Free Republic 2nd Quarter Fundraising Target: $85,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $24,008
28%  
Woo hoo!! And the first 28% is in!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: ancientautopsies

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Ramesses II Suffered From Arthritis

    07/25/2005 9:11:31 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies · 519+ views
    Discovery News ^ | Sept. 15, 2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    The finding challenges a previous diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis (A.S), a condition by which some or all of the joints and bones of the spine fuse together. That would have meant that the pharaoh spent most of his life in pain, feeling feverish and experiencing night sweats... The third king of Egypt's 19th dynasty, Ramesses ruled for 67 years (1279-1212 B.C.). During his long reign, Ramesses build more temples and monuments, took more wives — his favorite was the beautiful Nefertari — and produced more children — as many as 162, according some accounts — than any other pharaoh... "Ankylosing...
  • Human Remains In Ancient Jar A Mystery

    01/26/2007 2:38:22 PM PST · by blam · 34 replies · 1,040+ views
    Discovery.com ^ | 1-26-2007 | Jennifer Viegas
    Human Remains in Ancient Jar a Mystery Jennifer Viegas, Discovery News Jan. 23, 2007 — For over 100 years, four blue-glazed jars bearing the nametag of Rameses II (1302-1213 B.C.) were believed to contain the Egyptian pharaoh's bodily organs. But analysis of organic residues scraped from the jars has determined one actually contained an aromatic salve, while a second jar held the organs of an entirely different person who lived around 760 years later. Now the question is, who was this individual? "We do believe that the unknown person was of importance for at least two reasons," said Jacques Connan,...
  • Rare sarcophagus, Egyptian scarab found in Israel

    04/17/2014 11:05:42 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 14 replies
    Phys.Org ^ | Apr 09, 2014 | by Daniel Estrin
    Israeli archaeologists have unearthed a rare sarcophagus featuring a slender face and a scarab ring inscribed with the name of an Egyptian pharaoh, Israel's Antiquities Authority said Wednesday. The mystery man whose skeleton was found inside the sarcophagus was most likely a local Canaanite official in the service of ancient Egypt, Israeli archaeologists believe, shining a light on a period when pharaohs governed the region. "This is a really beautiful face, very serene," said Edwin van den Brink, an Egyptologist and archaeologist with Israel's government antiquities authority. "It's very appealing." Van den Brink said archaeologists dug at Tel Shadud, an...
  • Rare clay sarcophagus found in Israel alongside Seti I scarab seal ring

    04/09/2014 9:02:37 PM PDT · by blueplum · 9 replies
    The Guardian ^ | April 9, 2014 14:53 EDT | AP none stated
    Archaeologists unearth 3,300-year-old coffin at Tel Shadud thought to hold Canaanite official in service of Egyptian pharaoh :snip: Found alongside the new sarcophagus was a scarab seal ring encased in gold, carved with the name of Pharaoh Seti I, who ruled ancient Egypt in the 13th century BC. Seti I conquered the region of today's Israel in the first year of his reign in order to secure Egyptian trade routes and collect taxes for Egypt, said Ron Beeri, an archaeologist who participated in the dig. The man buried in the sarcophagus might have been a tax collector for the pharaoh,...
  • New Tomb For 'Altai Princess' To Be Built In Siberia

    03/21/2008 11:12:35 AM PDT · by blam · 4 replies · 729+ views
    Novosti ^ | 3-20-2008
    New tomb for 'Altai Princess' to be built in Siberia 21:34 | 20/ 03/ 2008 NOVOSIBIRSK, March 20 (RIA Novosti) - A tomb to house the remains of a woman found after being preserved in ice for 2,500 years will be built in Siberia's Altai Republic, the director of a local museum said on Thursday. The well-preserved remains of the woman dubbed the Altai Princess were discovered in the region by a team led by a Novosibirsk archeologist in 1993 near the Mongolian border, and have been studied at the Archaeology and Ethnography Institute in Novosibirsk. Residents of Altai, where...
  • Siberian Princess reveals her 2,500 year old tattoos

    08/16/2012 8:42:37 AM PDT · by Renfield · 21 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | 8-14-2012
    The ancient mummy of a mysterious young woman, known as the Ukok Princess, is finally returning home to the Altai Republic this month. She is to be kept in a special mausoleum at the Republican National Museum in capital Gorno-Altaisk, where eventually she will be displayed in a glass sarcophagus to tourists. For the past 19 years, since her discovery, she was kept mainly at a scientific institute in Novosibirsk, apart from a period in Moscow when her remains were treated by the same scientists who preserve the body of Soviet founder Vladimir Lenin. To mark the move 'home', The...
  • Medieval Siberian mummies baffle archaeologists

    04/15/2014 1:08:43 PM PDT · by Renfield · 29 replies
    Archaeology News Network ^ | 4-10-2014 | Kate Baklitskaya
    Academics restart work to unlock secrets of mystery medieval civilization with links to Persia on edge of the Siberian Arctic. A red-haired man was found, protected from chest to foot by copper plating [Credit: Kate Baklitskaya/Go East] The 34 shallow graves excavated by archaeologists at Zeleniy Yar throw up many more questions than answers. But one thing seems clear: this remote spot, 29 km shy of the Arctic Circle, was a trading crossroads of some importance around one millennium ago. The medieval necropolis include 11 bodies with shattered or missing skulls, and smashed skeletons. Five mummies were found to be shrouded...
  • Descendant Of Stone Age Skeleton Found (Cheddar Man - 9,000 Years Old)

    12/30/2005 5:03:20 PM PST · by blam · 79 replies · 4,773+ views
    The Japan Times, March 9, 1997Descendant of Stone Age skeleton found LONDON (Reuter) British scientists Saturday celebrated their feat of tracing a living descendant of a 9,000-year-old skeleton and establishing the world's oldest known family tree. In an astonishing piece of detective work, they matched mitochondrial DNA material extracted from the tooth cavity of Britain's oldest complete skeleton with that of a 42-year-old history teacher, Adrian Targett. The genetic material showed without doubt that Targett is a direct descendant through his mother's line of the skeleton known as Cheddar Man, which was found in 1903 in caves in Cheddar Gorge...
  • Earliest Evidence of Gigantism-Like Disease Found in 3,800-Year-Old California Skeleton

    04/01/2014 4:28:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 28 replies
    Western DIgs ^ | March 24, 2014 | Blake de Pastino
    The remains of a man buried 3,800 years ago in a richly decorated California grave bear some unusual but unmistakable features — a protruding brow, a lantern jaw, thick leg and arm bones, and teeth so crowded together that at one point they erupt in rows three deep. According to a new study of the ancient skeleton, they are signs of acromegaly, a rare disorder of the endocrine system that’s similar to gigantism. The California man is among the very few examples of acromegaly ever found in the archaeological record, and it’s the oldest ever identified, according to Dr. Eric...
  • 1,300-year-old Egyptian mummy had tattoo of St. Michael

    04/01/2014 2:24:16 PM PDT · by mgist · 17 replies
    Fox ^ | 3/26/14 | Koprowski
    1,300-year-old Egyptian mummy had tattoo of St. Michael CT scan 3D visualisation of the mummified remains of a Sudanese woman, to show the organs. TRUSTEES OF THE BRITISH MUSEUM Next A mummy of an Egyptian woman dating back to 700 A.D. has been scanned and stripped to reveal a tattoo on her thigh that displays the name of the biblical archangel Michael. The discovery, announced by researchers at the British Museum over the weekend, was made during a research project that used advanced medical scans, including Computed Tomography (CT) images, to examine Egyptian mummies at a number of hospitals in...
  • Ancient bone fragments help describe diet, health of Saharan ancestors

    04/01/2014 3:46:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | Marcj 27, 2014 | University of Cambridge
    To describe the ancient Saharan diets, the researchers are measuring the levels of chemical entities called isotopes in the remains. Biological tissues are reservoirs for elements such as carbon and oxygen, which arrive in the body through the food we eat and the environment we live in, and which have variants (isotopes) that can be measured. "Tooth enamel is formed in the very early years of life and the chemical fingerprints within it don't change throughout life," explained O'Connell. "So whatever isotope signals the teeth contain are a result of the geographical area where individuals spent their childhood and the...
  • Contemporary “War Of The Roses” Among Academics Over Claimed Richard III Remains Discovery

    04/01/2014 3:40:34 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies
    BioNews Texas ^ | March 28, 2014 | Charles Moore
    Professor Michael Hicks, an expert on Richard III and professor of history at Winchester University, is cited saying he is not convinced that the car park remains are those of the Yorkist monarch, arguing that they could just as well belong to one of many other victims of the Wars of the Roses, and that evidence from DNA testing and radiocarbon dating cited to bolster the claims that Richard had been found places the bones at somewhere between 1450 and 1540, and thus is not specific enough to pin down an exact date. Therefore it can’t be relied upon to...
  • Beachy Head Lady was young sub-Saharan Roman with good teeth, say archaeologists

    04/01/2014 3:24:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies
    Culture 24 ^ | March 28, 2014 | Ben Miller
    ...The facial reconstruction was done by Caroline Wilkinson from Dundee University, one of the country’s foremost reconstructors... Caroline said, ‘oh my, you realise you’ve got a sub-Saharan African here?’ Our osteo hadn’t picked that up, but Caroline subsequently had it looked at by two more experts who agreed, without being prompted, that this individual showed so many traits of being a sub-Saharan African person... The radiocarbon dating came back with a firm Roman date – around 200 or 250 AD. That was a relief. It’s not without precedent to find Africans from this date in Britain, such as the famous...
  • Black Death skeletons unearthed by Crossrail project

    03/31/2014 11:43:12 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 33 replies
    BBC ^ | 29 March 2014 Last updated at 20:00 ET | James Morgan
    Records say thousands of Londoners perished and their corpses were dumped in a mass grave outside the City, but its exact location was a mystery. Archaeologists now believe it is under Charterhouse Square near the Barbican. They plan to expand their search for victims across the square - guided by underground radar scans, which have picked up signs of many more graves. Crossrail's lead archaeologist Jay Carver says the find "solves a 660-year-old mystery". "This discovery is a hugely important step forward in documenting and understanding Europe's most devastating pandemic," he said
  • A Visigoth In Kent?

    02/21/2006 12:03:31 PM PST · by blam · 9 replies · 573+ views
    A Visigoth in Kent? The excavations at Springhead uncovered a large number of brooches. One in particular has turned out to be a very exciting discovery. X-ray photography showed that the 5th-6th century iron bow brooch was of Visigothic design, of a type known as Estagel. The Visigoths (West Goths) were one of the German tribes. Settled near the Black Sea in the 3rd century AD, by the 6th century they had migrated west and reached Spain and northern France. Kent was probably the most cosmopolitan region in the country at this time and Saxons and Jutes have left evidence...
  • A Visigoth in Kent?

    02/21/2006 12:19:07 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 10 replies · 331+ views
    Wessex Archaeology ^ | January 2006 | Roman Finds Group Newsletter
    Kent was probably the most cosmopolitan region in the country at this time and Saxons and Jutes have left evidence of their culture here. In the last 30 years or so, a number of objects of Visigothic design have come to light, mainly in south-east England. Now this brooch adds to the evidence for connections between the people of Kent and the small number of Visigothic groups known to have lived in northern France at the time.
  • Archaeologists discover unusual network of burial chambers in Rome

    05/02/2006 10:16:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 662+ views
    Catholic News Service ^ | May 2, 2006 | John Thavis
    Archaeologists repairing a Roman catacomb have discovered an unusual network of underground burial chambers containing the elegantly dressed corpses of more than 1,000 people... The rooms appear to date back to the second century and are thought to be a place of early Christian burial. Because of the large number of bodies deposited over a relatively short period, experts believe a natural disaster or epidemic may have occurred at the time. The corpses, dressed in fine clothes embroidered with gold thread, were carefully wrapped in sheets and covered in lime. Balsamic fragrances were also applied, according to Raffaella Giuliani, chief...
  • Gladiators' Graveyard Discovered

    05/02/2007 5:55:16 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 1,576+ views
    BBC ^ | 5-2-2007 | Monika Kupper - Huw Jones
    Gladiators' graveyard discovered By Monika Kupper and Huw Jones BBC Timewatch Gravestones helped identify the site as a gladiator graveyard Scientists believe they have for the first time identified an ancient graveyard for gladiators. Analysis of their bones and injuries has given new insight into how they lived, fought and died. The remains were found at Ephesus in Turkey, a major city of the Roman world, BBC Timewatch reports. Gladiators were the sporting heroes of the ancient world. Archaeological records show them celebrated in everything from mosaics to graffiti. Motifs of gladiators are found on nearly a third of all...
  • Latin Course Stage 6 (Pompeii Slave Girl)

    07/18/2004 7:24:53 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies · 5,740+ views
    Cambridge ^ | 2004 | University of Cambridge
    Gold bracelet found on arm of (slave?) girl killed near Pompeii by the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. On the inside of the bracelet is carved "from the Master to his slave girl" (DOM[I]NUS ANCILLAE SUAE).
  • Roman horse skeletons, chariot dug up

    06/13/2008 1:03:59 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 196+ views
    Herald Sun (Australia) ^ | June 12, 2008 | AFP correspondents in Athens
    Archaeologists have dug up the skeletons of 16 horses and a two-wheeled chariot in a grave dating back to the Roman Empire in north-east Greece, the culture ministry announced today. Half of the horses were buried in pairs, whilst two human skeletons were also discovered in a dig near Lithohori, in the Kavala region. Near to the remains of six of the horses archaeologists found a shield, weapons and various other accessories... diggers found a grave and four tombs covered with a ceramic lid, which contained four bronze coins dating back to the fourth century AD. The chariot, dating from...
  • Early chemical warfare comes to light

    01/12/2009 7:37:48 AM PST · by BGHater · 6 replies · 633+ views
    ScienceNews ^ | 11 Jan 2009 | Bruce Bower
    Roman soldiers defending a Middle Eastern garrison from attack nearly 2,000 years ago met the horrors of war in a most unusual place. Inside a cramped tunnel beneath the site’s massive front wall, enemy fighters stacked up nearly two dozen dead or dying Romans and set them on fire, using substances that gave off toxic fumes and drove away Roman warriors just outside the tunnel. The attackers, members of Persia’s Sasanian culture that held sway over much of the region in and around the Middle East from the third to the seventh centuries, adopted a brutally ingenious method for penetrating...
  • Genes set Jews apart, study finds (European Jews Descended from Ancient Roman Converts?)

    06/10/2010 9:08:00 AM PDT · by GOPGuide · 105 replies · 646+ views
    LA Times ^ | June 3, 2010 | Thomas H. Maugh II
    The Jewish people, according to archaeologists, originated in Babylon and Persia between the 4th and 6th centuries BC. The modern-day Jews most closely related to that original population are those in Iran, Iraq and Syria, whose closest non-Jewish relatives are the Druze, Bedouins and Palestinians, the study found. Sometime in that period, the Middle Eastern and European Jews diverged and the European branch began actively proselytizing for converts. At the height of the Roman Empire, about 10% of the empire's population was Jewish, although the bulk of them were converts. Some Khazars were also incorporated during this period. "That explains...
  • Romans killed dozens of unwanted babies at English 'brothel'

    06/29/2010 8:48:14 AM PDT · by NYer · 55 replies
    Mail Online ^ | June 26, 2010 | Sam Greenhill
    A farmer's field in Buckinghamshire has yielded a grisly secret  -  it was the burial ground for nearly 100 tiny babies slaughtered by the Romans. The site is suspected of being an ancient brothel and the 97 newborns could have been the unwanted babies of prostitutes, experts say. With little or no effective contraception available to the Romans, who also considered infanticide less shocking than it is today, they may have simply murdered the children as soon as they were born. The Yewden Villa excavations at Hambleden in 1912. Archaelogists have found the remains of 97 babies at the site...
  • Skeletons halt work on clinic

    11/09/2010 6:57:31 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 49 replies
    Edinburgh Evening News ^ | October 28, 2010 | Adam Morris
    It is a major public sector building project which has been delayed, causing headaches for bosses and the public. But it is decapitated skeletons and 2000-year-old forts rather than red tape and swelling costs that have caused the hold-up for the new health centre in Musselburgh... significant Roman remains were discovered... human remains, the bones of horses and weapons and culinary tools. Archeologists there said the "unique" finds, among the most impressive ever discovered in Scotland from that period, will help build a picture not only of Roman activity in Musselburgh from 140AD, but improve the wider understanding of life...
  • Lead poisoning in Rome: The skeletal evidence

    05/31/2012 5:10:10 AM PDT · by Renfield · 14 replies
    Past Horizons ^ | 2-24-2012 | http://www.poweredbyosteons.org/
    A recent article in the online publication io9, “The First Artificial Sweetener Poisoned Lots of Romans“ provided a (very) brief look at some of the uses of lead (Pb) in the Roman world, including the tired old hypothesis that it was rampant lead poisoning that led to the downfall of Rome - along with gonorrhoea, Christianity, slavery, and the kitchen sink. The fact the Romans loved their lead is not in question, with plenty of textual and archaeological sources that inform us of the uses of lead – as cosmetics, ballistics, sarcophagi, pipes, jewellery, curse tablets, utensils and cooking pots,...
  • Romans Faced Head-To-Head Battle (Lice)

    03/30/2004 6:34:09 PM PST · by blam · 23 replies · 287+ views
    BBC ^ | 3-31-2004
    Romans faced head-to-head battle Head lice were common among Roman soldiers in Cumbria A new exhibition in Cumbria has revealed that Roman foot soldiers faced a battle of a different kind against a microscopic foe. The Romans, sent to the northern front of the empire and Hadrian's Wall, came head to head with lice. A new display of items from an excavation outside Carlisle Castle includes a soldier's comb with a fully intact, three-millimetre-long louse. Archaeologists say the louse is around 2,000 years old. The dig was part of Carlisle City Council's Gateway City Millennium Project which took place between...
  • Burial with the Romans

    08/01/2004 7:15:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 1 replies · 470+ views
    British Archaeology magazine, March 2003 ^ | March 2003 | Alison Taylor
    Victims of every age, social class and sex were chosen. An exceptional proportion had a physical impairment of some kind. 'Overkill' was normal - a single individual might, for example, be garotted, bludgeoned, drowned and have his or her throat cut before being cast into the bog. In Britain this prehistoric practice, although always a rare event, was apparently unaffected by the Roman conquest... [T]he ritual killings of prisoners of war, sent to Rome to be paraded around the streets and executed in public, carried on.
  • Ancient Germans weren't so fair

    07/17/2004 7:07:03 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies · 2,309+ views
    Australian Broadcasting Corporation ^ | Friday, 16 July 2004 | Anna Salleh
    Researchers may be able to make more accurate reconstructions of what ancient humans looked like with the first ever use of ancient DNA to determine hair and skin colour from skeletal remains.... German anthropologist, Dr Diane Schmidt of the University of Göttingen... said her research may also help to identify modern day murderers and their victims... In research for her recently completed PhD, Schmidt built on research from the fields of dermatology and skin cancer that have found genetic markers for traits such as skin and hair colour in modern humans... She extracted DNA from ancient human bones as...
  • ROMAN REMAINS (Ancient Sports Fans (Gladiator Contests) Ate Fast Food, Bought Tacky Gifts)

    05/18/2005 5:23:35 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 24 replies · 1,006+ views
    May 18 2005
    ANCIENT sports fans ate fast food and bought tacky gifts, it is claimed. Archaeologists say Romans gnawed on spare ribs and chicken while watching gladiators fight nearly 2000 years ago. It follows a dig at the site of an amphitheatre in Chester where the bones of discarded snacks were found. Part of a souvenir bowl decorated with pictures of the fights was also uncovered
  • Archaeologists Baffled by Headless Bodies Find

    08/05/2005 8:27:24 AM PDT · by robowombat · 33 replies · 1,296+ views
    Taphophilia.com ^ | April 2005 | Nick Foley
    Archaeologists Baffled by Headless Bodies Find By Nick Foley, PA Archaeologists have been left mystified by the discovery of 36 decapitated bodies, it was revealed today. Experts from the York Archaeological Trust unearthed the skeletons of 49 young men and seven children at a Roman cemetery they discovered in The Mount area of the city. But they were stunned to find that most of the men had had their heads chopped off, while another was bound with iron shackles. Dr Patrick Ottaway, the trust’s head of field word, said he was left baffled by the find because Romans had no...
  • Antiquities Robbers Caught Selling Rare Ancient Burial Chests

    03/31/2014 1:09:05 PM PDT · by BlueDragon · 9 replies
    Arutz Sheva ^ | 3/31/2014 | Ari Yashar
    Some of the 11 Jewish ossuaries from Second Temple period still held bones, featured Hebrew script listing names of those interred. The Antiquities Authority and police cooperated last Friday to arrest suspects who allegedly stole ornate stone ossuary burial chests, which were used by Jews in Israel during the Second Temple period roughly 2,000 years ago. The suspects were caught while in possession of eleven ossuaries, some of them still containing skeletal remains. The suspected grave robbers, who were arrested and brought in for questioning, came from the Arab village of Abadiyah in Judea, located near Bethlehem, as well as...
  • 800-year-old monk found poking out of cliff face

    03/11/2014 1:11:46 PM PDT · by Sawdring · 64 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 10 Mar 2014 | Sarah Knapton
    The legs of an 800-year-old medieval monk have been discovered, poking out of a cliff face in Wales. Although badly damaged and missing their knees, shins and feet, the thigh bones were found after the fierce recent storms caused severe coastal erosion.
  • Infamous Mass Grave of Young Women in Ancient City of Cahokia Also Holds Men: Study

    03/01/2014 3:51:42 AM PST · by Renfield · 23 replies
    Western Digs ^ | 8-5-2013 | Blake de Pastino
    <p>The victims all appeared to be women, mostly in their late teens or early 20s. Evidence suggested they were strangled, or perhaps cut at the throat, at the edge of their shared mass grave, and then interred, meters away from an ornate burial of two men thought to be clan elders, political leaders, spiritual guides, or all three.</p>
  • Ancient mummies found buried with world's oldest cheese

    03/01/2014 3:15:21 AM PST · by Renfield · 29 replies
    L. A. Times ^ | 2-28-2014 | Jean Harris
    For some cheese lovers, the older and stinkier the cheese, the better. Well, what about a cheese that's been aging for 3,600 years? Yellow lumps, believed to be the world's oldest cheese, were found on mummies buried in the Taklamakan Desert in northwestern China. The cheese, which was found during archaeological excavations that took place between 2002 and 2004, dates to as early as 1615 BC. The cheese was found on the necks and chests of the mummies. The multiple layers of cowhide the mummies were buried in, and the dry, salty desert helped preserve the cheese....
  • Prehistoric Boy May Be Native American 'Missing Link' (Aznick Boy)

    02/12/2014 2:05:43 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies
    Live Science - Yahoo News ^ | 2-12-2014 | Charles Q. Choi
    Prehistoric Boy May Be Native American 'Missing Link' LiveScience.com By By Charles Q. Choi, LiveScience ContributorFebruary 12, 2014 A prehistoric boy's DNA now suggests that ancient toolmakers long thought of as the first Americans may serve as a kind of "missing link" between Native Americans and the rest of the world, researchers say. The findings reveal these prehistoric toolmakers are the direct ancestors of many contemporary Native Americans, and are closely related to all Native Americans. Scientists investigated a prehistoric culture known as the Clovis, named after sites discovered near Clovis, N.M. Centuries of cold, nicknamed the "Big Freeze," helped...
  • Mystery of 39 skulls found at London Wall is solved after 25 years

    01/16/2014 4:32:45 AM PST · by Renfield · 9 replies
    Daily Mail (UK) ^ | 1-15-2014 | Amanda Williams
    Skulls discovered within the boundaries of ancient London a quarter of a century ago are now believed to be those of gladiators, brutally killed for the amusement of Roman audiences. The haul of 39 skulls, discovered beneath the site of the Guildhall in the City of London, were discovered in 1988 and were believed to have originated from human remains washed out of burial sites by the Walbrook, one of the area’s lost rivers. But now after 25 years in storage, the remains have been re-examined by an historian from the Museum of London, who believes they are the first...
  • Ancient graves hint at cultural shift to Anglo-Saxon Britain

    02/17/2014 1:08:17 PM PST · by Renfield · 31 replies
    Phys.org ^ | 2-14-2014 | Alex Peel
    Human remains dug up from an ancient grave in Oxfordshire add to a growing body of evidence that Britain's fifth-century transition from Roman to Anglo-Saxon was cultural rather than bloody. The traditional historical narrative is one of brutal conquest, with invaders from the North wiping out and replacing the pre-existing population. But a new study, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, hints at a more peaceful process. Dr Andrew Millard, from Durham University, is one of the study's authors. 'The main controversy over the years has centred on how many Anglo-Saxons came across the North Sea,' he says. 'Was...
  • 1,300 year-old mummy and her intimate tattoo

    03/28/2014 4:16:37 AM PDT · by NYer · 79 replies
    Telegraph ^ | March 27, 2014 | Robert Mendick
    Wrapped in bandages and caricatured as figures of terror in Hollywood movies, Egypt’s mummies have long captivated and bewildered scientists and children alike. Now a new exhibition at the British Museum will disclose the human side of the mummies of the Nile. Eight have been – scientifically speaking – stripped bare revealing secrets taken to the grave thousands of years ago. snip One of the mummies, whose remains were found just seven years ago, was so well preserved that archaeologists could almost make out the tattoo on her skin on the inner thigh of her right leg with the naked...
  • Tattoo Discovered on Ancient Egyptian Mummy

    03/24/2014 12:58:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 33 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Monday, March 24, 2014 | unattributed
    CT scans and the use of infra-red technology on the naturally mummified remains of a woman who lived in in a Christian community in the Sudan 1,300 years ago have revealed a tattoo on her inner thigh. The tattoo is a symbol of the Archangel Michael, assembled from ancient Greek letters. “She is the first evidence of a tattoo from the period. This is a very rare find,” Daniel Antoin, curator of physical anthropology at the British Museum, told The Telegraph. The woman’s remains are part of a special exhibition of eight mummies and what technology has revealed about their...
  • Ancient statesman skeleton found in Giza

    03/24/2014 12:12:37 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Egypt Independent ^ | Monday, March 24, 2014 | Edited translation from Al-Masry Al-Youm
    In collaboration with the Ministry of Antiquities, a Czech mission working in the area of Abu Seer in Giza discovered a skeleton of a senior statesman called Nefer who lived under rule of the King Nefer-ir-ka-Re of the fifth dynasty from ancient Egypt’s Pharaonic era. The team team was resuming studies on his tomb, which was discovered last year, when Nefer's skeleton was found inside the coffin, according to Minister of Antiquities Mohamed Ibrahim. Ali al-Asfar, head of the Egyptian antiquities sector, Nefer’s tomb was rocky and unfinished, located within mortuary complex for burial that consists of four corridors. The...
  • Genetic mugshot recreates faces from nothing but DNA

    03/21/2014 1:05:01 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    www.newscientist.com ^ | 20 March 2014 | by Peter Aldhous
    A MURDER has been committed, and all the cops have to go on is a trace of DNA left at the scene. It doesn't match any profile in databases of known criminals, and the trail goes cold. But what if the police could issue a wanted poster based on a realistic "photofit" likeness built from that DNA? Not if, but when, claim researchers who have developed a method for determining how our genes influence facial shape. One day, the technique may even allow us to gaze into the faces of extinct human-like species that interbred with our own ancestors. It's...
  • Scientists Reconstruct Faces From DNA Samples

    03/21/2014 1:08:25 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 17 replies
    www.forbes.com ^ | 03-21-2014 | Alex Knapp Forbes Staff
    Sometime in the future, technicians will go over the scene of the crime. They’ll uncover some DNA evidence and take it to the lab. And when the cops need to get a picture of the suspect, they won’t have to ask eyewitnesses to give descriptions to a sketch artist – they’ll just ask the technicians to get a mugshot from the DNA. That, at least, is the potential of new research being published today in PLOS Genetics. In that paper, a team of scientists describe how they were able to produce crude 3D models of faces extrapolated from a person’s...
  • Ancient mass grave unearthed at Italian gallery thought to contain dozens of plague victims

    02/12/2014 3:06:15 PM PST · by Squawk 8888 · 24 replies
    National Post ^ | February 12, 2014
    Work to expand the Uffizi Gallery’s exhibit space has unearthed an ancient cemetery with dozens of skeletons archaeologists say might have been victims of the plague or some other epidemic that swept through Florence during the 4th or 5th century. Archaeologists and art officials showed reporters Wednesday the excavation at the renowned museum. In five months of digging, archaeologists uncovered 60 well-preserved skeletons in a cemetery apparently made in a hurry, perhaps a mass grave, with bodies laid side-by-side at roughly the same time.
  • Spanish team in Egypt finds 3,600-year-old mummy

    02/13/2014 8:29:44 PM PST · by BenLurkin · 6 replies
    Associated Press, Updated: ^ | Thursday, February 13, 6:12 PM
    CAIRO — Spanish archeologists have unearthed a 3,600-year-old mummy in the ancient city of Luxor, Egypt’s Antiquities Minister said Thursday. Prosecutors accused nine people including three Germans of smuggling stone samples from pyramids. In a statement, Mohammed Ibrahim said the rare find in a preserved wooden sarcophagus dates back to 1600 BC, when the Pharaonic 17th Dynasty reigned. He said the mummy appears to belong to a high official. The sarcophagus is engraved with hieroglyphs and decorated with inscriptions of birds’ feathers. The exact identity of the well-preserved mummy will now be studied, Ibrahim said, adding that it was discovered...
  • Are Richard III's secrets about to be revealed?

    02/12/2014 3:04:42 AM PST · by afraidfortherepublic · 30 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 2-12-14 | Harry Mount
    What a treat for all medieval historians! More than 500 years after he was killed, the skeleton of Richard III is giving them much more reliable biographical information than they acquired over the previous half a millennium. Henry VII, his successor, and opponent at Bosworth, encouraged his court historians to produce a warped picture of Richard. Thank God, then, for the miraculous discovery of his body in a Leicester car park in 2012, and the undeniable truths it provided. Analysis of his skeleton showed the king didn’t have a hunchback exactly; he suffered from scoliosis of the spine, meaning his...
  • Experts Reveal 'Ancient Massacre' (UK - 3590BC)

    03/12/2007 11:15:11 AM PDT · by blam · 33 replies · 1,199+ views
    BBC ^ | 3-12-2007
    Experts reveal 'ancient massacre' The Neolithic bones were discovered at Wayland's Smithy Bones found at a prehistoric burial site indicate they belonged to victims of an ancient massacre, say scientists. Remains of 14 people were discovered at Wayland's Smithy, near Uffington White Horse, Oxfordshire, in the 1960s. Latest techniques date the bones at between 3590 BC and 3560 BC, and have led experts to believe the people may have died in a Neolithic Age massacre. English Heritage carried out the work with the help of Cardiff University and the University of Central Lancashire. Flint arrowhead Michael Wysocki of the University...
  • Archaeologists Find 3 Prehistoric Bodies In SE Mexico (Tulum - 10-14.5k YO)

    04/11/2007 3:40:41 PM PDT · by blam · 50 replies · 1,114+ views
    Xinhuanet ^ | 4-11-2007 | China View
    Archaeologists find 3 prehistoric bodies in SE Mexico www.chinaview.cn 2007-04-11 11:39:34 MEXICO CITY, April 10 (Xinhua) -- Mexican archaeologists found remains of two women and a man that can be traced to more than 10,000 years ago in the Mayan area of Tulum, Mexico's National Anthropology and History Institute said in a statement on Tuesday. The remains were being examined by laboratories in Britain, the United States and Mexico, all of which had said the remains were people between 10,000 and 14,500 years ago, said Carmen Rojas, an archaeologist quoted in the statement. "This makes southeastern Mexico one of the...
  • Charlemagne's bones are (probably) real

    02/05/2014 7:54:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 29 replies
    The Local ^ | 31 Jan 2014 | unattributed
    German scientists have announced after almost 26 years of research that the bones interred for centuries at Aachen Cathedral are likely to be those of Charlemagne. Researchers confirmed on Wednesday evening - 1,200 years to the day since Charlemagne died - that the 94 bones and bone fragments taken from the supposed resting place of the King of the Franks and founder of what was to become the Holy Roman Empire came from a tall, thin, older man. The team first opened the sarcophagus of the first emperor in western Europe since the fall of the Roman Empire in secret...
  • Starvation Cannibalism at Jamestown

    01/19/2014 4:03:14 AM PST · by Renfield · 35 replies
    Bones Don't Lie ^ | 5-2-2013 | Katy Myers
    If you’ve read any news in the past day, you’ve seen reports regarding cannibalism in colonial Jamestown. It was known prior that the colonists had undergone a number of starvation years where they were forced to eat foods that they wouldn’t normally. The trash pits from the sites hold the remains of animals who aren’t normally butchered, including horses, cats, dogs, rats and snakes. Burials from this period are not given the complete funerary treatment likely due to the high number of deaths, and the skeletons show evidence of nutritional hardship and early death. The colony was founded in 1607...
  • Skeleton of 2,000-year-old woman unearthed in Davie (Florida)

    01/09/2014 8:17:00 PM PST · by ConservativeStatement · 34 replies
    South Florida Sun-Sentinel ^ | January 9, 2014 | Ken Kaye
    She rested in peace for about 2,000 years until utility crews came shortly before Christmas to install a new waterline on Pine Island Road in Davie. That's when the fully intact skeleton of what is believed to be a Tequesta Indian woman was found — perhaps the best-preserved remains of an ancient human uncovered in the past 40 years, authorities said Thursday. "It's either Tequesta or the member of a people that predates the Tequesta," said Bob Carr, of the Archaeological and Historical Conservancy in Davie. "It's unusually well preserved, considering it's been under a highway with thousands and thousands...