ^ | 12 February 2015 | Ewen Callaway
    Large ancient-DNA study uncovers population that moved westwards 4,500 years ago. A mysterious group of humans from the east stormed western Europe 4,500 years ago -- bringing with them technologies such as the wheel, as well as a language that is the forebear of many modern tongues, suggests one of the largest studies of ancient DNA yet conducted. Vestiges of these eastern emigres exist in the genomes of nearly all contemporary Europeans, according to the authors, who analysed genome data from nearly 100 ancient Europeans. ...last year, a study of the genomes of ancient and contemporary Europeans found echoes not...
  • Pollen Study Points to Drought as Culprit in Bronze Age Mystery (Global Warming in Ancient Times)

    10/26/2013 6:42:44 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 17 replies
    NY Times ^ | 10/24/2013 | ISABEL KERSHNER
    More than 3,200 years ago, life was abuzz in and around what is now this modern-day Israeli metropolis on the shimmering Mediterranean shore. To the north lay the mighty Hittite empire; to the south, Egypt was thriving under the reign of the great Pharaoh Ramses II. Cyprus was a copper emporium. Greece basked in the opulence of its elite Mycenaean culture, and Ugarit was a bustling port city on the Syrian coast. In the land of Canaan, city states like Hazor and Megiddo flourished under Egyptian hegemony. Vibrant trade along the coast of the eastern Mediterranean connected it all. Yet...
  • Syrian Conflict Imperils Historical Treasures

    08/18/2012 11:04:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    New York Times ^ | August 15, 2012 | Patricia Cohen
    Preservationists and archaeologists are warning that fighting in Syria's commercial capital, Aleppo -- considered the world's oldest continuously inhabited human settlement -- threatens to damage irreparably the stunning architectural and cultural legacy left by 5,000 years of civilizations. Already the massive iron doors to the city's immense medieval Citadel have been blown up in a missile attack, said Bonnie Burnham, president of the World Monuments Fund, an organization that works to preserve cultural heritage sites... President Bashar al-Assad's forces have been shelling the city, and in recent days his army has taken up positions inside the Citadel, trading fire with...
  • University of Toronto archaeologists find...cuneiform tablets in 2,700-year old Turkish temple

    08/10/2009 9:49:19 AM PDT · by decimon · 38 replies · 1,096+ views
    University of Toronto ^ | August 7, 2009 | Unknown
    University of Toronto archaeologists find cache of cuneiform tablets in 2,700-year old Turkish templeTORONTO, ON Excavations led by a University of Toronto archaeologist at the site of a recently discovered temple in southeastern Turkey have uncovered a cache of cuneiform tablets dating back to the Iron Age period between 1200 and 600 BCE. Found in the temples cella, or holy of holies, the tablets are part of a possible archive that may provide insights into Assyrian imperial aspirations. The assemblage appears to represent a Neo-Assyrian renovation of an older Neo-Hittite temple complex, providing a rare glimpse into the religious...