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Keyword: ancientautopsies

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  • Skull Study Suggests at Least Two Groups Colonized America

    12/15/2005 3:48:14 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 18 replies · 864+ views
    Sci-Tech Today ^ | December 15, 2005
    The 7,500- to 11,000-year-old remains suggest the oldest settlers of the Americas came from different genetic stock than more recent Native Americans. Modern Native Americans share traits with Mongoloid peoples of Mongolia, China, and Siberia, the researchers said. But they found dozens of skulls from Brazil appear much more similar to modern Australians, Melanesians, and Sub-Saharan Africans. A Brazilian study involving a large collection of South American skulls suggests at least two distinct groups of early humans colonized the Americas. Anthropologists Walter Neves and Mark Hubbe of the University of Sao Paulo studied 81 skulls of early humans and found...
  • Naqada tombs uncovered in Egypt's Daqahliyah

    07/07/2015 1:35:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    el Ahram ^ | Tuesday, July 7, 2015 | Nevine El-Aref
    A Polish mission at Tel Al-Farkha in Daqahliyah has discovered four pre-dynastic tombs, Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty announced on Tuesday. Eldamaty said three of the tombs are in a very poor condition and include child burials. Meanwhile the fourth tomb is in very good conservation condition and can be dated to the Naqada IIIC2 era. The minister told Ahram Online that the tomb is a small mastaba with two chambers. The southern one was filled with 42 clay vessels, mainly beer jars, bowls as well as a collection of 26 stone vessels of different shapes and sizes. Some of...
  • 8,500-Year-Old Well Unearthed in Israel, Mystery Surrounds Two Human Skeletons

    11/17/2012 1:11:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Science News ^ | Thursday, November 8th, 2012 | Sergio Prostak
    Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority have unearthed an ancient well dating to the Neolithic period some 8,500 years ago in the Jezreel Valley. "The impressive well that was revealed was connected to an ancient farming settlement and it seems the inhabitants used it for their subsistence and living. The upper part of the well was built of stones and its lower part was hewn in the bedrock. Two capstones, which narrowed the opening, were set in place at the top of the well. It is about 8 m deep and its upper part measures about 1.3 m in diameter,"...
  • The king of Stonehenge: Were artefacts at ancient chief's burial site Britain's first Crown Jewels?

    05/12/2009 8:57:45 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 69 replies · 3,768+ views
    dailymail ^ | 12th May 2009 | Paul Harris
    He was a giant of a man, a chieftain who ruled with a royal sceptre and a warrior's axe. When they laid him to rest they dressed him in his finest regalia and placed his weapons at his side. Then they turned his face towards the setting sun and sealed him in a burial mound that would keep him safe for the next 4,000 years. In his grave were some of the most exquisitely fashioned artefacts of the Bronze Age, intricately crafted to honour the status of a figure who bore them in life in death. For this may have...
  • Britain's 'most important archeological' discovery found in desk drawer

    10/28/2008 8:13:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 763+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Thursday, October 23, 2008 | Urmee Khan
    The pinhead-sized studs form an intricate pattern on the handle of a dagger, but archeologists failed to realise their significance when they excavated the burial mound in Wiltshire - known as Bush Barrow - in 1808. Now they are to be re-united with other priceless artefacts unearthed at the site and put on show at the Wiltshire Heritage Museum in Devizes after Niall Sharples, a senior lecturer at Cardiff University turned out his predecessors' desk and discovered them in a film canister labelled Bush Barrow. In the 1960s, the gold was taken away for examination by Professor Richard Atkinson, a...
  • Viking Burial Site Found in England

    09/07/2004 7:53:26 AM PDT · by 68skylark · 127 replies · 2,470+ views
    THE ASSOCIATED PRESS via NY Times ^ | September 7, 2004 | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    LONDON (AP) -- Archaeologists in northwestern England have found a burial site of six Viking men and women, complete with swords, spears, jewelry, fire-making materials and riding equipment, officials said Monday. The site, discovered near Cumwhitton, is believed to date to the early 10th century, and archaeologists working there called it the first Viking burial ground found in Britain. The only other known Viking cemetery was found in Ingleby east of Cumwhitton. It was excavated in the 1940s, but the bodies had been cremated and not buried. Local metal specialist Peter Adams made the find at the end of March...
  • Iron Age warrior lived with arrowhead in spine

    07/01/2015 7:20:54 AM PDT · by dware · 28 replies
    Live Science via Fox News ^ | 07.01.2015 | Laura Geggel
    A horrific spinal injury caused by a bronze arrowhead didn't immediately kill an Iron Age warrior, who survived long enough for his bone to heal around the metal point, a new study of his burial in central Kazakhstan finds. "This found individual was extremely lucky to survive," said study researcher Svetlana Svyatko, a research fellow in the school of geography, archaeology and paleoecology at Queen's University Belfast in Northern Ireland. "It's hard to get a vertebral wound without damaging the main blood vessels, which would have resulted in an immediate death."
  • The life of an Anglo-Saxon princess

    07/17/2010 2:40:51 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 3 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | 17 June 2010 | Michael Wood
    The unearthing of Eadgyth, the Anglo-Saxon princess, was an emotional moment for historian Michael Wood. She was the Diana of the dark ages – charismatic, with the common touch ___ For anyone interested in the kings and queens of England it was a touching moment last year to see the heavy tomb cover lifted in Magdeburg Cathedral. The inscription said the occupant was Eadgyth, queen of the Germans, the Anglo-Saxon granddaughter of Alfred the Great, sister of Athelstan the first king of a united England. But was it really her? Now the results of the scientific examination are through: isotopes...
  • Experts may have found bones of 10th-century English princess

    01/20/2010 3:15:37 PM PST · by Tennessee Nana · 26 replies · 1,251+ views
    ChattanoogaTimesFreePress ^ | January 20, 2010 | RAPHAEL G. SATTER
    LONDON — She was a beautiful English princess who married one of Europe's most powerful monarchs and dazzled subjects with her charity and charm. Now an international team of scientists say they think they've found the body of Princess Eadgyth (pronounced Edith) — a 10th-century noblewoman who has been compared to Princess Diana. "She was a very, very popular person," said Mark Horton, an archaeology professor at Bristol University in western England. "She was sort of the Diana of her day if you like — pretty and full of good works." Horton is one of a team of experts working...
  • 51 Headless Vikings Found in English Execution Pit?

    07/28/2009 1:34:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies · 2,449+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | July 28, 2009 | James Owen in London
    Naked, beheaded, and tangled, the bodies of 51 young men -- their heads stacked neatly to the side -- have been found in a thousand-year-old pit in southern England, according to carbon-dating results released earlier this month. The mass burial took place at a time when the English were battling Viking invaders, say archaeologists who are now trying to verify the identity of the slain. The dead are thought to have been war captives, possibly Vikings, whose heads were hacked off with swords or axes... Many of the skeletons have deep cut marks to the skull and jaw as well...
  • Identifying Eadgyth

    12/02/2010 6:09:52 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 1+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | November 26, 2010 | University of Bristol
    Eadgyth was the granddaughter of Alfred the Great and the half-sister of Athelstan, the first acknowledged King of England. She was sent to marry Otto, King of Saxony, in AD 929, and bore him at least two children, before her death, at around the age of 36, in AD 946. Buried in the monastery of St Maurice in Magdeburg, historical records state that her bones were moved on at least three occasions before being interred in an elaborate tomb in Magdeburg Cathedral in 1510. It was long assumed that this tomb was empty, so, when German archaeologists opened it in...
  • Skeleton Crew Digs Up Past

    02/25/2007 9:49:23 PM PST · by blam · 26 replies · 812+ views
    Skeleton crew digs up the past The skeleton of an Anglo-Saxon lord has been recovered as the hunt for buried treasure continues at a city allotment site. The removal of the seventh Century body follows the discovery of a rare ceremonial brass bowl on the site at Palmerston Road, Woodston, Peterborough. The priceless Coptic bowl, which was made more than 1,300 years ago in the Mediterranean, has led historical experts to conclude they had discovered the grave of an extremely wealthy Anglo-Saxon – probably a prince or a powerful warlord from the ancient kingdom of Mercia. Excavation by archaeologists from...
  • Dundee experts recreate face of Saxon man at Lincoln Castle

    06/28/2015 11:04:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    University of Dundee ^ | Wednesday, June 3, 2015 | Roddy Isles
    The work has been carried out by specialists in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) at the University of Dundee, one of the world's leading centres for facial reconstruction. Caroline Erolin, Lecturer in Forensic and Medical Art at CAHID, said, "His grave lay slightly under an important sarcophagus burial, which had resulted in excellent preservation of his skull making it the best candidate among the skeletons for facial reconstruction." ... "The burial of this man was one of eight burials which were interred inside a small stone church or chapel which predates Lincoln Castle and was previously unknown,"...
  • 'Roswell Alien' Photo Revealed as Mummified Boy

    06/24/2015 11:54:12 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 22 replies
    http://news.discovery.com ^ | Benjamin Radford | May 14, 2015
    Earlier this month at a UFO conference in Mexico City two photographs claimed to have been found in a trunk in Sedona and depicting an alien body that crashed in Roswell in 1947 were revealed. The images, which have created a buzz among UFO believers, depict a small human-shaped figure with an enlarged head—apparently in a display case with an unreadable placard, oddly enough. Low-resolution images had been circulating for some time, and several skeptical researchers (including myself here on Discovery News, I modestly note) identified the “Roswell alien” as a mummified child.
  • 8 Million Dog Mummies Found in 'God of Death' Mass Grave

    06/19/2015 12:28:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Livescience ^ | June 18, 2015 | Laura Geggel
    In ancient Egypt, so many people worshiped Anubis, the jackal-headed god of death, that the catacombs next to his sacred temple once held nearly 8 million mummified puppies and grown dogs, a new study finds. The catacomb ceiling also contains the fossil of an ancient sea monster, a marine vertebrate that's more than 48 million years old, but it's unclear whether the Egyptians noticed the existence of the fossil when they built the tomb for the canine mummies, the researchers said. Many of the mummies have since disintegrated or been disrupted by grave robbers and industrialists, who likely used the...
  • Autopsy carried out in Far East on world's oldest dog mummified by ice

    06/19/2015 12:01:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | Thursday, June 18 2015 | Anna Liesowska
    Scientists in the Russian Far East have carried out a post-mortem examination of the remains of the only mummified dog ever found in the world. Found sealed inside permafrost during a hunt for traces of woolly mammoths, the perfectly-preserved body is 12,450 years old. The dog, believed to be a three-month-old female, was unearthed in 2011 on the Syallakh River in the Ust-Yana region of Yakutia, also known as the Sakha Republic. Experts spent the past four years analysing the body – which included not just bones but also its heart, lungs and stomach – but only carried out the...
  • 400,000-year-old dental tartar provides earliest evidence of manmade pollution

    06/17/2015 10:07:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | June 17, 2015 | Tel Aviv University
    In what Prof. Barkai describes as a "time capsule," the analysed calculus revealed three major findings: charcoal from indoor fires; evidence for the ingestion of essential plant-based dietary components; and fibers that might have been used to clean teeth or were remnants of raw materials. "Prof. Karen Hardy published outstanding research on the dental calculus of Neanderthals from El Sidron cave in Spain, but these dated back just 40,000-50,000 years—we are talking far earlier than this," said Prof. Barkai. "This is the first evidence that the world's first indoor BBQs had health-related consequences," said Prof. Barkai. "The people who lived...
  • Face of Tehran’s 7 millennia old woman reconstructed

    06/17/2015 10:05:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Mehr News Agency ^ | June 17, 2015 | unattributed
    In November 2014, Mahsa Vahabi, an Archeology student serendipitously discovered in the dug soil in Mowlavi St., of Tehran Water and Wastewater Company some pottery. Her discovery of simple earthen material drew attentions from her fellow archeologist and a study team addressed the place on Mowlavi St. Further excavations uncovered from under the soil bones and skeleton, reportedly and supposedly belonging to a women from 7,000 years ago. Soon archeology researchers carried out research to find out more about its characteristics. A 3D documentation method was carried out on the skeleton by Mohammad Reza Rokni, an expert in Archeology Research...
  • Fully dressed and preserved 350-year-old corpse of French noblewoman found

    06/04/2015 4:17:08 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 42 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | Wednesday 3 June 2015 18.40 EDT | Kim Willsher in Paris
    French archaeologists have uncovered the well-preserved body of a noblewoman who died 350 years ago – along with the clothes in which she was buried, including her cap and shoes, still intact. The corpse of Louise de Quengo, a widow from an aristocratic family from Brittany, was discovered in an hermetically sealed lead coffin placed in a stone tomb at a convent chapel in the western city of Rennes. Four other lead coffins dating from the 17th century were also found at the site of the Saint-Joseph chapel, as well as 800 other graves containing skeletons. Researchers expected to find...
  • Lethal wounds on skull may indicate 430,000-year-old murder

    05/27/2015 7:01:10 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 65 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | 5/27/15 | Nohemi Sala et al
    Lethal wounds identified on a human skull in the Sima de los Huesos, Spain, may indicate one of the first cases of murder in human history, some 430,000 years ago, according to a study published May 27 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nohemi Sala from Centro Mixto UCM-ISCIII de Evolución y Comportamiento Humanos, Spain, and colleagues. The archeological site, Sima de los Huesos in northern Spain, is located deep within an underground cave system and contains the skeletal remains of at least 28 individuals that date to around 430,000 years ago, during the Middle Pleistocene. The only...
  • ...Bizarre new pyramid ... opens in Pompeii to house volcano exhibition

    05/26/2015 7:03:14 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | By Jack Crone
    The 12-metre high pyramid allows visitors to walk along a track before entering it. It is built almost entirely out of wood with an inner dome made of fiberboard Inside, they will be find the casts of Roman citizens killed more than 1,900 years ago in 79AD when Mount Vesuvius erupted with devastating force destroying the Roman towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The plaster casts are placed in the centre, while the exhibition also features archival photographs documenting the work in the excavations in the 19th and 20th centuries. The photos are partly broken down into fragments and then reassembled...
  • Scientists Investigate a Medieval Mass Grave Under a French Supermarket

    05/17/2015 10:14:29 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 14 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 5-13-15 | Marissa Fessenden
    hen the Monoprix Réaumur-Sébastopol supermarket in Paris, France, decided to renovated their basement to get more storage space, they probably didn’t expect to uncover hundreds of human bones. But when they dug into the basement floor, that's exactly what they discovered. The human remains are, apparently, the legacy of a cemetery from a medieval hospital, reports Aurelien Breeden for The New York Times. Since the find in January, France’s National Institute for Preventive Archeological Research, or Inrap, has been excavating the site. The institute knows that the hospital itself was the Hôpital de la Trinité, built in the early 13th...
  • Traces of flowers placed on a Palaeolithic tomb are found

    05/10/2015 10:18:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 8, 2015 | University of the Basque Country
    The burial of the so-called Red Lady, dating back to the Upper Palaeolithic, was discovered in El Mirón cave (Cantabria) in 2010. The Journal of Archaeological Science has devoted a special edition to all the studies conducted at this unique burial site, because there are hardly any Palaeolithic tombs like this one which is intact and which has not been contaminated. One study is the research led by the UPV/EHU's Ikerbasque lecturer Mª José Iriarte, who analysed the remains of fossilised pollen dating back more than 16,000 years ago and which appeared on the tomb. "They put whole flowers on...
  • New study of Iceman reveals oldest known example of red blood cells

    05/09/2015 9:34:00 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 08, 2015 | Bob Yirka
    The Iceman as he has come to be known, (also known as Ötzi) has been the object of intense scrutiny ever since being found embedded in an Alpine glacier back in 1991 -- he is believed to have died approximately 5,300 years ago... a [moving] nano-sized probe... allows for capturing 3D imagery -- it revealed the clear doughnut shape of red blood cells. To confirm that the images they were seeing represented real red blood cells, the team shone a laser on the same material and read the wavelengths that were reflected back -- that revealed that the molecular makeup...
  • Did King Harold II Die With an Arrow in His Eye?

    05/09/2015 9:08:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies
    NBC News ^ | October 13, 2014 | unattributed
    King Harold II, the last Anglo-Saxon king of England, has long been thought to have been killed at the Battle of Hastings in 1066. But British archaeologists are to test a theory he survived on the anniversary of the famous battle this Tuesday. The battle, on Oct. 14, 1066, marked a turning point in British history as the Normans conquered medieval England. There are different accounts of how he was killed, one of them pictured in the Bayeux Tapestry, which appears to have him gripping an arrow that had pierced his eye. Another account has Harold being killed by knights...
  • Excavations reveal new terracotta army at ancient emperor's tomb

    05/09/2015 6:13:45 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    News.com.au ^ | May 10, 2015 | China News Service
    CHINA's famous terracotta army is about to be reinforced: Fresh excavations on a burial pit in the ancient capital, Xi'an are expected to uncover 1500 more of the live-sized clay figurines. The excavation, which began last Thursday, is centred upon a 200sq/m patch of the 56sq/km underground mausoleum of China's first emperor, Emperor Qinshihuang, who reigned in 221BC. Archaeologist Yuan Zhongyi told media that he anticipated the burial pit would contain 1400 more terracotta warriors and archers, along with about 90 horse-drawn chariots. Progress has so far been promising, he said.: "Their colourful paint is also relatively well preserved." The...
  • Tales teeth can tell: Dental enamel reveals surprising migration patterns in ancient Indus civ...

    05/09/2015 6:20:25 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    University of Florida ^ | April 29, 2015 | Gigi Marino [Sources: John Krigbaum, George Kamenov]
    When tooth enamel forms, it incorporates elements from the local environment -- the food one eats, the water one drinks, the dust one breathes. When the researchers looked at remains from the ancient city of Harappa, located in what is known today as the Punjab Province of Pakistan, individuals' early molars told a very different story than their later ones, meaning they hadn't been born in the city where they were found... The text of the Indus Valley Civilization remains undeciphered, and known and excavated burial sites are rare. A new study, published in today's PLOS ONE, illuminates the lives...
  • Bone analysis reveals violent history of pre-Hispanic Mesoamerica

    05/09/2015 6:08:21 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 7 replies
    Phys.org ^ | May 05, 2015 | Bob Yirka
    A pair of archeologists with Arizona State University has found evidence of different types of bone treatment among people that lived at the La Quemada archaeological site approximately 1,500 years ago in what is now modern Mexico... Ben Nelson and Debra Martin... looked at bones from the site dating back to 500-900 C.E. and discovered the remains of those who had died or were killed were treated very differently depending on whether they were from their own people or were those of enemies. Bones found inside the compound, they noted showed signs of being treated with respect, whereas those outside...
  • The Flores Hobbit's face revealed

    12/10/2012 2:53:37 PM PST · by Renfield · 14 replies
    PhysOrg ^ | 12-10-2012 | Sunanda Creagh
    An Australian anthropologist has used forensic facial reconstruction techniques to show, for the first time, how the mysterious Flores 'hobbit' might have once looked. Homo floresiensis, as the hobbit is officially known, caused a storm of controversy when it was discovered in Flores, Indonesia in 2003. Some argued the hobbit was an entirely new species, while others suggested it may have simply been a diseased specimen of an existing human species. Using techniques she has previously applied to help police solve crimes, Honorary Senior Research Fellow at the University of Wollongong and specialist facial anthropologist, Dr Susan Hayes, moulded muscle...
  • Oldest evidence of breast cancer found in Egyptian skeleton

    03/29/2015 4:44:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Reuters ^ | Tuesday, March 24, 2015 | Mahmoud Mourad; editing by John Stonestreet
    A team from a Spanish university has discovered what Egyptian authorities are calling the world's oldest evidence of breast cancer in the 4,200-year-old skeleton of an adult woman. Antiquities Minister Mamdouh el-Damaty said the bones of the woman, who lived at the end of the 6th Pharaonic Dynasty, showed "an extraordinary deterioration". "The study of her remains shows the typical destructive damage provoked by the extension of a breast cancer as a metastasis," he said in a statement on Tuesday. Despite being one of the world's leading causes of death today, cancer is virtually absent in archaeological records compared to...
  • The stapes of a neanderthal child points to the anatomical differences with respect to our species [

    03/29/2015 4:34:10 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    University of the Basque Country• ^ | Wednesday, March 25, 2015 | (press release)
    New remains recovered in an excavation carried out over 40 years ago have enabled this auditory ossicle to be reconstructedAsier Gómez-Olivencia, an Ikerbasque researcher at the UPV/EHU-University of the Basque Country, has published in The Journal of Human Evolution a piece of research in which he stresses the importance of reviewing old excavationsThe Neanderthals (Homo neanderthalensis) inhabited Europe and parts of western Asia between 230,000 and 28,000 years ago... The archaeological site at La Ferrassie, excavated throughout the 20th century, is a mythical enclave because it was where 7 Neanderthal skeletons, ranging from foetuses to almost complete skeletons of...
  • The Secrets of Paviland Cave

    04/30/2011 1:07:33 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 8 replies
    Past Horizons (from The Guardian) ^ | Wednesday, April 27, 2011 | Stephen Moss
    Paviland cave, on the Gower peninsula in South Wales, is a crucial site for tracing the origins of human life in Britain. It was in here, in 1823, that William Buckland, the first professor of geology at Oxford University, excavated the remains of a body that had been smeared with red ochre (naturally occurring iron oxide) and buried with a selection of periwinkle shells and ivory rods. Buckland initially thought the body was that of a customs officer, killed by smugglers. Then he decided it was a Roman prostitute... This misidentification gave the headless skeleton its name -- "the Red...
  • Ancient Skeleton Was 'Even Older' (Red Lady Of Paviland)

    10/30/2007 7:59:59 PM PDT · by blam · 34 replies · 79+ views
    BBC ^ | 10-30-2007
    Ancient skeleton was 'even older' The burial site was in Goat's Hole Cave at Paviland on Gower The Red Lady of Paviland has always been a little coy about her age - but it appears she may be 4,000 years older than previously thought. Scientists say more accurate tests date the earliest human burial found in the UK to just over 29,000 years ago. When discovered in a cave on Gower in the 1820s the bones were thought to be around 18,000 years old, but were later redated to between 25,000 and 26,000. Researchers said it casts a new light...
  • Paviland Cave And The Red Lady

    01/17/2007 12:39:44 PM PST · by blam · 17 replies · 857+ views
    Paviland Cave and The Red Lady Paviland Cave, on the south coast of the Gower peninsula, South Wales, is an Early Upper Palaeolithic (Early Stone Age) archaeological site, dating to roughly 30,000 - 20,000 years ago. It is the richest site of its kind in Britain, with four and a half thousand finds, including worked bone and stone (lithic) tools. The Red Lady of Paviland was a fairly complete human skeleton dyed in red ochre that was discovered in 1826 by the Reverend William Buckland in one of the Paviland limestone caves at )Goat’s Hole Cave). The "lady" has since...
  • Campaign To Bring 'Red Lady' Back To Swansea After 180 Years

    12/27/2004 12:05:01 PM PST · by blam · 8 replies · 695+ views
    IC Wales ^ | 12-27-2004 | Robin Turner
    Campaign to bring 'Red Lady' back to Swansea after 180 years Dec 27 2004 Robin Turner, Western Mail THE chairman of Swansea's tourism association is backing an Elgin Marbles style campaign to secure the return to Wales of the Red Lady of Paviland. The skeleton of the "red lady", complete with jewellery and a mammoth's head grave marker, is regarded as one of the world's most important archaeological finds. It was discovered in 1823 at Paviland Cave on Gower. Later analysis showed the skeleton to be that of a man, probably a chieftain, but the Red Lady tag has stuck....
  • Red Lady cave burial reveals Stone Age secrets

    03/29/2015 11:54:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 20 replies
    New Scientist ^ | March 18, 2015 | Penny Sarchet
    Aged between 35 and 40 when she died, she was laid to rest alongside a large engraved stone, her body seemingly daubed in sparkling red pigment. Small, yellow flowers may even have adorned her grave 18,700 years ago -- a time when cave burials, let alone one so elaborate, appear to have been very rare. It was a momentous honour, and no one knows why she was given it... Her remains were discovered when Straus's team began digging behind this block in 2010. Radiocarbon dating reveals that the block fell from the ceiling at most only a few hundred years...
  • The House of Tudor Didn't Get the Last Word

    03/27/2015 8:49:58 AM PDT · by Kaslin · 61 replies
    Townhall.com ^ | March 26, 2015 | Jeff Jacoby
    IT'S REMARKABLE what five centuries can do for a guy's reputation. When Richard III, the last Plantaganet king of England, was killed at the Battle of Bosworth Field in 1485, his corpse was stripped and hauled in disgrace through the streets of Leicester, "all besprinkled with mire and blood … a miserable spectacle," as Holinshed's Chronicle recounted. Then it was stuffed into a crude grave, naked and coffinless, while "few lamented and many rejoiced." This week, the medieval king, whose bones were found under a parking lot in 2012, will be reburied in Leicester Cathedral with full reverence and honor....
  • Richard III returns to Bosworth Field for final time

    03/22/2015 11:44:34 AM PDT · by Prospero · 49 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 3/22/2015 | Sarah Knapton
    The last time Richard III was at Bosworth Field the outcome proved less than satisfactory for the King. The battle, which was the last significant skirmish in the War of the Roses, saw Richard not only lose the English throne but also his life.
  • The Battle of Towton :Nasty, brutish and not that short

    12/29/2010 5:00:36 PM PST · by worst-case scenario · 24 replies · 9+ views
    The Economist ^ | Dec 16 2010
    Medieval warfare was just as terrifying as you might imagine. THE soldier now known as Towton 25 had survived battle before. A healed skull fracture points to previous engagements. He was old enough—somewhere between 36 and 45 when he died—to have gained plenty of experience of fighting. But on March 29th 1461, his luck ran out. Towton 25 suffered eight wounds to his head that day. The precise order can be worked out from the direction of fractures on his skull: when bone breaks, the cracks veer towards existing areas of weakness. The first five blows were delivered by a...
  • Towton, the bloodbath that changed the course of English history. (Well worth reading)

    08/23/2008 7:45:39 PM PDT · by PotatoHeadMick · 58 replies · 406+ views
    The Sunday Times (UK) ^ | August 24, 2008 | AA Gill
    Get onto the B1217 – the Ferrybridge-to-Tadcaster road – just after the M1 joins the A1M, and you’ve crossed that unmapped line where the north stops being grim and begins to be bracing. Go through Saxton, past the Crooked Billet pub, and on your left you’ll see rising farmland, green corn and copses – an old landscape, untroubled by poets or painters or the hyperbole of tourist boards, but handsome, still and hushed. The road is straight; it knows where it’s going, hurrying along, averting its gaze. Through the tonsured hedge you might just notice a big old holly tree...
  • Battle of Towton, the birth of modern warfare and the killing of 1% of the population

    12/06/2010 7:45:21 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 30 replies
    Archaeology News (UK) ^ | November 25, 2010 | Stephen
    The Battle of Towton was one of the bloodiest battle to ever take place on English soil, with nearly 1% of the English population of the time killed during the battle. New finds on the site has produced the earliest evidence of the use of guns on the battle field. The Battle of Towton took place on a snowy 29 March 1461 on high ground between the villages of Towton and Saxton in Yorkshire (about 12 miles (19 km) southwest of York and about 2 miles (3.2 km) south of Tadcaster). The battle was one of the key battles of...
  • Skeletons Of Bloodiest Day (Towton - 1461AD)

    09/12/2006 2:45:57 PM PDT · by blam · 71 replies · 2,073+ views
    The Press ^ | 9-12-2006 | Nadia Jefferson-Brown
    Skeletons of bloodiest day By Nadia Jefferson-Brown SKELETONS bearing marks of horrendous sword injuries have been unearthed beneath a North Yorkshire hall. The victims of a medieval battle were discovered beneath the floor of the dining room of Towton Hall, between Tadcaster and Sherburn-in- Elmet, dating from the Battle of Towton in 1461. The discovery was made as part of a ten-year investigation into the archaeological evidence of the longest and bloodiest battle ever fought in England. Taking place on Palm Sunday, March 29, 1461, the Lancastrian army was handed an enormous blow with its leader, King Henry VI, forced...
  • Veni Vidi, Veggie...(Roman Gladiators)

    03/01/2004 6:03:18 PM PST · by blam · 22 replies · 679+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 2-3-2004 | Tom Leonard
    Veni, vidi, veggie... By Tom Leonard, Media Editor (Filed: 02/03/2004) Roman gladiators were overweight vegetarians who lived on barley and beans, according to a scientific study of the largest gladiator graveyard discovered. Analysis of the bones of more than 70 gladiators recently found near Ephesus, the Roman capital of Asia Minor, puts paid to traditional Hollywood images of macho carnivores with the physique of boxers. The dietary findings of the scientists from the University of Vienna are detailed in a forthcoming documentary on Channel Five. They may give vegetarians a new, harder image. But the vegetarian stereotype is shattered by...
  • Treasure-hunting sisters find human remains from Roman era

    12/20/2007 8:04:47 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies · 38+ views
    Haaretz ^ | Wednesday, December 19, 2007 | Fadi Eyadat
    Julia Shvicky of Kibbutz Barkai and Janet Daws, visiting from England, found some bones that had washed up on the shore during a stroll by the beach... At first, the sisters did not know they had found human bones. They took them to the kibbutz nurse who told them the bones were part of a human spinal cord and hip. They immediately handed their find over to the police who briefly quizzed them and sent the human remains to the National Institute of Forensic Medicine at Abu Kabir for examination. Though test results are not yet in, police and the...
  • Human Sacrifice Was Rarer Than Thought

    07/22/2004 4:53:50 PM PDT · by blam · 39 replies · 845+ views
    ABC Science News ^ | 7-22-2004 | Anna Salleh
    Human sacrifice was rarer than thought Anna Salleh in Brisbane ABC Science Online Thursday, 22 July 2004 Did this skull from the Lichtenstein cave come from someone who was sacrificed or who died naturally? (Image: Stefan Flindt) Bronze Age ritual human sacrifice may have been rarer than believed, according to a unique study of ancient DNA from bones in central Europe. German anthropologist Dr Susanne Hummel from the University of Göttingen presented her team's research at a recent ancient DNA conference in Brisbane, Australia. Hummel said the research was also the first to use ancient DNA to complete a family...
  • Study finds significant facial variation in pre-Columbian South America

    03/15/2015 8:06:15 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | March 5, 2013 | North Carolina State University
    A team of anthropology researchers has found significant differences in facial features between all seven pre-Columbian peoples they evaluated from what is now Peru -- disproving a longstanding perception that these groups were physically homogenous. The finding may lead scholars to revisit any hypotheses about human migration patterns that rested on the idea that there was little skeletal variation in pre-Columbian South America. Skeletal variation is a prominent area of research in New World bioarchaeology, because it can help us understand the origins and migration patterns of various pre-Columbian groups through the Americas... The recently-published findings may affect a lot...
  • Harvard study: global warming may end threat of mummies

    03/12/2015 9:07:09 PM PDT · by smokingfrog · 21 replies
    American Thinker ^ | Pedro Gonzales
    For generations, books, films, and TV have warned us of the danger of mummies. In their crypts they are relatively harmless, but when they rise from the dead and start strangling people, as they did in the Cotswolds of south central England in “Doctor Who and the Pyramids of Mars,” they become a much greater threat. But this problem may shortly be solved, thanks to global warming. The world’s oldest mummies are at risk of disappearing because of man-made climate change, according to a group of Harvard University scientists. Bodies mummified about 7,000 years ago in Chile are starting to...
  • Incan Skull Surgery

    04/26/2008 7:32:58 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 595+ views
    Science News ^ | 4-25-2008 | Bruce Bower
    Incan skull surgery By Bruce BowerApril 25th, 2008 Holes in ancient skulls reflect skilled medical careHealing Hole in the HeadANCIENT SURGERY A new analysis of ancient skulls reveals skills of Incan healers in cranial cutting.Valerie AndrushkoWhen Incan healers scraped or cut a hunk of bone out of a person’s head, they meant business. Practitioners of this technique, known as trepanation, demonstrated great skill more than 500 years ago in treating warriors’ head wounds and possibly other medical problems, rarely causing infections or killing their patients, two anthropologists find. Trepanation emerged as a promising but dangerous medical procedure by about 1,000...
  • Spartans Did Not Throw Deformed Babies Away: Researchers

    12/12/2007 11:10:15 AM PST · by blam · 73 replies · 2,464+ views
    Yahoo News ^ | 12-10-2007
    Spartans did not throw deformed babies away: researchers Mon Dec 10, 1:22 PM ETAFP/File Photo: The statue of King Leonidas of ancient Sparta stands over the battlefield of Thermopylae, some... ATHENS (AFP) - The Greek myth that ancient Spartans threw their stunted and sickly newborns off a cliff was not corroborated by archaeological digs in the area, researchers said Monday. After more than five years of analysis of human remains culled from the pit, also called an apothetes, researchers found only the remains of adolescents and adults between the ages of 18 and 35, Athens Faculty of Medicine Anthropologist Theodoros...
  • American Drugs In Egyptian Mummies

    11/11/2006 3:14:05 PM PST · by blam · 56 replies · 2,009+ views
    American Drugs in Egyptian MummiesS. A. Wells www.colostate.edu Abstract: The recent findings of cocaine, nicotine, and hashishin Egyptian mummies by Balabanova et. al. have been criticized on grounds that: contamination of the mummies may have occurred, improper techniques may have been used, chemical decomposition may have produced the compounds in question, recent mummies of drug users were mistakenly evaluated, that no similar cases are known of such compounds in long-dead bodies, and especially that pre-Columbian transoceanic voyages are highly speculative. These criticisms are each discussed in turn. Balabanova et. al. are shown to have used and confirmed their findings with...