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Keyword: ancientrome

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  • Ancient Inscription Identifies Gargilius Antiques as Roman Ruler on Eve of Bar Kochva Revolt

    12/02/2016 4:30:23 AM PST · by SJackson · 18 replies
    Jewish Press ^ | December 1st, 2016
    University of Haifa researchers have made an important discovery underwater: a rare inscription from the period preceding the Bar Kochva revolt offers for the first time the definite identification of Gargilius Antiques as the Roman prefect of Judea at that time. The inscription was found in a University of Haifa underwater excavation at Tel Dor, on Israel’s Mediterranean coast, about 20 miles south of Haifa. “For the first time, we can state with certainty the name of the Roman prefect of Judea during the critical period leading up to the Bar Kochva revolt,” stated Prof. Assaf Yasur-Landau of the University...
  • The Fall of Rome-Are there Lessons to be Learned?

    09/04/2016 4:18:00 PM PDT · by Jim Robinson · 43 replies
    THE FALL OF ROME was a culmination of external and internal factors. GREAT WALL OF CHINA By 220AD, the Later Eastern Han Dynasty had extended sections of the Great Wall of China along its Mongolian border. This resulted in the Northern Huns attacking west instead of east. This caused a domino effect of tribes migrating west across Central Asia, and overrunning the Western Roman Empire. OPEN BORDERS Illegal immigrants poured across the Roman borders: Visigoths, Ostrogoths, Franks, Anglos, Saxons, Alemanni, Thuringians, Rugians, Jutes, Picts, Burgundians, Lombards, Alans, Vandals, as well as African Berbers and Arab raiders. Will and Ariel Durant...
  • After Renovation, Prison Where Sts. Peter and Paul were Jailed Now Open to Visitors

    07/15/2016 7:12:08 PM PDT · by marshmallow · 83 replies
    The ancient Roman prison where Sts. Peter and Paul were once confined has been re-opened to visitors after a year-long renovation. The Mamertine prison, also known as the Carcer Tullianum, is a 3,000-year-old structure, located near the Roman Forum. The church of San Giuseppe dei Falegnami now stands above it, and in the prison itself there is an altar so that Mass can be celebrated at the site where the apostles were jailed. The renovations to the prison include the introduction of a multimedia tour, which allows visitors to learn more about any facet of the building and its history...
  • Grim reality of life in ancient Rome revealed: Average worker was DEAD by 30 [tr]

    05/28/2016 5:01:59 AM PDT · by C19fan · 35 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | May 28, 2016 | Ekin Karasin
    The average ancient Roman worker was riddled with arthritis, suffered broken bones and was dead by 30 thanks to a diet of rotting grains and a lifetime of hard labour. The grim realities of the Eternal City were revealed in a study carried out by an Italian team of specialists that used modern-scanning techniques to analyse 2,000 ancient skeletons. The majority of the skeletons from the first and third century AD, found in the suburbs of the ancient city, had broken collar bones, noses and hand bones.
  • DNA Captured From 2,500-Year-Old Phoenician

    05/28/2016 10:34:05 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 39 replies
    This is the first ancient DNA to be obtained from Phoenician remains. Known as “Ariche,” the young man came from Byrsa, a walled citadel above the harbor of ancient Carthage. Byrsa was attacked by the Roman general Scipio Aemilianus “Africanus” in the Third Punic War. It was destroyed by Rome in 146 B.C. Analysis of the skeleton revealed the man died between the age of 19 and 24, had a rather robust physique and was 1.7 meters (5’6″) tall. He may have belonged to the Carthaginian elite, as he was buried with gems, scarabs, amulets and other artifacts. Now genetic...
  • 1,700 years ago, the mismanagement of a migrant crisis cost Rome its empire

    05/08/2016 2:46:27 PM PDT · by Lorianne · 48 replies
    Source material cannot be posted to FR | 07 May 2016 | Annalisa Merelli
    see link below
  • 'Sistine Chapel of the Early Middle Ages' buried for a millenium by an earthquake reopens

    03/23/2016 9:35:07 AM PDT · by rdl6989 · 14 replies
    telegraph.co.uk ^ | March 23, 2016 | Nick Squires,
    A 1,500-year-old church which was buried under debris from an earthquake for more than a millennium has reopened to the public after a painstaking restoration of some of the world’s earliest Christian art. The sixth-century church of Santa Maria Antiqua is located in the ancient Roman Forum, at the bottom of the Palatine Hill, where Roman emperors lived for centuries in sumptuous palaces.
  • (Rome HBO Series) Octavian - The True Story

    03/13/2016 8:25:03 PM PDT · by Read Write Repeat · 29 replies
    YouTube
    If you're a fan of HBO's series "Rome," here's the producers and actors revealing Octavian's true storyline. It's HBO, so the mature warning should be obvious. https://youtu.be/XnwpjE4MrB0
  • Ancient Roman Puzzle Gets New Piece

    03/05/2016 2:38:35 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 15 replies
    Discovery News ^ | March 4, 2016 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Only fragments remain today and most are held in the Capitoline museum. They cover just 10 percent the original map surface that once stood on a wall in the Templum Pacis (Temple of Peace). The wall still survives today in a building near the 6th-century Church of Santi Cosma e Damiano. Rows of holes where the map was attached using bronze clamps can still be seen. Carved on 150 marble slabs, the 60-foot by 43-foot map detailed every building, street and staircase in Rome until it was partially ripped from the wall, probably to make lime for cement. What was...
  • Could You Stomach the Horrors of 'Halftime' in Ancient Rome?

    02/06/2016 10:26:13 AM PST · by EveningStar · 73 replies
    Live Science ^ | February 4, 2016 | Cristin O'Keefe Aptowicz
    The enormous arena was empty, save for the seesaws and the dozens of condemned criminals who sat naked upon them, hands tied behind their backs. Unfamiliar with the recently invented contraptions known as petaurua, the men tested the seesaws uneasily. One criminal would push off the ground and suddenly find himself 15 feet in the air while his partner on the other side of the seesaw descended swiftly to the ground. How strange. In the stands, tens of thousands of Roman citizens waited with half-bored curiosity to see what would happen next and whether it would be interesting enough to...
  • How Ancient Rome Killed Democracy

    12/10/2015 4:13:10 PM PST · by Clintonfatigued · 41 replies
    The Daily Beast ^ | December 9, 2015
    It didn’t take all that much to tip a great civilization into the shackles of empire. Rome holds a special place in the popular imagination. Cast as a culture steeped in myth, with values reminiscent of our own, it is often treated as the forebearer of our own political system, an ancestral democracy that provides a republican link between the present and the ancient past. From architecture to literature to political system, Rome is where it all began. But in his latest book, Richard Alston wants us all to think a little more critically about our beloved Rome. Alston is...
  • Excavation of Rome home shows city bigger than thought

    09/13/2015 1:25:46 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies
    Phys dot org ^ | September 9, 2015 | unattributed
    Archaeologists have discovered a 6th-century B.C. residence under a palazzo in central Rome, saying that it proves the ancient city was much bigger than previously thought. Officials said Wednesday that the area on the Quirinale Hill had long been thought to have only been used as a necropolis, with ancient Rome's residential zone further south and centered around the Roman Forum. But archaeologists excavating a palazzo on the hill said they discovered a well-preserved rectangular home, complete with wooden supports and a roof, proving that the area was also used for residential purposes. The ANSA news agency quoted excavation chief...
  • Dinner At Piso's: Ancient Romans ate meals most Americans would recognize

    02/07/2015 9:01:27 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies
    Inside Science ^ | Tuesday, February 3, 2015 | Joel N. Shurkin, Contributor
    Let's pretend it is 56 B.C. and you have been fortunate enough to be invited to a party at the home of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, a great social coup. Piso, after all, was Julius Caesar's father-in-law and a consul of Rome... You need to prepare for pig. Archaeologists studying the eating habits of ancient Etruscans and Romans have found that pork was the staple of Italian cuisine before and during the Roman Empire. Both the poor and the rich ate pig as the meat of choice, although the rich, like Piso, got better cuts, ate meat more often and...
  • Shackled Skeletons Found In Ancient Gallo-Roman Cemetery in Southwest France; circa 2nd Century A.D.

    12/05/2014 3:22:15 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 17 replies
    IO9 ^ | December 4, 2014 | George Dvorsky
    • Skeletons Found In Ancient Cemetery Still Have Shackles On Their Necks Archaeologists working in southwest France have discovered hundreds of Gallo-Roman graves dating to the second half of the 2nd century AD, with some of the skeletons featuring shackles still strapped around their necks and ankles. The site, which may have been part of an important Gallo-Roman necropolis, is situated near the amphitheatre of Saintes. The Romans dominated the area during the first and second centuries AD. The amphitheatre, which featured battles between gladiators and wild animals, could hold between 12-18,000 people. The remains of the dead would be...
  • Roman skeletons found in Worcestershire

    11/13/2014 5:00:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Worcester News ^ | Friday 31 October 2014 | James Connell
    The two incomplete adult skeletons, an adult female and a younger adult male, during building works at Overbury Primary School, near Bredon in February this year. Experts from the Worcestershire County Council Archives and Archaeology Service have now confirmed that remains are from Roman times. The adult female, aged over 50, was found with hobnails, which are associated with rural Roman agricultural burials. The other was an adult male, aged 25 to 30 who had signs of degenerative joints and osteoarthritis. Also found were a selection of Roman pots. Archaeologist Tom Vaughan said: "The remains have been thoroughly examined and...
  • Did You Know That the Emperor Nero Engaged in Two Public Same Sex Marriages?

    09/22/2014 8:39:03 AM PDT · by ComtedeMaistre · 58 replies
    This article has an interesting account from the Roman Empire, that will enable you to understand what will happen to America when the gay agenda seizes 100 control: http://www.fgfbooks.com/Turner-Craig/2013/Turner130323.html ".....But our most detailed images of homosexual marriages come from the descriptions of Roman emperors. Nero, a depraved first-century emperor, married at least two men. He wed Pythagoras in a formal same-sex wedding by first putting on a bridal veil that made Nero the "bride" and Pythagoras the "groom." Every symbol of a classical marriage was present at this ceremony: a dowry, marriage bed, torches, and witnesses. Tacitus, the great Roman...
  • Excavations unearth basilica in Bursa

    05/07/2014 6:52:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | May 2, 2014 | Anadolu Agency
    Excavations at a tower in the Tophane portion of Bursa’s city walls have revealed a basilica from the early Roman era that could be one of the oldest structures ever discovered in the northwestern province. Architect İbrahim Yılmaz, who has been conducting the restoration projects on Bursa’s city walls, said the Tophane city walls restoration project included an area of 1,200 square meters from the north of the Saltanat Gate to the Kaplıca Gate... Speaking about the technical features of the basilica, Yılmaz said: “There is a round apse [the place for religious ceremonies] and a window bay in front...
  • Ancient Gladiator School Discovered in Austria

    03/03/2014 2:01:54 PM PST · by mojito · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 2/27/2014 | Megan Gannon
    An ancient Roman gladiator school has been discovered in Austria, complete with cell blocks, a training arena and a bath complex, archaeologists say. The buried remains of the school — at the site of Carnuntum, near Vienna — were detected not through excavations but through remote-sensing techniques. Based on these findings, researchers reconstructed the gladiator center in virtual 3D models. Archaeologists have been studying Carnuntum, which is on the south bank of the River Danube, for more than 100 years. Previous excavations at the ancient military city had revealed parts of the civilian town, the legionary fortress and an amphitheater....
  • What We Have Learned From The Duck Dynasty Controversy

    01/11/2014 12:45:56 PM PST · by ReformationFan · 26 replies
    Steadfast Lutherans ^ | 1-8-14 | Pastor Matt Richard
    It seems that the A&E Duck Dynasty controversy has come to a conclusion. In the aftermath of this dispute, after all the words exchanged have been reviewed, what can we learn? I believe that the public responses surrounding this recent chain of events reveal several observable trends and ideologies about us as a society. Thus, the following theses presented below are based upon what I believe is the trending American ideology and ethos towards scripture, ethics, and what it values. Thesis #1: Society is unable to apply the simple rules of grammar to scripture. In the debated GQ Interview, it...
  • The Glue Holding America Together (We are like Rome Circa A.D. 200)

    06/27/2013 8:21:51 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    National Review ^ | 06/27/2013 | Victor Davis Hanson
    By A.D. 200, the Roman Republic was a distant memory. Few citizens of the global Roman Empire even knew of their illustrious ancestors like Scipio or Cicero. Millions no longer spoke Latin. Italian emperors were a rarity. There were no national elections. Yet Rome endured as a global power for three more centuries. What held it together? A stubborn common popular culture and the prosperity of Mediterranean-wide standardization kept things going. The Egyptian, the Numidian, the Iberian, and the Greek assumed that everything from Roman clay lamps and glass to good roads and plentiful grain was available to millions throughout...