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Keyword: andes

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  • Chilean soccer team's plane finally found 54 years after doomed flight crashed in Andes

    02/09/2015 6:34:20 PM PST · by ConservativeStatement · 27 replies
    Fox News Latino ^ | February 09, 2015
    Fifty four years after a Douglas DC-3 crashed in Chile’s Andes – killing all 24 people aboard, including members of a Chilean soccer team and three referees – a team of mountaineers discovered the remains of the crash. The 1961 LAN 301 air crash was deemed at the time one of the world’s major air disasters involving athletes – surpassed maybe only by the 1972 Uruguayan plane crash that stranded members of a rugby in the high Andes. The plane’s whereabouts has been one of the great unsolved aerial mysteries.
  • Football team plane found 50 years after crash in Chile

    02/08/2015 1:58:02 AM PST · by moose07 · 32 replies
    BBC ^ | 08.02.2015 | Tim Allman
    Mountaineers in Chile have discovered the wreckage of a plane that went missing more than 50 years ago. Twenty four people died when the aircraft disappeared in 1961 - among them eight players for what was then one of Chile's top football teams. VIDEO at site.
  • Mummy Hair Reveals Drinking Habits

    09/23/2004 7:24:12 PM PDT · by blam · 40 replies · 1,168+ views
    Discovery News ^ | 9-23-2004 | Rossella Lorenzi
    Mummy Hair Reveals Drinking Habits By Rossella Lorenzi, Discovery News Sept. 23, 2004 Mummy hair has revealed the first direct evidence of alcohol consumption in ancient populations, according to new forensic research.The study, still in its preliminary stage, examined hair samples from spontaneously mummified remains discovered in one of the most arid regions of the world, the Atacama Desert of northern Chile and southern Peru. The research was presented at the 5th World Congress on Mummy Studies in Turin, Italy, this month. “ In modern human hair the levels would generally be in the ranges of social drinking, but we...
  • Mummifird Dogs Uncovered In Peru

    09/23/2006 3:40:14 PM PDT · by blam · 20 replies · 598+ views
    BBC ^ | 9-23-2006 | Dan Collins
    Mummified dogs uncovered in Peru By Dan Collins BBC News, Lima Archaeologists in Peru have uncovered the mummified remains of more than 40 dogs buried with blankets and food alongside their human masters. The discovery was made during the excavation of two of the ancient Chiribaya people who lived in southern Peru between 900 and 1350 AD. Experts say the dogs' treatment in death indicated the belief that the animals had an afterlife. Such a status for pets has only previously been seen in ancient Egypt. Hundreds of years before the European conquest of South America, the Chiribaya civilisation valued...
  • Ancient pet cemeteries found in Peru

    09/23/2006 3:53:20 PM PDT · by fanfan · 8 replies · 259+ views
    AP via CTV News ^ | Sat. Sep. 23 2006 | Associated Press
    LIMA, Peru -- Even in ancient Peru, it seems dogs were a man's best friend. Peruvian investigators have discovered a pre-Columbian culture of dog lovers who built pet cemeteries and buried their pets with warm blankets and even treats for the afterlife. "They are dogs that were thanked and recognized for their social and familial contribution," anthropologist Sonia Guillen said. "These dogs were not sacrificed." Since 1993, researchers have unearthed 82 dog tombs in pet cemetery plots, laid alongside human mummy tombs of the Chiribaya people in the fertile Osmore River valley, 540 miles southeast of Lima. The Chiribaya were...
  • 700-year-old Peruvian mummies found (so well preserved – an eye and internal organs intact)

    02/24/2004 6:35:01 AM PST · by dead · 15 replies · 373+ views
    Reuters via SMH | February 25, 2004
    Two of the oldest mummies found in Peru - so well preserved that one had an eye and internal organs intact - have gone on display after their discovery by building workers two weeks ago. Officials from the National Institute of Culture said the mummies - a young boy and a man in his mid-30s - were at least 700 years old. They came from a culture that predated the Incas, who dominated a vast swathe of South America from Colombia to Chile until they were toppled by Spanish invaders in the 1530s. Well preserved ... one of the recently...
  • Peruvian Air Force to launch UFO department

    10/19/2013 7:06:44 AM PDT · by BenLurkin · 8 replies
    unexplained-mysteries.com ^ | Friday, 18 October, 2013
    The Anomalous Aerial Phenomenon Research Department (DIFAA) is scheduled to be formally launched in Lima today at the offices of the Peruvian Air Force with the assistance of the Civilian Advisory Council. The announcement was made by council member Giorgio Piacenza who is also an adviser to the Exopolitics Institute. During his talk he outlined the plans for the new department and emphasised that it would value objective research and employ a number of qualified researchers and scientists.
  • Pre-Incan Mettalurgy Discovered

    04/19/2007 4:43:37 PM PDT · by blam · 17 replies · 906+ views
    Yahoo News/Live Science ^ | 4-19-2007 | Charles Q. Choi
    Pre-Incan Metallurgy Discovered Charles Q. Choi Special to LiveScience Thu Apr 19, 9:50 AM ET Metals found in lake mud in the central Peruvian Andes have revealed the first evidence for pre-Colonial metalsmithing there. These findings illustrate a way that archaeologists can recreate the past even when looters have destroyed the valuable artifacts that would ordinarily be relied upon to reveal historical secrets. For instance, the new research hints at a tax imposed on local villages by ancient Inca rulers to force a switch from production of copper to silver. Pre-Colonial bronze artifacts have previously been found in the central...
  • City where sacrificial slaughter was way of life

    09/02/2006 1:28:10 PM PDT · by wagglebee · 97 replies · 2,646+ views
    UK Telegraph ^ | 9/2/06 | Aidan Laverty and Roger Highfield
    As they waited to be sacrificed outside a temple, the victims made no attempt to escape their fate: their throats were cut, they were decapitated and their hearts ripped out. Their hands were not tied and they offered no resistance to the sacrificial knife. A seed containing a potent drug was used to paralyse their bodies, leaving the victims aware of a terrifying ritual that has been revealed for the first time by a dig in the vast pre-Colombian city of Túcume in northern Peru. Archaeologists working in the ruined city of giant pyramids have discovered one of the largest...
  • Mummified women, human sacrifices discovered in ancient Peruvian tomb

    06/30/2013 5:54:39 AM PDT · by csvset · 13 replies
    Reuters ^ | 28 June 2013 | Mitra Taj
    Reuters) - Archaeologists in Peru on Thursday said they have unearthed a massive royal tomb full of mummified women that provides clues about the enigmatic Wari empire that ruled the Andes long before their better-known Incan successors. "For the first time in the history of archeology in Peru we have found an imperial tomb that belongs to the Wari empire and culture," lead archeologist Milosz Giersz said. Researchers said the discovery will help them piece together life in the Andes centuries before the rise of the Incan empire, which was written about in detail by the conquering Spaniards. The mausoleum,...
  • Pre-Inca Ruins Emerrging From Peru's Cloud Forests (Chapapoyas)

    09/23/2004 8:09:38 PM PDT · by blam · 47 replies · 8,770+ views
    National Geographic ^ | 9-16-2004 | John Roach
    Pre-Inca Ruins Emerging From Peru's Cloud Forests John Roach for National Geographic News September 16, 2004 On the eastern slope of the Andes mountains in northern Peru, forests cloak the ruins of a pre-Inca civilization, the size and scope of which explorers and archaeologists are only now beginning to understand. Known as the Chachapoya, the civilization covered an estimated 25,000 square miles (65,000 square kilometers). The Chachapoya, distinguished by fair skin and great height, lived primarily on ridges and mountaintops in circular stone houses. Sean Savoy, leader of the Gran Saposoa-El Dorado IV Expedition (July-August 2004), points out a stone...
  • Peru Temple, Mural Hints At Complexity (2,000BC)

    11/13/2007 2:59:48 PM PST · by blam · 6 replies · 63+ views
    AP ^ | 12-13-2007 | Leslie Josephs
    Peru Temple, Mural Hints at Complexity By LESLIE JOSEPHS LIMA, Peru (AP) — The sophisticated design and colorful artwork found in a 4,000-year-old temple unearthed near Peru's northern desert coast suggests that early civilization here was more complex than originally thought, archaeologists said. Ventarron, a 7,000-square-foot site — a bit larger than a basketball court — with painted walls and a white-and-red mural of a deer hunt, points to an "advanced civilization," said the lead archaeologist who excavated the site last week. "We have the use of a construction material that is not primitive," Walter Alva, a prominent Peruvian archaeologist...
  • Ancient "Human Sacrifices" Found in Peru, Expert Says

    06/05/2008 8:11:43 PM PDT · by blam · 8 replies · 114+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 6-4-2008 | Kelly Hearn
    Ancient "Human Sacrifices" Found in Peru, Expert SaysKelly Hearn for National Geographic NewsJune 4, 2008 Three possible human sacrifice victims have been found at a 4,000-year-old archaeological site in Peru, an archaeologist says. The apparently mutilated, partial skeletons (see photos) could overturn the peaceful reputation of the Pre-Ceramic period (3000 B.C. to 1800 B.C.) in the Andes mountains—a time generally seen as free of ritualized killing and warfare. Alejandro Chu Barrera, who led the dig, said: "We found two pairs of legs—probably young females around their 20s—and the decapitated body of a young male in his 20s." "They appear to...
  • Pyramid 'renovation' may cause collapse

    10/20/2009 4:59:37 PM PDT · by decimon · 8 replies · 547+ views
    AFP ^ | October 20, 2009 | From correspondents in Bolivia
    EAGER to attract more tourists, the town of Tiwanaku in the Bolivian Andes has spruced up the ancient Akapana pyramid with adobe instead of stone, in what some experts are calling a renovation fiasco. Now, the Akapana pyramid risks losing its designation as a UN World Heritage Site and there is concern the makeover could even cause its collapse. The pyramid is one of the biggest pre-Columbian constructions in South America and a building of great spiritual significance for the Tiwanaku civilisation, which spread throughout south-western Bolivia and parts of neighboring Peru, Argentina and Chile from around 1500 BC to...
  • Red alert issued for volcano on Chile-Argentina border

    12/23/2012 6:30:53 PM PST · by John W · 10 replies
    cnn.com ^ | December 23, 2012 | Erica Harrington and Greg Botelho
    Chilean authorities on Sunday issued a red alert -- the most severe in their warning system -- that the Copahue Volcano, high in the Andes mountains on the border with Argentina, might be poised for a significant eruption. In a statement, Chile's Geological and Mining Service stressed that no mandatory evacuations have been ordered around the remote volcano, which lies about 280 kilometers southeast (175 miles) of Concepcion, though the closest roads to it are in Argentina. Even though the seismic activity suggests a minor eruption, the agency decided to raise the alert level because it could not rule out...
  • 'I had to eat piece of my friend to survive': Torment of 1972 Andes plane crash survivor

    10/13/2012 9:03:03 AM PDT · by ConservativeStatement · 32 replies
    UK Daily Mail ^ | October 13, 2012
    Forty year on from the plane crash that changed his life forever, Dr Roberto Canessa still vividly remembers having to eat the flesh of friends to survive. He was one of 16 men who escaped death when their chartered aircraft smashed into the bleak Andes mountains between Chile and Argentina on October 13, 1972. They were rescued 72 days later after Dr Canessa, then a 19-year-old medical student, and another survivor trekked for 10 days to get help.
  • How Che Guevara Nearly Started World War Three

    09/23/2011 4:43:16 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 52 replies
    The Propagandist ^ | 9/18/2011
    Billions would have died in the nuclear holocaust. But this was the plan from the Latin American warmonger Che Guevara, who's face is emblazoned on T-shirts around the globe: “What?!” Khrushchev gasped upon reading Castro’s telegram on Oct. 28 1962. “Is he proposing that we start a nuclear war? That we launch missiles from Cuba? But that is insane! Remove them (our missiles) as soon as possible! Before its too late!” instructed the Soviet premier. So much for the Camelot fable of JFK “standing up to the Russians,” during the Missile Crisis Khrushchev “blinked” alright. But at Fidel Castro and...
  • Peruvian Desert Once a Breadbasket

    08/16/2011 7:25:40 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 42 replies
    Discovery News ^ | Tuesday, August 16, 2011 | Tim Wall
    Throughout human history unsustainable agricultural practices have turned fragile ecosystems into wastelands and left people starving. During the Dust Bowl, American farmers learned the consequences of removing the deep rooted grasses from the Great Plains when the soil blew away in tremendous dust storms. Icelandic shepherds learned that the sheep rearing practices their ancestors used on the European mainland destroyed the thin soils of their island and left them with starving herds and little to eat. The ancient inhabitants of what is now Peru also learned the unhappy consequences of farming in a delicate ecosystem. The Ica Valley, near the...
  • Penn Museum Begins Ground-breaking Project to Create Underground Image of Pre-Inca City

    06/03/2011 8:18:50 AM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 2 replies
    University of Pennsylvania ^ | January 6, 2005 | Pam Kosty
    University of Pennsylvania Museum archaeologists working at the renowned ancient site of Tiwanaku in Bolivia site sometimes called the "American Stonehenge" have joined forces with a team of engineers, mathematicians, computer scientists and anthropologists from the University of Pennsylvania's Department of Computer and Information Science, School of Engineering, the Center for Advanced Spatial Technologies, University of Arkansas, and the Department of Anthropology, University of Denver, to begin a large-scale, subsurface surveying project using equipment and techniques that may one day serve as a model for future archaeological efforts worldwide. Their three-year, collaborative pilot project, made possible through a 1.05 million...
  • 440-year-old document sheds new light on native population decline under Spanish colonial rule

    05/26/2011 6:07:24 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 13 replies
    Eurekalert ^ | May 19, 2011 | Kevin Stacey of University of Chicago Press Journals
    Analysis of a 440-year-old document reveals new details about native population decline in the heartland of the Inca Empire following Spanish conquest in the 16th century. According to the analysis, the native Andean population in the Yucay Valley of Peru showed a remarkable ability to bounce back in the short term from the disease, warfare, and famine that accompanied the initial Spanish invasion. However, it was the repetition of such disasters generation after generation, along with overly rigid colonial administration, that dramatically reduced the population over the long term... The analysis is based on an unusually detailed survey of the...
  • Survivor of 1972 Andes plane crash trusts Dallas firm to tell his tale in film

    10/20/2010 8:50:26 AM PDT · by DFG · 14 replies
    Dallas Morning News ^ | 10/20/10 | Staff
    A week ago, the world watched Chilean miners resurface one by one from their hellacious entrapment. But few people understood the true measure of triumph over death as Nando Parrado did. You've probably heard of him, even if you don't recognize his name. On Friday, Oct. 13, 1972 – 38 years ago to the day from when the first Chilean miner was rescued – a charter plane carrying Parrado, his mother, his younger sister and his rugby teammates from Uruguay slammed into the middle of the Andes Mountains east of Chile.
  • Ceremonial Temples 4,000 Years Old Found in Peruvian Jungle

    09/20/2010 7:08:29 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 4 replies
    Latin American Times ^ | Monday, September 20, 2010 | unattributed
    ...the most ancient in the country and identifies them with the Bracamoros culture, the daily El Comercio said on Saturday. On both sites were found 14 burial vaults that typically contain the skeletons of newborns and adolescents placed there as offerings at different times in the course of the 800 years these buildings were in use, the newspaper said. The Bracamoros culture occupied part of the current Ecuadorian province of Zamora Chinchipe and the Peruvian regions of Amazonas and Cajamarca, where the temples were found, the daily said. It said that the place where the archaeological remains were uncovered was...
  • Geology Picture of the Week, September 12-18, 2010: Badlands of Colombia

    09/18/2010 8:45:38 PM PDT · by cogitator · 16 replies
    These are near the volcano Nevado del Huila, southwest of Bogota. I wouldn't normally think of Colombia as a semi-desert environment, but these high alpine mountain basins can be pretty dry. [Click for full-size.]
  • Hostile volcanic lake teems with life: Microbes thriving in salty, alkali waters containing...

    04/04/2010 8:24:51 PM PDT · by neverdem · 18 replies · 672+ views
    Nature News ^ | 2 April 2010 | Ana Belluscio
    Microbes thriving in salty, alkali waters containing arsenic.It looks peaceful, but Laguna del Diamante's waters are deadly.MARÍA EUGENIA FARÍAS Argentinian investigators have found flamingos and mysterious microbes living in an alkaline lagoon nestled inside a volcano in the Andes. The organisms, exposed to arsenic and poisonous gases, could shed light on how life began on Earth, and their hardiness to extreme conditions may hold the key to new scientific applications.In 2009, a team led by María Eugenia Farías, a microbiologist at the National Scientific and Technical Research Council in Tucumán, Argentina, discovered living stromatolites in the Socompa and Tolar Grande...
  • About those 'anomalous' temperatures...

    01/05/2010 3:33:49 AM PST · by Scanian · 3 replies · 520+ views
    The American Thinker Blog ^ | January 05, 2010 | William D. Zeranski
    Here we have some poor mountain people in Peru, living in the most primitive of conditions, on the verge of ‘extinction' because of severe cold, and it is being said that this proves, dare I say it, even as I shake my head at the utter silliness, this proves the "world growing ever hotter." Global warming/Climate change believers continue to seek validation for bad science. It's the continual mantra, "See, see! It's true!" Climategate broke last year and the Copenhagen Climate Carnival collapsed. The jig is up, but all the same, it's about finding that one item, which can be...
  • Snow at Highest Elevations No Longer Pure

    12/10/2009 8:59:21 AM PST · by NormsRevenge · 41 replies · 1,106+ views
    LiveScience.com ^ | 12/10/09 | Rachael Rettner
    The pure white snow atop the Andes Mountains may not be so pure after all. Scientists have found traces of toxic pollutants called PCBs in snow samples taken from Aconcagua Mountain, the highest peak in the Americas. While the overall PCB levels were quite low, the results show that these long-lasting contaminants, notorious for causing myriad health problems, can end up at altitudes as high as 20,340 feet (6,200 meters), making their way through the atmosphere to these remote areas. PCBs, or polychlorinated biphenyls, break down slowly, and as a result, can last for many years in the environment. They...
  • Studying hair of ancient Peruvians answers questions about stress

    12/09/2009 8:23:56 AM PST · by decimon · 14 replies · 518+ views
    University of Western Ontario ^ | Dec 9, 2009 | Unknown
    Recent studies show that one in three Canadians suffer from stress and the number is on the rise. But stress isn't a new problem. While the physiological state wasn't properly named until the 1930s, new research from The University of Western Ontario proves stress has plagued humans for hundreds, and perhaps thousands of years. The first study of its kind, published in the Journal of Archaeological Science, detected the stress hormone cortisol in the hair of ancient Peruvians, who lived between 550 and 1532 A.D. When an individual is stressed – due to real or perceived threats – cortisol is...
  • Severed heads among discovery at Sacsayhuamán

    11/13/2009 5:35:44 PM PST · by SunkenCiv · 18 replies · 765+ views
    En Peru 'blog ^ | November 13, 2009 | unattributed
    Above the Inca capital of Cusco (Q'osco) sits the important ceremonial site and one of human-kinds most impressive constructions called Sacsayhuamán, which despite its global fame still offers up secrets to investigators. Yesterday the discovery was announced of three burials, one of which contained the severed heads of the Inca's enemies. The discovery was made within the archaeological park of Sacsayhuamán in the area of Qowikarana, under threat from illegal settlements of the city's poor. Chief on-site archaeologist Washington Camacho explains that three separate burials were found -- one of an older man buried with a ceremonial knife, one of...
  • Andes Mountains Are Older Than Previously Believed

    05/25/2009 4:20:13 PM PDT · by SunkenCiv · 26 replies · 3,263+ views
    ScienceDaily ^ | Sunday, May 17, 2009 | Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, via EurekAlert!
    The geologic faults responsible for the rise of the eastern Andes mountains in Colombia became active 25 million years ago -- 18 million years before the previously accepted start date for the Andes' rise, according to researchers at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panama, the University of Potsdam in Germany and Ecopetrol in Colombia... The team integrated new geologic maps that illustrate tectonic thrusting and faulting, information about the origins and movements of sediments and the location and age of plant pollen in the sediments, as well as zircon-fission track analysis to provide an unusually thorough description of basin...
  • PHOTOS: Mountains fed Amazon's poison frog diversity

    03/22/2009 6:49:33 PM PDT · by JoeProBono · 20 replies · 2,661+ views
    msnbc ^ | March. 20, 2009 | Emily Sohn
    The Amazon basin is well known for its wide variety of species, but the rainforest might owe some credit to the mountains as a source for that rich diversity. A new study found that populations of poison frogs made their way from the Andes to the Amazon about a dozen times over the last 10 million years. Scientists suspect that the mountains have long been supplying the jungle with other species of plants and animals, too.
  • Discovery Of Vast Prehistoric Works Built By Giants?

    02/28/2008 4:25:52 PM PST · by blam · 82 replies · 6,429+ views
    Raider News Network ^ | 2-24-2008 | David E. Flynn
    Discovery of vast prehistoric works built by Giants?The Geoglyphs of Teohuanaco Posted: February 24, 2008 1:00 am EasternBy David E. Flynn© 2008 RaidersNewsNetwork The size and scope of David Flynn's Teohuanaco discovery simply surpasses comprehension. Mammoth traces of intelligence carved in stone and covering hundreds of square miles. For those who understand what they are seeing here for the first time, this could indeed be the strongest evidence ever found of prehistoric engineering by those who were known and feared throughout the ancient world as gods. ~ Thomas Horn This satellite image (above) is a portion of the Andean foothills...
  • Ancient Iron Ore Mine Discovered In Peruvian Andes (More)

    02/12/2008 2:17:28 PM PST · by blam · 22 replies · 837+ views
    National Geographic News ^ | 2-11-2008 | Kelly Hearn
    Ancient Iron Ore Mine Discovered in Peruvian Andes Kelly Hearn in Buenos Aires, Argentina for National Geographic NewsFebruary 11, 2008 A 2,000-year-old mine has been discovered high in mountains in Peru. The find offers proof that an ancient people in the Andes mined hematite iron ore centuries before the Inca Empire, archaeologists say. The mine was used to tap a vein of hematite, or ochre—the first such mine found in South America that predates the arrival of Spanish conquistadors, experts note. The discovery, reported by a U.S. archaeologist, was made in southern Peru in the region once inhabited by the...
  • Geology Picture of the Week, Dec. 2-8, 2007: Andean Volcanoes: Osorno and Reventador

    12/06/2007 2:53:14 PM PST · by cogitator · 3 replies · 229+ views
    Searched on Andes volcanoes, and I was thinking of this: Osorno (Chile) But I found this and couldn't pass it up. Reventador (Ecuador) Can't have the first without the second. This was the November 2, 2002 eruption of Reventador.
  • Anti-Drug Air Base Pact To Be Ended (Ecuador)

    10/30/2007 8:49:18 AM PDT · by RDTF · 62 replies · 166+ views
    The Washington Times ^ | Oct 30, 2007 | not specified
    QUITO, ECUADOR — The Ecuadorean government on Friday insisted on ending a cooperation agreement with the United States that allows the U.S. military to use a coastal air force base for anti-drug operations in the Andes. -snip- ...Galo Mora, a representative of Ecuadorean President Rafael Correa, told participants at a solidarity forum with Cuba. The 10-year agreement, signed by the United States and Ecuador in 1999, allows Washington to deploy up to 475 military personnel in Manta in support of counternarcotics operations.
  • Double-nosed dog not to be sniffed at

    08/12/2007 2:00:11 PM PDT · by Renfield · 32 replies · 2,379+ views
    BBC News ^ | 8-10-07
    Explorer Colonel John Blashford-Snell has had close encounters with vampire bats and angry bees, but his latest brush has been with a rather odd dog. He spotted a rare breed of Double-Nosed Andean tiger hound, which has two noses, on a recent trip to Bolivia. Xingu is said to be intelligent and fond of salty biscuits The chairman of the Scientific Exploration Society said the dog, named Xingu, was "not terribly handsome". He said: "This breed could be used for sniffing out mines or narcotics because they have an enhanced sense of smell." Colonel Blashford-Snell first encountered a Double-Nosed Andean...
  • 100-foot deep Andes lake disappears (Chile)

    06/21/2007 2:29:58 PM PDT · by Kimmers · 51 replies · 4,730+ views
    CNN ^ | 7/21/07
    <p>SANTIAGO, Chile (AP) -- A five-acre glacial lake in Chile's southern Andes has disappeared -- and scientists want to know why. An undated photo shows a lake in the Chilean Andes as it was before May.</p>
  • Anarchy In The Andes As Race Divides Bolivia

    05/03/2007 7:50:19 PM PDT · by blam · 7 replies · 1,287+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 4-5-2007 | Hamida Ghafour
    Anarchy in the Andes as race divides Bolivia By Hamida Ghafour in Santa Cruz Last Updated: 2:14am BST 04/05/2007 On a long, high wall near the main square in Bolivia's business capital graffiti reads 'Evo the dictator' and 'Independence for Santa Cruz'. It is a sign that the excitement for this poverty-stricken Andean country of electing its first indigenous president after years of being governed by a wealthy white elite has already turned sour. As Evo Morales has tightened his links to Venezuela's stridently anti-capitalist leader Hugo Chavez, opposition to his government has grown and the country is increasingly divided...
  • Mummy's Amazing American Maize

    02/14/2007 8:49:13 AM PST · by blam · 24 replies · 648+ views
    Alpha Galileo ^ | 2-14-2007 | U of M
    Mummy’s amazing American maize The far-reaching influence of Spanish and Portuguese colonisers appears not to have extended to South American agriculture, scientists studying Andean mummies up to 1,400 years old have found. The University of Manchester researchers working with colleagues in Buenos Aires compared the DNA of ancient maize found in the funerary offerings of the mummy and at other sites in northwest Argentina with that grown in the same region today. Surprisingly, they found both ancient and modern samples of the crop were genetically almost identical indicating that modern European influence has not been as great as previously...
  • Geology Picture of the Week 3-for-1, September 24-30, 2006: Nevada Huandoy, Cascade du Sautadet

    09/25/2006 9:48:10 AM PDT · by cogitator · 10 replies · 361+ views
    Absolute Wissen ^ | Various | Various
    Not quite Ansel Adams quality, but a nice black-and-white image of Nevada Huandoy in the Andes: Color image: the sheer rockface on the left (right front in the black and white image) is apparently a well-known climber's challenge: On another note, this place in France, the "Cascade du Sautadet", looks like a theme-park water ride (you can actually swim there, but caution is advised). The formation is due to wind and water erosion.
  • Prehistoric Tools, Weapons Discovered In Peruvian Andes

    08/21/2006 5:16:01 PM PDT · by blam · 24 replies · 1,293+ views
    Prehistoric tools, weapons discovered in Peruvian Andes AFP August 20, 2006 LIMA -- A team of Peruvian and US archaeologists have discovered prehistoric stone tools and weapons some 10,000 years old in an Andean town, the National Institute of Culture announced Friday. Stone axes, spearheads, and weapons were found in the main square of San Pedro de Chavin de Huantar, an Andean town some 400 kilometers (250 miles) north of Lima, officials said. "This discovery represents exceptional evidence of the presence of inhabitants in the Pleistocene era," the Institute said in a statement. The Pleistocene went from about 1.6 million...
  • Andes People Look Back To The Future

    06/12/2006 6:02:34 PM PDT · by blam · 14 replies · 536+ views
    The Telegraph (UK) ^ | 6-13-2006 | Roger Highfield
    Andes people look back to the future Roger Highfield, Science Editor (Filed: 13/06/2006) The Aymara people in South America have a concept of time opposite to the rest of the us, so that the past lies ahead of them and the future behind, according to a study published yesterday. "Until now, all the studied cultures and languages of the world - from European and Polynesian to Chinese, Japanese, Bantu and so on - have not only characterised time with properties of space, but also have all mapped the future as if it were in front. "The Aymara case is the...
  • (Keith) Andes, leading man to Marilyn Monroe, dies at 85

    11/27/2005 8:24:17 PM PST · by NormsRevenge · 14 replies · 779+ views
    AP on Yahoo ^ | 11/27/05 | AP - Los Angeles
    LOS ANGELES - Keith Andes, a handsome actor who was Marilyn Monroe's leading man in the 1952 film "Clash by Night," has died at the age of 85. Andes, who had suffered from bladder cancer and other ailments, was found dead Nov. 11 in his Santa Clarita home, said longtime friend Marshall LaPlante. The Los Angeles County coroner's office ruled the death a suicide by asphyxiation. Though Andes rarely discussed his career, his apartment walls displayed memorabilia including an album cover from "Wildcat," the 1960 Broadway musical in which he starred with Lucille Ball. A framed note from her refers...
  • Chavez Named President of Andean Bloc

    07/20/2005 6:05:51 AM PDT · by Our_Man_In_Gough_Island · 4 replies · 297+ views
    Voice of America ^ | 19 July 2005 | Carmen Gentile
    Andean leaders have appointed Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez the new head of the Andean Community of Nations, a regional trade bloc. Mr. Chavez will serve as chairman of the Andean Community for a term of one year. He succeeds Peruvian President Alejandro Toledo as the head of the community. The group is made up of the nations of Bolivia, Colombia, Ecuador, Peru and Venezuela. Representatives from Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and other Latin American nations also attended the summit. After accepting the post Monday, Mr. Chavez called for greater involvement of Andean Pact nations in projects relating to energy. Venezuela is...
  • Wallet Found, 32 Years Later (From the '72 "Alive" Plane Crash)

    05/31/2005 8:43:46 PM PDT · by nickcarraway · 23 replies · 1,662+ views
    Wilmington Star ^ | February 26. 2005
    MONTEVIDEO, URUGUAY - One of 16 survivors of a 1972 Andes plane crash made famous by the book Alive: The Story of the Andes Survivors by Piers Paul Read has gotten his wallet and jacket back 32 years. Eduardo Strauch, who survived 72 days in mountain snows, got the aged wallet, drivers license and other personal items Wednesday, a week after they were found in the Andes by a mountain climber. Mr. Strauch, 57, was aboard a flight with fellow rugby players, relatives and friends when their plane crashed high in the Andes on Oct. 12, 1972.
  • 1972 Crash Survivor's Wallet Recovered

    02/26/2005 6:00:16 AM PST · by billorites · 17 replies · 1,386+ views
    AP ^ | February 24, 2005
    MONTEVIDEO, Uruguay (AP) -- One of 16 survivors of a 1972 Andes plane crash made famous by a book and movie has gotten his wallet and jacket back 32 years after leaving them in the mountain snows. Eduardo Strauch, who survived 72 days in high mountain snows, received the aged wallet, drivers license and other personal items Wednesday, a week after they were found in the Andes by a mountain climber. Strauch, now a 57-year-old architect and father of five, was aboard a flight with fellow rugby players, relatives and friends when their plane crashed high in the Andes on...
  • Geology Picture of the Week, November 21-27, 2004: Touching the Void (Siula Grande)

    11/22/2004 1:43:49 PM PST · by cogitator · 971+ views
    Link post: access the article in the Chat section with the link below, and post any commentary there (this posting provided as a service to interested Free Republic citizens): Geology Picture of the Week, November 21-27, 2004: Touching the Void (Siula Grande)
  • Geology Picture of the Week, November 21-27, 2004: Touching the Void (Siula Grande)

    11/22/2004 1:37:32 PM PST · by cogitator · 5 replies · 2,411+ views
    Bergalbum von Mathias Zehring ^ | ??? | Mathias Zehring
    A moderately amusing story inspired this week's pictures. I'd read impressive reviews of the movie "Touching the Void", and I finally went to the video store Friday to rent it. Guess what was on PBS Sunday night? Anyway, the DVD was worth it for the additional special features. I'd give the movie 4 stars out of 5, with impressive mountain scenery and snow. If you don't know the story, I won't give it away; Google searching "Touching the Void" will provide the story for anyone that wants to know it. The linked Web site has quite a few mountain pictures...
  • The Monolith of Pokotia (Sumerian Language etched on Ancient Mesopotamian Items)!

    10/19/2002 10:28:48 AM PDT · by vannrox · 35 replies · 6,052+ views
    Bernardo Biadós Yacovazzo & Freddy Arce, ^ | FR Post 10-19-2002 | Bernardo Biadós Yacovazzo & Freddy Arce
    Introduction - Investigations of Bolivia Fuente Magna and the Monolith of Pokotia The following material is reprinted by permission from Bernardo Biadós Yacovazzo & Freddy Arce, OIIB - Omega Institute Investigations (Bolivia), INTI - NonGovernmental Organizacion (Bolivia). A large stone vessel, resembling a libation bowl, and now known as the Fuente Magna, was originally discovered in a rather casual fashion by a country peasant from the ex-hacienda CHUA, property of the Manjon family situated in the surrounding areas of Lake Titicaca about 75/80 km from the city of La Paz. The site where it was found has not been...
  • Pre-Incan Brewery Unearthed in Peru's Andes (Chicha)

    07/30/2004 2:59:04 PM PDT · by NormsRevenge · 40 replies · 1,389+ views
    Reuters on Yahoo ^ | 7/30/04 | Reuters - Miami
    MIAMI (Reuters) - U.S. researchers have unearthed what they say may be the oldest known brewery in the Andes, a pre-Incan plant at least 1,000 years old that could produce drinks for hundreds of people at one sitting. The University of Florida said on Thursday that its archeologists and researchers from the Field Museum in Chicago found the brewery at Cerro Baul, a mountaintop religious center of the Wari empire that ruled what is now Peru hundreds of years before the Incas. At least 20 ceramic, 10- to 15-gallon (38- to 57-litre) vats were found at the site some 8,000...
  • Geology Picture of the Week, July 11-17, 2004: Aconcagua

    07/15/2004 12:45:29 PM PDT · by cogitator · 9 replies · 3,502+ views
    Though it's the highest point on Earth that's not in Asia (and obviously the highest point in the Southern Hemisphere), Aconcagua just doesn't get any respect.