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Keyword: ancientrome

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  • Dinner At Piso's: Ancient Romans ate meals most Americans would recognize

    02/07/2015 9:01:27 AM PST · by SunkenCiv · 62 replies
    Inside Science ^ | Tuesday, February 3, 2015 | Joel N. Shurkin, Contributor
    Let's pretend it is 56 B.C. and you have been fortunate enough to be invited to a party at the home of Lucius Calpurnius Piso Caesoninus, a great social coup. Piso, after all, was Julius Caesar's father-in-law and a consul of Rome... You need to prepare for pig. Archaeologists studying the eating habits of ancient Etruscans and Romans have found that pork was the staple of Italian cuisine before and during the Roman Empire. Both the poor and the rich ate pig as the meat of choice, although the rich, like Piso, got better cuts, ate meat more often and...
  • Shackled Skeletons Found In Ancient Gallo-Roman Cemetery in Southwest France; circa 2nd Century A.D.

    12/05/2014 3:22:15 PM PST · by DogByte6RER · 17 replies
    IO9 ^ | December 4, 2014 | George Dvorsky
    • Skeletons Found In Ancient Cemetery Still Have Shackles On Their Necks Archaeologists working in southwest France have discovered hundreds of Gallo-Roman graves dating to the second half of the 2nd century AD, with some of the skeletons featuring shackles still strapped around their necks and ankles. The site, which may have been part of an important Gallo-Roman necropolis, is situated near the amphitheatre of Saintes. The Romans dominated the area during the first and second centuries AD. The amphitheatre, which featured battles between gladiators and wild animals, could hold between 12-18,000 people. The remains of the dead would be...
  • Roman skeletons found in Worcestershire

    11/13/2014 5:00:56 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies
    Worcester News ^ | Friday 31 October 2014 | James Connell
    The two incomplete adult skeletons, an adult female and a younger adult male, during building works at Overbury Primary School, near Bredon in February this year. Experts from the Worcestershire County Council Archives and Archaeology Service have now confirmed that remains are from Roman times. The adult female, aged over 50, was found with hobnails, which are associated with rural Roman agricultural burials. The other was an adult male, aged 25 to 30 who had signs of degenerative joints and osteoarthritis. Also found were a selection of Roman pots. Archaeologist Tom Vaughan said: "The remains have been thoroughly examined and...
  • Did You Know That the Emperor Nero Engaged in Two Public Same Sex Marriages?

    09/22/2014 8:39:03 AM PDT · by ComtedeMaistre · 58 replies
    This article has an interesting account from the Roman Empire, that will enable you to understand what will happen to America when the gay agenda seizes 100 control: http://www.fgfbooks.com/Turner-Craig/2013/Turner130323.html ".....But our most detailed images of homosexual marriages come from the descriptions of Roman emperors. Nero, a depraved first-century emperor, married at least two men. He wed Pythagoras in a formal same-sex wedding by first putting on a bridal veil that made Nero the "bride" and Pythagoras the "groom." Every symbol of a classical marriage was present at this ceremony: a dowry, marriage bed, torches, and witnesses. Tacitus, the great Roman...
  • Excavations unearth basilica in Bursa

    05/07/2014 6:52:56 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Hurriyet ^ | May 2, 2014 | Anadolu Agency
    Excavations at a tower in the Tophane portion of Bursa’s city walls have revealed a basilica from the early Roman era that could be one of the oldest structures ever discovered in the northwestern province. Architect İbrahim Yılmaz, who has been conducting the restoration projects on Bursa’s city walls, said the Tophane city walls restoration project included an area of 1,200 square meters from the north of the Saltanat Gate to the Kaplıca Gate... Speaking about the technical features of the basilica, Yılmaz said: “There is a round apse [the place for religious ceremonies] and a window bay in front...
  • Ancient Gladiator School Discovered in Austria

    03/03/2014 2:01:54 PM PST · by mojito · 16 replies
    LiveScience ^ | 2/27/2014 | Megan Gannon
    An ancient Roman gladiator school has been discovered in Austria, complete with cell blocks, a training arena and a bath complex, archaeologists say. The buried remains of the school — at the site of Carnuntum, near Vienna — were detected not through excavations but through remote-sensing techniques. Based on these findings, researchers reconstructed the gladiator center in virtual 3D models. Archaeologists have been studying Carnuntum, which is on the south bank of the River Danube, for more than 100 years. Previous excavations at the ancient military city had revealed parts of the civilian town, the legionary fortress and an amphitheater....
  • What We Have Learned From The Duck Dynasty Controversy

    01/11/2014 12:45:56 PM PST · by ReformationFan · 26 replies
    Steadfast Lutherans ^ | 1-8-14 | Pastor Matt Richard
    It seems that the A&E Duck Dynasty controversy has come to a conclusion. In the aftermath of this dispute, after all the words exchanged have been reviewed, what can we learn? I believe that the public responses surrounding this recent chain of events reveal several observable trends and ideologies about us as a society. Thus, the following theses presented below are based upon what I believe is the trending American ideology and ethos towards scripture, ethics, and what it values. Thesis #1: Society is unable to apply the simple rules of grammar to scripture. In the debated GQ Interview, it...
  • The Glue Holding America Together (We are like Rome Circa A.D. 200)

    06/27/2013 8:21:51 AM PDT · by SeekAndFind · 30 replies
    National Review ^ | 06/27/2013 | Victor Davis Hanson
    By A.D. 200, the Roman Republic was a distant memory. Few citizens of the global Roman Empire even knew of their illustrious ancestors like Scipio or Cicero. Millions no longer spoke Latin. Italian emperors were a rarity. There were no national elections. Yet Rome endured as a global power for three more centuries. What held it together? A stubborn common popular culture and the prosperity of Mediterranean-wide standardization kept things going. The Egyptian, the Numidian, the Iberian, and the Greek assumed that everything from Roman clay lamps and glass to good roads and plentiful grain was available to millions throughout...
  • Rare Roman coin found in Acle only the second of its kind

    02/09/2013 4:38:46 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 27 replies
    edp24 ^ | Friday, February 8, 2013 | Lauren Rogers
    An incredibly rare Roman coin discovered in Acle has been donated to Norwich Castle Museum. The coin -- only the second of its kind known in the world -- was unearthed by Dave Clarke during the Springfield archaeology dig last summer. Acle Parish Council has sent the ancient artefact to Norwich where it may go on display and will be used by experts to identify and date other coins. The coin dates from AD 312 when Emperor Constantine I ruled the Roman world. The only other example was found in the 18th Century and is on show in Lisbon. One...
  • Famed Roman Shipwreck Could Be Two

    02/09/2013 4:57:18 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 11 replies
    LiveScience ^ | January 5, 2013 | Stephanie Pappas
    A dive to the undersea cliff where a famous Roman shipwreck rests has turned up either evidence that the wreck is enormous -- or a suggestion that, not one, but two sunken ships are resting off the Greek island of Antikythera... The Antikythera wreck is famed for the massive number of artifacts pulled from the site over the past century. First discovered in the early 1900s by local sponge divers, the wreck is most famous for the Antikythera mechanism, a complex bronze gear device used to calculate astronomical positions (and perhaps the timing of the Olympic games). Numerous bronze and...
  • Ovarian tumor, with teeth and a bone fragment inside, found in a Roman-age skeleton

    02/04/2013 8:17:51 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 12 replies
    Eurekalert! ^ | January 24, 2013 | Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona
    A team of researchers led by the UAB has found the first ancient remains of a calcified ovarian teratoma, in the pelvis of the skeleton of a woman from the Roman era. The find confirms the presence in antiquity of this type of tumour -- formed by the remains of tissues or organs, which are difficult to locate during the examination of ancient remains. Inside the small round mass, four teeth and a small piece of bone were found. Teratomas are usually benign and contain remains of organic material, such as hair, teeth, bones and other tissues. There are no...
  • Movie for a Sunday afternoon: "The Fall of the Roman Empire"

    09/16/2012 11:57:29 AM PDT · by ReformationFan · 7 replies
    You Tube ^ | 1964
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jv6YwLpy6G4
  • Buried but found: First images of a lost Roman town

    09/10/2012 6:02:01 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies
    Phys.org ^ | Wednesday, September 5, 2012 | U of Cambridge
    Originally founded as a Roman colony in the 4th century BCE, the site of Interamna Lirenas lies in the Liri Valley in Southern Lazio, about 50 miles south of Rome itself. After it was abandoned around the year 500 CE, it was scavenged for building materials and, over time, its remains were completely lost from view. Today, the site is an uninterrupted stretch of farmland, with no recognisable archaeological features. Now, researchers have successfully produced the first images of the ancient site, using geophysical methods that allowed them to look beneath the surface of the earth and map the layout...
  • Divers discover 2,000-year-old Roman shipwreck that is so well preserved even the FOOD is intact

    08/09/2012 8:38:47 AM PDT · by Kartographer · 38 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | 8/9/12 | Mark Prigg
    The ship, a navis oneraria, or merchant vessel, was located at a depth of about 200 feet after a remotely operated vehicle (ROV) was used to scour the seabed. A search for the shipwreck was launched after local fisherman revealed they kept finding pieces of pottery in their nets. The divers found the wreck so well preserved even the food, still sealed in over 200 pots, is intact.
  • The Ivy League of Ancient Roman Gladiator Schools

    06/27/2012 11:17:49 AM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 6 replies
    IO9 ^ | Jun 22, 2012 | Keith Veronese
    The Ivy League of Ancient Roman Gladiator Schools If you got sent back in time 2,000 years to ancient Rome, you probably wouldn't want to choose a career as a gladiator. After all, it was a messy existence, with a fairly low life expectancy. But if you were up to your eyeballs in debt, or wanted a chance at fortune or fame, you could break in at the top, by going to gladiator school. And four different Roman gladiator academies rose above the nearly 100 others, to become the best of the best. At these schools, you'd learn specific fighting...
  • Rome Icon Actually Younger Than the City

    06/25/2012 7:49:47 PM PDT · by DogByte6RER · 10 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Mon Jun 25, 2012 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Rome Icon Actually Younger Than the City The icon of Rome's foundation, a life-size bronze statue of a she-wolf with two human infants suckling her, is about 1,700 years younger than its city, Rome's officials admitted on Saturday. The official announcement, made at the Capitoline Museums, where the 30 inch-high bronze is the centerpiece of a dedicated room, quashes the belief that the sculpture was adopted by the earliest Romans as a symbol for their city. "The new dating ranges between 1021 e il 1153," said Lucio Calcagnile, who carried radiocarbon tests at the University of Salento's Center for Dating...
  • Gay Marriage—Nothing New Under the Sun

    05/22/2012 6:25:30 AM PDT · by marshmallow · 15 replies
    Catholic World Report ^ | 5/22/12 | Benjamin Wiker
    Gay marriage and homosexuality were part of the moral landscape faced by the first Christians in Ancient Rome.Given that the gay marriage agenda will be increasingly pressed upon Catholics by the state, we should be much more aware of what history has to teach us about gay marriage—given that we don’t want to be among those who, ignorant of history, blithely condemned themselves to repeat it. Contrary to the popular view—both among proponents and opponents—gay marriage is not a new issue. It cannot be couched (by proponents) as a seamless advance on the civil rights movement, nor should it be...
  • Trash Talk [ Monte Testaccio, imperial Roman landfill ]

    05/05/2012 8:34:47 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 9 replies
    Archaeology, Volume 62 Number 2 ^ | March/April 2009 | Jarrett A. Lobell
    In the middle of Rome's trendiest neighborhood, surrounded by sushi restaurants and nightclubs with names like Rodeo Steakhouse and Love Story, sits the ancient world's biggest garbage dump--a 150-foot-tall mountain of discarded Roman amphorae, the shipping drums of the ancient world. It takes about 20 minutes to walk around Monte Testaccio, from the Latin testa and Italian cocci, both meaning "potsherd." But despite its size--almost a mile in circumference--it's easy to walk by and not really notice unless you are headed for some excellent pizza at Velavevodetto, a restaurant literally stuck into the mountain's side. Most local residents don't know...
  • Vulgarity and Vengeance (Penn State sex abuse response)

    01/05/2012 2:42:36 PM PST · by NYer · 9 replies
    The Catholic Thing ^ | January 5, 2012 | Anthony Esolen
    The story is familiar by now. Nine years ago, a young football coach at Penn State walked into the locker room and heard odd noises from the showers. He peeked in, and claims to have seen a young boy with his hands placed on the walls, and a retired coach, Jerry Sandusky, embracing him from behind.  He reported this to his superiors, and, after a perfunctory investigation, they let the matter drop. Other young men now claim that Sandusky recruited them through his charity, The Second Mile, and seduced them or pressured them into sexual activity.
Sandusky maintains that he is...
  • Richard Nixon Tapes: Archie Bunker & homosexuality

    09/30/2011 8:34:26 PM PDT · by ReformationFan · 13 replies
    Youtube ^ | May 13, 1971 | Richard M. Nixon
    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TivVcfSBVSM
  • Roman Sandals in Hospital Halls

    08/22/2011 7:22:03 PM PDT · by jfd1776 · 3 replies
    American Thinker ^ | August 22, 2011 A.D. | John F. Di Leo
    The Illinois Department of Revenue has substituted the whim of a bureaucrat for the written law, in commencing a groundless project to strip non-profit status from Illinois hospitals.... Watch as we travel from Ancient Rome to modern-day Springfield, Illinois... Roman life in the 5th century B.C. was pretty good, relatively speaking. Roman society had freed itself from the tyranny of Etruscan kings; the people had representation in the Council of the Plebs, and the nation was at peace. And a merchant class was rising from the fields; no longer was the society entirely made up of farmers, soldiers, and rulers....
  • There’s No Place Like Rome (Part One)

    05/25/2011 6:25:19 PM PDT · by AustralianConservative · 1 replies
    Weekend Libertarian ^ | May 26, 2011 | B.P. Terpstra
    Like so many “lost” civilizations, her rollercoaster ride history is hard for politically-correct elites to process. But why ignore or edit her lessons? One clue: Professor Anthony Esolen of Providence College says, “In some ways ancient Rome, especially during the centuries of the Republic, was as politically incorrect a place as you can imagine.” To Christians, Rome strengthened the church through persecution. That said, not all Romans were bloodthirsty tyrants, and Christians and Jews weren’t always at odds with warring imperialists. Table-turning Christ (no pacifist) openly applauded the Centurion. In the Bible, “righteous pagans” (even turnaround prostitutes) were given credit,...
  • Buried Roman Soldiers of Dura May Be Victims of Ancient Iranian Chemical Weapon

    03/09/2011 10:35:20 PM PST · by OddLane · 23 replies
    The Circle Of Ancient Iranian Studies ^ | Thursday, 10 March 2011 | CAIS
    LONDON, (CAIS) -- Almost 2,000 years ago, 19 Roman soldiers rushed into a cramped underground tunnel, sent to defend the Roman-occupied Syrian city of Dura-Europos from an army of Persians digging to undermine the city's mudbrick walls. But instead of Persian soldiers, the Romans met with a wall of noxious black smoke that turned to acid in their lungs. Their crystal-pummelled swords were no match for this weapon; the Romans choked and died in moments, many with their last pay of coins still slung in purses on their belts. Nearby, a Persian soldier — perhaps the one who started the...
  • Highest-Paid Athlete Hailed From Ancient Rome

    09/02/2010 12:07:51 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 40 replies
    Discovery News ^ | 9/1/10 | Rossella Lorenz1
    Ultra millionaire sponsorship deals such as those signed by sprinter Usain Bolt, motorcycle racer Valentino Rossi and tennis player Maria Sharapova, are just peanuts compared to the personal fortune amassed by a second century A.D. Roman racer, according to an estimate published in the historical magazine Lapham's Quarterly.According to Peter Struck, associate professor of classical studies at the University of Pennsylvania, an illiterate charioteer named Gaius Appuleius Diocles earned “the staggering sum" of 35,863,120 sesterces (ancient Roman coins) in prize money.Recorded in a monumental inscription erected in 146 A.D., the figure eclipses the fortunes of all modern sport stars,...
  • Genes set Jews apart, study finds (European Jews Descended from Ancient Roman Converts?)

    06/10/2010 9:08:00 AM PDT · by GOPGuide · 105 replies · 646+ views
    LA Times ^ | June 3, 2010 | Thomas H. Maugh II
    The Jewish people, according to archaeologists, originated in Babylon and Persia between the 4th and 6th centuries BC. The modern-day Jews most closely related to that original population are those in Iran, Iraq and Syria, whose closest non-Jewish relatives are the Druze, Bedouins and Palestinians, the study found. Sometime in that period, the Middle Eastern and European Jews diverged and the European branch began actively proselytizing for converts. At the height of the Roman Empire, about 10% of the empire's population was Jewish, although the bulk of them were converts. Some Khazars were also incorporated during this period. "That explains...
  • Evidence for the Resurrection

    02/28/2010 2:11:37 PM PST · by CondoleezzaProtege · 21 replies · 879+ views
    LeadershipU ^ | Josh McDowell
    For centuries many of the world's distinguished philosophers have assaulted Christianity as being irrational, superstitious and absurd. Many have chosen simply to ignore the central issue of the resurrection. Others have tried to explain it away through various theories. But the historical evidence just can't be discounted. A student at the University of Uruguay said to me. "Professor McDowell, why can't you refute Christianity?" "For a very simple reason," I answered. "I am not able to explain away an event in history--the resurrection of Jesus Christ." After more than 700 hours of studying this subject, I have come to the...
  • Silver coin dating to 211 BC is oldest piece of Roman money ever found in Britain

    02/02/2010 9:15:34 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 24 replies · 659+ views
    Daily Mail ^ | Friday, January 29th, 2010 | Daily Mail Reporter
    Dating from 211 BC and found near the Leicestershire village of Hallaton, the coin was uncovered with 5,000 other coins, a helmet and a decorated bowl. Unearthed in 2000 by a metal detectorist, staff at the nearby Harborough Museum have only just realised its significance. One side of the coin depicts the goddess Roma wearing her characteristic helmet while mythical twins Castor and Pollux sit astride galloping horses on the reverse. David Sprason, Leicestershire County Council cabinet member for communities and well-being said: 'Leicestershire boasts the largest number of Iron Age coins ever professionally excavated in Britain. 'To also have...
  • Bones In Togas Puzzle Vatican Arhaeologists

    05/20/2006 7:30:15 PM PDT · by blam · 42 replies · 1,612+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 5-21-2006 | Nick Pisa
    Bones in togas puzzle Vatican archaeologists By Nick Pisa in Rome (Filed: 21/05/2006) Archaeologists exploring one of Rome's oldest catacombs are baffled by neat piles of more than 1,000 skeletons dressed in elegant togas. The macabre find emerged as teams of historians slowly picked their way through the complex network of underground burial chambers, which stretch for miles under the city. They say the tomb, which has been dated to the first century AD, is the first known example of a "mass burial". The archaeologists are unable to explain why so many apparently upper-class Romans - who would normally have...
  • So that's what the Romans gave us -- more historic camps than anywhere [Scotland]

    11/21/2009 6:41:42 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 16 replies · 851+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | Thursday, November 19, 2009 | Tim Cornwell
    Scotland already has more identified Roman camps than any other European country -- reflecting Rome's repeated attempts to stamp its rule on the troublesome north. Now the number is set to increase. The first comprehensive survey of Roman remains for 30 years will boost the total of officially recognised sites and give them greater legal protection, officials said yesterday. Traces of at least 225 Roman military camps dot the Scottish countryside from the Borders to Aberdeenshire... They can be spotted today mostly from the air, where the distinctive bank and ditch defences thrown up by the legionaries still mark the...
  • Nero's rotating banquet hall unveiled in Rome

    09/29/2009 12:55:36 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 52 replies · 2,242+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 9/29/09 | Marta Falconi - ap
    ROME – Archaeologists on Tuesday unveiled what they think are the remains of Roman emperor Nero's extravagant banquet hall, a circular space that rotated day and night to imitate the Earth's movement and impress his guests. The room, part of Nero's Golden Palace, a sprawling residence built in the first century A.D., is thought to have been built to entertain government officials and VIPs, said lead archaeologist Francoise Villedieu. The emperor, known for his lavish and depraved lifestyle, ruled from 37 A.D. to 68 A.D. The dig so far has turned up the foundations of the room, the rotating mechanism...
  • Near Army construction site in Germany, a trove of ancient Roman artifacts

    09/24/2009 10:15:27 PM PDT · by Jet Jaguar · 13 replies · 828+ views
    Stars and Stripes ^ | September 24, 2009 | By Mark Patton
    WIESBADEN, Germany — A team of archaeology students and experts believe they have unearthed remnants of a Roman settlement from the second or third century near the construction site of an Army housing project, but the discovery isn’t expected to affect the project. The team, from nearby Mainz University, discovered a Roman coin, pieces of pottery, roof tiles, decorated bricks and 23 pieces of raw lead. The students also believe they have found the wall outlines of a building. "We think it’s from the first to third century after Christ," said Dr. Guntram Schwitalla, a district archaeologist in Hessen. "If...
  • Rome Catacomb Reveals "Oldest" Image of St Paul

    06/28/2009 4:20:19 PM PDT · by marshmallow · 41 replies · 2,558+ views
    Reuters ^ | 6/28/09
    ROME (Reuters) – Vatican archaeologists using laser technology have discovered what they believe is the oldest image in existence of St Paul the Apostle, dating from the late 4th century, on the walls of catacomb beneath Rome. Vatican newspaper Osservatore Romano, revealing the find on Sunday, published a picture of a frescoed image of the face of a man with a pointed black beard on a red background, inside a bright yellow halo. The high forehead is furrowed. Experts of the Ponitifical Commission for Sacred Archaeology made the discovery on June 19 in the Catacomb of Santa Tecla in Rome...
  • Rome Catacomb Reveals "Oldest" Image Of St Paul

    06/28/2009 3:06:32 PM PDT · by Steelfish · 21 replies · 2,230+ views
    Reuters ^ | June 28, 2009
    Rome catacomb reveals "oldest" image of St Paul Sun Jun 28 ROME (Reuters) – Vatican archaeologists using laser technology have discovered what they believe is the oldest image in existence of St Paul the Apostle, dating from the late 4th century, on the walls of catacomb beneath Rome. Vatican newspaper Osservatore Romano, revealing the find on Sunday, published a picture of a frescoed image of the face of a man with a pointed black beard on a red background, inside a bright yellow halo. The high forehead is furrowed. Experts of the Ponitifical Commission for Sacred Archaeology made the discovery...
  • Oldest Icon of St. Paul Discovered

    06/28/2009 11:54:12 AM PDT · by Mighty_Quinn · 25 replies · 2,824+ views
    Oldest known icon of St. Paul discovered! http://singinginthereign.blogspot.com/2009/06/oldest-icon-of-st-paul-discovered.html
  • ROME'S TREMENDOUS TUNNEL

    04/19/2009 4:27:23 AM PDT · by Fred Nerks · 37 replies · 1,375+ views
    SpiegelOnLine ^ | 03/11/2009 | By Matthias Schulz
    The Ancient World's Longest Underground Aqueduct Roman engineers chipped an aqueduct through more than 100 kilometers of stone to connect water to cities in the ancient province of Syria. The monumental effort took more than a century, says the German researcher who discovered it. When the Romans weren't busy conquering their enemies, they loved to waste massive quantities of water, which gurgled and bubbled throughout their cities. The engineers of the empire invented standardized lead pipes, aqueducts as high as fortresses, and water mains with 15 bars (217 pounds per square inch) of pressure. PHOTO GALLERY: ROME'S LONGEST PIPE In...
  • Druids Committed Human Sacrifice, Cannibalism?

    03/20/2009 4:10:41 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 32 replies · 1,711+ views
    nationalgeographic ^ | March 20, 2009 | James Owen
    Recent evidence that Druids possibly committed cannibalism and ritual human sacrifice—perhaps on a massive scale—add weight to ancient Roman accounts of Druidic savagery, archaeologists say.After a first century B.C. visit to Britain, the Romans came back with horrific stories about these high-ranking priests of the Celts, who had spread throughout much of Europe over a roughly 2,000-year period.
  • Gladiators return to Colosseum after 2,000 years

    12/20/2008 9:25:01 PM PST · by nickcarraway · 43 replies · 1,701+ views
    The Times ^ | December 20, 2008
    They came. They saw. They slaughtered. And now, almost 2,000 years after fighters and wild animals last entertained the rabble, gladiators are set to return to the Colosseum. Umberto Broccoli, the head of archaeology at Rome city council, said it was time that the five million people who visited the Colosseum annually saw the kind of shows originally staged there. They should also experience “the sights, sounds and smells” of Ancient Rome. Mauro Cutrufo, the deputy mayor, said that a series of events would be held next year to mark the two thousandth anniversary of the birth of the Emperor...
  • History Buffs Can Visit Ancient Rome with Google "Virtual Time Machine" - Videos

    11/16/2008 5:09:47 AM PST · by Federalist Patriot · 11 replies · 643+ views
    Freedom's Lighthouse ^ | November 16, 2008 | BrianinMO
    History buffs can now visit Ancient Rome using Google's "Virtual time machine." Here are two video reports on the new technology available to users of Google Earth. . . . (Watch Video)
  • How Excessive Government Killed Ancient Rome (Barack “Robin Hood” Obama should read this)

    10/18/2008 7:42:15 AM PDT · by trueamerica · 27 replies · 1,104+ views
    The Cato Journal ^ | 1994 | Bruce Bartlett
    The complete text is at: http://www.cato.org/pubs/journal/cjv14n2-7.html Here are some highlights: Augustus, emperor of Rome 27 B.C. to 14 A.D: An expansion of economic freedom. Augustus clearly favored private enterprise, private property, and free trade. The burden of taxation was significantly lifted … a period of "almost complete freedom for trade and of splendid opportunities for private initiative. Tiberius, emperor of Rome (14-37 A.D.) extended the policies of Augustus. It was his strong desire to encourage growth and establish a solid middle class (bourgeoisie), which he saw as the backbone of the Empire. High level of economic prosperity, made possible by...
  • Tomb of Real 'Gladiator' Found in Rome

    10/17/2008 4:12:50 AM PDT · by NCDragon · 17 replies · 1,253+ views
    FOXNews/Times ^ | October 16, 2008 | FOXNews Staff
    Italian archaeologists have discovered the tomb of the ancient Roman hero said to have inspired the character played by Russell Crowe in the film "Gladiator." Daniela Rossi, an archaeologist based in Rome, said the discovery of the monumental marble tomb of Marcus Nonius Macrinus, including a large inscription bearing his name, was "an exceptional find." She said it was "the most important ancient Roman monument to come to light for twenty or thirty years." The tomb is on the banks of the Tiber near the via Flaminia, north of Rome. Cristiano Ranieri, who led the archeological team at the site,...
  • "In early centuries, being a 'gladiator' prohibited a person from becoming Christian"

    10/08/2008 10:12:46 AM PDT · by NYer · 21 replies · 581+ views
    CNA ^ | October 7, 2008
    An expert in the history of the Catholic Church, Domingo Ramos-Lissón, explained in an interview that the preparation of the early Christians for baptism could last up to three years, and that many professions prohibited a person from registering as a catechumen. "If we follow the path taken by someone who wanted to become a Christian in the fourth century, initially we will see a thorough examination of his life, family conditions and aspiring profession," Ramos-Lissón said in an interview with the website PrimerosCristianos.com (First Christians). In that regard, he explained, "some family situations, such as polygamy and concubinage, or...
  • Huge statue of Roman ruler found [ Marcus Aurelius , Sagalossos ]

    08/26/2008 5:04:30 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 500+ views
    BBC News ^ | Monday, August 25, 2008 | Paul Rincon
    Parts of a giant, exquisitely carved marble sculpture depicting the Roman emperor Marcus Aurelius have been found at an archaeological site in Turkey... at the ancient city of Sagalassos. So far the statue's head, right arm and lower legs have been discovered... The partial statue was unearthed in the largest room at Sagalassos's Roman baths. The cross-shaped room measures 1,250 sq m (13,500 sq ft), is covered in mosaics and was probably used as a frigidarium -- a room with a cold pool which Romans could sink into after a hot bath. It was partially destroyed in an earthquake between...
  • Colossal Head of Roman Empress Unearthed

    08/17/2008 5:18:19 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 25 replies · 123+ views
    Archaeology ^ | Marc Waelkens | August 13, 2008
    The head is 0.76 m in height (2.5 feet). It has large, almond-shaped eyes (only the tear ducts are rendered, not the iris or pupils as became usual during the reign of Hadrian) and fleshy thick lips. Its hair is parted in the middle of the front and taken in wavy strains below and around the ears toward the back. The rendering of the hair was done with only sparing sparing use of the drill, a feature characteristic for portraits of empresses in this, the Antonine, dynasty, in sharp contrast with the beards and curly hairs of their husbands. On...
  • Roman Shops Unearthed Under Corn Hall (UK)

    03/05/2008 1:20:03 PM PST · by blam · 29 replies · 352+ views
    Wilts And Gloucestershire Standard ^ | 3-5-2008 | Andy Woolfoot
    Roman shops unearthed under Corn Hall By Andy Woolfoot Workers unearthed the remains during renovation work THE remains of an ancient Roman shopping parade, hidden for centuries under the floorboards of Cirencester's historic Corn Hall have been unearthed this week. Workers came across the remains of what archaeologists claim is the most significant Roman discovery in the town in the last 50 years while carrying out refurbishment work. A series of walls were discovered 10 feet below the level of the floorboards in the main room of the 19th Century building along with evidence the site used to house shops...
  • 'Caesar's superglue' find

    12/04/2007 6:32:34 PM PST · by BGHater · 77 replies · 196+ views
    The Scotsman ^ | 05 Dec 2007 | The Scotsman
    ARCHAEOLOGISTS in Germany have found a 2,000-year-old glue Roman warriors used to repair helmets, shields and the other accessories of battle. "Caesar's superglue" - as it has been dubbed by workers at the Rhine State Museum in Bonn - was found on a helmet at a site near Xanthen on the Rhine River where Romans settled before Christ. Frank Welker, a restorer at the museum, said: "We found the parade cavalry helmet had been repaired with an adhesive that was still doing its job. "This is rightly called some kind of superglue because air, water and time have not diminished...
  • Sanctuary of Rome's 'Founder' Revealed

    11/20/2007 10:08:23 AM PST · by Pyro7480 · 59 replies · 265+ views
    Yahoo! News (AP) ^ | 11/20/2007 | Ariel David
    ROME - Archaeologists on Tuesday unveiled an underground grotto believed to have been revered by ancient Romans as the place where a wolf nursed the city's legendary founder Romulus and his twin brother Remus. Decorated with seashells and colored marble, the vaulted sanctuary is buried 52 feet inside the Palatine hill, the palatial center of power in imperial Rome, the archaeologists said at a news conference. In the past two years, experts have been probing the space with endoscopes and laser scanners, fearing that the fragile grotto, already partially caved-in, would not survive a full-scale dig, said Giorgio Croci, an...
  • Ancient Rome is rebuilt digitally

    06/11/2007 2:21:35 PM PDT · by BenLurkin · 33 replies · 1,135+ views
    Associated Press ^ | 6 minutes ago | ARIEL DAVID,
    ROME - Computer experts on Monday unveiled a digital reproduction of ancient Rome as it appeared at the peak of its power in A.D. 320 — what they called the largest and most complete simulation of a historic city ever created. Visitors to virtual Rome will be able to do even more than ancient Romans did: They can crawl through the bowels of the Colosseum, filled with lion cages and primitive elevators, and fly up for a detailed look at bas-reliefs and inscriptions atop triumphal arches. "This is the first step in the creation of a virtual time machine, which...
  • Lessons from Carthage

    08/27/2006 4:30:46 PM PDT · by tobyprissy · 29 replies · 1,001+ views
    Lessons from Carthage Elyakim Haetzni August 22, 2006 Carthage was an empire that ruled from Libya in North Africa to Sicilia to Sardinia to parts of Spain. It was the center of world finance. Rome stood in opposition, but encountered Carthage's naval superiority. The fighting between them continued for 200 years and ended with the destruction of Carthage. Theodor Mommsen, in his classic "The History of Rome", describes the people of Carthage as a nation not driven by freedom, or even by power. All they cared about was money. And they tried to use their money to buy peace and...
  • Road sees first traffic for 1,400 years

    07/28/2006 9:56:49 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 47 replies · 633+ views
    Havant & W Sussex News ^ | 27 July 2006 | unattributed
    Feet have trodden on a stretch of Roman road for the first time in 1,600 years. A section of the road has been fully uncovered in the final stages of an archaeological excavation on the former Shippams factory site in Chichester city centre... Jo Taylor, of Pre-Construct Archaeology, which has been carrying out the project with Gifford Archaeology, said the road probably dated from the late first century AD. Postholes on the southern side indicated some form of settlement, which was probably domestic. District council archaeological officer James Kenny said it was a privilege to stand on a Roman street....
  • Sabine Chariot Rewrites History

    05/12/2006 4:17:08 PM PDT · by blam · 25 replies · 838+ views
    Ansa ^ | 5-12-2006
    Sabine chariot rewrites history'Exceptional' find proves independence of ancient city (ANSA) - Rome, May 12 - An ancient king's war chariot found in a tomb near Rome has helped rewrite the history of the Romans and their Sabine rivals . "This chariot is an exceptional find," said archaeologist Paola Santoro. "It shows that the city of Ereteum remained independent long after the Sixth Century BC." "In other Sabine cities like Custumerium, conquered by the Romans, the custom of putting regal objects in king's tombs had died out by that time". "We can say that Eretum kept its independence until the...