Free Republic 3rd Quarter Fundraising Target: $88,000 Receipts & Pledges to-date: $75,683
86%  
Woo hoo!! And we're now over 86%!! Thank you all very much!!

Keyword: ancientautopsies

Brevity: Headers | « Text »
  • Scientists find evidence of prehistoric massacre in Europe

    08/18/2015 6:16:15 AM PDT · by ETL · 61 replies
    AP, via Yahoo News ^ | Aug 17, 2015 | FRANK JORDANS
    BERLIN (AP) — Scientists say they have found rare evidence of a prehistoric massacre in Europe after discovering a 7,000-year-old mass grave with skeletal remains from some of the continent's first farmers bearing terrible wounds. Archaeologists who painstakingly examined the bones of some 26 men, women and children buried in the Stone Age grave site at Schoeneck-Kilianstaedten, near Frankfurt, say they found blunt force marks to the head, arrow wounds and deliberate efforts to smash at least half of the victims' shins — either to stop them from running away or as a grim message to survivors. [snip] "What is...
  • The bones of 'Red Sonja' have been found. Where's Conan?

    08/13/2015 10:57:20 AM PDT · by Hombre Malevo · 38 replies
    Spero News ^ | 8/13/2015 | Martin Barillas
    The remains are believed to date as far back as 200 B.C. in what was then the ancient state of Kangyuy. She is believed to be the first warrior woman discovered in modern Kazakhstan. The Kangyuy people were a nomadic and war-fighting nation who became renowned for fighting off the equally fearsome Huns.
  • Another Tomb Discovered at Al-Qurna [18th Dynasty Egypt]

    03/11/2015 9:56:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Archaeology ^ | Tuesday, March 10, 2015 | editors
    Another 18th Dynasty tomb has been discovered by archaeologists from the American Research Center in Egypt at Al-Qurna in Luxor. Paintings on the walls of this New Kingdom (1550-1070 B.C.) tomb "are records of daily life practices that prevailed in that era," according to a statement made by Antiquities Minister Mamdouh al-Damaty. This tomb, which belonged to Satmut and his wife Ta-kh-at, was also looted in antiquity, and some of the scenes and inscriptions on its walls were erased. "The newly discovered tomb is located to the east of TT110 and they share the same courtyard. The tomb door is...
  • Tombs of legendary lovers

    02/15/2014 11:25:16 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 17 replies
    al-Ahram ^ | February 13, 2014 | Nevine El-Aref
    Queen Nefertari, whose name means “beautiful companion”, was one of Ramses II’s eight royal wives and his most beloved one. Although Nefertari’s family background is unknown, the discovery of an inscription of the cartouche of the pharaoh Ay inside her tomb has led archaeologists to speculate that she was related to him. If any relation exists, she could be his great-granddaughter because of the time between the reign of Ay and Ramses II in Ancient Egyptian history. Until now no decisive archaeological evidence has been found to link Nefertari to the royal family of the 18th Dynasty. Nefertari married Ramses...
  • Amenhotep I -- the undiscovered tomb [ 18th Dynasty Egypt ]

    11/14/2010 1:32:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 31 replies
    News from the Valley of the Kings 'blog ^ | Thursday, June 26, 2008 | Kate Phizackerley
    The first announcement of a new tomb in the Valley of the Kings came in August 2005 when the Egyptian State Information Service announced that an Egyptian Polish team had been given to excavate the tomb of the New Kingdom Pharaoh Amenhotep I in the Valley of the Kings. As I describe below, unfortunately this was mis-reported by the press how announced the stunning find of an intact tomb. Amenhotep I was the second pharaoh (1526-1506 BC) of the 18th Dynasty. His tomb was mentioned in the Abbott Papyrus, one of the highlights of the British Museum. The papyrus dates...
  • DNA Shows that KV55 Mummy Probably Not Akhenaten [Smenkhare]

    03/02/2010 7:00:36 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 626+ views
    KV-64 blog ^ | Tuesday, March 2, 2010 | Kate Phizackerley
    If we identify the KV55 mummy as Smenkhare and assume that Akhenaten remains missing, we can add Akhenaten and Nefertiti into the family tree, while retaining KV55 (Smenkhare) as the father of Tutankhamun as shown by the Hawass team. It's tempting to consider that KV21B and the Younger Lady are also daughters of Akhenaten and Nefertiti. While not essential for my revised theory, this would neatly fit historical facts. In considering whether the DNA data would fit the revised family tree, it seems appropriate to consider that KV21B and the Younger Lady may also have been daughters of Akhenaten and...
  • Archaeology professor scrutinizes age-old mystery [ Uluburun wreck excavation]

    11/24/2008 3:39:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies · 1,338+ views
    University of Tennessee, Knoxville ^ | Saturday, November 22, 2008 | Kayla Kitts
    In 1983 a sponge diver found funny metal biscuits with ears at the ocean floor. That is how the excavation got started, Hirschfeld said. The ship carried ten tons of copper ingots, which after being analyzed, were determined to be from Cyprus. Each ingot weighs approximately 60 pounds, she said. She and her team also excavated glass ingots, tons of tin, and three Italian swords that were not part of the cargo of the ship. Among the 130 Canaanite jars they found, there were traces of wine in the jars and one was full of glass beads. The team also...
  • Mystery of Tut's Father: New Clues on Unidentified Mummy

    07/10/2007 4:52:43 PM PDT · by blam · 23 replies · 852+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 7-10-2007 | Brian Handwerk
    Mystery of Tut's Father: New Clues on Unidentified Mummy Brian Handwerk for National Geographic News July 10, 2007 Egyptologists have uncovered new evidence that bolsters the controversial theory that a mysterious mummy is the corpse of the heretic pharaoh Akhenaten, husband of Nefertiti and, some experts believe, the father of King Tut. (Photos: Who Was Tut's Father?) The mummy's identity has generated fierce debate ever since its discovery in 1907 in tomb KV 55, located less than 100 feet (30 meters) from King Tutankhamun's then hidden burial chamber. So an international team of researchers led by Zahi Hawass, head of...
  • Mummy dearest: riddle wrapped in a mystery [Nefertiti, Maya, Ankhesenpamon?] [ KV-63 ]

    06/07/2006 9:31:03 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies · 1,113+ views
    Washington Times / AFP ^ | June 7, 2006 | Alain Navarro
    Could the small tomb, designated KV63, hold a royal mummy, perhaps that of Tutankhamen's widow or even his mother? ...Otto Schaden, the man who found them, leads the American team. He believes they may have located the mummy of Tutankhamen's widow, Ankhesenamen, after traces of her name were found on the seal of one urn. The secretary general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities, Zahi Hawass, thinks the final coffins may contain the remains of the pharaoh's mother, whose identity is unknown, and not the wife of Tutankhamen, the boy king who died at age 18.
  • Mystery tomb could hold Tutankhamen's widow

    06/02/2006 4:46:30 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 55 replies · 2,132+ views
    The Daily Telegraph ^ | 6/2/06 | The Daily Telegraph
    LONDON: It has been 84 years since Egypt's famed Valley of the Kings revealed its last great riches – the fabulous gold of Tutankhamen's tomb. Now archaeologists believe they have stumbled across one final secret: The mummified remains of the boy king's widow buried 3000 years ago. In a mysterious shaft less than 15m from Tutankhamen's burial ground, US archaeologists found seven coffins. They believe one they have not yet been able to open may contain the remains of Queen Ankhesenpaaten. The tomb – found by accident by Memphis University team leader Dr Otto Schaden – contained seven coffins stacked...
  • Pharaonic tomb find stuns Egypt [Possibly Nefertiti ... find by American archaeologists]

    02/10/2006 3:57:33 PM PST · by aculeus · 63 replies · 1,951+ views
    BBC News on line ^ | February 10, 2006 | Unsigned
    Archaeologists have discovered an intact, ancient Egyptian tomb in the Valley of the Kings, the first since King Tutankhamun's was found in 1922. A University of Memphis-led team found the previously unknown tomb complete with sarcophagi and five mummies. The archaeologists have not yet been able to identify them. But Egypt's chief archaeologist Zahi Hawass says they "might be royals or nobles" moved from "original graves to protect them from grave robbers". "We don't really know what kind of people are inside but I do believe they look royal. Maybe they are kings or queens or nobles," he told Reuters...
  • Intact tomb found in Egypt's Valley of the Kings

    02/09/2006 7:32:55 AM PST · by AdmSmith · 66 replies · 1,886+ views
    reuters ^ | February 9, 2006 | staff
    CAIRO (Reuters) - An American team has found what appears to be an intact tomb in the Valley of the Kings, the first found in the valley since that of Tutankhamun in 1922, one of the archaeologists said on Thursday. ADVERTISEMENT The tomb contains five or six mummies in intact sarcophagi from the late 18th dynasty, about the same period as Tutankhamun, but the archaeologists have not yet had the time or the access to identify them, the archaeologist added. The 18th dynasty ruled Egypt from 1567 BC to 1320 BC, a period during which the country's power reached a...
  • US dig uncovers King Tut's neighbours

    02/08/2006 10:48:04 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 65 replies · 1,625+ views
    The Age ^ | February 9, 2006 - 2:26AM
    AN American archaeological mission discovered a tomb in Luxor's Valley of the Kings next to the burial place of King Tut, Egyptian antiquities authorities have announced. An excavation team from the University of Memphis made the find five metres from Tutankhamun's tomb, while the mission was doing routine excavation work, said Zahi Hawass, secretary-general of Egypt's Supreme Council of Antiquities. Some three metres beneath the ground, the tomb contained five human mummies with coloured funerary masks enclosed in sarcophagi and several large storage jars. The mummies date to the 18th dynasty (circa 1539-1292 BC).
  • Theban Mapping Project (Valley of the Kings etc)

    01/13/2005 8:03:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 43 replies · 2,248+ views
    Theban Mapping Project ^ | 1980s to present | Kent Weeks et al
    The original page used client side image maps, and that was pretty, but a little search and replace turned it into a usable (I hope) table of links. Enjoy. FR Lexicon·Posting Guidelines·Excerpt, or Link only?·Ultimate Sidebar Management·HeadlinesDonate Here By Secure Server·Eating our own -- Time to make a new start in Free RepublicPDF to HTML translation·Translation page·Wayback Machine·My Links·FreeMail MeGods, Graves, Glyphs topic·and group·Books, Magazines, Movies, Music
  • Smenkhkhare, the Hittite Pharaoh

    07/30/2004 9:42:36 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 2,926+ views
    BBC History ^ | September 5, 2002 | Dr Marc Gabolde
    [T]he exclusively masculine epithets referring to this individual in the same tomb and on a now-vanished block at Memphis, confirm that we are dealing with a man - as distinct from the pharaoh-queen Ankh(et)kheperure Neferneferuaten... Contrary to Ancient Egyptian custom, Smenkhkare is not presented under a coronation name and a birth name in his two cartouches, but under two coronation names. The explanation for this curious fact seems to me clear: both his royal names were composed on the occasion of his coronation. He therefore must have had another name beforehand... The absence of a birth name, the lack of...
  • Nefertiti mummy 'found in Egypt'

    06/10/2003 10:42:05 AM PDT · by Constitution Day · 65 replies · 3,137+ views
    BBC News ^ | 10 June 2003 | BBC staff
    Nefertiti mummy 'found in Egypt' Scientists in Egypt say they may have discovered the mummy of Queen Nefertiti, one of the most famous figures of ancient Egypt. A group of scientists believe that she is one of three mummies discovered in a secret chamber of a tomb known as KV35 in Egypt's Valley of the Kings in Luxor.The tomb was originally located and catalogued in 1898, but the mummies were sealed up and apparently forgotten, until scientists drilled through to the room."There is a very, very strong possibility that... this in fact is the great female Pharaoh Nefertiti herself,"...
  • Found: Queen Nefertiti's Mummy

    06/08/2003 10:05:51 AM PDT · by blam · 75 replies · 4,731+ views
    The Sunday Times (UK) ^ | 6-8-2003 | Jack Grinston
    June 08, 2003 Found: Queen Nefertiti’s mummy Jack Grimston BRITISH archeologists believe they may have identified the body of one of the most legendary beauties of the ancient world. They are confident a tattered mummy found in a tomb in the Valley of the Kings is probably Queen Nefertiti, stepmother of the boy king Tutankhamun and one of the most powerful women in ancient Egypt. The conclusion has been made after 12 years of research, using clues such as fragments of a wig and the piercing of the mummy’s ears. The breakthrough came after the Egyptian authorities allowed the 3,500-year-old...
  • All The King's Men

    10/09/2001 4:05:44 PM PDT · by blam · 4 replies · 1+ views
    The Guardian (UK) ^ | 10-4-2001 | Tim Radford
    All the king's men Tim Radford on ancient skulduggery and a new search for old secrets in Egypt Thursday October 4, 2001 The Guardian Somewhere beneath the Valley of the Kings could lie the body of a 3,300-year-old woman whose face has become an icon of beauty. A British-led group of archaeologists, in the first exploration of new ground since Howard Carter unearthed the body of the young King Tutankhamun, dreams of discovering the royal tomb of Nefertiti. The dream is based on reasoning rather than direct evidence, according to Nicholas Reeves, curator of Egyptian and classical art at ...
  • Pottery, beads retrace close links between India and Bali

    08/03/2015 10:34:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 5 replies
    Znews ^ | Thursday, July 30, 2015 | IANS
    Remnants of ancient Indian pottery, beads and even Indian DNA found in human bones point to thriving trade and social contacts between India and Bali dating back to more than 2,000 years. Besides trade, Indian merchants brought with them their language -- Sanskrit -- and the influence of Hinduism and Buddhism... The major Indian port of connect with Bali in Indonesia and other places in Southeast Asia was Arikamedu, a thriving port located seven kilometres from Puducherry from where archaeologists have unearthed Roman artefacts too. The influence of Sanskrit and the ideology of Hinduism and Buddhism which the Indian traders...
  • Gruesome Find: 100 Bodies Stuffed into Ancient House [China]

    08/03/2015 9:46:29 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 41 replies
    www.livescience.com ^ | July 27, 2015 07:07am ET | by Owen Jarus
    The 5,000-year-old house found in China was about 14 by 15 feet in size. Credit: Photo courtesy Chinese Archaeology ===================================================================================================================== The remains of 97 human bodies have been found stuffed into a small 5,000-year-old house in a prehistoric village in northeast China, researchers report in two separate studies. The bodies of juveniles, young adults and middle-age adults were packed together in the house — smaller than a modern-day squash court — before it burnt down. Anthropologists who studied the remains say a "prehistoric disaster," possibly an epidemic of some sort, killed these people. The site, whose modern-day name is "Hamin...
  • Sixth Salt Man Discovered In Chehr-Abad Mine

    06/05/2007 2:46:29 PM PDT · by blam · 51 replies · 2,748+ views
    Cais News ^ | 6-4-2007
    Sixth Salt Man Discovered in Chehr-Abad Mine 04 June 2007 Chehr Abad Saltman No. 2. LONDON, (CAIS) -- The sixth salt man was discovered in Chehr-Ābād Mine in Zanjan City. It is likely that a large number of salt men were buried in Chehr-Ābād Salt Mine, said Farhang Farokhi head of Zanjan Cultural Heritage, Handicrafts and Tourism Organization (ZCHTO). Five previous discovered salt men are being kept in Washhouse Museum , he added. Based on previous reports, Chehr-Ābād Mine had been used from the Achaemenid dynastic era (550-330 BCE) up to the early of the Sassanid dynasty (224-651 CE). The...
  • Oxford Archaeologists Want To Join Studies On Iran's Salt Men

    09/30/2006 9:40:31 PM PDT · by blam · 8 replies · 774+ views
    Payvand ^ | 9-27-2006
    Oxford archaeologists want to join studies on Iran's salt men TEHRAN, Sept. 27 (Mehr News Agency) -- The director of an archaeological team working at the Chehrabad Salt Mine in the Hamzehlu region near Zanjan said that a group of Oxford University archaeologists is interested in participating in the study on the salt men found at the mine. "A group of Oxford University archaeologists has prepared a plan, asking to participate in the study, and the Center for Archaeological Research is investigating the plan," Abolfazl Aali told the Persian service of CHN on Wednesday "The archaeologists will be invited to...
  • New Studies Show Fourth Salt Man Is 2000 Years Old

    12/23/2005 10:31:43 AM PST · by blam · 13 replies · 982+ views
    Mehr News ^ | 12-23-2005
    New studies show Fourth Salt Man is 2000 years old TEHRAN, Dec. 23 (MNA) -- The most recent studies on the Fourth Salt Man indicate that the body is 2000 years old, the director of the Chehrabad Studies Center announced on Friday. Recent radiography and CAT scans of the body indicate that the Fourth Salt Man was 15 or 16 years old at the time of death, Abolfazl Ali added. Discovered in the Hamzehlu Salt Mine in early March 2005, the Fourth Salt Man is the most intact of the “salt men” discovered in the mine, which is located near...
  • The Man in Salt, Salzwelten, Hallstatt, Austria

    09/08/2005 10:10:50 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 22 replies · 2,462+ views
    Salinen Austria AG ^ | by 2005 | staff
  • French teen finds 560,000 year-old tooth (Update)

    07/28/2015 12:23:38 PM PDT · by Red Badger · 25 replies
    A 16-year-old French volunteer archaeologist has found an adult tooth dating back around 560,000 years in southwestern France, in what researchers hailed as a "major discovery" Tuesday. "A large adult tooth—we can't say if it was from a male or female—was found during excavations of soil we know to be between 550,000 and 580,000 years old, because we used different dating methods," paleoanthropologist Amelie Viallet told AFP. "This is a major discovery because we have very few human fossils from this period in Europe," she said. The tooth was found in the Arago cave near the village of Tautavel, one...
  • A Skeleton, a Catholic Relic, and a Mystery About American Origins

    07/29/2015 12:31:45 PM PDT · by BlatherNaut · 32 replies
    The Atlantic ^ | 7/28/15 | Adrienne LaFrance
    After 400 years in the Virginia dirt, the box came out of the ground looking like it had been plucked from the ocean. A tiny silver brick, now encrusted with a green patina and rough as sandpaper. Buried beneath it was a human skeleton. The remains would later be identified as those of Captain Gabriel Archer, one of the most prominent leaders at Jamestown, the first permanent English colony in America. But it was the box, which appeared to be an ancient Catholic reliquary, that had archaeologists bewildered and astonished... ...It’s the kind of discovery that makes historians, anthropologists, archaeologists,...
  • Strange 'conehead' skeleton unearthed at Russia's Stonehenge:

    07/29/2015 6:21:12 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 63 replies
    www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | Updated: 15:18 EST, 27 July 2015 | Sarah Griffiths
    Elongated head was bound in tribal tradition 2,000 years ago Skeleton with long skull was unearthed in Arkaim, central Russia It's thought to belong to a woman living almost 2,000 years ago Her skull is elongated because it was bound out of tribal tradition Arkaim is known as Russia's Stonehenge because it may have been used by ancient people to study the stars, like the British site A skeleton with an unusual-shaped skull has been unearthed on a site known as Russia's Stonehenge. When images of the remains were first published, UFO enthusiasts rushed to claim they were proof that...
  • Skull Study Suggests at Least Two Groups Colonized America

    12/15/2005 3:48:14 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 18 replies · 864+ views
    Sci-Tech Today ^ | December 15, 2005
    The 7,500- to 11,000-year-old remains suggest the oldest settlers of the Americas came from different genetic stock than more recent Native Americans. Modern Native Americans share traits with Mongoloid peoples of Mongolia, China, and Siberia, the researchers said. But they found dozens of skulls from Brazil appear much more similar to modern Australians, Melanesians, and Sub-Saharan Africans. A Brazilian study involving a large collection of South American skulls suggests at least two distinct groups of early humans colonized the Americas. Anthropologists Walter Neves and Mark Hubbe of the University of Sao Paulo studied 81 skulls of early humans and found...
  • Naqada tombs uncovered in Egypt's Daqahliyah

    07/07/2015 1:35:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    el Ahram ^ | Tuesday, July 7, 2015 | Nevine El-Aref
    A Polish mission at Tel Al-Farkha in Daqahliyah has discovered four pre-dynastic tombs, Minister of Antiquities Mamdouh Eldamaty announced on Tuesday. Eldamaty said three of the tombs are in a very poor condition and include child burials. Meanwhile the fourth tomb is in very good conservation condition and can be dated to the Naqada IIIC2 era. The minister told Ahram Online that the tomb is a small mastaba with two chambers. The southern one was filled with 42 clay vessels, mainly beer jars, bowls as well as a collection of 26 stone vessels of different shapes and sizes. Some of...
  • 8,500-Year-Old Well Unearthed in Israel, Mystery Surrounds Two Human Skeletons

    11/17/2012 1:11:55 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Science News ^ | Thursday, November 8th, 2012 | Sergio Prostak
    Archaeologists from the Israel Antiquities Authority have unearthed an ancient well dating to the Neolithic period some 8,500 years ago in the Jezreel Valley. "The impressive well that was revealed was connected to an ancient farming settlement and it seems the inhabitants used it for their subsistence and living. The upper part of the well was built of stones and its lower part was hewn in the bedrock. Two capstones, which narrowed the opening, were set in place at the top of the well. It is about 8 m deep and its upper part measures about 1.3 m in diameter,"...
  • The king of Stonehenge: Were artefacts at ancient chief's burial site Britain's first Crown Jewels?

    05/12/2009 8:57:45 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 69 replies · 3,768+ views
    dailymail ^ | 12th May 2009 | Paul Harris
    He was a giant of a man, a chieftain who ruled with a royal sceptre and a warrior's axe. When they laid him to rest they dressed him in his finest regalia and placed his weapons at his side. Then they turned his face towards the setting sun and sealed him in a burial mound that would keep him safe for the next 4,000 years. In his grave were some of the most exquisitely fashioned artefacts of the Bronze Age, intricately crafted to honour the status of a figure who bore them in life in death. For this may have...
  • Britain's 'most important archeological' discovery found in desk drawer

    10/28/2008 8:13:08 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies · 763+ views
    Telegraph ^ | Thursday, October 23, 2008 | Urmee Khan
    The pinhead-sized studs form an intricate pattern on the handle of a dagger, but archeologists failed to realise their significance when they excavated the burial mound in Wiltshire - known as Bush Barrow - in 1808. Now they are to be re-united with other priceless artefacts unearthed at the site and put on show at the Wiltshire Heritage Museum in Devizes after Niall Sharples, a senior lecturer at Cardiff University turned out his predecessors' desk and discovered them in a film canister labelled Bush Barrow. In the 1960s, the gold was taken away for examination by Professor Richard Atkinson, a...
  • Viking Burial Site Found in England

    09/07/2004 7:53:26 AM PDT · by 68skylark · 127 replies · 2,470+ views
    THE ASSOCIATED PRESS via NY Times ^ | September 7, 2004 | THE ASSOCIATED PRESS
    LONDON (AP) -- Archaeologists in northwestern England have found a burial site of six Viking men and women, complete with swords, spears, jewelry, fire-making materials and riding equipment, officials said Monday. The site, discovered near Cumwhitton, is believed to date to the early 10th century, and archaeologists working there called it the first Viking burial ground found in Britain. The only other known Viking cemetery was found in Ingleby east of Cumwhitton. It was excavated in the 1940s, but the bodies had been cremated and not buried. Local metal specialist Peter Adams made the find at the end of March...
  • Iron Age warrior lived with arrowhead in spine

    07/01/2015 7:20:54 AM PDT · by dware · 28 replies
    Live Science via Fox News ^ | 07.01.2015 | Laura Geggel
    A horrific spinal injury caused by a bronze arrowhead didn't immediately kill an Iron Age warrior, who survived long enough for his bone to heal around the metal point, a new study of his burial in central Kazakhstan finds. "This found individual was extremely lucky to survive," said study researcher Svetlana Svyatko, a research fellow in the school of geography, archaeology and paleoecology at Queen's University Belfast in Northern Ireland. "It's hard to get a vertebral wound without damaging the main blood vessels, which would have resulted in an immediate death."
  • The life of an Anglo-Saxon princess

    07/17/2010 2:40:51 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 3 replies
    Guardian UK ^ | 17 June 2010 | Michael Wood
    The unearthing of Eadgyth, the Anglo-Saxon princess, was an emotional moment for historian Michael Wood. She was the Diana of the dark ages – charismatic, with the common touch ___ For anyone interested in the kings and queens of England it was a touching moment last year to see the heavy tomb cover lifted in Magdeburg Cathedral. The inscription said the occupant was Eadgyth, queen of the Germans, the Anglo-Saxon granddaughter of Alfred the Great, sister of Athelstan the first king of a united England. But was it really her? Now the results of the scientific examination are through: isotopes...
  • Experts may have found bones of 10th-century English princess

    01/20/2010 3:15:37 PM PST · by Tennessee Nana · 26 replies · 1,251+ views
    ChattanoogaTimesFreePress ^ | January 20, 2010 | RAPHAEL G. SATTER
    LONDON — She was a beautiful English princess who married one of Europe's most powerful monarchs and dazzled subjects with her charity and charm. Now an international team of scientists say they think they've found the body of Princess Eadgyth (pronounced Edith) — a 10th-century noblewoman who has been compared to Princess Diana. "She was a very, very popular person," said Mark Horton, an archaeology professor at Bristol University in western England. "She was sort of the Diana of her day if you like — pretty and full of good works." Horton is one of a team of experts working...
  • 51 Headless Vikings Found in English Execution Pit?

    07/28/2009 1:34:43 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 74 replies · 2,449+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | July 28, 2009 | James Owen in London
    Naked, beheaded, and tangled, the bodies of 51 young men -- their heads stacked neatly to the side -- have been found in a thousand-year-old pit in southern England, according to carbon-dating results released earlier this month. The mass burial took place at a time when the English were battling Viking invaders, say archaeologists who are now trying to verify the identity of the slain. The dead are thought to have been war captives, possibly Vikings, whose heads were hacked off with swords or axes... Many of the skeletons have deep cut marks to the skull and jaw as well...
  • Identifying Eadgyth

    12/02/2010 6:09:52 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies · 1+ views
    PhysOrg ^ | November 26, 2010 | University of Bristol
    Eadgyth was the granddaughter of Alfred the Great and the half-sister of Athelstan, the first acknowledged King of England. She was sent to marry Otto, King of Saxony, in AD 929, and bore him at least two children, before her death, at around the age of 36, in AD 946. Buried in the monastery of St Maurice in Magdeburg, historical records state that her bones were moved on at least three occasions before being interred in an elaborate tomb in Magdeburg Cathedral in 1510. It was long assumed that this tomb was empty, so, when German archaeologists opened it in...
  • Skeleton Crew Digs Up Past

    02/25/2007 9:49:23 PM PST · by blam · 26 replies · 812+ views
    Skeleton crew digs up the past The skeleton of an Anglo-Saxon lord has been recovered as the hunt for buried treasure continues at a city allotment site. The removal of the seventh Century body follows the discovery of a rare ceremonial brass bowl on the site at Palmerston Road, Woodston, Peterborough. The priceless Coptic bowl, which was made more than 1,300 years ago in the Mediterranean, has led historical experts to conclude they had discovered the grave of an extremely wealthy Anglo-Saxon – probably a prince or a powerful warlord from the ancient kingdom of Mercia. Excavation by archaeologists from...
  • Dundee experts recreate face of Saxon man at Lincoln Castle

    06/28/2015 11:04:22 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies
    University of Dundee ^ | Wednesday, June 3, 2015 | Roddy Isles
    The work has been carried out by specialists in the Centre for Anatomy and Human Identification (CAHID) at the University of Dundee, one of the world's leading centres for facial reconstruction. Caroline Erolin, Lecturer in Forensic and Medical Art at CAHID, said, "His grave lay slightly under an important sarcophagus burial, which had resulted in excellent preservation of his skull making it the best candidate among the skeletons for facial reconstruction." ... "The burial of this man was one of eight burials which were interred inside a small stone church or chapel which predates Lincoln Castle and was previously unknown,"...
  • 'Roswell Alien' Photo Revealed as Mummified Boy

    06/24/2015 11:54:12 PM PDT · by Beowulf9 · 22 replies
    http://news.discovery.com ^ | Benjamin Radford | May 14, 2015
    Earlier this month at a UFO conference in Mexico City two photographs claimed to have been found in a trunk in Sedona and depicting an alien body that crashed in Roswell in 1947 were revealed. The images, which have created a buzz among UFO believers, depict a small human-shaped figure with an enlarged head—apparently in a display case with an unreadable placard, oddly enough. Low-resolution images had been circulating for some time, and several skeptical researchers (including myself here on Discovery News, I modestly note) identified the “Roswell alien” as a mummified child.
  • 8 Million Dog Mummies Found in 'God of Death' Mass Grave

    06/19/2015 12:28:29 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 40 replies
    Livescience ^ | June 18, 2015 | Laura Geggel
    In ancient Egypt, so many people worshiped Anubis, the jackal-headed god of death, that the catacombs next to his sacred temple once held nearly 8 million mummified puppies and grown dogs, a new study finds. The catacomb ceiling also contains the fossil of an ancient sea monster, a marine vertebrate that's more than 48 million years old, but it's unclear whether the Egyptians noticed the existence of the fossil when they built the tomb for the canine mummies, the researchers said. Many of the mummies have since disintegrated or been disrupted by grave robbers and industrialists, who likely used the...
  • Autopsy carried out in Far East on world's oldest dog mummified by ice

    06/19/2015 12:01:43 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    Siberian Times ^ | Thursday, June 18 2015 | Anna Liesowska
    Scientists in the Russian Far East have carried out a post-mortem examination of the remains of the only mummified dog ever found in the world. Found sealed inside permafrost during a hunt for traces of woolly mammoths, the perfectly-preserved body is 12,450 years old. The dog, believed to be a three-month-old female, was unearthed in 2011 on the Syallakh River in the Ust-Yana region of Yakutia, also known as the Sakha Republic. Experts spent the past four years analysing the body – which included not just bones but also its heart, lungs and stomach – but only carried out the...
  • 400,000-year-old dental tartar provides earliest evidence of manmade pollution

    06/17/2015 10:07:39 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | June 17, 2015 | Tel Aviv University
    In what Prof. Barkai describes as a "time capsule," the analysed calculus revealed three major findings: charcoal from indoor fires; evidence for the ingestion of essential plant-based dietary components; and fibers that might have been used to clean teeth or were remnants of raw materials. "Prof. Karen Hardy published outstanding research on the dental calculus of Neanderthals from El Sidron cave in Spain, but these dated back just 40,000-50,000 years—we are talking far earlier than this," said Prof. Barkai. "This is the first evidence that the world's first indoor BBQs had health-related consequences," said Prof. Barkai. "The people who lived...
  • Face of Tehran’s 7 millennia old woman reconstructed

    06/17/2015 10:05:07 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 34 replies
    Mehr News Agency ^ | June 17, 2015 | unattributed
    In November 2014, Mahsa Vahabi, an Archeology student serendipitously discovered in the dug soil in Mowlavi St., of Tehran Water and Wastewater Company some pottery. Her discovery of simple earthen material drew attentions from her fellow archeologist and a study team addressed the place on Mowlavi St. Further excavations uncovered from under the soil bones and skeleton, reportedly and supposedly belonging to a women from 7,000 years ago. Soon archeology researchers carried out research to find out more about its characteristics. A 3D documentation method was carried out on the skeleton by Mohammad Reza Rokni, an expert in Archeology Research...
  • Fully dressed and preserved 350-year-old corpse of French noblewoman found

    06/04/2015 4:17:08 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 42 replies
    theguardian.com ^ | Wednesday 3 June 2015 18.40 EDT | Kim Willsher in Paris
    French archaeologists have uncovered the well-preserved body of a noblewoman who died 350 years ago – along with the clothes in which she was buried, including her cap and shoes, still intact. The corpse of Louise de Quengo, a widow from an aristocratic family from Brittany, was discovered in an hermetically sealed lead coffin placed in a stone tomb at a convent chapel in the western city of Rennes. Four other lead coffins dating from the 17th century were also found at the site of the Saint-Joseph chapel, as well as 800 other graves containing skeletons. Researchers expected to find...
  • Lethal wounds on skull may indicate 430,000-year-old murder

    05/27/2015 7:01:10 PM PDT · by Rebelbase · 65 replies
    PHYS.ORG ^ | 5/27/15 | Nohemi Sala et al
    Lethal wounds identified on a human skull in the Sima de los Huesos, Spain, may indicate one of the first cases of murder in human history, some 430,000 years ago, according to a study published May 27 2015 in the open-access journal PLOS ONE by Nohemi Sala from Centro Mixto UCM-ISCIII de Evolución y Comportamiento Humanos, Spain, and colleagues. The archeological site, Sima de los Huesos in northern Spain, is located deep within an underground cave system and contains the skeletal remains of at least 28 individuals that date to around 430,000 years ago, during the Middle Pleistocene. The only...
  • ...Bizarre new pyramid ... opens in Pompeii to house volcano exhibition

    05/26/2015 7:03:14 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 9 replies
    dailymail.co.uk ^ | By Jack Crone
    The 12-metre high pyramid allows visitors to walk along a track before entering it. It is built almost entirely out of wood with an inner dome made of fiberboard Inside, they will be find the casts of Roman citizens killed more than 1,900 years ago in 79AD when Mount Vesuvius erupted with devastating force destroying the Roman towns of Pompeii and Herculaneum. The plaster casts are placed in the centre, while the exhibition also features archival photographs documenting the work in the excavations in the 19th and 20th centuries. The photos are partly broken down into fragments and then reassembled...
  • Scientists Investigate a Medieval Mass Grave Under a French Supermarket

    05/17/2015 10:14:29 AM PDT · by afraidfortherepublic · 14 replies
    Smithsonian Magazine ^ | 5-13-15 | Marissa Fessenden
    hen the Monoprix Réaumur-Sébastopol supermarket in Paris, France, decided to renovated their basement to get more storage space, they probably didn’t expect to uncover hundreds of human bones. But when they dug into the basement floor, that's exactly what they discovered. The human remains are, apparently, the legacy of a cemetery from a medieval hospital, reports Aurelien Breeden for The New York Times. Since the find in January, France’s National Institute for Preventive Archeological Research, or Inrap, has been excavating the site. The institute knows that the hospital itself was the Hôpital de la Trinité, built in the early 13th...
  • Traces of flowers placed on a Palaeolithic tomb are found

    05/10/2015 10:18:58 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 14 replies
    EurekAlert! ^ | May 8, 2015 | University of the Basque Country
    The burial of the so-called Red Lady, dating back to the Upper Palaeolithic, was discovered in El Mirón cave (Cantabria) in 2010. The Journal of Archaeological Science has devoted a special edition to all the studies conducted at this unique burial site, because there are hardly any Palaeolithic tombs like this one which is intact and which has not been contaminated. One study is the research led by the UPV/EHU's Ikerbasque lecturer Mª José Iriarte, who analysed the remains of fossilised pollen dating back more than 16,000 years ago and which appeared on the tomb. "They put whole flowers on...