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Keyword: ancientautopsies

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  • Oldest Bubonic Plague Genome Decoded

    06/11/2018 5:14:12 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | June 8, 2018 | Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History
    The strain identified by the researchers was recovered from individuals in a double burial in the Samara region of Russia, who both had the same strain of the bacterium at death... this strain is the oldest sequenced to date that contains the virulence factors considered characteristic of the bubonic plague, and is ancestral to the strains that caused the Justinian Plague, the Black Death and the 19th century plague epidemics in China... caused by the bacterium Yersinia pestis... The disease continues to affect populations around the world today. Despite its historical and modern significance, the origin and age of the...
  • Roman Tomb Unearthed; to Everyone’s Surprise, It’s Intact [4th c BC]

    06/11/2018 12:57:11 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 45 replies
    New York Times ^ | June 1, 2018 | Elisabetta Povoledo
    Sometimes the most extraordinary finds occur by sheer luck. At least that was the case of a fourth century B.C. chamber tomb that came to light five weeks ago during the construction of an aqueduct in a Rome suburb, when an earthmover accidentally opened a hole in the side of the chamber... The tomb contained the remains of four occupants -- three men and a woman -- and funerary wares. Archaeologists are calling it "the Tomb of the Athlete" because of the presence of two bronze strigils, the instrument used by ancient Greek and Roman athletes to scrape sweat from...
  • Archaeologists find new mass child sacrifice site in Peru

    06/09/2018 4:48:27 PM PDT · by BBell · 42 replies
    A group of archaeologists has discovered the remains of more than 50 children who were ritually sacrificed by the pre-Columbian Chimu culture on the northern coast of what is now Peru. The site is located a close to another where evidence of the biggest-ever sacrifice of children was found, with more than 140 youngsters were slain. But the most recent discovery may be even bigger. “So far we have found the remains of 56 children who were sacrificed by the Chimu culture,” archaeologist Gabriel Prieto told AFP. “At this new site, we can easily double the number of remains we...
  • A human fossil species in western Europe could be close to a million years old

    06/07/2018 7:13:23 AM PDT · by Red Badger · 28 replies
    phys.org ^ | June 7, 2018 | CORDIS
    Credit: Mathieu Duval ========================================================================= First direct dating of an early human tooth confirms the antiquity of Homo antecessor, western Europe's oldest known human fossil species. A previous find from the unit TD6 of Atapuerca Gran Dolina archaeological site in northern Spain has yielded more information about our early human lineage. An international team of researchers from Australia, China, France and Spain has conducted the first direct dating study of a fossil tooth belonging to Homo antecessor (H. antecessor), the earliest known hominin species identified in Europe. The study shows that H. antecessor probably lived somewhere between 772 000 and 949...
  • Today's Birthday girl: Elizabeth Ist of England

    09/07/2006 8:19:40 AM PDT · by yankeedame · 17 replies · 1,985+ views
    Elizabeth I- Born: 7 September 1533 - Birthplace: Greenwich, England - Died: 24 March 1603 Best Known As: "The Virgin Queen" of England, 1558-1603 The daughter of King Henry VIII and Anne Boleyn, Elizabeth succeeded Mary I in 1558. Dedicated to her position as ruler, Elizabeth fought off rivals (such as heir to the throne Mary, Queen of Scots, imprisoned for 19 years and executed in 1587) and expanded England's power overseas, eventually succeeding in defeating the Spanish Armada in 1588. Her nearly 45-year reign is considered one of England's high points: it featured luminaries such as Sir Walter Raleigh,...
  • Elizabeth I dress: Altar cloth may be Queen's gown

    05/21/2016 4:37:17 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    BBC ^ | May 16, 2016 | unattributed
    The fabric at St Faith's Church in Bacton has been identified by experts as a piece of a 16th Century dress. An examination by Historic Royal Palaces curators has strengthened a theory it formed part of a court dress. The Queen is depicted in the Rainbow Portrait wearing a similar fabric, but no documentary evidence has been found to suggest the dress was worn by her. Historians believe the monarch could have gifted the garment to one of her servants, Blanche Parry. Dating back to the last decades of the 16th Century, the altar cloth that hung in a glass...
  • 5 things you (probably) didn’t know about Henry VIII

    01/28/2018 9:43:51 AM PST · by beaversmom · 195 replies
    History Extra ^ | January 25, 2018
    1 Henry VIII was slim and athletic for most of his life At six feet two inches tall, Henry VIII stood head and shoulders above most of his court. He had an athletic physique and excelled at sports, regularly showing off his prowess in the jousting arena. Having inherited the good looks of his grandfather, Edward IV, in 1515 Henry was described as “the handsomest potentate I have ever set eyes on…” and later an “Adonis”, “with an extremely fine calf to his leg, his complexion very fair…and a round face so very beautiful, that it would become a pretty...
  • Henry VIII’s erratic behavior was likely caused by an NFL-style injury, argue Yale researchers

    02/06/2016 1:17:28 PM PST · by beaversmom · 87 replies
    Phys ^ | February 3, 2016 | Bill Hathaway
    Did Henry VIII suffer same brain injury as some NFL players? February 3, 2016 by Bill Hathaway Henry VIII may have suffered repeated traumatic brain injuries similar to those experienced by football players and others who receive repeated blows to the head, according to research by a Yale University expert in cognitive neurology. Traumatic brain injury explains the memory problems, explosive anger, inability to control impulses, headaches, insomnia—and maybe even impotence--that afflicted Henry during the decade before his death in 1547, according to a paper published online the week of Feb. 1."It is intriguing to think that modern European history...
  • Is this proof the Virgin Queen was an imposter in drag?

    06/10/2013 3:34:21 PM PDT · by BBell · 45 replies
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk ^ | 8 June 2013 | Christopher Stevens
    The bones of Elizabeth I, Good Queen Bess, lie mingled with those of her sister, Bloody Mary, in a single tomb at Westminster Abbey. But are they really royal remains — or evidence of the greatest conspiracy in English history? If that is not the skeleton of Elizabeth Tudor, the past four centuries of British history have been founded on a lie. And according to a controversial new book, the lie began on an autumn morning 470 years ago, when panic swept through a little group of courtiers in a manor house in the Cotswold village of Bisley in Gloucestershire.The...
  • Shocking new theory about Elizabeth I unearthed in historic manuscripts

    06/10/2013 8:46:02 AM PDT · by the scotsman · 51 replies
    Daily Mail ^ | 10th June 2013 | Christopher Stevens
    'The bones of Elizabeth I, Good Queen Bess, lie mingled with those of her sister, Bloody Mary, in a single tomb at Westminster Abbey. But are they really royal remains — or evidence of the greatest conspiracy in English history?. If that is not the skeleton of Elizabeth Tudor, the past four centuries of British history have been founded on a lie.'
  • Britain's oldest family business opened when Henry VIII ruled

    11/04/2011 9:29:26 AM PDT · by DeoVindiceSicSemperTyrannis · 35 replies
    Telegraph ^ | 11-4-11
    RJ Balson and Sons, a butchers based in Bridport, Dorset, boasts an astonishing history that is almost 500 years old. Experts have traced the businesses roots back through 25 generations to when founder John Balson opened a stall in the town's market on South Street in 1535. Since then dozens of family members have worked as butchers in the market town, passing their skills down the generations. And 476 years later, the shop remains a thriving business and has been named Britain's oldest family run retailer. At that time Henry VIII was still married to Anne Boleyn, the first complete...
  • Solving the puzzle of Henry VIII

    03/03/2011 12:38:11 PM PST · by decimon · 67 replies
    Southern Methodist University ^ | March 3, 2011 | Unknown
    Could blood group anomaly explain Tudor king's reproductive problems and tyrannical behavior?DALLAS (SMU) – Blood group incompatibility between Henry VIII and his wives could have driven the Tudor king's reproductive woes, and a genetic condition related to his suspected blood group could also explain Henry's dramatic mid-life transformation into a physically and mentally-impaired tyrant who executed two of his wives. Research conducted by bioarchaeologist Catrina Banks Whitley while she was a graduate student at SMU (Southern Methodist University) and anthropologist Kyra Kramer shows that the numerous miscarriages suffered by Henry's wives could be explained if the king's blood carried the...
  • Vatican Reveals Letter on Henry VIII’s Papal Plea

    05/13/2009 8:49:12 AM PDT · by markomalley · 21 replies · 1,356+ views
    NY Slimes ^ | 5/12/2009 | ELISABETTA POVOLEDO
    The Vatican has opened its secret archives, the repository of centuries worth of documents pertaining to the Holy See, to let the world get a closer look at a document presaging England’s split from the Church of Rome. Dated July 13, 1530, and addressed to Pope Clement VII, the letter, right, asks for the annulment of Henry VIII’s marriage to Catherine of Aragon and includes the seals of dozens of peers of England who concurred with the request.
  • Thank Henry VIII for laying those foundations of freedom

    04/22/2009 11:16:36 AM PDT · by Sherman Logan · 87 replies · 2,461+ views
    Telegraph ^ | 22 Apr 2009 | Simon Heffer
    ... Every half-millennium or so an event occurs in our history that changes the basis of society. The Romans come, the Romans go. The Normans come; and between their arrival in 1066 and the outbreak of the Great War in 1914 there is one seismic event after which society sets off (after a false start or two) on an entirely new course: the Reformation in England. When the Convocation of Canterbury of the Church in England agreed in March 1531 to accede to Henry's demands about church governance that included the clergy's recognition of him as head of the English...
  • Dragon Bones: The Mystery of the Peking Man

    03/09/2013 3:07:58 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    TruTV ^ | prior to 2013 | Rachael Bell
    Probably the most interesting story yet, concerned a Chicago broker named Christopher Janus who was determined to solve the case of the missing fossils. Janus offered a $5,000 reward for the recovery of the Peking Man in the mid-1970s. He received an unusual response from an unidentified woman who claimed she had the fossils and demanded that they meet on the top of the Empire State Building in New York City. Janus curiosity was aroused and he met the woman at the designated spot. The woman claimed that her deceased husband, a Marine during World War II, returned home after...
  • Report from Former U.S. Marine Hints at Whereabouts of Long-Lost Peking Man Fossils

    03/29/2012 9:18:28 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    Scientific American 'blogs ^ | March 22, 2012 | Kate Wong
    In the 1930s archaeologists working at the site of Zhoukoudian near Beijing recovered an incredible trove of partial skulls and other bones representing some 40 individuals that would eventually be assigned to the early human species Homo erectus. The bones, which recent estimates put at around 770,000 years old, constitute the largest collection of H. erectus fossils ever found. They were China's paleoanthropological pride and joy. And then they vanished. According to historical accounts, in 1941 the most important fossils in the collection were packed in large wooden footlockers or crates to be turned over to the U.S. military for...
  • Violence and climate change in prehistoric Egypt and Sudan

    07/21/2014 10:50:52 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 6 replies
    British Museum ^ | Monday, July 14, 2014 | Renée Friedman, curator
    Among the most exciting of the new acquisitions are the materials from the site of Jebel Sahaba, now in northern Sudan, which were donated to the Museum by Dr Fred Wendorf in 2002. Excavating here in 1965–66, as part of the UNESCO-funded campaign to salvage sites destined to be flooded by the construction of the Aswan High Dam, Dr Wendorf found a cemetery (site 117) containing at least 61 individuals dating back to about 13,000 years ago. This discovery was of great significance for two reasons. First, as a designated graveyard, evidently used over several generations, it is one of...
  • Pompeii: New find shows man crushed trying to flee eruption

    05/29/2018 9:30:03 AM PDT · by BBell · 51 replies
    MILAN (AP) — Officials at the Pompeii archaeological site have announced a dramatic new discovery, the skeleton of a man crushed by an enormous stone while trying to flee the explosion of Mt. Vesuvius in 79 A.D. Pompeii officials on Tuesday released a photograph showing the skeleton protruding from beneath a large block of stone that may have been a door jamb that had been "violently thrown by the volcanic cloud."
  • Tests on skull fragment cast doubt on Adolf Hitler suicide story

    10/01/2009 7:17:05 AM PDT · by COUNTrecount · 51 replies · 2,095+ views
    Bone with bullet hole found by Russians in 1946 came from an unknown woman, not the German leader Tests on skull fragment cast doubt on Adolf Hitler suicide In countless biographies of Adolf Hitler the story of his final hours is recounted in the traditional version: committing suicide with Eva Braun, he took a cyanide pill and then shot himself on 30 April 1945, as the Russians bombarded Berlin. Some historians expressed doubt that the Führer had shot himself, speculating that accounts of Hitler's death had been embellished to present his suicide in a suitably heroic light. But a fragment...
  • Hitler definitely died in 1945, according to new study of his teeth

    05/20/2018 9:08:09 AM PDT · by golux · 71 replies
    The Telegraph ^ | 19 May 2018 | R. Mulholland
    French researchers claim to have put an end to conspiracy theories surrounding the death of Adolf Hitler, after a study of his teeth proved he definitely died after taking cyanide and shooting himself in the head in Berlin in 1945. The researchers reached their conclusion after they were given rare access to fragments of Hitler’s teeth which have been held in Moscow since the end of World War II. "The teeth are authentic, there is no possible doubt. Our study proves that Hitler died in 1945," said professor Philippe Charlier. "We can stop all the conspiracy theories about Hitler. He...